Dulwich Flog It!


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Dulwich

Paul Martin, Kate Bateman and Michael Baggott visit Dulwich College in South London, where Michael finds an unusual candlestick and Kate has a big surprise in the saleroom.


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This magnificent building is Dulwich College in South London

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and the architect was Charles Barry Junior.

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His father designed the Houses of Parliament, but it's what's on the inside that interests me

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because it's our valuation day. Welcome to Flog It.

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This magnificent school was founded in 1619

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by Edward Alleyn, one of the most famous actors of the day.

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Originally, it was to educate just 12 pupils, poor scholars as they were known,

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but despite Dulwich College's humble beginnings,

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it's grown to be one of the most successful independent schools in the country.

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Hundreds of people have turned up to get their items valued by our experts.

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They want to know what it's worth, it's our job to tell them, so let's get on with the show.

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'This London crowd can't wait to put our experts through their paces

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'and who knows what treasures lie in all those bags and boxes, waiting to be unearthed?

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'Heading up the experts today is the lovely Kate Bateman.'

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-That's quite cool, isn't it?

-It's rather nice.

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'And the distinguished Michael Baggott.'

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-You might be thinking of parting with it?

-That might be a "no".

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-'Coming up, Michael gets philosophical.'

-It's got the peach of immortality in it.

-Yeah.

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Maybe the buyer thinks he'll live for ever.

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'Kate's lost for words.'

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Um, I thought about 200 to 400?

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Oh... Oh...

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'And as always, the tension of the auction.'

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Fingers crossed!

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'The crowds are pouring in, the heat is rising

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'and first up on Michael's table are Cristina and her beautiful brooch.'

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Cristina, thank you for bringing along this intriguing brooch.

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Can you tell me where you got it from?

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It was my wedding present in 1965.

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-Good grief!

-I come from Italy, so it was from Italy.

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And a friend of the family gave it to me and she said it belonged to her grandmother. That's all I know.

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-That's marvellous. So it's come all the way from Rome to Dulwich to be on Flog It?

-Yes.

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-It's actually come further than that.

-Really?

-Do you know where it was made?

-No idea.

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-This is in fact a Chinese brooch.

-Oh, my goodness!

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-There are certain factors. Chinese jewellery is heavily influenced with filigree work.

-Yeah.

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And all of this ground, the little flowers and scrolls,

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it's all very fine lines of wire

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that have worked and soldered together to form these decorative motifs.

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Amazingly difficult, technically demanding

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and you can imagine the time it takes to do something like this.

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But if you didn't know, because there are no marks on it apart from a little silver mark,

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if you didn't know it was Chinese from that, you know it's Chinese from what's in the middle of it.

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And that is a little immortal peach.

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So the gods would eat these peaches and become immortal.

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Oh, it's got a lot of history.

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And I think is earlier than the brooch.

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I think the brooch is about 1890, 1900.

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But this little carving which is out of amethyst,

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I think is probably late 18th, early 19th century.

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It isn't of marvellous quality, but it's a rare little precious item on its own.

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Fantastic journey, to have something from China to Italy.

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I thought she just gave me something to get rid of it.

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You might be forgiven for thinking it's costume jewellery at a glance,

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but it's got all of this history tied up with it and all this craftsmanship.

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-The sad thing is it's not dramatically valuable.

-Yeah.

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-That, I think, just as a pretty brooch, is worth £30 to £50 of anybody's money.

-Yeah.

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And because of its sentimental attachment to you as a wedding gift,

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-I think we've got to put a reserve of £30 on it.

-Yeah.

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But who knows, two people might see as much in it as I do and it might go on from there,

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-but you're happy to...?

-Yeah, quite happy.

-Why now have you decided to part with it?

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I don't know. It's always inside a jewellery box. I never do anything with it.

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-That's the sad thing with brooches today.

-I know.

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But that craftsmanship might prompt someone to feel, "I'll buy it and wear it."

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-You never know.

-Even if it's just to go to the supermarket on a Saturday! Who knows?

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-We'll just see on the day.

-I look forward to it.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Let's hope Cristina's brooch catches the eye of someone who will wear it with pride.

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Now, over on Kate's table, Karen has brought in an unusual bronze figure.

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You've brought this fantastic figure in. What can you tell me about it?

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That it belonged or belongs to my mother.

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And she's had it since the late 1920s.

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It came from a gentleman that used to be a doctor

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and my mum used to go and visit him with her mother.

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He knew that she liked it and used to let her play with it, then he gave it to her.

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It's always sat on the side indoors.

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-Just on a shelf somewhere?

-Just on a shelf somewhere.

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-We were told not to touch it as it's very heavy.

-Do you like it?

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-Yes and no.

-It's a funny thing.

-I don't know.

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-There's something about it, but I'm not quite sure that I'd give it house room myself.

-OK.

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-Do you know who made it, first of all?

-I know it's Bergman,

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-but only because of the programme.

-A-ha! We've popularised Franz Bergman!

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It is a chap called Franz Bergman. On the bottom you've got the "B" in a little urn

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which is the mark for Franz Bergman.

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He did various things. He's known for his slightly risque, sort of naughty, erotic ladies,

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so bronze, very Art Nouveau, Art Deco ladies. This is not one of those ones.

