Colchester Flog It!


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Colchester

Paul Martin visits Colchester with David Barby and Kate Bateman. There is a jaw-dropping moment at the auction as a jade scent bottle receives some unexpected attention.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

This is Colchester town hall in Essex.

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These people are waiting to join in a very special TV programme!

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And they've all brought along something for us to look at.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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This is the show where we value your antiques and send them off to auction.

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I'm already eyeing up some items!

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Oh, very nice. Look at that!

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How beautiful is that?

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-It's an improvement!

-Yeah, a big improvement!

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Funny, I was just about to say that!

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This lot hope their items are really going somewhere.

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The journey starts here for many of our owners.

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The queue at the valuation day.

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Somebody here will go home later with an awful lot of money.

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Stay tuned and you'll find out.

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They don't know it yet, we don't know it yet and that's the exciting thing.

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You never know what's going to happen when we go to auction,

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which is where some of the lucky ones are going later.

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Leading today's team of experts is David Barby, on the look-out for quality.

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Hello, what have we got?

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A load of rubbish!

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-That's a good start!

-It really is rubbish.

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You'll have to look a bit harder than that, David!

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And we have auctioneer Kate Bateman. She's hot stuff when it comes to antiques.

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I'm cold. Once we get going it'll be nice and warm.

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Well, I could stay here all morning!

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But now it's 9.30 by my watch. Time to get the queue inside

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and start valuing.

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As the crowd find their seats, they have no idea what the day has in store.

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Trust me, one of them is in for a really big surprise.

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At my age, you know, it's shocking, this sort of thing!

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-Oh, do stop. This is awful!

-Don't stop!

-Keep going!

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Oh, no! They're still at it!

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That's all to come. Let's get down to the valuations.

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Here's Kate with Joe.

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Joe, you've brought this fantastic centrepiece. What can you tell me about it?

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Right. It was bought in 1965.

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My mother bought it. There was a fantastic three-day auction

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at an old house in Burnham on Crouch.

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It belonged to a sea captain who'd brought back things, filled the house, from all over the world.

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-Right.

-Absolutely marvellous.

-OK.

-My mother really loved it.

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She always had it on the mantelpiece.

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We had it out at Christmas on the table with a bunch of grapes hanging from here.

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And tangerines and things down the bottom.

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It's a really unusual shape. We've got all this crazy decoration.

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-It's quite ornate. All these sea scrolls. It's a bit Rococo.

-Yes.

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If we look on the bottom to see who the maker is.

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As we suspected, Doulton Burslem.

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A registration number, 142326.

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If we look that up in a book, that will tell us it was made in 1890.

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That's the year this registration number was put in the book.

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It was retailed by Phillips of Oxford Street in London.

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Quite a high-class retailer. Do you like it?

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-I do.

-Yes?

-I love it when it's got the grapes and the fruit.

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-Very festive, I imagine.

-It is. It brings it all together.

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It looks so empty like that.

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When I see things like this, I expect to see bits broken off.

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I've looked really carefully for bits of glue! But it seems to be perfect.

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-It's amazing it's survived this well.

-Yes.

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-You've taken good care of it.

-As good as I could.

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That's one very good reason for selling it.

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-Because it is in perfect condition.

-OK.

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Either it's a question of putting it in the loft to keep it safe

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or putting it on the mantelpiece and it gets chipped or broken.

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I'd think, "Why on earth didn't I bring it to Flog It before it got broken?"

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That's probably a good thing. Pass it on to somebody who'll enjoy it.

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-Price-wise, 100 to £150.

-Mm-hmm.

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I wouldn't be surprised if it made a bit more on the day. It's a strange thing.

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-Would you be happy with that sort of figure?

-Yes, yes.

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-What about a reserve of £80?

-Yes.

-And estimate of 100 to 150.

-Sounds fine.

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-What have you got there? I'm intrigued.

-That's actually the original catalogue.

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-Where your mother bought it?

-Yes.

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-We went there, my mother and I.

-And this is it, Lot 162.

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-Yes. Old Doulton china fruit bowl and a Staffordshire figure.

-A Staffordshire figure.

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-How much did you pay?

-Seven pounds, five shillings.

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-So that's our aim, seven pounds, five shillings.

-Yes!

-I hope we improve on that.

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-We'll send it to the sale room.

-Thank you!

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I think Kate's on safe ground, there.

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As she says, it shouldn't be hard to make that seven pound target ten times over.

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While she's been dealing in old money, Lena's brought in a fascinating old chap.

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-Lena, what do you know about the oil painting?

-Very, very little.

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I found it in a flat I bought about 35 years ago.

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-Where was the flat?

-In Crouch End in London.

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-Crouch End. And the owners just left him there.

-Yes.

-On the wall?

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Yes, lots of bits and pieces. And wine in the cellar!

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-Really? I like him. Don't you?

-I do. He's got a lovely old face.

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Where has he been, these last 30 years? On the wall?

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He's been under the stairs since I've had him.

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Why under the stairs? Shouldn't he be on the wall going up the stairs?

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-No, he's not very attractive. He's depressing.

-Depressing?

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Depressing! Now, this is signed Hans Tiel.

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I took the opportunity, half an hour ago, to look him up on the internet.

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German. Yeah. Instantly looking at this, you can say late 1800s quite easily.

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1890, 1900.

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Yet the weird thing is, when you look up his biog on the internet,

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when you type in his name, it comes up with his date of birth as 1900

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and his death, 1900.

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So the website's not very reliable!

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But looking at this I'd say that's circa 1890, 1900.

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-Have you heard of him?

-No. Not until today.

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-Oh.

-So I've learned something.

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I think a very skilful artist.

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It's loose, slightly impressionistic.

