Peterborough Flog It!


Peterborough

The Flog It! team are at Peterborough Cathedral and Paul Martin delivers a behind-the-scenes tour of the place, unearthing some of the secrets of its colourful past.


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Transcript


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Today we're in Peterborough, which was designated new-town status back in the '60s.

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But this new town has a very old heart.

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It's bursting with thousands of years of history!

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Welcome to "Flog It!"!

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If one building that sums up Peterborough's spirit,

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it's the magnificent cathedral,

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with its majestic gothic west front.

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If you thought the exterior was a wonder to behold,

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just take a look at this wonderful ornate interior

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inspired by its Anglo-Saxon, Norman and Victorian heritage.

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Later on, I'll be having an exclusive tour behind the scenes. Something to look forward to.

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Right now, I'm itching to find out what's in all of these bags and boxes.

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I've got "Flog It!" favourites Philip Serrell and Charlie Ross

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joining me on the hunt for some prized Peterborough pieces.

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As an ex PE teacher, I'm sure Philip will give this crowd a jolly good workout!

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-Is this something you want to sell?

-I want to get a price for it.

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Will Granddad Charlie be able to keep up?

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Is there anybody here I haven't dipped into?

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We won't need to wait to find out because it looks like they've both already spotted a few gems.

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-Is this your engagement ring, my dear?

-I wish!

-You wish!

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Let's get started. The doors are open and our crowd is moving in.

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Let's get over to the tables.

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Philip's making his first valuation with Paul look like child's play.

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I think this is fabulous. Was this yours?

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-It was, yes.

-Really?

-I bought it as a youngster.

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-You and your toy have both worn very well.

-Thanks.

-This dates to 1949, 1950?

-Yes.

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-It's got ten shillings and eightpence on the back.

-Correct.

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-Ten shillings and eightpence is about 57 and a half pence.

-That's correct.

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-That was a lot of money, wasn't it?

-It was. I saved a long time for it.

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This is a Dinky Supertoy. It's a Blaw Knox Bulldozer.

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It's got the number on the side, which is 561, and that would've been its catalogue number.

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-What I love about it is the way that just lifts the front blade up.

-It does.

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But I've got to ask you a question.

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-You saved up in 1950 to buy this.

-Yes.

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-You kept the box.

-Yes.

-It hardly looks like it was played with.

-Not a lot.

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Why are you going to sell it? This is your childhood, Paul!

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Yes, but I've come to the end of that childhood now.

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You never grow out of that!

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I suppose it's been in the cupboard for so long

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and I've never had it out on display until just recently.

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-But you played with it at the time?

-I suppose so. For a few years.

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Most of the young lads I know, if you give them something like this,

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it would've been in the sandpit, the garden.

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It did go in the garden.

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You must've been hot on your maintenance!

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It was made in 1949, 1950.

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And the key thing for this is condition.

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Because if you think about toys, they would've been played with.

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So if you can find a toy that's in really, really good condition, that adds to value.

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And if you can find a toy that's got the original box,

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that adds more to value.

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That brings you the expression of being "mint and boxed",

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and a minted boxed-toy is worth so much more than one that's been played with.

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-How long did it take you to save up for that?

-Probably five to six weeks.

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-How much would somebody have earned in 1950 as an average wage?

-I earned roughly £5 a week.

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So £5 a week, and this would've cost 50 pence,

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-would've been 10 percent of someone's salary, on a toy.

-Yes.

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With the average salary today, would it be £300 or more?

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-Oh...

-Between £300 and £500?

-I'm not an earner any more.

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-But that would be roughly, wouldn't it?

-It would be.

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And ten percent of £300 to £500 would be £30 to £50,

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-and I think that's exactly what this is worth.

-Yes.

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-So it's kept its ten percent all the way through!

-It has!

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I think this is worth £30 to £50 as an auction estimate.

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I think they should put a reserve on it of £25,

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and I hope it does really well and that someone treasures it just like you've done.

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-Thank you for bringing it.

-You're very welcome. Thank you.

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We'll be back to see if Paul's toy bulldozer smashes Philip's estimate in a bit.

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First, though, it's over to Charlie for a spot of tea.

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-This is as good a piece as I've seen today.

-Thank you.

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It's absolutely wonderful, Pauline.

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Presumably you know what you've got here?

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-To a degree.

-To a degree.

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-You know it's a tea service.

-Yes! THEY LAUGH

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-And do you know what it's made of?

-Silver.

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-Do you know how old it is?

-No.

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-Do you know who made it?

-No.

-Ooh! Well, I'm very excited by this.

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-This is made by Robert Hennell IV, 1874 in date.

-Right.

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Robert Hennell is one of the great names in English silversmiths.

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We have this rather swirly gadrooning decoration on here,

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the bobbin decoration.

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-Very ornate, isn't it?

-It is.

-Very Victorian.

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But I have to say, the oval Queen Anne-style teapot

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rather flies in the face of the decoration.

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This spout here, you might well expect to be on an early 19th century teapot

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and not a late 19th century teapot.

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Substantial size. Plenty of cups available out of that.

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Bags of room for sugar and for milk.

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I like the shape of the handles.

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Here you can see a little buffer between the two bits of silver.

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-You know why it's there?

-Stop your hand getting hot.

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It's a very good conductor of heat, silver,

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-and if you didn't have the ivory, you wouldn't be able to pick it up.

-It's ivory!

-That's right.

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I'm going to turn one of these pieces upside down.

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The hallmark is spread over a distance here.

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What we have are all the elements that we would expect to find.

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We have the lion passant, that tells you it's silver.

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The leopard's head tells you it was made in...

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-I was going to say London.

-London is correct.

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We have Queen Victoria's head here.

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Just as a small aside,

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from 1891 until the end of her reign ten years later, they didn't have her head on there.