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He did a series of North African, Arab-type scenes.

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This is one of those. It's somebody like a Berber tribesman, a North African,

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with his camel gun or something like that.

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And his dirk or his curved sword behind him and traditional dress.

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It's quite fun. It's not to everyone's taste.

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-No.

-You don't particularly like it. Your mum liked it.

-Yeah, it's got memories.

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-How old do you think it is?

-Oh, about 1920s.

-Right, OK.

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About the same time as the naughty figurines. He was a sculptor.

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-You can tell that in...

-There's a lot of detail.

-It's very well done.

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He is very collectable. He is the best.

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Basically, condition-wise, I'm going to have a moan at this point.

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He's got a bit of a wonky barrel of his gun.

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It's a cold-painted bronze, so it was a cast bronze figure that then they let cool, they painted

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and all of these chips is where the original paint has chipped back to the bronze underneath.

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-That's why it's so heavy because it is a bronze and it's a very dense thing.

-Right.

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-Do you have any idea what you think it's worth?

-I thought about 200 to 400?

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Oh... Oh...

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That's fairly... That's fairly... That's fairly good.

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-The condition might be an issue with this one.

-That's fair enough.

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This can be straightened out, but there's always a chance that it will break,

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-so you've got to be fairly gutsy to try and do it and that will affect the buying of this.

-Right.

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-I would say maybe the lower end of your estimate, so 200 to 300 is doable in this condition.

-OK.

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I would put a reserve of 150 just to protect it,

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-so that if it doesn't make it, we'll make a firm reserve at 150.

-OK.

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-Hopefully, between 200 and 300.

-That would be good.

-Your mum will be happy with that.

-Yes, she will be.

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'Fingers crossed we can make Karen's mum's day and get a great price at auction.

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'I've found something special and I want to take it somewhere quiet for a closer look.'

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Come with me, Annette. We've left the hustle and bustle of the valuation in the next room.

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We're in the library. You've brought in a book to show me, so I thought I'd show you several thousand,

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but I bet there's not a book like that in here. Tell me all about this autograph album.

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-I saw Paul McCartney quite often as I lived close by. And I was a big Beatles fan.

-Were you?

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-I still am.

-Can I have a look?

-Yes.

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Oh, look at this. This is lovely.

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Oh, look, there's Jane Asher.

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-She was engaged to Paul McCartney?

-She was, yes.

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-So you've got all the Beatles.

-I have.

-All on separate pages.

-Yes.

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-Did you take all of these photographs?

-I did take them all.

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-So you got behind the scenes?

-Yes.

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Lots of hanging around, lots of hours just waiting?

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-Yes, but he was worth it.

-What a reward!

-I know.

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-Not just Paul McCartney, but John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo.

-Yes.

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-And the wives.

-That's right.

-You're a good photographer as well.

-Thank you.

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You've captured a moment back in time in the 1960s which is so evocative, isn't it?

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-It's so rock'n'roll. It really is.

-Yeah.

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-Is this something you're thinking of selling?

-No.

-I couldn't twist your arm?

-No.

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Look, Ringo Starr, the drummer. This... This is priceless.

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This is a wonderful piece of Beatles memorabilia.

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In ten years of doing Flog It, we've seen a lot of Beatles memorabilia,

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but nothing as comprehensive as this. Those four autographs on one sheet of paper,

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you'll fetch two grand for, with provenance, £3,000.

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But what you've got here, what do you think this is worth?

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-I don't know.

-If I said to you around £4,000 to £5,000, would you be really happy?

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-I would be very happy.

-That's what it would be. Make sure you get this insured.

-I will.

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-Don't lose it.

-I know. I won't.

-Oh, gosh! It's all your memories.

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-It's so old as well.

-I'm pleased you're not selling it. Do you have kids?

-I do.

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-That'll be their inheritance.

-Yes.

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-Thank you for bringing that in.

-Thank you.

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'That was such a treat. I'm so pleased Annette is hanging on to that book for her kids to enjoy.

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'Back in the hall, Michael has homed in on some silver that Josephine has brought in.'

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I'm always delighted to see a bit of silver on Flog It.

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These are wonderful. It's a christening bowl and spoon.

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-So are they yours?

-Yes, they're mine.

-When were they given to you?

-When I was christened.

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It's indiscreet of me to ask!

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So you were given them for your christening.

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It's strange they don't have more of a sentimental attachment to you?

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Well, it's just that my daughter and son are not terribly keen,

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so I just thought I would come and see what it was worth and see if I could sell it.

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Very sensible. What we've got...

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It's unusual because they were bought second-hand for you

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and we've got an earlier spoon with a later bowl.

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-Oh, right.

-So if we look at the spoon first, this might have been from a three-piece christening set.

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It's usual to get the spoon, knife and fork.

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As it's a very elaborate pattern, normally the hallmarks would be struck towards the top of the stem,

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but that would damage the design, so in this case it's marked on the edge of the back of the bowl.

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And if I huff on it, and I only do that to reduce the glare when I look at the marks,

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we can see that it was made in London in 1878.

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-Right.

-And there's the maker's mark. It's always good to see on a spoon "GA".

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George Adams for Chawner & Company.

