Saltaire Flog It!


Saltaire

Paul Martin and the team are in Saltaire, West Yorkshire. Paul visits a Grade 1 listed building and Michael Baggott finds one of his favourite things.


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Transcript


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Today's show comes from the beautiful Victorian village

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of Saltaire, nestled in the West Yorkshire countryside.

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But it's no time to go sight-seeing

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because there's valuations to do.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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We've got a deluge of stalwart Flog It fans ready to shower us

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with all manner of antiques and collectibles.

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And our experts won't let the British weather get in the way of their antique antics.

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Michael Baggott is braving the elements.

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I would love to say they were gold.

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-It's a melon knife and fork.

-Really?

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Whilst David Barby soldiers on.

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Hello. Isn't that lovely?

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Absolutely exquisite.

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It looks like the whole of Saltaire has turned up

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and I know the weather is appalling but we will have a fun day

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so thank you so much for turning up. Without you, we wouldn't have a show.

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What are you here to find out?

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ALL: What's it worth?

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-What are you going to do?

-Flog it!

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-Do you want to go inside?

-Yes!

-Come on, then!

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My word, the heavens opened up then

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but we are all safely seated inside drying off.

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While you're drying off, and our experts are getting ready,

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we have got a small musical interlude for you.

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There is a wonderful Wurlitzer organ up here on the stage.

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-And there was even a little dog down on the front there. What is the dog called?

-Daisy!

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I think there's a song there and here's Robert to play us in.

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PLAYS INTRO TO DAISY BELL

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Here we go.

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# I'm half crazy...#

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-Sing up.

-# All for the love of you... #

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Whilst we finish off our song, here's what coming up.

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We could set a table fit for royalty using items on today's show.

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But which lot features the most princely sum at auction?

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Is it the Victorian salt cellars?

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The 1930's Shelley 20 piece tea service?

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Or the Georgian tea caddy spoon?

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Stay tuned to find out.

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It's time to get our first valuation under way.

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Now, some people might accuse our experts of being born

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with a silver spoon in their mouth.

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Sylvia, thank you so much for bringing in my absolute favourite

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-thing to see which is a silver spoon.

-It is, yes.

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But before I tell you about it, where did it come from?

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It actually came from Overgate hospice shop,

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-that I work for in Brighouse.

-So you are a volunteer?

-I am, yes.

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-And this came in?

-It came in amongst a lot of other things.

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So you looked at that and thought, that's a bit different?

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-Yes.

-That might be a bit special?

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It might be, and it might be a bit more than £5

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than a price tag might have gone on it.

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Now, really, I should tell you it's worth £5 and pop along to the shop,

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shouldn't I, but that is an unkind thing to do.

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This is wonderful. This is what we call a tea caddy spoon.

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We have had on Flog It before,

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these wonderful wooden tea caddies with the twin divisions.

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Well, they didn't just reach in for the tea leaves.

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You would have a little scoop or spoon like this.

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And the lovely thing about these spoons is you can make them

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in almost any fashion and style you want.

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Leaves, jockey's caps, hands, so they've become,

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now we don't use them, a tremendous area for collectors.

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-I mean, it's dirty.

-Yes!

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To be honest, if you are selling a bit of silver and it is as dirty as this,

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don't clean it, because the person that will buy it

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will clean it as much as they want to.

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Sometimes you can over clean these things.

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We've got the maker's mark which D-U over N-H.

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It is a bit of a mouthful.

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It is Duncan Hart and Naphtali Hart.

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We haven't got a town mark but because this is a small article

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of silver, it only needs to bear the standard mark,

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the date letter and the duty mark which is for London 1805.

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Urquhart and Hart, who made this,

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made much larger things as well.

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They are not specialist spoon or caddy spoon makers.

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So you could imagine that as a gentleman in 1805,

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you might have bought from them, the teapot, the sugar bowl,

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the cream jug, the tea caddy in silver

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and this was probably not made by them.