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So it's possible to have a piece of Victorian silver without her head on.

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But we can see her head here.

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And we've got a "T" letter date, which I have checked to 1874.

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And here we've got the magic initials, RH.

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In addition to that, we've got a little mark next to it.

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That mark, he put on to pieces

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-that were specifically made to order for someone.

-Right.

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-This was made for somebody special. Was it made for your family?

-Oh, no!

-Oh, no!

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-No such luck.

-It's be nice to think that it was.

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The other thing that is going to tell you here,

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this engraving must've been put in at the same time as it was made.

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-Do you see?

-Mm.

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There's a gap in the floral engraving here

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to make way for the lettering.

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-Yes. I understand that.

-Fantastic quality!

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I'm going to have a quick look inside.

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I don't think anybody's ever made a cup of tea in their lives in there!

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Superb!

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Value? Come on!

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-Have a stab!

-I was thinking somewhere between

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four, maybe £500.

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I think we've got a pleasant surprise for you.

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I've weighed these and the weight is 36, 37 ounces.

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Now, if you were to melt that down, it would come to £500-plus.

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But I think we can forget about the scrap price for Robert Hennell.

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But I'm going to be sensible and say five to £800.

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But I think we'll probably end up at 800.

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-Oh!

-Possibly a bit more.

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It's not every day you go to a sale and come back with a bit of Hennell. It's sensational.

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-Thank you for bringing it along.

-You're very welcome.

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I feel very privileged to see a piece of Hennell.

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I'm sure Pauline's tea set will sparkle when it goes up for auction.

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Back to Philip now. Can he guess what treasure is hiding inside's Alan's leather box?

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-You and I both know what this is.

-Yes.

-Shall we enlighten everybody?

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We open that and if we wanted to leave it in there,

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we take that out

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and there's our little carriage clock.

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-How long have you had that?

-About 18 months. It's inherited from my father.

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-Your father left it?

-Yes.

-Why are you selling your father's clock?

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-Because we live in a narrow boat -

-Really?!

-I don't think it's...

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-You live on a narrow boat?

-Yes.

-Fantastic.

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-So, this is superfluous on the narrow boat, is it?

-Yes.

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These little carriage clocks, often, the case that they come in get lost.

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There's always a little slot where the key is kept. There we are.

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What's nice about it is that it's all complete.

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This dial is enamelled.

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Very often, these dials are either chipped

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or they become cracked,

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and that can hugely affect the value.

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This is a very basic clock.

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I would think in date, it would be around about 1895 to 1910.

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Lovely little gilt case.

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There's the Rolls-Royce examples and there's the Ford Fiesta,

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and we're looking at a Ford Fiesta.

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A Rolls-Royce might have a repeat movement on it,

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where you press a button on the top and it strikes at the last hour or whatever.

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This is at the lower end of the market. I think they're reasonable in value.

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-Have you any idea what you think it might be worth?

-About £80, £90?

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You're good at this!

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In auction terms, you would put an estimate of about 80 to £120.

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You'd probably say to the auctioneer,

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"You can have ten percent discretion so if you get close, sell it."

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They are rare.

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There are a number that come up at every auction throughout the land every week.

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So you've got to almost accept what the market will give you,

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rather with a rare thing, where you dictate what you will accept.

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My advice is 80 to 120. 10 percent discretion. Let's hope it goes really well.

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-What will you buy for the narrow boat?

-We'll have a weekend in London.

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-On the boat?

-No, on dry land.

-Ohh! You are a fraud, sir!

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Philip may think it's average,

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but I'm hoping at least one bidder finds this little clock special.

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Here's a reminder of the items we're taking off to auction.

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I think this'll do quite well and the reason why is simple.

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People are sentimental, and this is a chance to buy a bit of your childhood back.

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Seeing as where we are, I think the expression is, "More tea, Vicar?"

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As tea services go, this is quite the best I've seen today,

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or I'm likely to see this year.

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£80 to £120 doesn't seem a great deal of money for that,

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but at auction, they don't make much more,

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and I'd be surprised to see that do much over £150.

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We're at Batemans in Stamford today,

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where auctioneer David Palmer will be directing all the action.

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All auction houses charge a seller's commission.

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The rate here is 15 percent.

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Let's get down to business, as the auction is about to kick off.

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-We've been joined by Paul, who's looking very smart.

-Thank you!

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This little bulldozer, boxed as well, superb condition,

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-in my notes it said you grew out of it after four weeks.

-I did.

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Why now, after all these years?

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The cabinet's gotten too full of stuff that doesn't match.

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It is an iconic-looking thing.

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I'm sure that's going to find a home with a few boys here today. It's got the look.

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-Boys never grow up. They always want their toys.

-I'm still 15!

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Dinky Supertoys.

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Look, a little bulldozer. With a little man in it!

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And its original box.

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Tenner for it. 10. 12. 15.

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18. 20. Two.

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25. At 25 now. I sell over there, in the doorway, at 25.

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Anybody else? Net, you bidding?

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Goes, then, at 25 here in the room. Sell, then, at 25.

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The hammer has gone down on the reserve at £25.

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-Are you happy?

-Yes.

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-Not sad?

-A little.

-A little bit.

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I'd expect you would be, as well. I would be.

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-Hopefully, it's gone to a collector.

-Skin of our teeth.

-Just.

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I wish that had given Paul a little bit more money,

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but at least he was happy with the £25 it made.

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Time for Alan's carriage clock to go under the hammer now.

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Thoroughly enjoying this show!

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Alan lives on a narrow boat. He wants to treat the wife to a candlelit supper.

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Is that on the boat or are you going to a hotel on land?

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-We'll do the hotel on land and then go on the boat.

-Ohh!

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-You want a night's bed and breakfast somewhere.

-Hopefully.