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-They're one of the best silversmiths producing flatware in the 19th century.

-I see.

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This is somewhat later

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and from a different assay office.

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And that's got the mark of Atkin Brothers. And that was made in Sheffield in 1901.

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-Oh, I see.

-So, Victorian and just, just Victorian, early Edwardian.

-Yeah.

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Really, they're two separate items. We'll put them in together, but they don't relate to one another.

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That spoon is worth...£15 to £25.

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-Oh, right.

-Probably in its silver weight alone, actually, these days.

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The bowl is the more commercial thing and I think the two together would be £100 to £150 at auction.

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And I think if we have a little bit of discretion and put a reserve of £90, would that be OK?

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Well, I'd like to put it a bit higher because they do take commission as well, don't they?

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-So you'd like it at 100?

-I wouldn't like it to go for less than 100.

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-Well, we'll put 100 fixed on it.

-Yeah.

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We'll hope that two people are looking for christening gifts at the auction.

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-Yeah.

-And we might do very much better than that.

-OK.

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-You're happy to do that?

-Yes.

-We'll put them into the auction and hope for a marvellous result.

-Thank you.

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'Some level-headed thinking from Josephine

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'and I think she made a good call with that reserve.'

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We are now halfway through our day. We've found our first three items to take to auction,

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so this is where all the talking stops and the action begins.

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Here's a quick reminder from our experts, just to jog your memory, of the items we've found so far.

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Given the immense work that's gone into making this wonderful brooch,

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it well deserves to make its £30 to £50 estimate at auction.

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This Bergman bronze is the best that you can get.

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It's great quality. I'm hoping the condition doesn't do for it on the day. I hope it makes my estimate.

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As this spoon and bowl have been together for so long already, I hope the new owners keep them together.

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Our items are going under the hammer at Greenwich Auctions in south-east London.

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Right, it's auction time. I'm getting excited. I hope you are.

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'The saleroom is already filling up with eager bidders.

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'I met up with auctioneer Robert Dodd and asked him what he thought about Josephine's bowl and spoon.'

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Josephine's family silver - she's selling this because her son and her daughter don't really want it.

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We've got £100 to £150 on the two as one lot.

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I spoke to the lady again and said I'm going to split them up,

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only because they are two completely different eras.

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-I've got people who are collectors of spoons who I don't think would pay £100 for that spoon.

-No.

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I've also got people who collect Edwardian silver or whatever it might be

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and I think it gives the vendor more of a chance

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of hitting that reserve and hopefully going over by separating them.

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-So I'm confident.

-I'm confident about that one. I think you've done the right thing.

-Thank you.

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'We'll find out in a bit what the bidders think.

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'Auctioneer Robert has tweaked the estimates on our items to give them the best chance of selling.

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'And now it's our first item.'

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Going under the hammer is a Chinese brooch. It belongs to Cristina and it was a wedding present.

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-A long time ago.

-1965?

-Yes.

-That's what I read in my notes.

-Correct.

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Fingers crossed we get the top end.

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-I know brooches are out of fashion, but it's so much work.

-You never know. We might be lucky.

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We might be lucky. Fingers crossed. Here we go. Let's find out.

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Lot 355, late Victorian, Chinese filigree brooch.

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And the bid's with me straight away at £40.

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-Straight in.

-Looking for 42. I've got 40 on it. Looking for 42.

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45. 48. 50.

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5 I need. 55. 60 with me.

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-It's the quality of it.

-I'll take 62. 5 with me.

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Looking for 70 on the brooch. I've got 65. Are we all done?

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-£70 there.

-They like it.

-That's good.

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Are we all done? Last time on this brooch. Selling at £70...

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-Yes, £70.

-I'm pleased.

-That's good.

-Thank you very much.

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-It was worth every penny.

-Thank you.

-It's got the peach of immortality.

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Maybe the buyer thinks he'll live for ever.

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-Thank you for coming in.

-Thank you.

-I thoroughly enjoyed meeting you.

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'What a great result for Cristina! Let's see if Josephine's silver items can do as well.'

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Next up, the silver christening bowl and spoon. They belong to Josephine who's right next to me.

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-Hello, Josephine.

-Hello.

-The auctioneer has split the lot.

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The christening bowl is coming up first, then the spoon.

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-Hopefully, we'll get all the money in the first lot.

-Yes.

-£100 reserve.

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-Ready?

-Yes, sure.

-This is it.

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Lot 310 is the early 20th century, hallmarked silver bowl.

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-Fingers crossed.

-The bid's with me at £100 on this.

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-Straight in.

-Straight in. We've got our reserve.

-Yes.

0:17:500:17:55

100, looking for 110. All done?

0:17:550:17:57

Last time on this silver bowl at £100...

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-Sold.

-I hate to say it, but it's down to the scrap, I'm afraid.

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-That one is, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-OK, and now the spoon.

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Lot 311, Victorian, hallmarked silver, Art Nouveau tablespoon

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with a vine relief. Lovely lot. The bid's with me at £12.

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Looking for 15. 18. 20 with me. Looking for 22, are we all done?

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-Selling at £20...

-£120. Got to be happy with that.

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-Yes, that's fine.

-Yes.