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It takes a lot of skill to paint like that.

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It's as if he's painted it in a hurry, but it's not. Know what I mean?

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It's got life and vitality. Isn't he lovely?

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-He's the uncle you never had.

-Exactly.

-Old Uncle Albert.

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-I think we put him into auction with a valuation of 100 to £150.

-OK.

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-That's super. Fine.

-And put a reserve on at £80.

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-That's fine.

-How do you feel about that?

-That's fine.

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-It's better than having him under the stairs!

-Why isn't he on the wall as you go upstairs?

-No.

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Nice thing, going up the wall.

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Going up the wall - exactly!

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Well, it might be driving Lena up the wall, but I like it.

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And so will someone else at the auction room.

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So from one aging gentleman, it's over to David Barby

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who's suddenly feeling younger.

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-Congratulations, Lynne. You have brought the oldest piece along today.

-That's nice.

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This is a beautiful, beautiful piece

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of Chinese, provincial Chinese, celedon ware.

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Probably date-wise I would say 17th/18th century.

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Right.

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This is celedon green, a lovely opaque green glaze.

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If you look right at the bottom of the bowl,

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can you see the barest outline of design

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and also following through on the sides.

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-I'd never noticed that before.

-See it just cached in the light?

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-I see, yes.

-This was actually carved into a block.

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Then the clay was put on and turned on a wheel.

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So you have this nice finish all the way round.

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Inside, you're left with the relief pattern.

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That was obliterated on this occasion by this thick glaze.

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What do you use it for?

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Well, it's been sitting on my coffee table for about ten years,

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filled with pot pourri.

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So I never noticed the design.

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It's very difficult to see the design, actually.

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But that's a good use.

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When it came over to England, let's say in the 18th century,

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it would have been used for the same thing.

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Or it might have been used for fruit or gourds, something like that.

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Is this a family heirloom? Have you had it a long time?

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My father worked in Indonesia in the '50s, '60s.

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So I suspect he bought it then.

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-How astute of him!

-Yes.

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Yes, it was. Yes.

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What I like is the sort of aging detail underneath.

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If you look, you'll see where this has been put onto the floor of a kiln.

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In the firing and the glazing, it's picked up all the grit.

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-Oh, I see.

-All the way round. Feel it.

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Like little blotches of sand.

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-What would this...

-That's when it was turned on the wheel.

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-Right.

-As it was finished like this.

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And it's where it's possibly been cut off with a wire.

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-Then this foot rim was added all the way round.

-I see. Right.

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Lovely piece. I did notice as my hand was going round

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that there's a hairline crack there.

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Yes.

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And again there. So at one stage, a great chunk came out.

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But for it to have survived that length of time is quite remarkable.

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But that's going to affect its value.

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Yes.

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-I'd like to see it do about 200 to 300.

-Right.

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But I think because of that hairline crack, it may deter people.

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But for me it's quite exciting but I have reservations about the damage.

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Right. OK. Would we put a reserve on it?

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I think a reserve of 80.

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-OK. Fair enough.

-So the guide price will have to be shoved up to 90 to 150.

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-OK. That's fair enough.

-Happy with that?

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Yes, yes.

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Lynne, thank you very much for bringing this beautiful bowl along.

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-And I hope it's going to surprise us both when it goes to auction.

-I'm looking forward to it.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

-Not at all.

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Halfway through the day and the hall is still buzzing.

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There are more people arriving all the time.

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It's been hectic, our experts working flat-out meeting hundreds of owners and valuing their items.

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-We're having a fabulous time, aren't we?

-Yes!

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Have a big smile. The camera's up there. Give it a wave!

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Yeah!

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We're coming back later in the show to find some more gems.

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Now let's go to the auction room to put those valuations to the test!

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This is what we're taking.

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Joe's Doulton centrepiece has stayed intact for 120 years.

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I hope somebody at the auction will see it, fall in love with it and keep it that way.

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He is my choice in going to auction today

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because I think it's a good starting point for anybody that doesn't own an original piece of fine art.

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At £100, you can't go wrong.

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This is the oldest thing I've held today.

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I hope it's reflected in the price at auction!

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For our auction, we stay in Colchester. We're at Reeman Dansie auction rooms.

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Before the auction, there's always time for prospective buyers to get hands-on.

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And that includes me. I must show you this.

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This caught my eye. Possibly my favourite thing here.

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Unfortunately, it's not one of our owners' items.

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But it's here for sale, lot 851.

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Pardon the pun, but I think this might fly away.

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I've looked it up in the catalogue and it says 1,000 to £1,500.

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It's a hardwood model of a hawk. Look at this wonderful tail feather

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which helps it to balance.

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It's quite steady. See the key here?

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An original key and lock. But look at this.

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It's a lovely little box. And another compartment just here.

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Fabulous detail. Absolutely fabulous.

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Everybody wants to discover something in the sale room

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that they know is worth a lot of money, hoping everyone else missed it.

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I bet there's half a dozen people thinking the same thing.

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It's got wear and got the age consistent with something from the early 1800s

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possibly later - 1700s.

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It's fabulous! I've never seen anything like it.

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I've seen a lot of furniture like this, inlaid with bone and ivory from this region in India.

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But nothing as sculptural as this.

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It's folk art at its very best. This was found in a charity shop.

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All the money is going to a local cancer hospice.

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I think that's £15,000 at a top London fair.

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That will fly away! Let's watch this one later.

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851. Make a note of it.

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The sale room is filling up and we're almost ready to start.

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Remember, if you're buying or selling at auction, there's commission to pay.

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That's how they pay the wages here. It varies, so check the small print in the catalogue

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or ask the auctioneer.