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Ooh, dear. Will we do that? 80 to 120, we should do that, shouldn't we?

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-Depends where you want to eat!

-Yes, good point!

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Anyway, it's going under the hammer right now. Good luck, Alan.

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It's a carriage clock, with its case. Nice little clock.

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32. 35. 38. At 38 now. 40. Five.

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50. 55? Here at 55. 60. 65. 70.

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75? 75 here.

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-75 on the net. You're out in the room.

-Five.

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85 now. Still with the net. 95. Net at 95.

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You're out in the room still. It goes down here at 95.

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-All done.

-100.

-100.

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-Good.

-100, madam? 110 with the lady. Sold with the lady at 110.

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Here at 110. All done at £110. Is that it at 110?

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Yes! The hammer's gone down at £110!

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-Happy?

-Yes.

-That was a good result.

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I think that is supper out and a night in a little hotel.

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-It's pudding, as well, I think!

-Yes.

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A marvellous top-end result for Alan.

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Not just an average little clock after all.

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I've got high hopes for our next item.

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This could be a roller coaster ride, especially for Pauline here.

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We're just about to sell that Victorian tea service. There's a lot of silver there.

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This is gorgeous. This is the best thing, not just in our sale today,

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-but in the whole auction room.

-Yes. I agree with you.

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-And it's yours!

-It is.

-There's no better maker.

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So, why, why are you flogging it?!

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I ran out of silver polish!

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Let's find out what the bidders think.

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The Victorian three-piece silver tea service.

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Robert Hennell. Nice little lot. Straight in, £400. Take 20 now.

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400. 420. 440. 460. 480.

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500. 520. 540. 560. 580.

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600. At £600 now. Is that it? 620. 640.

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-WOMAN: 650.

-650. 660. At 660. 680. 700.

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At £700 now. 720.

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720. At 720. Sell, then, at £720.

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-Nobody else?

-It's going in the room at 720.

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720. The room at 720. All done at £720. Nobody else?

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-Well done.

-Thank you.

-£720. We're happy.

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It's gone to the London silver trade in the back of the room. I recognise them.

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-Happy?

-Very. Very happy.

-Good.

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£720. A sterling result for Pauline.

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Let's travel back to Peterborough Cathedral,

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as I take you on a privileged behind-the-scenes tour.

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Pass through the outskirts of Peterborough, and from the images you see of its '60s new-town roots,

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you can understand why the place isn't exactly up there

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as one of Britain's must-see destinations.

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But venture further in and you start to realise that this is a new town with an old heart,

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one that is very much worth getting to know.

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If there's one place that captures and distils the beauty of Peterborough,

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it's got to be this place, this very imposing 12th century cathedral.

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It's been at the heart and hearth of the city for well over 1,350 years.

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It's a complete symphony of musical,

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archaeological, architectural and artistic treasures.

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Well, as soon as you enter through the west front door,

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you're immediately hit with this.

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What an incredible view!

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This great big space of the nave, look at that!

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What does take my breath away is that mid-13th century painted ceiling.

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It's the longest surviving example of its kind.

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It stretches 203 feet,

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all the way down there to the central alter.

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That's incredible. The whole building is breathtaking.

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The sheer majesty of this place makes it easy to see why it was recently voted

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one of the top ten landmarks in the UK.

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Whether you're struck by the dramatic hanging crucifix that frames the choir stalls,

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or inspired by the intricately carved masonry

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of the fan-vaulted ceiling in the 16th century new building,

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or simply spellbound by the colourful designs

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combined in the 19th century stained glass windows in the transepts,

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the rich history of this place paints a wonderfully compelling picture.

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However, this building has had a long and somewhat troubled past.

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The traces of this can be seen everywhere you look.

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One of the oldest surviving remnants of the abbey is this stone,

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called the Hedda Stone, carved in the late eighth century.

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There are six figures on the face side and six on the reverse. Their definition is quite visible.

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Later on, a myth was built around this stone. It's a legend you can believe or disbelieve.

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It's to mark the area of the mass grave

0:19:270:19:31

where Abbott Hedda and his monks were buried.

0:19:310:19:34

They were murdered by an invading Danish army back in the year 870.

0:19:340:19:38

But if you really want to get to the root of this building's past,

0:19:390:19:42

you need to quite literally scratch beneath the surface

0:19:420:19:46

and head underground.

0:19:460:19:48

Thanks to extensive archaeological discoveries,

0:19:480:19:51

we now have physical remains of the Anglo-Saxon building.

0:19:510:19:54

I'm going to boldly go where very few have gone before.

0:19:540:19:59

Thankfully, I've got cathedral archaeologist Dr Jackie Hall

0:19:590:20:03

to show me these medieval foundations

0:20:030:20:05

and a few other discoveries.

0:20:050:20:08

-It's quite low.

-It is quite low.

0:20:080:20:11

These were discovered in the 1880s,

0:20:130:20:15

because they had to rebuild the central tower.

0:20:150:20:18

The Clerk of Works at the time was a brilliant archaeologist,

0:20:180:20:21

and they arranged to preserve them by building this brick vault over the top.

0:20:210:20:26

The idea is so that these foundations are still visible.

0:20:260:20:29

We're actually standing...

0:20:290:20:31

-On those foundations.

-Inside the building of the 10th century church. It might even be earlier.

0:20:310:20:37

They put some of these Anglo-Saxon grave covers down here.

0:20:370:20:41

-What makes them Anglo-Saxon?

-It's the interlace.

-Oh, I see.

0:20:410:20:46

-There's another one here. It's in much worse condition.

-It's weathered, isn't it?

0:20:460:20:50

-What's over there?

-This is the east end of the Anglo-Saxon abbey church.

0:20:500:20:56

And so the Victorians preserved the step

0:20:560:21:00

-that rises up to where the alter would've been.

-Wow.