0:18:250:18:27

-Silver of the 20th century lacks a bit of excitement because we can value it almost so precisely.

-Yeah.

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The reserve was its price and it's met that. We got a bit more for the spoon. That's the upside.

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-Yes.

-Yeah.

-OK, that's fine.

-Thank you.

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250. 260. 270...

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Remember, if you are buying or selling at auction, there is commission to pay.

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It does vary from saleroom to saleroom. You can pay as low as 10% or as much as 20%.

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Here in fact, it's 21.6% including the VAT, so you must factor that in to whatever you are selling.

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'Well, the sale is in full swing and we've had two super results so far.'

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190. 200. 210. 220. 230...

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'Karen's up next with her tribesman figurine.'

0:19:130:19:17

Karen, good luck. We've seen many Franz Bergman bronzes on the show and they never let us down.

0:19:170:19:23

OK, here we go. Good luck.

0:19:230:19:25

Lot 280, painted bronze sculpture of a Middle Eastern warrior,

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attributed to Franz Bergman.

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And it's got to start with a bid with me of...

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..£120.

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Looking for 130.

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140 here. Looking for 150 on this cold-painted bronze.

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£150...

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-On the phone. That's good.

-Back of the room, looking for 160.

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160. 170 at the back of the room. Looking for 180.

0:19:550:19:59

180 on the phone. 190 at the back of the room. Looking for 200.

0:19:590:20:03

There's somebody in the room. That's good. They've seen it as well.

0:20:030:20:07

210 at the back of the room. Looking for 220...

0:20:070:20:10

£210. 220 I need.

0:20:100:20:12

Are we all done at £220 on the second phone?

0:20:120:20:16

£230 at the back of the room. Looking for 240...

0:20:160:20:19

-£240...

-You see, it doesn't let us down.

-That's good.

0:20:190:20:24

-It is Bergman. You know that.

-Yeah.

0:20:240:20:26

Looking for 280. 280 I need.

0:20:260:20:29

280. 290 at the back of the room. Looking for 300.

0:20:290:20:34

£300 I want. £300 on the phone. 310...

0:20:340:20:37

-We're getting a bit more now.

-Yeah.

0:20:370:20:40

320. 330 at the back of the room. Looking for 340...

0:20:400:20:44

340. 350 I need. 350 I've got. Looking for 360...

0:20:440:20:50

360 on the telephone. Looking for 370. Are we all done?

0:20:500:20:54

At £360 on the telephone...

0:20:540:20:59

Yes! Doesn't that hammer go down with a lot of force? Crack!

0:20:590:21:03

It's like a carpenter's mallet!

0:21:030:21:05

-That's a really good result - top end and a bit more.

-Yeah. Thank you very much.

0:21:050:21:10

'Things are sailing along nicely at the auction

0:21:100:21:13

'and we'll be back later on with more items to go under the hammer,

0:21:130:21:18

'but first I want to tell you about a dilemma of astronomical proportions.'

0:21:180:21:23

Life at sea in the 15th and 16th centuries was extremely dangerous.

0:21:310:21:36

Sailors had started exploring the high seas in search of new worlds,

0:21:360:21:40

but had no accurate way of knowing their longitude, their position east or west.

0:21:400:21:46

Maps were useless without being sure of your location

0:21:460:21:49

and ships often hit rocks, causing thousands of deaths.

0:21:490:21:53

But when King Charles II realised how serious the problem was, he decided something must be done.

0:21:550:22:01

By 1674, he was convinced the solution lay in astronomy.

0:22:010:22:06

So he set up the Royal Observatory in Greenwich to try to solve the longitude problem

0:22:060:22:12

and he made John Flamsteed the first Astronomer Royal.

0:22:120:22:16

'The first building here was completed in 1675.

0:22:160:22:21

'The following year, Flamsteed started recording star positions,

0:22:230:22:27

'hoping navigators at sea could use this information to work out their longitude.'

0:22:270:22:34

But despite all of his hard work to find an astronomical solution,

0:22:340:22:39

more awful tragedies at sea put pressure on the government to find a quicker answer.

0:22:390:22:45

They appointed a panel of experts called the Longitude Board, who offered a £20,000 reward to anybody

0:22:450:22:51

who solved the problem of longitude at sea within half a degree.

0:22:510:22:56

'The prize attracted a lot of interest and people throughout the world tried to crack it.

0:22:560:23:02

'Many thought the answer lay in a device telling you how far you were from a set point in terms of time.

0:23:020:23:08

'This is because the Earth rotates at 360 degrees every 24 hours.

0:23:080:23:13

'So an hour of time is equal to 15 degrees difference in longitude.

0:23:130:23:18

'So if you knew what the time was at your original home port, you could work out your position.

0:23:190:23:25

'But no clock existed that could keep accurate time at sea.

0:23:250:23:30

'The treacherous conditions affected the workings of all clocks in existence.'

0:23:300:23:36

A carpenter finally solved this.

0:23:360:23:38

John Harrison dedicated his life to designing a timepiece that could withstand the rocking of a ship

0:23:380:23:44

and constant changes in temperature without losing any time.

0:23:440:23:48

After decades of research, finally, in 1772,

0:23:480:23:52

one of Harrison's timepieces was successfully trialled and approved by the Board.