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Here at Reeman Dansie for our sellers, it's:

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Today we're in the safe hands of auctioneer James Grinter.

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Now for the moment we've been waiting for.

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It's lights, camera and action!

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Time's ticking away. Let's find out what it's worth!

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Our first item is the one I spotted.

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The oil painting on canvas by Hans Tiel.

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A value of about 100 to £150, with a reserve at £80.

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Unfortunately, owner Lena can't be with us. She's feeling poorly.

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She really wants to be here. Lena, get well soon. All the best.

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Let's find out what it's worth. Here we go.

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The Hans Tiel. Late 19th-century oil on canvas.

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Portrait of the bearded gentleman.

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I have two commissions with me

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and I start the bidding at £90. £90 with me now.

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At £90.

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We've sold it.

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At £90. With me at £90. Any advance?

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All done at... 95. With you, madam. At 95.

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That's more like it! Come on.

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All done at £95.

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Hammer's gone down.

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£95. Blink and you'll miss that.

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We got it away. Hope you're happy with that, Lena.

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Short but sweet. Next up, Joe with his 120-year-old fruit dish.

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Good luck, Joe. You've got a packed sale room here.

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Quality always sells. Doulton is a great name.

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We're looking at 100 to £150.

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-You got this in auction, didn't you?

-Yes, 1965.

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-Have you spotted anything here you'd like to buy?

-Some beautiful furniture.

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-Yes.

-Georgian furniture.

-It's a good time to invest in antiques.

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-There's never been a better time.

-Yeah.

-And it doesn't get greener.

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-Their carbon footprint is zero because they get recycled.

-It's the ultimate recycling.

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-Good stuff.

-Have you seen anything you'd like to buy?

-Loads of things.

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-If you were allowed!

-Yes. There's a box there I'd take home with me.

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But sadly not. Not today.

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Good luck. Let's find out what the bidders think.

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We want £150 at the top end. Here we go.

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The unusual Victorian Doulton Burslem fruit dish.

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Complete with a grape suspender. There we are.

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Very splendid thing. What do you say? 80?

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£80 to start me. £80 to start me.

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£80 for it. 60, then?

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£60 start. 60 is bid on there. At 60.

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At £60 bid now. At 60. Do I hear 65?

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£60 is bid.

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-It's struggling.

-Struggling.

-£60 is bid.

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-And advance? All done now?

-He's not selling.

-All done?

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65 on the internet.

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70. At £70 bid now.

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At 70. At £70 bid.

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At £70.

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75. At 75.

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-80. At £80 bid now. 80.

-Gosh, it's done it.

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At £80 bid now. At 80. At £80.

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-£80 is bid.

-Well done, internet bidders!

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It's going to be sold. Against you on the internet. One more? £80 is bid.

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Are you all done?

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-Fabulous.

-Phew!

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Internet bidding does slow it up, but it does put the prices up,

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-that's for sure.

-It's worth the wait.

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Somebody sitting at home on their computer bidding at the very last minute.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, absolutely.

-Well done.

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-Good.

-Thank you.

-Thank you. That was great.

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-Just, wasn't it just? I didn't think it was going to sell.

-I thought it was stuck at 70. It's good.

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What a rollercoaster ride!

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If you want more excitement, hold on to your seats.

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Keep watching!

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Remember that late 18th-century, early 19th-century wooden bird

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inlaid with ivory and bone that I showed you earlier? It's going under the hammer.

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We've had a huge amount of interest in this lot. We've got six telephone lines booked on it.

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I hope we're through on all those lines.

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The bidding's quickly reached £1,900.

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At 1,900 now. 2,000 on the internet. 2,000.

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2,100. At 2,100.

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-This could be quite a long time!

-With me on the book at 2,200. 2,300.

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2,400. With me on the book now at 2,400.

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It's taking time because the internet is quite a slow process.

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Telephone bid's come in now.

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2,800. At 2,800.

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2,900.

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At 3,000. 3,100. At 3,100. 3,200.

0:18:180:18:21

At 3,200.

0:18:210:18:23

At 3,400.

0:18:230:18:24

At 3,400. 3,500.

0:18:240:18:27

They certainly love it!

0:18:270:18:29

3,900 is bid. 4,000.

0:18:290:18:31

4,100.

0:18:310:18:33

4,100 is bid now.

0:18:330:18:35

This is what it's all about, the excitement of the auction room!

0:18:350:18:39

At 4,800. 5,000.

0:18:390:18:41

The great thing is the money's going back to a cancer charity where the bird was found in a charity shop.

0:18:410:18:46

6,400. 6,600. 6,800.

0:18:460:18:49

At 6,800. 7,000.

0:18:490:18:52

7,000 now. I said earlier five to ten grand.

0:18:520:18:56

8,000.

0:18:560:18:57

At 8,000. 8,400.

0:18:570:18:59

At 8,800.

0:18:590:19:01

9,200. At 9,200.

0:19:010:19:04

9,600.

0:19:040:19:05

£10,000!

0:19:050:19:08

10,500 on the internet.

0:19:080:19:09

10,500!

0:19:090:19:12

Now I'm shivering! I'm tingling all over.

0:19:120:19:15

At 11,000. Make it 11,500?

0:19:150:19:17

11,500. 12,000 on the telephone.

0:19:170:19:20

£12,000.

0:19:200:19:21

12 grand! I wish this was one of our owner's items.

0:19:210:19:25

Are you sure? At 12,500 now.

0:19:250:19:30

£12,500.

0:19:300:19:32

Madness! £12,500!

0:19:330:19:37

That's the beauty of an auction.

0:19:370:19:39

That sale just shows how strong the market is for Asian items right now.

0:19:390:19:44

Let's hope some of it rubs off for our next item, the Chinese bowl.