0:21:000:21:03

-What's that?

-That's another grave slab.

0:21:030:21:06

-You see how incredibly thick it is, but the whole of the top has gone.

-I can see that.

0:21:060:21:12

Behind it there, that's the inside of the wall of the east end.

0:21:120:21:16

Archaeology has helped shed light on the history of this building.

0:21:160:21:20

That's right. I mean, most of it was over a century ago.

0:21:200:21:24

-Yes.

-But you understand, it's been in use the whole time,

0:21:240:21:28

so we don't often get the chance to do big excavations, even small ones.

0:21:280:21:34

There's one more thing I'd really like to show you through here.

0:21:340:21:38

I know it's horrible to crouch in the space.

0:21:380:21:41

There's the foundation. We're in the equivalent of what's the north transept.

0:21:410:21:46

And then outside, you can see the remains of the graveyard.

0:21:460:21:49

-Oh, yes!

-This must represent the ground level,

0:21:490:21:53

probably just before the building burnt down in 1116.

0:21:530:21:57

So this discovery really confirms...

0:21:570:21:59

BOTH: An Anglo-Saxon date.

0:21:590:22:02

Isn't that brilliant? Absolutely brilliant.

0:22:020:22:05

Thank you so much for my little tour! Shall we go back up?

0:22:050:22:09

That's better. I can stand up straight.

0:22:120:22:15

-It's a relief!

-Jackie, thank you so much.

0:22:150:22:18

But it's not just monks and bishops who were buried here.

0:22:190:22:22

It is also where two former queens were laid to rest.

0:22:220:22:27

Catherine of Aragon remains in her tomb,

0:22:270:22:30

but this one, which held Mary Queen of Scots, was emptied

0:22:300:22:32

when her son, James I, decided to move her

0:22:320:22:35

to Westminster Abbey in 1612,

0:22:350:22:38

shortly after he ascended the throne.

0:22:380:22:41

And this is the chap who buried both queens, Robert Scarlett.

0:22:410:22:46

He was the cathedral sexton and grave-digging was one of his jobs.

0:22:460:22:51

But his biggest claim to fame was he lived to the ripe old age of 98,

0:22:510:22:55

which was such an achievement back in the 16th century!

0:22:550:22:58

He managed to clock up a career which spanned two generations.

0:22:580:23:03

If you think that's worth celebrating, you can also have a pint of Old Scarlett.

0:23:030:23:07

It's an ale that's recently been launched to celebrate his remarkable career.

0:23:070:23:12

Now, whether or not you're gazing up in awe

0:23:150:23:17

at that incredible Norman ceiling, or marvelling at the stained glass windows,

0:23:170:23:22

or even being enchanted by the choir during their daily service of evensong,

0:23:220:23:27

one thing is for sure, there's no denying the beauty and charm of this incredible ancient building.

0:23:270:23:33

My journey has come to an end. It's been a marvellous day.

0:23:330:23:36

I've climbed to the top of the cathedral. I'm on the tower. It's pretty breezy up here!

0:23:360:23:40

But what this cathedral does is, it transforms Peterborough from a mundane, modern municipality

0:23:400:23:47

into a magical metropolis, and that is so beautiful.

0:23:470:23:52

This place really is one of the country's most breathtaking cathedrals.

0:23:570:24:02

As we head back to the tables, it seems that Charlie is captivated

0:24:020:24:07

by the items that Shirley has brought with her.

0:24:070:24:10

-You've been raiding the Crown Jewels, I think!

-Could be.

0:24:110:24:16

-Where's it all come from?

-This was my mother's.

0:24:160:24:19

-All of them?

-All of them.

0:24:190:24:21

This was your mother's? She had pretty amazing taste.

0:24:210:24:24

-She was very dramatic.

-That looks dramatic.

0:24:240:24:27

-It's an Elizabeth Taylor-type ring.

-You could call it that.

-It's sensational.

0:24:270:24:32

-It rather reminds me of the Queen's crown!

-Oh, dear!

0:24:320:24:36

-I've been having a look at it. There's no markings on it.

-No.

0:24:360:24:39

I'm sure it's set in platinum.

0:24:390:24:42

You wouldn't set a big bobby dazzler like that in a bit of silver.

0:24:420:24:46

Having said that, super stone that that is,

0:24:460:24:49

it's probably not everybody's cup of tea.

0:24:490:24:52

-Was she an actress?

-Yes.

-Was she really?

0:24:520:24:54

-That was a pure guess!

-Yes, in her day.

-Pure guess!

0:24:540:24:58

That says "actress", doesn't it? To me, fantastic.

0:24:580:25:01

This one is very different, probably dating from the '50s,

0:25:010:25:05

although it's got rather a Deco look to it,

0:25:050:25:09

which would lead to being the '20s or the '30s.

0:25:090:25:11

-Would that have been made for her?

-That was her engagement ring.

0:25:110:25:15

-So it would've been.

-So it would be the '50s.

0:25:150:25:17

-What's quite interesting, we've got old-cut diamonds in here, reset.

-Oh!

0:25:170:25:22

-So those diamonds would've probably come out of a piece of Victorian jewellery...

-Oh!

0:25:220:25:27

..and then been put into that very modern setting,

0:25:270:25:31

with a cabochon-shaped sapphire in the middle.

0:25:310:25:35

Actually, I quite like that ring. But again, it's chunky. Very chunky.

0:25:350:25:40

The third item is a charm bracelet. Nine-carat gold.

0:25:400:25:46

It's not something that many people wear nowadays.

0:25:460:25:48

It's coming back into fashion, I hear.

0:25:480:25:51

Well, I think what happens with a lot of these things is,

0:25:510:25:54

they take some of the charms off and perhaps put them on a pendant.

0:25:540:25:58

We've got some charming ones. We've got rather a nice plane.