0:23:520:23:57

That clock that finally nailed it and is possibly the greatest timepiece ever designed

0:23:570:24:04

is right here. That's it there.

0:24:040:24:06

'Harrison's masterpiece solved the longitude problem and his invention saved countless lives.'

0:24:070:24:15

Important astronomical work continued here at Greenwich,

0:24:160:24:20

each Astronomer Royal studying the sky at night, using telescopes along a meridian, a north-south line.

0:24:200:24:26

By comparing thousands of other observations along the same meridian,

0:24:260:24:31

they pieced together essential information for navigators, astronomers and cartographers.

0:24:310:24:37

'Every time a better telescope was developed, it was placed on a new meridian line.

0:24:370:24:42

'Essentially, a meridian line can be wherever you choose, so there's a number of old lines here.'

0:24:420:24:50

Up until the mid-19th century, towns and cities around the world kept local time.

0:24:510:24:57

The discrepancy in time didn't really matter until the railways.

0:24:570:25:01

Once a rail network system linked all these places, trying to write a timetable was almost impossible.

0:25:010:25:09

So in 1884 an international conference discussed which of the half a dozen or so meridians

0:25:090:25:15

currently being used could be recommended to governments.

0:25:150:25:19

Eventually, Greenwich was picked for its widespread use of data produced here.

0:25:190:25:24

So not only am I standing on the eastern and western hemispheres,

0:25:240:25:28

I'm also at the very start of time.

0:25:280:25:31

'So this is what the meridian line looks like at night.

0:25:310:25:36

'It's projected via a laser into the capital's night sky.

0:25:360:25:40

'You can see it as far as 10 miles away on a clear night.'

0:25:400:25:44

Something else here can be seen from afar - the big, red time ball.

0:25:450:25:50

It was used to help sailors on the Thames in the 19th century.

0:25:500:25:54

Every day, that big red ball would rise up the mast and then at 1pm it would drop down.

0:25:540:26:00

So navigators aboard the ships could calibrate their chronometers before setting out to sea.

0:26:000:26:06

'It was first used in 1833 and it still drops every day.

0:26:060:26:11

'The sailors would have seen this.'

0:26:110:26:14

20 years after the time ball was set up, the Royal Observatory started distributing time electronically

0:26:140:26:20

to Big Ben and the Royal Exchange clock, but accurate time wasn't accessible to everybody,

0:26:200:26:26

so John Henry Belville and later his daughter Ruth set up a private service, selling time.

0:26:260:26:33

They would come here on a Monday morning, set their chronometer against the clocks here

0:26:330:26:39

and then wander off to the city giving accurate time to all the main chronometer makers.

0:26:390:26:45

Of course, I couldn't visit the Royal Observatory without showing its most impressive telescope.

0:26:470:26:53

It is a bit of a whopper. It's a refracting telescope and uses a lens rather than a mirror

0:26:530:26:59

to focus and gather light from the object being observed.

0:26:590:27:03

It's the largest refracting telescope in the UK and the seventh largest in the world.

0:27:030:27:10

The 28-inch lens weighs 200lbs and it was so complicated to produce,

0:27:140:27:20

only two glassmakers in the world were capable of making it.

0:27:200:27:24

The telescope itself took 8 years to make and it was finally completed in 1893.

0:27:240:27:30

The telescope was used for research into double star systems -

0:27:300:27:34

stars that share a common centre of gravity. But nowadays this remarkable piece of technology

0:27:340:27:40

is used as an educational tool for visitors.

0:27:400:27:44

By the late-19th century, light pollution from the city and vibration from trains

0:27:450:27:50

started to affect the good work being done here.

0:27:500:27:54

Plans were afoot to relocate in the early 20th century and in the 1930s,

0:27:540:27:59

but that was interrupted because of WWII. The last observation to be done here was made in 1954.

0:27:590:28:06

Further astronomical work continued to flourish at Herstmonceux Castle in Sussex,

0:28:060:28:12

but today the Royal Observatory is open to the public and it's a fascinating insight

0:28:120:28:18

into early science. I hope my little visit inspires you to take a look at this remarkable place.

0:28:180:28:25

We're at Dulwich College in London and our valuation day is bustling.

0:28:310:28:36

Kate's with Sue who wants to find out more about her childhood toy.

0:28:380:28:43

-Sue, welcome to Flog It.

-Thank you.

-You've brought a really pretty doll. What do you know about her?

0:28:430:28:50

She was given to me in the 1950s, when I was a child,

0:28:500:28:53

-by the wife of one of my father's army pals.

-OK.

0:28:530:28:58

Her name was Audrey Smith and she worked at Chad Valley in Shropshire in the 1930s.

0:28:580:29:05

So with hindsight I think she probably dates from the 1930s, rather than the '50s.

0:29:050:29:12

And she was so beautiful I couldn't play with her.

0:29:120:29:17

-What?!

-I just displayed her and looked at her.

0:29:170:29:21

-The name I chose for her was Caroline because it was the nicest name I could think of.

-She's lovely.

0:29:210:29:27

And she is Chad Valley. When we take her shoe off,

0:29:270:29:31

she has the little Chad Valley label. She's really pretty. I can see why you liked her.