0:19:440:19:49

We're about to find out what it goes for, what it's worth. Hi, Paddy. Hi, Lynne.

0:19:490:19:53

-Hello.

-You've got a bidding card there!

-I've spent my money!

0:19:530:19:58

-Oh, dear!

-Spent my money already!

0:19:580:20:00

What are you after?

0:20:000:20:01

-I've bought two cups and saucers.

-Have you?

-Very pretty.

0:20:010:20:05

-Who knows?

-This is nice. Bring something along, sell it,

0:20:050:20:10

-and buy something to take home.

-Recycling!

0:20:100:20:13

-We haven't sold the item yet!

-Ah. Good point!

0:20:130:20:16

I think we will, though, don't you?

0:20:160:20:18

My reservation is it has a crack in it.

0:20:180:20:21

A bad crack. But it's a nice early piece.

0:20:210:20:25

But Chinese art and Korean art is flavour of the month.

0:20:250:20:28

Very difficult to put a price on.

0:20:280:20:31

I'm not expecting 41 million!

0:20:310:20:32

If only! That would be a record for Flog It!

0:20:330:20:37

Let's find out exactly what the bidders think. It's going under the hammer.

0:20:370:20:42

The early Chinese provincial celedon-charged dish.

0:20:430:20:47

With the moulded proud decoration. What do you say to start me? £80 to start me?

0:20:470:20:52

80? £80 to start me somewhere?

0:20:530:20:56

£80 I have on the internet.

0:20:570:20:59

Straight in at £80 bid.

0:20:590:21:01

£80 bid. 85?

0:21:010:21:03

-At £80. On the internet now.

-No-one's bidding against the internet buyer.

0:21:040:21:08

-£80.

-He's selling it.

0:21:080:21:11

-Right.

-Sold at 80.

-Well, it will cover my purchases!

0:21:110:21:14

-How much did they cost?

-50.

0:21:140:21:16

-I don't know what that cost.

-By the time you've divvied it up

0:21:160:21:20

and paid the commission and the buyer's premium,

0:21:200:21:23

you're about equal.

0:21:230:21:25

-Well done.

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:21:250:21:27

That's it from the auction house right now. We'll be back later

0:21:280:21:32

with more items to sell.

0:21:320:21:34

We meet a lot of collectors on this programme,

0:21:400:21:42

people with shelves full of Clarice Cliff and display cabinets full of Royal Doulton.

0:21:420:21:47

But what if your budget is a lot bigger and your display shelves are the size of two big barns?

0:21:470:21:55

I'm at Bonnard's Farm in Essex to meet a man who's taking collecting to the next level.

0:21:550:22:01

It starts here through this rather unassuming door. Let's have a look.

0:22:010:22:06

There's always been a certain romance about the early days of motoring.

0:22:090:22:14

Cars have been with us now for over 120 years.

0:22:140:22:18

So are they mechanical artworks, technical wonders or just a necessity of modern life?

0:22:180:22:23

Either way, the nostalgia of those pioneering days

0:22:230:22:26

is still being fuelled by vintage rallies, museums

0:22:260:22:29

and more unusually, private collections like this one.

0:22:290:22:33

Bernard Holmes used to be an executive at the Ford Motor Company.

0:22:330:22:37

So when his own business ventures provided enough money for an expensive hobby,

0:22:370:22:42

it's not surprising his collection led here.

0:22:420:22:44

This is where it all started for you?

0:22:440:22:47

Yes, this was the first car we restored

0:22:470:22:49

and it was a nuts to bolts restoration. Body off, down to the chassis.

0:22:490:22:55

Incredible job you've done.

0:22:550:22:57

It was very enjoyable doing it.

0:22:570:22:59

What do you look for in a practical classic like these lovely old cars

0:22:590:23:05

-when you go to buy one.

-If I come across a car and I fall in love with it, I'll buy it.

0:23:050:23:09

I then add it to the collection.

0:23:090:23:11

So this one was bought. I knew nothing about the car.

0:23:110:23:16

I've learned about it as I've restored it and I've learned to love it.

0:23:160:23:21

We've travelled a number of miles in it.

0:23:210:23:23

All these cars get used.

0:23:230:23:25

-They're all roadworthy.

-It's after using them that you get an affinity with them.

0:23:250:23:30

-But you would buy a wreck, would you?

-Yes, this one was a wreck.

0:23:300:23:34

A very expensive wreck! But it was a wreck when I bought it.

0:23:340:23:38

You couldn't have used it.

0:23:380:23:40

You get the parts hand-made now in this country?

0:23:400:23:43

Yes, what you try and do is use the original part and repair it

0:23:430:23:47

by re-sleeving or putting bushes in or whatever.

0:23:470:23:52

That's the first way to go.

0:23:520:23:54

If you can't do that, you're forced into copying the part and remaking it.

0:23:540:23:58

You try and do that as little as possible.

0:23:580:24:01

You do a lot of the work yourself, which keeps the costs down.

0:24:010:24:06

Yes. Although I say I do the restoration myself,

0:24:060:24:09

obviously I use a team of people. So I subcontract the paint out.

0:24:090:24:14

I subcontract the upholstery out.

0:24:140:24:16

A friend of mine, Barry, did the wickerwork.

0:24:160:24:20

Somebody else does the woodwork for me.

0:24:200:24:23

But there's a lot of time and money spent in disassembling the car,

0:24:230:24:28

doing all the running around, getting the parts plated, that's what I do.

0:24:280:24:33

Bernard has 26 cars and dozens of motorbikes

0:24:360:24:40

all restored to an incredible condition.

0:24:400:24:43

If we're going to talk about these wonderful vintage cars, you have to include a Rolls Royce!