0:25:580:26:02

We've got a bath. Looks like it's got foaming water coming out,

0:26:020:26:05

-which is a little over the top.

-Yes!

0:26:050:26:07

A bicycle.

0:26:070:26:09

But the mere fact that they're gold tells you they're going to be valuable.

0:26:090:26:13

Now, although we're looking at all three together,

0:26:130:26:16

I really think we shouldn't put them in as one lot.

0:26:160:26:19

-The person that likes that won't necessarily like that or that.

-True.

0:26:190:26:24

And they stand on their own with ease, in terms of value.

0:26:240:26:28

I think this ring is conservatively £500 to £800.

0:26:280:26:33

Because I think that that stone, frankly, ought to be worth £500.

0:26:330:26:37

-But what would you have to insure that ring for?

-Exactly.

0:26:370:26:40

To get someone to make a ring like that would be enormously expensive!

0:26:400:26:45

But you've got to temper that with who's going to want to buy it.

0:26:450:26:48

-I think £500 to £800. Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

-Good.

0:26:480:26:53

This ring, I'm a bit concerned about the cut.

0:26:530:26:55

It ought to be worth £300, but I'd like to estimate it at £200 to £300,

0:26:550:26:59

-with a reserve of £200.

-Yes. OK.

0:26:590:27:03

-Not quite so happy with that.

-No.

-I think it's the right valuation.

-OK.

0:27:030:27:07

-We'll put a reserve on at 200.

-Good.

0:27:070:27:09

-And fix the reserve at 200. No discretion.

-Yes.

0:27:090:27:12

Here, we've got plenty of gold to make it stand up to 300 to 400.

0:27:120:27:18

-300 to 400 is the right estimate. Reserve 300.

-OK.

0:27:180:27:22

-How does that fit in?

-Yes.

0:27:220:27:24

So not bad. Five, six, seven...

0:27:240:27:27

-I suppose we're looking at £1,000 to £1,500.

-Good.

0:27:270:27:31

Together, it comes to a reasonably chunky sum, doesn't it?

0:27:310:27:35

-Good.

-OK?

-Yes.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:27:350:27:38

We'll be back to find out if Shirley's jewels

0:27:380:27:41

make a dramatic statement in the sale in a little while.

0:27:410:27:44

First, let's go over to Philip, as he tries to put a price

0:27:440:27:47

on the unusual pepper shakers that Evelyn has brought in.

0:27:470:27:51

-How are you doing?

-I'm very well, thank you.

0:27:520:27:55

-Are you on your own today?

-Yes.

-Are these yours?

-They belong to my husband.

0:27:550:27:59

-Does he know you brought them?

-Yes.

-He'll be able to make the auction?

-Yes.

0:27:590:28:03

-How long's he had these?

-About four years.

-Four years.

0:28:030:28:08

-Did he inherit them or buy them?

-They belonged to a friend of mine

0:28:080:28:11

and my husband helped her move house.

0:28:110:28:14

He wouldn't take money from her and she knew that he liked the antiques, so she gave a load of them.

0:28:140:28:19

-Can I ask you a question? A whole load of antiques?

-A cabinet full.

0:28:190:28:23

-What's his daily rate?

-Of what, to move house?

-Yes!

-I don't know!

0:28:230:28:27

-Do you think he got well paid?

-Yes, he did!

0:28:270:28:29

I think these are lovely. We've got the hare.

0:28:290:28:32

-This should be a tortoise.

-Yes, it should.

0:28:320:28:35

But we've got a very wise owl.

0:28:350:28:37

They're a base metal. And these heads unscrew.

0:28:370:28:42

-You know what they are, don't you?

-I think they're both peppers.

-They're peppers.

0:28:420:28:47

This one, you can just see there, the heads screw in.

0:28:470:28:50

We've got glass eyes.

0:28:500:28:52

I would think that they date around about

0:28:520:28:57

1890, 1910, something like that.

0:28:570:28:59

-As old as that?

-Yes. But they're collectable.

0:28:590:29:02

Lots of people can't afford silver ones,

0:29:020:29:05

and so these, in a way, they're almost like a substitute.

0:29:050:29:08

In terms of value, have you any idea?

0:29:080:29:10

I don't know. About £50 or something like that?

0:29:100:29:14

-You're very good at this. Do you want my job?

-No!

0:29:140:29:17

Do you know what I was going to say?

0:29:170:29:19

-I think you should estimate these at £50 to £80.

-Right.

0:29:190:29:23

-We'll put a fixed reserve on them of £40.

-Yes.

0:29:230:29:27

-I think they'll do well. Will he be pleased at that?

-Yes.

0:29:270:29:31

-He won't shout at me if I get it wrong at the auction?

-Not at all.

0:29:310:29:34

-I think he thought this was more rare because it still had the eyes.

-You see lots of them around.

0:29:340:29:39

It's nice that it's got these little glass eyes, because they do fall out.

0:29:390:29:45

-For me...

-The hare.

-I love the hare.

-Lovely.

-I really do.

0:29:450:29:49

-Evelyn, you're a star. Thank you for bringing them in.

-You're welcome. Thank you.

0:29:490:29:53

Will the bidders go wild for those animal pepper shakers?

0:29:530:29:57

All will be revealed soon.

0:29:570:30:00

But now, let's find out what Albert and Emily have brought in that's got Charlie so excited.

0:30:000:30:05

I think this is the most interesting, if not the most valuable thing I have had today.

0:30:050:30:11

It won't be the most valuable. But before I start reading it,

0:30:110:30:14

perhaps you can tell me where it came from.

0:30:140:30:17

My father was doing house clearances in the early '70s.

0:30:170:30:20

-Yes.

-And amongst the old furniture and bric-a-brac, he found an old trunk.

0:30:200:30:26

-Yes.