0:29:310:29:38

She's got the Nora Wellings-type face. This hand-painted over the top of felt face.

0:29:380:29:44

And then she's got this really lovely little dress. Little flowers. She looks a bit wartime bride.

0:29:440:29:51

I can see why 1950s, but I think she is a bit earlier, as you say.

0:29:510:29:56

-You've got her original box.

-I have.

-She's velvet or velveteen body

0:29:560:30:02

and then other composite parts are calico. A rather sweet little dress.

0:30:020:30:07

-Yeah, she's an interesting thing and it's brilliant to have it from someone at the factory.

-Yes.

0:30:070:30:13

Chad Valley started out as printers in the 19th century, producing all kinds of printed matter.

0:30:130:30:19

And then basically they started producing soft toys in WWI

0:30:190:30:24

-because there was a ban on soft toys made in Germany coming into Britain.

-Oh, right.

0:30:240:30:30

That sparked off their turn to the soft toy market and they did a great job.

0:30:300:30:35

-They had artists like Nora Wellings producing them. You loved her.

-I did. I thought she was special.

0:30:350:30:42

-And I still do, but she's been up in the loft for 50 years and she has been chewed...

-Some little mice.

0:30:420:30:49

She has this fantastic bright pink dress, but it is a little foxed, I suppose, and a bit faded.

0:30:490:30:56

But overall the condition is really good, considering how old she is.

0:30:560:31:00

There are lots of collectors. And her face is good.

0:31:000:31:04

She's got little mohair bits of hair falling out a little bit, but she's pretty good.

0:31:040:31:10

-In terms of value...

-Yes?

-..I was thinking maybe £50-£100, something like that.

0:31:100:31:15

-Is that a figure you're happy with?

-I think £100 is probably a better bet. Can we...?

0:31:150:31:22

-100 is always better than 50!

-I know!

0:31:220:31:25

-OK, you want it a bit higher. How about we put £100-£150?

-Yes.

0:31:250:31:30

And maybe a fixed reserve just below, say 80?

0:31:300:31:33

-I think that's absolutely fine.

-You'd be happy to let it go?

-Yes.

-Sweet Caroline.

0:31:330:31:39

-We hope she sells well. I'm sure she will.

-Thank you.

0:31:390:31:43

I hope we can find Caroline a new owner to admire her like Sue did.

0:31:430:31:48

Now what on earth has Michael got on his table?

0:31:480:31:52

Ian, thank you for struggling in today with this massive heavy beast of a candlestick.

0:31:520:31:58

-Can you tell me where you got it from?

-What it is, basically, is 20 years ago my flatmate died

0:31:580:32:05

and he left it and I thought it was out of character of the house so I've decided to get rid of it.

0:32:050:32:12

Well, if you're going to have something in Orientalist taste,

0:32:120:32:17

this is bells and whistles!

0:32:170:32:19

We've got this wonderful Indonesian detailing, these dragon mouths with the scrolls coming out,

0:32:190:32:25

forming the three tripod feet. But if you move up we've got this lovely formal knop and vase

0:32:250:32:33

with these petals coming out and possibly a lotus flower.

0:32:330:32:37

It's not everybody's taste, but if you like the design of this, it's got everything going for it.

0:32:370:32:43

-What century would you say it was?

-These aren't marked in any way, so we have to go by the patination.

0:32:430:32:50

Certainly the colour around these knops and the detailing here make me think that it's...

0:32:500:32:57

mid- to late-19th century.

0:32:570:32:59

So 1850 up to 1900.

0:32:590:33:02

There's been a little bit of work, but we can forgive that.

0:33:020:33:07

The one thing we can't forgive is we haven't got another one.

0:33:070:33:11

There's nothing sadder than a single candlestick, so they are sometimes quite difficult things to sell.

0:33:110:33:19

-Any idea what the value might be?

-I haven't a clue.

0:33:190:33:23

I think had we had a pair of them,

0:33:230:33:27

£150-£250, £200-£300, with no difficulty at all.

0:33:270:33:32

But of course a single one, I think we're in the region of 50... Let's be generous and say £50-£100.

0:33:320:33:39

-Yeah.

-But I would certainly set the reserve, with a little bit of discretion, at say £40, fixed.

0:33:390:33:46

I think that's sensible. If we proceed along those lines,it's an attractive purchase to somebody.

0:33:460:33:53

-But why now have you decided to part with it?

-I need to get some money to get married.

-Oh, marvellous.

0:33:530:34:00

-Oh, it's going to a good cause, then.

-It's going to a good cause.

0:34:000:34:04

-Well, let's hope it does really well on the day, in that case.

-Thanks.

0:34:040:34:08

Thank you very much indeed.

0:34:080:34:10

That's a lovely way to spend the proceeds. I hope Ian gets a great result towards his special day.

0:34:100:34:16

What a fabulous turnout we have here today. I think that's because it's half-term school holidays.

0:34:160:34:23

-But hang on - what are you two doing back at school? What's your name?

-Phoebe.

-Luke.

0:34:230:34:30

-I guess you're into antiques, are you?

-We're just here with my grandmother.

-Here with grandma.