0:24:480:24:53

-You ought to, I guess!

-And there's one right here!

0:24:530:24:57

This is a 1913 Silver Ghost

0:24:570:25:00

with a particularly light bodywork on it.

0:25:000:25:04

-It's called a London to Edinburgh.

-It was built as a Grand Tourer.

0:25:040:25:09

Yes. And this is capable of 70 miles an hour.

0:25:090:25:13

Last year we did a tour via Paris down to the Cotes D'Azur

0:25:130:25:19

-back to Monaco and back through the Alps.

-Your wife told me you took this to Durban.

0:25:190:25:25

Yes, we did 4,500 kilometres around South Africa.

0:25:250:25:29

Durban, Swaziland, and down out through Cape Town.

0:25:290:25:33

-Wonderful.

-What did the people from the townships think about this?

0:25:330:25:36

I always think people are very generous.

0:25:360:25:39

Actually, we did take this into a township.

0:25:390:25:42

And it just caused the same sort of stir that it would in England!

0:25:420:25:47

They must have thought you were royalty! It's incredible!

0:25:470:25:52

You don't get envy. People just admire the car for what it is.

0:25:520:25:55

-Clap and cheer!

-It's very generous of people, really.

0:25:550:25:59

What would one of these cost in this condition today?

0:25:590:26:02

-Half a million, I guess.

-Incredible.

0:26:020:26:04

Absolutely incredible.

0:26:040:26:06

But they're not all that price. The entry level would be a Model T Ford.

0:26:060:26:11

There are thousands still on the road. You can get one for £10,000.

0:26:110:26:16

All that nostalgia is kept alive by events like the annual London to Brighton Veteran Car Run.

0:26:160:26:21

It started in 1927 and every year, 500 old cars make the 54-mile journey south.

0:26:210:26:28

The only rule is they have to have been built before 1905.

0:26:280:26:33

It's an enthusiast's dream, and some of them really go!

0:26:330:26:36

Bernard's cars are regulars on the various historic rallies.

0:26:390:26:43

His engineering background means he has his favourites.

0:26:430:26:47

I'm particularly interested in De Dion Bouton.

0:26:470:26:50

I have single cylinders, twins, four cylinders, an eight-cylinder.

0:26:500:26:54

-So I can follow the De Dion.

-What's the fascination with them?

0:26:540:26:58

I like the engineering.

0:26:580:26:59

And at the turn of the last century,

0:26:590:27:03

Darroch and De Dion supplied more than 60% of all motor cars.

0:27:030:27:07

-Right.

-In the world. So they were the leaders in their industry.

0:27:070:27:11

Let's look at another. I know you have a favourite down there.

0:27:140:27:17

It's a particularly exciting car.

0:27:170:27:20

It's a twin-cylinder De Dion dating from 1904.

0:27:200:27:24

Let's have closer look. Is it easy to drive?

0:27:250:27:28

It's particularly easy, this one,

0:27:280:27:31

because you just move this lever into that position,

0:27:310:27:34

push that forward, and you're in first gear.

0:27:340:27:37

-Right.

-Push it back and you're into second gear.

0:27:370:27:40

-Then move that back to that position and that's into third gear.

-Right.

0:27:400:27:45

-So it's a bit like rubbing your tummy and patting your head.

-Yes!

0:27:450:27:50

But once you're used to it, there's no possibility of mucking the gear change up.

0:27:500:27:54

-You need good co-ordination.

-Yes. And it's got a good turn of speed.

0:27:540:27:58

35 miles an hour, nearly 40 miles an hour.

0:27:580:28:02

You don't go any faster or it vibrates itself to death!

0:28:020:28:05

What a wonderful collection. The good news is, Bernard opens to the public on selected days of the year.

0:28:080:28:14

Back at Colchester town hall, everyone's in good spirits

0:28:260:28:29

and Kate is ready with our next owner, Mariette.

0:28:290:28:32

Mariette, hello. Welcome to Flog It! You've brought something small and beautiful!

0:28:320:28:37

-Yes.

-Tell me about it.

0:28:370:28:39

I can't tell you very much. I brought it on behalf of my mother.

0:28:390:28:43

She inherited it when my father's mother died, my paternal grandmother.

0:28:430:28:49

It's lived in the box ever since. That's all I know about it.

0:28:490:28:52

-In a box? You don't show it at all?

-No!

-Aw!

0:28:520:28:55

-I know!

-It's come from quite far away.

0:28:550:28:58

-Ah.

-What he have here is a 19th-century Chinese celadon jade scent bottle.

0:28:580:29:05

If we pick it up here, it's so small and tactile,

0:29:050:29:08

it's got this lovely little brass and turquoise, but faded, lid.

0:29:080:29:13

And then you've got what's probably a bone or possibly ivory scoop.

0:29:130:29:18

I guess you'd dip it in and dab it behind your ears or dab your perfume inside your wrists

0:29:180:29:23

and put it back in.

0:29:230:29:25

It's really sweet.

0:29:250:29:27

The only other thing I can think it might be used for is snuff or something like that.

0:29:270:29:32

It could be that instead of perfume a snuff scoop that you'd put a pinch of snuff on and sniff it up!

0:29:320:29:38

But it's quite a lovely thing, irrespective of what its use is.

0:29:380:29:42

We'll stick with scent bottle at the moment.

0:29:420:29:45

It's a lobed, we call it lobed form decoration.

0:29:450:29:48

-But otherwise very plain.

-Yes.

0:29:480:29:50

Often we see them with intricate carvings, dragons, all kinds of stuff on it.

0:29:500:29:55

But I love the simplicity of this. It's so tactile.

0:29:550:29:58

-You want to pick it up...