-It was full of old newspapers, letters and documents.

0:30:260:30:29

-He was going to fling it. He said, "This is no good." I said, "Let me have it."

-Yes.

0:30:290:30:34

-I love anything to do with history.

-It's absolutely wonderful.

0:30:340:30:38

It's a parchment, dated 1854. What happened in 1854?

0:30:380:30:42

Charge of the Light Brigade. And written! It's just iconic.

0:30:420:30:46

-Did you do the photocopying?

-A friend did that.

-Very well done.

0:30:460:30:50

You really don't want to handle that original document any more than is possible.

0:30:500:30:55

"The 20th of September 1854. As written and sung by Corporal John Brown."

0:30:550:31:00

I dare say if you look up the records, we'll find out who Corporal Brown is.

0:31:000:31:05

"Grenadier Guards,

0:31:050:31:06

"when the Men got some Drink for the first time at Balaklava,

0:31:060:31:11

"September 28th, 1854."

0:31:110:31:14

So the Crimean War. And it's been very well typed out here.

0:31:140:31:18

It's done to the tune of the British Grenadiers.

0:31:180:31:21

-Do you know how that goes?

-No, but I'm sure you'll show us.

0:31:210:31:25

HE HUMS JOLLY TUNE

0:31:250:31:28

-That was the tune. Whether the words fit to it or not, I'll give it a try.

-OK.

0:31:290:31:33

# Come all you gallant British hearts that love the red and blue

0:31:330:31:38

# And drink the health of those brave lads

0:31:380:31:40

# Who made the Russians rue # It does fit!

0:31:400:31:43

-It does, doesn't it?

-BOTH: It does!

-I won't go on.

0:31:430:31:46

It'll only get worse!

0:31:460:31:48

But to think of this chap writing this and singing this in 1854...

0:31:480:31:53

-And it goes on for pages, doesn't it?

-Several pages.

0:31:530:31:57

It's interesting historically, because it talks about fighting.

0:31:570:32:00

"The French they had the right that day, & flanked the Russian line."

0:32:000:32:04

It goes on and on. It mentions commanding officers, and what have you, from the battle.

0:32:040:32:10

"A letter to old Nick they found, & this was what it said,

0:32:100:32:13

"To meet their bravest men, my Liege, your Russians do not dread."

0:32:130:32:17

-Amazing, isn't it?

-Fabulous!

-Isn't it, yes!

0:32:170:32:20

-Fabulous!

-There's a lot of history there in a little document.

-A huge amount of history.

0:32:200:32:25

-The condition is not great.

-No.

0:32:250:32:28

-I'm not going to attach a great deal of value to this.

-No.

0:32:280:32:31

But we should sell it and let it go to a historian.

0:32:310:32:35

Somebody that will appreciate it and enjoy it.

0:32:350:32:38

My brother is a historian and an author. He writes history books.

0:32:380:32:42

He would love to read something like that!

0:32:420:32:45

-The most important thing is that it goes to somebody who'll enjoy it.

-That's a nice thing to hear.

0:32:450:32:50

It's not so much the value and we're not going to get a wonderful surprise.

0:32:500:32:55

-I think it's probably worth less than £50.

-Yes.

0:32:550:32:58

We'll go with an estimate of 30 to 50.

0:32:580:33:00

-Put a reserve of 20 on.

-That's fine.

-It'll go to someone that appreciates it.

0:33:000:33:05

-It'll not go to somebody bidding willy-nilly.

-BOTH: No.

0:33:050:33:08

-It's a great find. Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

0:33:080:33:11

-I'm sorry for the singing.

-That's all right!

-We'll forgive you.

0:33:110:33:14

Thank you!

0:33:140:33:16

Unlike Charlie's singing, that historical letter probably won't make a racket,

0:33:170:33:21

but I do hope it finds a buyer who will appreciate and preserve its incredible provenance.

0:33:210:33:27

Our experts have now made their final choices of the day,

0:33:270:33:31

so we're going over to the auction rooms for the last time.

0:33:310:33:34

Fingers crossed for some big surprises.

0:33:340:33:36

As those bells chime, it'll be sad to leave Peterborough Cathedral.

0:33:360:33:40

I'm going to have fond memories and I'm definitely coming back.

0:33:400:33:43

Here's a quick recap of what we're taking,

0:33:430:33:46

but, more importantly, why we're taking them.

0:33:460:33:49

Well, well, well. The charm bracelet is pretty predictable.

0:33:490:33:53

I'm not sure about the cabochon ring.

0:33:530:33:55

But what is going to happen to this extraordinary diamond ring?

0:33:550:34:00

It might make £1,000!

0:34:000:34:03

How are they going to do at auction? Is it going to be the speedy hare or the wise old owl?

0:34:030:34:07

For me, they're both winners.

0:34:070:34:10

"Flog It!" isn't all about money and how much things are.

0:34:100:34:14

It's about history, as well.

0:34:140:34:16

The owners want to see it go to someone

0:34:160:34:19

that is really going to cherish it.

0:34:190:34:22

What better reason to sell something?

0:34:220:34:24

It's the day before the auction and the sale room is buzzing.

0:34:290:34:33

I'm taking the chance to have a chat with senior valuer Kate Bateman

0:34:330:34:37

about that Crimean War letter.

0:34:370:34:39

What do you think about this? I find it fascinating.

0:34:410:34:45

How do you put a value on that?

0:34:450:34:47

We've put £30 to £50. It's absolutely brilliant, it seems no money for what it is.

0:34:470:34:52

Historically, an important document. I can't believe how cheap things like this are.

0:34:520:34:56

Let's just it was the Battle of Balaclava, the Charge of the Light Brigade...

0:34:560:35:00

That would add probably a couple of noughts on the end of the value.

0:35:000:35:03

-That's so historically important.

-Yes.