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It was probably made by a man called George Wintle.

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And they would have bought it from him and marked it up themselves.

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What's very nice is we have this fluted bowl

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and under all this blackness, we have bright cut decoration.

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-Right.

-It's a lovely little thing. Your initial valuation for the shop is a fiver.

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-Probably.

-We can do better than that.

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You would have thought we were all this history pouring behind it

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it would be hundreds and hundreds of pounds.

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But this is a more modest example. Let's say £50 to £100.

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-And let's put a reserve of £40 on it.

-That would be smashing.

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To be honest, if it doesn't make that,

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if you put it in the shop for £50,

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it will probably sell anyway. But if there are two spoon collectors,

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and there are lots of them about and they find this,

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you might be going up to the 100 mark so that his great.

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-It is.

-Thank you so much for bringing it in.

-You're welcome.

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We've got the teaspoon, what else do we need?

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My word, Frances, this is a jazzy, Shelley porcelain tea service.

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-Are you a jazzy person?

-Personally, no.

-Where has it come from?

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My mother passed it on to me when she was downsizing.

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Did she buy it when she first got married?

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I think she had it before she was married.

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I think it was a gift to her, perhaps a bottom drawer gift.

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And can you ever remember it being in use in your home?

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-No, never in use, but on display, yes.

-On display but never used.

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That accounts for its pristine condition.

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There is no rubbing on the enamel or anything.

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But there is just one cup with a crack which is a great shame,

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and that is of long standing, actually.

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-Yes. I know that was there when I received the set.

-Right, right.

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-Now, we are set out for a tea party of six people.

-Yes.

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Complete with the jug for milk and the sugar basin.

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We've got individual plates there to take cake or bread and butter.

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-Where's the teapot?

-I've never seen a teapot.

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This is all I've ever seen of it.

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Right, so this is in fact a part tea service.

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I think the design is stunning. It makes me think of Agatha Christie.

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It makes me think of Poirot, it makes me think of the Jazz Age,

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early cinema, all that wrapped up in this particular design.

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I think it is fabulous.

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The one thing I could criticise are the triangular handles.

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I think it is very much in keeping with the shape of the cup which is triangular,

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and also the design,

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which is a very early Russian design,

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but to hold the cup, you have to pinch your fingers to hold it.

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But I think this is lovely. Why are you selling this?

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-It's been in storage, it's been packed away for about 12 years.

-Gosh.

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12 years ago...

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This type of ware was very much in demand.

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The market's slightly wobbled and it's the more exotic patterns

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now that tend to make the high prices.

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When I say high prices, 15 to £2,500.

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This is a part tea service and I think

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because it is a part tea service and there is an element of damage,

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that will affect the price.

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And for this service, I would think in terms of round about 250

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to £300, but I think you must guard the reserve price at 250.

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-Does that sound reasonable?

-That sounds reasonable, yes.

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Are you slightly disappointed?

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I am disappointed but I think I am going by when I first received it

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and I researched it, I'm thinking of the value I came up with then.

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-About 400 to 500 for a perfect set?

-Yes, that's right.

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-Things have changed.

-The market has changed, yes, I understand.

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I love it. I'm just thinking in terms of your mother

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who would have bought this at the time of her marriage.

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She would have been a sort of Charleston girl

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wearing those cloche hats and very with-it clothes.

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-She probably was, yes.

-Thank you very much.

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-I hope we do exceedingly well for you.

-Thank you.

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Shelley shapes are pretty well in the sale room.

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A tea service in this popular Queen Anne style would fetch around £200.

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And although Vogue and Mode designs were shunned

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in the '30s for being impractical, they've got the last laugh now.

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Their rarity makes them the most desirable.

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A set in this Vogue cube pattern, would set you back at least £500.

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And at the height of the market, in 2004,

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Flog It sold this Vogue Art Deco set for a whopping £3,400.

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Now, that's one classy cup of tea.