-And stroke it, yes.

0:29:580:30:01

It's a lovely thing.

0:30:010:30:03

It sits in a box!

0:30:030:30:05

-Yes!

-So you wouldn't be gutted if we sold it, I suppose?

0:30:050:30:08

-No, she wouldn't be, no.

-It's your mother's.

-It is.

0:30:080:30:11

Price-wise, there are lots of collectors out there.

0:30:110:30:14

Obviously the earlier stuff is higher prices.

0:30:140:30:17

But Jade is quite high at the moment.

0:30:170:30:19

Chinese collectors are buying stuff like this back again.

0:30:190:30:22

-Right.

-I would have thought conservatively it's 50 to £80, something like that.

0:30:220:30:28

-But I would certainly put a reserve on it of £50 just to protect it.

-Yes.

0:30:280:30:32

You could maybe give it a bit of auctioneer's discretion, so maybe they'd let it go at 45.

0:30:320:30:37

-But I think it's worth £50 every day of the week.

-It's lovely,

0:30:370:30:40

but it sits in a box and my mother doesn't want it,

0:30:400:30:43

so sell it. Flog it!

0:30:430:30:45

Flog It! That's the name of the game and why we're here!

0:30:450:30:48

-We'll give it a go at the sale room.

-OK.

-Hopefully they'll have other Oriental bits to help it sell.

0:30:480:30:54

-Attract other bidders, yes.

-I'm scenting victory at the sale room!

0:30:540:30:59

Wonderful. Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:30:590:31:02

From a luxury item to something much more practical that's caught David Barby's eye.

0:31:020:31:07

Peter, this is quite an extraordinary collection

0:31:080:31:12

related to watches and clocks.

0:31:120:31:16

In particular, restoration of clocks and watches.

0:31:160:31:19

Where did all these come from?

0:31:190:31:22

It was a hobby. Many years ago, I was interested in engineering

0:31:220:31:27

so I decided to look at something which was quite easy to pick up

0:31:270:31:32

as regards items, clocks and watches.

0:31:320:31:36

-But mainly clocks.

-Right.

0:31:360:31:38

-It is such an exacting profession, clock repairs.

-It certainly is, yes.

0:31:380:31:43

But these are extraordinary.

0:31:430:31:45

This one here, which dates from the end of the 19th century

0:31:450:31:50

-is called an uprighting tool.

-Correct.

0:31:500:31:53

And this is for drilling back-plates of watches?

0:31:530:31:56

Back and front-plates, yes.

0:31:560:31:58

And it's so simple and wonderfully executed.

0:31:580:32:03

We have this adjusting section up here, called an arm

0:32:030:32:07

-which held the actual mechanism or clock.

-It held the plate.

0:32:070:32:12

And you could adjust it, then the drill was passed through the top.

0:32:120:32:16

-That's right.

-It's a beautiful instrument. Lovely. This one here

0:32:160:32:21

is again a well-made piece.

0:32:210:32:27

-What would you use this for?

-The same again, working with watches.

-Turning spindles.

0:32:270:32:32

Turning the pivots and parts of the wheels.

0:32:320:32:36

And this one here, which I think is an extraordinary-looking object,

0:32:360:32:41

particularly with the handle here.

0:32:410:32:45

To accompany all these, we've got a lovely selection of books.

0:32:450:32:48

This one here, Watchmaker's Handbook.

0:32:480:32:51

By Saunier.

0:32:510:32:53

-This is just a straightforward description of how to work clocks.

-Yes.

0:32:530:33:00

Even to the extent of polishing brass.

0:33:000:33:02

-They give you everything.

-Absolutely.

0:33:020:33:04

This would make a very interesting lot on its own.

0:33:040:33:07

-Yes.

-But I think the best is this one here.

0:33:070:33:11

I noticed it was owned by C.Curzon,

0:33:110:33:15

escapement maker, south Tottenham.

0:33:150:33:18

-Right.

-He was the one that owned this book.

0:33:180:33:21

Obviously he was a friend of the author,

0:33:210:33:25

F.J.Britten.

0:33:250:33:27

Britten has actually signed the dedication to Mr Curzon

0:33:270:33:30

"With F.J.Britten regards."

0:33:300:33:35

-How many times do you see a book autographed...

-You don't.

0:33:350:33:39

-..by the author, with a dedication.

-Never.

-Both involved in clocks. Clock restoration, clock making.

0:33:390:33:45

This is extraordinary. Why are you parting with them?

0:33:450:33:48

I've finished with my hobby now.

0:33:480:33:51

There's no need for it now.

0:33:510:33:53

I've enjoyed it over the last 30 years.

0:33:530:33:56

-Right.

-The time has come for me to depart and maybe someone else will enjoy them.

0:33:560:34:01

"Time to depart"?

0:34:010:34:03

Depart from the...

0:34:030:34:05

Plenty of life in you yet!

0:34:050:34:07

As regards value, I don't know how the auction house will deal with this.

0:34:070:34:11

They may separate it into two lots.

0:34:110:34:14

But overall, I think we have a price range in the region of about

0:34:140:34:17

-250 to £300.

-Right.

0:34:170:34:20

And I would think that they would suggest maybe,

0:34:200:34:23

excluding those two books,

0:34:230:34:26

they might suggest something in the region of about

0:34:260:34:29

£200 for this lot

0:34:290:34:32

and a reserve of about 180.

0:34:320:34:34

Yes, that's fair.

0:34:340:34:36

And that will leave those two books to be sold separately.

0:34:360:34:39

They could make anything up to £100.

0:34:390:34:41

Right.

0:34:410:34:43

So I'm putting these up for sale by auction in fear and trepidation

0:34:430:34:47

in view of your professionalism!