-And everybody's heard of it.

0:35:030:35:08

But this is a firsthand account of the battle,

0:35:080:35:11

mentioning loads of major figures of that campaign, us against the Russians.

0:35:110:35:15

It's fantastic. Someone was there that wrote it. They've touched it. I find that exciting.

0:35:150:35:20

If only you could trace the family of John Brown.

0:35:200:35:24

That would be really interesting. Somebody ought to be able to trace him.

0:35:240:35:29

-We've had no luck. John Brown is a standard name.

-Popular name!

0:35:290:35:33

But a historical documenter, a museum or something like that, should be really interested in this.

0:35:330:35:39

The condition is quite delicate, so it's difficult to display.

0:35:390:35:42

-Has there been much interest?

-I've seen a few looking.

0:35:420:35:45

I don't think it's going to sail away, which I think is really sad.

0:35:450:35:50

-I think it should be more.

-So do I.

-You never know.

0:35:500:35:52

Good luck with that, Kate. I think that's really interesting.

0:35:520:35:56

Let's dive straight into the auction, as the first of Shirley's jewellery items

0:35:560:36:00

is about to go under auctioneer David Palmer's gavel.

0:36:000:36:04

We're looking at £300 to £400 for our next lot. It's a real charmer.

0:36:050:36:08

It's a nine-carat gold bracelet.

0:36:080:36:10

-You've had this 30-odd years?

-Yes.

0:36:100:36:13

-Had a lot of use out of it?

-I haven't.

0:36:130:36:15

-Great time to sell gold.

-Spot on!

0:36:150:36:18

-It's probably gone up slightly in value, if you look at melt value since the valuation day.

-Yes.

0:36:180:36:23

I think it has. But a good lot, nevertheless.

0:36:230:36:27

-I hope so.

-Fingers crossed. Here we go. This is it.

0:36:270:36:32

The gold charm bracelet. Enamel bits and pieces.

0:36:320:36:36

250, I'm bid? Straight in. 250. 260. 270.

0:36:360:36:39

280. 290. 300. 310. 320. 330.

0:36:390:36:42

340. 350. 360. Room at 360. Is that it?

0:36:420:36:47

At £360 now, selling in the room at 360. Nobody else?

0:36:470:36:51

-Finished and done at 360.

-360. Straight in.

0:36:510:36:55

360 at the back.

0:36:550:36:58

-Just a bit over mid-estimate. I'm happy. You're happy?

-Yes.

0:36:580:37:01

Charlie's happy. That's good. It's gone!

0:37:010:37:03

A good outcome on the bracelet.

0:37:040:37:06

Let's hope the next treasure in Shirley's jewellery box hits a top score, too.

0:37:060:37:11

We're talking about that Deco ring.

0:37:110:37:13

-£200 to £300.

-Mm-hm.

-Got everything going for it.

-Yes.

0:37:130:37:17

It has. But it's not everybody's cup of tea.

0:37:170:37:19

-Personal jewellery...

-It's the wrong time period, really.

0:37:190:37:23

-This was your mother's engagement ring.

-Yes.

0:37:230:37:25

Good luck with it. It's going under the hammer now.

0:37:250:37:29

The gold ring. Size N.

0:37:300:37:32

-Straight in at 150. 160. 170. Done at 175.

-Oh, no.

0:37:320:37:37

-We're looking at two to three.

-At 170, finished and done.

0:37:370:37:41

-Nobody else?

-We're not selling at 170.

0:37:410:37:44

At £170, are you done with at 170? That's not sold, then, I'm afraid.

0:37:440:37:50

Ever so sorry. But it's good that we protected it with a reserve.

0:37:500:37:54

-It hasn't gone for nothing.

-It's personal taste.

0:37:540:37:57

Nobody liked that particular ring.

0:37:570:38:00

That ring didn't manage to tickle anyone's fancy.

0:38:000:38:03

I do hope Shirley's last item finds an avid admirer.

0:38:030:38:06

It's that bling-bling diamond ring.

0:38:060:38:09

-I know you put a value of around £500 to £800 on this.

-Yes.

0:38:110:38:14

-Hopefully, fingers crossed, it's going to do the top end.

-That would be good.

0:38:140:38:18

-That central diamond is good.

-Very good.

-Impressive and large.

0:38:180:38:22

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:38:220:38:24

It's a diamond ring showing now. Straight in £300.

0:38:240:38:29

-300. 320. 340.

-This is a sparkler.

0:38:290:38:32

400. 420. 450. 480.

0:38:320:38:34

500. At the back, at 500 now.

0:38:340:38:37

-Goes at £500.

-We're selling, aren't we?

0:38:370:38:39

-Now we're going.

-The phone line!

0:38:390:38:42

The room at 550.

0:38:420:38:43

580. 600. 620.

0:38:430:38:47

-680.

-700, sir.

0:38:470:38:49

700.

0:38:490:38:52

720.

0:38:520:38:54

-750.

-Ohh!

-At 750. Do you want to take a ten?

0:38:540:38:59

At £750 now, I sell with the phone at 750.

0:38:590:39:02

Nothing? Done at 750 on the phone.

0:39:020:39:06

Yes! We got the top end. £750.

0:39:060:39:10

-It's gone, Shirley.

-That's gone.

-But that's a lot of money.

0:39:100:39:13

-What are you going to put it to?

-I'm going to donate some to the Papworth Hospital.

0:39:130:39:17

-Brilliant!

-Thanks to them.

0:39:170:39:20

Wonderful. That 750 brought Shirley's grand total

0:39:210:39:24

up to a whopping £1,110.

0:39:240:39:28

A dazzling result.

0:39:280:39:30

It's Evelyn next. She's brought husband Dave along with her.

0:39:310:39:35

-These are yours, aren't they?

-They are.