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Claire, thank you for bringing along these wonderful coins.

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I think we'll all know what they are.

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Before we getting to that,

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you haven't done a bullion job or anything like that? Where did they come from?

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Well, they have been in the attic for about 12 years.

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They came from my brother-in-law.

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One of my sons and his partner found out they are having twins in December.

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-Oh!

-So I thought, get them down, see what they're worth

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and they can either go on a holiday before the twins are born

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-or they can buy a couple of cots.

-I think I would probably go on holiday, wouldn't you?

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They'll never know! They'll never know!

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Well, what we have got, are basically two gold sovereigns,

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very simple.

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When the sovereign was introduced in coinage,

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they were for use day-to-day.

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You often see Edwardian sovereign holders.

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People would use them as currency, when we were on the gold standard.

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We can quite clearly see that these are in sealed Perspex cases

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to keep them in absolutely pristine condition

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and we have these lovely presentation cases with them.

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When these were minted and sold in 1979 and 1981,

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-they were very much investments and collectors' pieces.

-Yes.

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I remember my grandmother saying I should buy a gold sovereign as an investment.

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I think back then they were about £35.

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Up until very recently, they weren't very much more.

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They were about 70, £75. So, over 30 years, a terrible investment.

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Yes, yes.

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But gold has gone through the roof in the past year and a half.

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-Actually, now, if you're ever going to sell them, now is the time to do it.

-Yes.

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We have got there, the figure of St George on horseback

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which you get on every sovereign and we have

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dear Queen Elizabeth's head on the back.

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We see them as auctioneers and valuers almost on a daily basis,

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so there is a fixed price for them.

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Which is good in one respect as we can be nice and accurate about it

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but I don't think you are going to get that run up Flog It wow factor.

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No, no.

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Unless you put them in for £10, which you're not going to do. Very sensible!

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Have you got an idea of value yourself before you came today?

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I would have thought about 100, 150 each.

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Absolutely, absolutely.

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I think what we'll do is we'll put them in at 250 to £350.

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Fixed reserve of 250.

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And then, hopefully, the gold market will stir a little bit in the next

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couple of weeks and we will do very well with them.

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-Thank you very much for bringing them along today.

-Thank you.

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We've been working flat out. We found our first items to take to auction.

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You know how this works. We put those valuations to the test.

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Let's up the tempo and hopefully have one or two surprises.

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While we make our way over to the sale room, here's a quick run-down,

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to jog your memory of all the items we are taking with us.

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Sylvia's silver spoon has won Michael over

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and he has high hopes it will catch a collector's eye.

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Frances's tea set has channelled the spirit of Poirot.

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Let's hope David puts his little grey cells to good use

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and the bidders agree he has solved this valuation.

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And magpie Michael thinks the price of gold makes these sovereigns

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a sure bet in the saleroom.

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We're travelling 20 miles across Yorkshire

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to Calder Valley Auctioneers near Halifax.

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This is where all out items are going under the hammer today.

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This is what we have been waiting for, this is where it gets exciting.

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Don't go away because somebody is going home with a lot of money.

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Today we're the guests of the Calder Valley Auction Rooms.

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I tell you what, there is one big atmosphere in this room.

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170. At 170 all done...

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And it looks like auctioneer Ian Peace is ready to go.

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And first up, it's that lovely little spoon.

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Sylvia, you are in the right place to spot these little gems

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all the time.

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We are looking at 50 to £100. It is Urquhart and Hart, good maker.

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Good maker, nice entry-level caddy spoon.

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We'll have no problem getting it away and if there are a couple

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of collectors here, we might get to the top end.

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Good luck. OK. Good luck, everybody, this is it. Let's stir things up.

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The silver engraved caddy spoon, rather nice. London 1805.

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What are my bid for this? 40? 30? 20? 20 I'm bid, thank you. £20.

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At 20. And five, sir, 30. And five.