0:34:470:34:49

-So I hope they'll do well.

-So do I.

0:34:490:34:51

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much. Fascinating talking to you.

-And you, too.

0:34:510:34:56

The valuation day is drawing to a close. We're off to auction.

0:34:560:34:59

Here's David and Kate with their thoughts on what we're taking.

0:34:590:35:03

I'm sure this Chinese scent bottle will make at least £50 at auction.

0:35:030:35:07

It's so tactile, I hope there's a collector for snuff bottles or scent bottles that will take it home.

0:35:070:35:12

This is such an extraordinary collection of clockmaker's tools.

0:35:120:35:17

Bearing in mind that at Colchester there was such a vibrant clock-making industry

0:35:170:35:22

during the 18th and 19th century.

0:35:220:35:25

So it's back to the auction room

0:35:290:35:31

just down the road at Reeman Dansie in Colchester.

0:35:310:35:35

The great thing about auction preview days,

0:35:410:35:44

you get a chance to look around, take your time and pick the lots up,

0:35:440:35:47

make sure there's no damage. Chat to the auctioneer.

0:35:470:35:50

He's duty-bound to talk to you and pick out all the faults and tell you the provenance.

0:35:500:35:55

That's his business. He wants to promote it.

0:35:550:35:58

Now, tell you what I've fallen in love with!

0:35:580:36:00

Da-da! These!

0:36:000:36:02

Can you guess what they are? I'll tell you.

0:36:020:36:05

They're made out of metal, gold-leafed bay trees in the form of a standard lamp.

0:36:050:36:11

A matched pair. They're quite weighted.

0:36:110:36:13

They terminate in these lovely bamboo baskets

0:36:130:36:17

and they'd be ideal in a conservatory.

0:36:170:36:20

They create the look. If you've got double doors into a conservatory,

0:36:200:36:23

I think those lit... There's some spotlights in there, about four or five.

0:36:230:36:28

Once those are on, you've really got the look.

0:36:280:36:31

This is a proper interior designer's lot.

0:36:310:36:33

They're here today for sale at only a couple of hundred pounds.

0:36:330:36:37

You can't make them for that.

0:36:370:36:39

I know they're kitsch, but there's something really fun about them.

0:36:390:36:44

Our auctioneer, James Grinter is ready at the rostrum. Here we go.

0:36:470:36:51

Our next owner is amateur clock and watch repairer Peter with two lots.

0:36:510:36:55

The specialist tools and his clockmaker's handbooks, up first.

0:36:550:36:59

Wonderful books. Obviously,

0:37:010:37:04

your bible, the definitive guide to repairing clocks and watches.

0:37:040:37:07

You must have nimble fingers and great eyesight!

0:37:070:37:11

I've got stumpy, clumpy things. Could you repair them?

0:37:110:37:14

-No, I couldn't. I'd bodge it.

-I wouldn't have the patience!

0:37:140:37:18

Good on you. Have you repaired many in your day?

0:37:180:37:21

Not watches so much, because they're so small.

0:37:210:37:25

-But mainly clocks all the time.

-Would you like to have been a professional?

0:37:250:37:29

I wouldn't mind because I'm interested in engineering as well.

0:37:290:37:33

That would have been ideal. There you go.

0:37:330:37:35

-What's your hobby now?

-Retirement now.

0:37:350:37:38

-Great!

-You've got a long way to go!

0:37:390:37:42

The Watch and Clockmakers' Handbook.

0:37:430:37:45

And the other watch book.

0:37:450:37:47

£50 start me.

0:37:470:37:49

£50 to start me. 50's bid on there. At 50.

0:37:500:37:54

£50 bid now. Five. 60. Five.

0:37:540:37:57

£65 bid here. At 65.

0:37:570:38:00

At £65 bid. 70 anywhere?

0:38:000:38:02

-£65 is bid.

-They're worth a lot more.

-All done? At £65.

0:38:020:38:07

Sold at £65, just over the £60 reserve.

0:38:070:38:10

-Sorry we couldn't get you any more.

-That's auctions for you!

-Yes.

0:38:100:38:15

That's money in the bank. Now Peter's clock-making tools.

0:38:160:38:20

The thing I like about this lathe is the way it tightens the spring.

0:38:210:38:25

If it accidentally comes off, it shifts all over the place.

0:38:250:38:30

Very skilled, very careful.

0:38:300:38:32

It's a wonderful little lathe. Hopefully it will get top end of estimate.

0:38:320:38:36

Let's find out.

0:38:360:38:38

The Swiss small precision lathe.

0:38:380:38:41

And other watch-repairing items here.

0:38:410:38:44

I have two commissions with me. I start the bidding at £320.

0:38:440:38:50

Brilliant!

0:38:500:38:51

Do I hear 340? £320 with me now. At 320.

0:38:510:38:56

At £320 with me. At 320. Do I hear 340?

0:38:560:39:00

At 320 with me. 340.

0:39:000:39:04

360. 360 still with me now. 360.

0:39:040:39:07

At £360.

0:39:070:39:09

Still with me. Are you all done?

0:39:090:39:12

Yes! I'm so pleased!

0:39:120:39:13

£360. Brilliant. Fabulous.

0:39:130:39:15

Spot-on estimate, there.

0:39:150:39:17

-Got to be happy with that?

-I'm pleased with that. Very pleased!

0:39:170:39:21

-So what hobbies have you taken up?

-Just resting now!

-Resting!

0:39:210:39:25

-Enjoy the money, Peter.

-Thank you very much.

0:39:250:39:28

Unusual item. First we've ever had.

0:39:280:39:30

That's a grand total of £425 for the two lots.

0:39:300:39:35

A retirement fund for Peter!