0:34:300:34:36

-She's into the antiques, isn't she? This is quite a fine school.

-Yeah.

0:34:360:34:41

-Are you going to come here one day?

-Maybe.

0:34:410:34:44

It's all go here, both in front of and behind the cameras.

0:34:440:34:48

Kate's up next with Alan, who has something a bit fishy.

0:34:480:34:53

Alan, you have brought a table lighter. What do you know about it?

0:34:530:34:57

-It's a Dunhill.

-Because it says Dunhill on the front.

-Exactly.

0:34:570:35:02

-It's called an aquarium lighter.

-For obvious reasons.

-Yeah.

0:35:020:35:07

-So where did you get it?

-Belgium or Amsterdam in the middle '70s.

-Mid-'70s.

0:35:070:35:13

-So you just saw it at an antiques fair?

-In the old flea market.

-OK.

0:35:130:35:18

-And do you collect lighters?

-No, no, no. It just caught my eye.

0:35:180:35:22

-You just liked it. Since you've had it, is it on a table or do you use it?

-It's just on a shelf.

-Right.

0:35:220:35:29

-Well, it's a fairly collectable lighter.

-Yeah.

-It is 1950s and probably by a chap at Dunhill

0:35:290:35:36

called Ben Shillingford. We know this because he pioneered the use of what they call Lucite,

0:35:360:35:43

which is the American version of our Bakelite. Lucite is clear, lucid, it's a clear plastic.

0:35:430:35:49

-An early plastic polymer. These are single panels - front, back and two sides.

-Yeah.

0:35:490:35:54

And you've got this fantastic aquarium scene. He's carved it from the back and then painted.

0:35:540:36:01

-Effective, innit?

-It's quite fun. It's not everyone's type of thing.

0:36:010:36:06

-Have you done any research on it?

-I have. I've seen them on the internet.

-Right.

0:36:060:36:11

And I've seen them going for nine to fifteen, up to sixteen.

0:36:110:36:16

-Hundred pounds?

-Yeah.

-For this type of lighter?

-Yeah.

0:36:160:36:20

There are collectors out there. Dunhill's a very good make of luxury goods, from the 1900s onwards.

0:36:200:36:27

I'm not sure. I think that might be a bit punchy for auction.

0:36:270:36:32

-I was thinking £600-£800, but you'd be a bit gutted.

-Without a doubt.

0:36:320:36:37

-How about if we compromise with a slightly higher estimate? £800-£1,000?

-That's a lot better.

0:36:370:36:43

-That will be inviting for buyers. But put a reserve at £800.

-Yeah.

-Would you be OK with that?

-OK.

0:36:430:36:49

-It will find its own level. It will make at least £800 or not sell.

-Yeah.

-So let's have fingers crossed,

0:36:490:36:55

-firm reserve at £800, estimate of £800-£1,000.

-Right.

-All right?

-That sounds all right.

0:36:550:37:01

-We'll give it a go.

-OK.

0:37:010:37:04

And that's our final item from Dulwich. Before we go to auction,

0:37:040:37:09

let's have a quick reminder of why our experts loved these objects.

0:37:090:37:14

Caroline's really happy to be out of her box and going to auction.

0:37:140:37:18

Let's hope somebody gives her a good home. If she went back in the box, she'd get into worse condition.

0:37:180:37:25

Let's hope the dragons on this breathe fire into the auction!

0:37:250:37:30

This 1950s lighter was for the discerning gentleman. Let's hope someone in the sale room likes it.

0:37:300:37:37

We've not got long before we find out how they fare at auction.

0:37:370:37:41

-£50. 55. £60.

-That pretty doll who belongs to Sue is about to go under the hammer.

0:37:410:37:48

The Chad Valley doll. Unfortunately, we don't have Sue, but we do have Sue's husband, Steve.

0:37:480:37:55

You're obviously not a doll fan or this would stay in the house.

0:37:550:37:59

-Well, quite possibly!

-Happy with the valuation?

-Absolutely.

-Spot on.

0:37:590:38:05

-Well, I hope so. There might be collectors here. You just can't tell.

-Find out right now!

0:38:050:38:10

Lot 141 is the vintage Chad Valley textile doll with original clothing.

0:38:130:38:18

-Come on.

-It's got to start with a bid with me of £72.

0:38:180:38:24

Looking for £75 on the Chad Valley doll. It's worth all of that.

0:38:240:38:29

-Looking for 80.

-They're struggling a bit, aren't they?

-Oh, I don't know...

0:38:290:38:34

At £78.

0:38:340:38:37

-No.

-Thank goodness we put a reserve on. We protected it.

0:38:370:38:41

-You did the right thing.

-It can go into another sale another day.

0:38:410:38:45

That's a real shame for Sue. Let's hope for better luck next time.

0:38:450:38:50

You never know what's going to happen at auction.

0:38:500:38:53

Let's see how Ian gets on with an unusual candlestick.

0:38:530:38:58

All the money for this lot is going towards Ian's wedding and he's right next to me and really excited,

0:38:580:39:04

-but nervous about this auction.

-Correct.

-We've got that cast metal candlestick, £50-£100.

0:39:040:39:12

-It's got all the flavours of the Orient.

-It's got so much detail.