0:39:350:39:37

-Happy with the valuation?

-Yes, it's fine.

0:39:370:39:40

Hopefully, we'll get that top end. Why sell?

0:39:400:39:42

We've got several things in the cabinet and they need downloaded!

0:39:420:39:47

-Nice little items, Philip.

-Yes.

0:39:470:39:50

-I'm glad you were pleased with the valuation. I think they'll do all right.

-I do.

0:39:500:39:55

-I think we should get the top end, plus a bit more.

-Hope so.

0:39:550:39:58

We'll find out right now. This is it.

0:39:580:40:01

Two animal pepper shakers.

0:40:010:40:03

Oh, the hare! It's a hare, isn't it? And an owl.

0:40:030:40:05

That's neat. I like that hare. And the owl.

0:40:050:40:08

£20! For nothing! £20. £28. £30.

0:40:080:40:12

Two. 35. 38 I've got. At 38. Net, 40.

0:40:120:40:16

42. 45. At 45. You in on the phone? 48. With the net at 48.

0:40:160:40:23

Oh, come on. This hare is seriously cool.

0:40:230:40:26

At 48. I sell with the net at £48.

0:40:260:40:28

Nobody else? Done, then, at £48. All done at 48? 50. 55.

0:40:280:40:35

-I think the hare is lovely.

-It's all on the internet.

0:40:350:40:38

-At 55.

-This is where the collectors find them.

0:40:380:40:40

..the faceless bidder, at £55.

0:40:400:40:43

Nobody else? Done at 55.

0:40:430:40:47

-£55. The hammer's gone down.

-That was a good estimate.

-Spot on.

0:40:470:40:50

It must be really hard being an owner,

0:40:500:40:53

because you get here and you see how wonderful the item looks.

0:40:530:40:57

-I bet most of our owners go, "I wish I wasn't selling."

-I nearly bought them myself!

0:40:570:41:01

I have to say, they flatter to deceive a bit.

0:41:010:41:05

They looked good, and they managed to make a pretty good price, too.

0:41:050:41:10

Last, but by no means least, it's the Crimean War letter

0:41:100:41:13

that sent Charlie into a frenzy.

0:41:130:41:16

Why, why, why are you selling something like this for so little money?

0:41:170:41:22

-It's real history!

-It's got no family connection to us.

-OK.

0:41:220:41:25

And it's getting a bit fragile, so we'd like it to go to somebody who'll look after it and enjoy it.

0:41:250:41:31

We had a chat to the valuer, Kate Bateman, and we both agreed with your valuation, Charlie.

0:41:310:41:37

We fell in love with it and said it's so hard to put a price on.

0:41:370:41:40

If you could find this corporal's family,

0:41:400:41:43

-it would be priceless to them, sentimentally.

-Yes.

0:41:430:41:46

Let's find out what the bidders think. This is history.

0:41:460:41:50

I hope it goes to a collector. Here we go.

0:41:500:41:53

The handwritten letter from the Crimean War.

0:41:540:41:57

A lot of history connected with this. Poetry and allsorts.

0:41:570:42:00

No great expectations on this.

0:42:000:42:02

A tenner for it. Start me at 10. 10. 12. 15. 18.

0:42:020:42:05

20. Two. 25. 28.

0:42:050:42:07

At 28 now. Done, then, at 28. All done at 28. 30. Two. 35. 38.

0:42:070:42:13

At 38. Is that it? At 38.

0:42:130:42:15

40. Five. 50. Five.

0:42:150:42:18

-That's better!

-At 55. Finished, then, at 55.

0:42:180:42:22

At... 60. Back in at £60. We're flashing down here.

0:42:220:42:26

At 60. 65. At 65. 70. At 70.

0:42:260:42:32

-This is more like it!

-Great.

0:42:320:42:35

For a bit of British history, only £70.

0:42:350:42:38

And five. 80. At 80 now.

0:42:380:42:42

At 80. Get passionate about this!

0:42:420:42:45

All done at 80.

0:42:450:42:47

Done, then, at £80. Nobody else? You're out on the net.

0:42:470:42:50

You're out. It goes, then, at 80.

0:42:500:42:53

You're disappointing me. Have another go. Done at 80.

0:42:530:42:57

-Five. 90.

-Ooh!

0:42:570:43:01

Five. 100. At 100. I'll take your five again. 105.

0:43:010:43:07

105. Down here at 105.

0:43:070:43:09

Take your ten. At £105, nobody else? All done at 105.

0:43:090:43:16

-You've got to be pleased.

-Really pleased.

-Very.

0:43:170:43:20

-Hopefully, that's gone to somebody that wants it.

-Exactly.

-Thanks for bringing in a piece of history.

0:43:200:43:25

Roma's going to get some of it.

0:43:250:43:29

-Is that your daughter?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:43:290:43:31

That more than doubled Charlie's estimate. I'm absolutely delighted!

0:43:310:43:36

That's it, it's all over. The auction has just finished.

0:43:390:43:43

All credit to Mr David Palmer on the rostrum there. He's done us proud. All credit to our experts, as well.

0:43:430:43:48

Everybody has gone home happy and that's what it's all about.

0:43:480:43:52

Join us again soon for many more surprises.

0:43:520:43:55

But for now, from Stamford, it's goodbye.

0:43:550:43:58

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:580:44:02

E-mail [email protected]

0:44:020:44:06

The Flog It! team are at Peterborough Cathedral and Paul Martin delivers a behind-the-scenes tour of the place, unearthing some of the secrets of its rich and colourful past.

Assisting the hunt for some prized finds from the crowds are experts Philip Serrell and Charlie Ross. And there's a real assortment of spoils today, from a sparkling silver Robert Hennell tea set that Charlie hopes will hit a high score, to a perfectly preserved Dinky toy that Philip can't help but indulge his inner child with.


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