0:39:350:39:37

Now we're going all girly and delicate

0:39:370:39:39

with this lovely 19th-century Chinese jade scent bottle.

0:39:390:39:43

We're looking at 50 to £80. It belongs to Mariette. This is Mum.

0:39:440:39:48

-It is actually mine!

-It's yours, isn't it! What's your name?

0:39:480:39:51

-Rosemary.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:39:510:39:53

Why have you decided to sell this?

0:39:530:39:55

-Because I don't collect scent bottles.

-You don't.

-No.

0:39:550:39:59

It's a lovely little thing.

0:39:590:40:00

It was a present to my husband from a grateful patient.

0:40:000:40:04

-OK. Happy with the valuation?

-Completely.

0:40:040:40:07

It should do the top end, shouldn't it?

0:40:070:40:10

-Jade and Chinese things are doing really well. So I'm hoping.

-Time to sell.

0:40:100:40:14

Good.

0:40:140:40:15

We'll find out what the bidders think. Good luck, Kate. Good luck both of you.

0:40:150:40:20

Thank you very much, Paul.

0:40:200:40:22

A late 19th-century Chinese green jade snuff bottle.

0:40:220:40:26

A snuff bottle here.

0:40:260:40:29

Two commissions with me.

0:40:290:40:30

Start the bidding at £320.

0:40:300:40:34

-£320 with me now. 320.

-Good heavens!

0:40:350:40:38

320. Do I hear 340?

0:40:380:40:40

At 320. 340 on the internet. 360.

0:40:400:40:44

At 360 with me on the book. 380.

0:40:440:40:46

400. At £400 with me.

0:40:460:40:49

420. 440.

0:40:490:40:51

440 with me.

0:40:510:40:52

440. 460. 480.

0:40:520:40:55

-Kate!

-480 is bid now. 500.

-A shocker!

0:40:550:40:58

£500 I'm at. 520. Another place on the internet. 540. 540 on the internet.

0:40:580:41:03

560. 580.

0:41:030:41:06

-600.

-At my age, it's shocking, this sort of thing!

0:41:060:41:10

£600. 620?

0:41:100:41:13

620 on the internet now. 640.

0:41:130:41:15

640 is bid now. 640.

0:41:150:41:17

At 640. 660? At 660.

0:41:170:41:22

660 is bid now.

0:41:220:41:23

680.

0:41:230:41:25

-700.

-I've gone all clammy.

-I don't believe it!

0:41:250:41:28

720?

0:41:280:41:29

720. 740.

0:41:290:41:31

-This is ridiculous!

-Oh, gosh!

0:41:310:41:34

740 is bid. 760?

0:41:340:41:37

-760.

-We missed something, didn't we, Kate?

0:41:370:41:39

-Somebody's gone mad.

-Somebody has!

0:41:390:41:41

At £800 now. 820? 820.

0:41:410:41:44

-£820!

-820 is bid.

0:41:440:41:46

820. 840? On the internet

0:41:460:41:49

at 840.

0:41:490:41:50

840. 860.

0:41:500:41:52

-Oh, do stop! This is awful!

-No, don't stop!

0:41:520:41:55

At £860.

0:41:550:41:58

All done now? Fair warning.

0:41:580:42:00

All done at 86... 880.

0:42:000:42:03

880. Back in the UK now.

0:42:030:42:05

900 in China!

0:42:050:42:07

At £900 in China.

0:42:070:42:10

Mr UK, will you make it 920?

0:42:100:42:12

Come on, UK!

0:42:120:42:14

920!

0:42:140:42:15

-Yes!

-At 920 now. 940 back in China.

0:42:150:42:18

-940 in China.

-Let's round it up!

0:42:180:42:20

940. All done at £940.

0:42:200:42:25

-940.

-960.

0:42:250:42:26

-No!

-Back in the UK! 960.

0:42:260:42:29

I like your style, sir. 980.

0:42:290:42:31

Back in China.

0:42:310:42:33

In China!

0:42:330:42:34

Round it up to £1,000. Come on.

0:42:340:42:36

It's only money! At £980.

0:42:360:42:40

Make it £1,000?

0:42:400:42:42

Last chance. £980. Sold!

0:42:420:42:46

-£980!

-Wonderful!

0:42:460:42:49

-What a lovely surprise!

-I can't believe it.

-Wow!

0:42:490:42:52

Tingling! Hope you're on the edge of your seats at home! Enjoying it as much as we are.

0:42:520:42:57

Absolutely wonderful. And it will all go to charity.

0:42:570:43:00

-Fabulous!

-I've made up my mind.

-Which charity?

-Medecins Sans Frontieres.

0:43:000:43:05

-OK.

-Excellent.

-My favourite charity.

0:43:050:43:08

My heart is really going. That rarely happens to an auctioneer!

0:43:080:43:12

What a rollercoaster ride!

0:43:120:43:14

We said somebody was going home with a lot of money and it's you!

0:43:140:43:18

I can't believe it. Thank you very much.

0:43:180:43:21

Thank you for bringing it in.

0:43:210:43:22

We're out of time here. Hope you've enjoyed the day as much as we have.

0:43:220:43:26

Join us again for more surprises. Until then, cheerio from us.

0:43:260:43:30

Thank you very much indeed.

0:43:300:43:32

It was a wonderful experience!

0:43:320:43:34

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:570:44:00

Paul Martin and the team head to Colchester in Essex. The experts are led by David Barby and Kate Bateman.

There is a jaw-dropping moment at the auction when a jade scent bottle found by Kate receives some unexpected attention.

Meanwhile, Paul visits an extreme collector - a man who buys and restores old cars and has a collection of 26 roadworthy vehicles dating back a hundred years.