-And that period is in vogue.

0:39:120:39:19

-It is.

-So hopefully you've hit the market at the right time.

0:39:190:39:24

-All we need is two people interested.

-He knows the score.

0:39:240:39:28

Let's find out what the bidders think. It's now down to them.

0:39:280:39:33

Oriental cast metal bronzed and gilt effect candle holder.

0:39:330:39:37

-Great lot, this. Bid's with me at £45.

-Brilliant.

0:39:370:39:40

-Straight in.

-That's good.

0:39:400:39:43

48. £50. 55. £60.

0:39:430:39:46

65. £70. 75.

0:39:460:39:49

-80 with me. Looking for 85. 90 with me.

-This is very good. They love it!

0:39:490:39:55

Are we all done? Last time at £100!

0:39:550:39:59

-Yes! A nice £100.

-That's good.

-Got to be happy.

0:39:590:40:02

-What's the good lady called?

-Rosella.

-How long have you known her?

-About a year and a half.

0:40:020:40:09

-She went back to Florida and we're just together again.

-Love is in the air!

0:40:090:40:14

-Have a great day.

-Thanks.

-Well done, Michael.

0:40:140:40:18

I love a happy ending. And now it's our final item in today's sale.

0:40:180:40:22

And now the one we've been waiting for. It's the Dunhill lighter,

0:40:240:40:28

the aquarium lighter belonging to Alan. We've got £800-£1,000.

0:40:280:40:32

We'll find out what the bidders think right now.

0:40:320:40:36

It's Lot 510, the early to mid-20th century Dunhill aquarium table lighter.

0:40:360:40:42

It's got to start with a bid with me of £550 on this lighter. Looking for 600.

0:40:420:40:49

600. 50 with me. 700. 750.

0:40:490:40:54

800. I'm out. 820 on the telephone.

0:40:540:40:58

-850 in the room. 880 I want. 880 I have.

-It's a phone bidder.

0:40:580:41:03

-Yes.

-Come on, 900.

-910 I want.

0:41:030:41:06

910. And 20 in the room.

0:41:060:41:09

930. 940 in the room. 950.

0:41:090:41:12

-Moving, isn't it?

-It's moving, yeah.

0:41:120:41:16

960 in the room. Looking for 970.

0:41:160:41:18

-970 I've got. 980.

-Let's get that magic £1,000.

0:41:180:41:24

-£1,000.

-It's done it.

-Come on!

-I'll take 1,010.

0:41:240:41:29

£1,010. £1,020.

0:41:290:41:32

1,030 I've got. Have I?

0:41:320:41:35

1,030. 1,040. Looking for 1,050.

0:41:350:41:39

1,050. 1,060.

0:41:390:41:43

-1,070. 1,080.

-I love it when a plan comes together!

0:41:430:41:48

Good quality lighter, innit, eh?

0:41:480:41:50

£1,110. 1,120.

0:41:520:41:55

1,130. 1,140.

0:41:550:41:58

He's just going for it.

0:41:580:42:00

1,170. 1,180.

0:42:000:42:03

1,190. 1,200.

0:42:030:42:06

And 10. 1,220. 1,230. 1,240.

0:42:060:42:11

1,250. 1,260. 1,270.

0:42:110:42:14

1,280. 1,290.

0:42:140:42:17

1,300. And 10 I need.

0:42:170:42:19

-This is a great result.

-1,320. 1,330.

0:42:190:42:24

1,340. 1,350.

0:42:240:42:26

1,360. 1,370.

0:42:260:42:30

1,380. 1,390. 1,400. And 10 I need.

0:42:300:42:34

-£1,410...

-Alan, that's very good, isn't it?

0:42:340:42:39

Yeah.

0:42:390:42:40

1,440. 1,450.

0:42:400:42:42

1,460. 1,470. 1,480.

0:42:420:42:46

1,490. 1,500. And 10.

0:42:460:42:50

1,510. Looking for 1,520. Are we all done? Last time.

0:42:500:42:55

On the telephone at £1,510!

0:42:550:42:58

Yes! £1,510!

0:42:580:43:01

-Yeah, well.

-Alan, that is tops! Tops, tops, tops!

0:43:010:43:05

-I remember saying to you 1,200 quid. Didn't I?

-Yeah.

0:43:050:43:09

-Yeah.

-Wow. Wow, Kate...

-Eight, you said, Kate!

0:43:090:43:14

-What was I?

-600-800.

-Did I?

-You've got to start somewhere.

0:43:140:43:18

-I like to keep expectations low and build the suspense!

-Exactly.

0:43:180:43:22

What a lovely result. I hope you enjoyed that. We certainly have.

0:43:220:43:27

Sadly, we've run out of time, but do join us again for more surprises.

0:43:270:43:31

From Greenwich until the next time, it's goodbye.

0:43:310:43:35

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2011

0:43:500:43:54

Email [email protected]

0:43:550:43:57

Presenter Paul Martin and experts Kate Bateman and Michael Baggott visit the impressive Dulwich College in South London, where Michael finds an unusual oriental candlestick and Kate has a big surprise in the saleroom.

A few miles away, Paul explores the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and tells the remarkable story of how one of the timekeepers there saved countless lives.