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40, and five. 50, and five.

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£55, all done at 55? 55, then.

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-£55, the hammer has gone down.

-Oh, wonderful.

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-That's good news, isn't it?

-It is.

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And hopefully, lots more things will be found?

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-You want the tea caddy next, that's worth a couple of thousand.

-Yes!

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Never mind the caddie, here's the set.

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We are certainly in the Mode for selling things.

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It is the Shelley tea service. The Mode pattern. Ready for this?

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-Absolutely.

-Are you sure, Frances?

-I'm sure.

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-Is this a-come-and-buy-me, David?

-No, I think the price is right.

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It is very stylish.

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It's not the flamboyant Art Deco designs you associate with Shelley.

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-I think we might struggle.

-It is a nation divided.

-Oh, no!

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-The auctioneer had a word with you earlier, didn't he?

-I'm confident.

-What did he say to you outside?

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Yes, he said we have some bids on it. And it's going to fly.

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-I've changed my mind!

-This is auctions for you. It is so subjective.

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It's an "objet" concept, fine arts and antiques - a matter of opinion.

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At the end of the day, it's their opinion.

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They're the ones who are going to stick their hands up and bid.

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Let's find out what happens. I'm going to enjoy this.

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Lot 246 which is the Shelley 20 piece tea service. Lovely design.

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-A phone line's booked.

-I'm going to have to open the bidding at £300.

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-Straight in at 300. I'm so pessimistic.

-At 310.

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320, 330.

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I have 340 here. 340? 350. 355.

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360 if you like.

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I'm out at £360. Are there any further bids? £360 then.

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£360! That hammer has gone down.

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-Are you happy?

-I'm very happy.

-That's good.

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Shelley does the business.

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I say that about Claris Cliff but I might start saying that about Shelley now.

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-Ever so happy with that?

-Very. I'm very happy.

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Let's hope Michael's coins are just as bankable.

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Clare, I can't believe you've been foraging around in the attic to produce two gold sovereigns.

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What were they doing there? You could lose them in the attic amongst all that fibreglass.

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They belonged to my brother-in-law and when he died we had a lot of stuff

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so we just shoved it up there and then we forgot about it.

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Like my mum does. There's stuff up in our attic as well.

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-But we're having twins in the family, the first grandchildren.

-Congratulations!

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So, we're hoping to get some money to go towards it.

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It's a bullion consideration and bullion is still high.

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On the day, I pitched them low because you never know what it's going to do.

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It fluctuates. Let's find out what the price for gold is, shall we?

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Now 139. Two cases of gold sovereigns. £200, please. £200.

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200, please. 200 I have. 210, 220, 230.

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-Should be hands everywhere at this.

-240, 250.

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260, 270, 280, 290, 300.

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And 10. 320, 330, 340, 350.

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Now we're at the top end.

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360, 370. 380, fresh bid.

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-That's very good!

-Yes.

-390, 400. And 10.

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At £410 at the back of the hall. £410 then. Your bid, sir.

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£410!

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-Great!

-Yeah, it is. What can we buy for the twins now?

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Or the parents can have a holiday instead.

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-Buy them something for £5 each and keep the 400!

-Oh, Mr Meanie there!

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45, 55, £60. At £60.

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That's the end of our first visit to the auction room today. We're coming back later. Don't go away.

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There could be one or two big surprises.

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I love auction rooms because you get hands-on with history,

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items that are 200 or 300 years old are still sought-after and relevant today.

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That's really encouraging.

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But it's not always the case with historic buildings, as I found out.

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There's a Grade I listed building not far from here

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which is struggling to remain relevant to the town that built it.

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Take a look at this.

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Halifax. A good northern market town with a tradition of working hard.

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Few pretensions. You know what you're getting in Halifax.

0:18:310:18:34

Or so I thought. Because here, in the centre of town, is Piece Hall.

0:18:340:18:39

It's the only complete survivor of the great 18th century northern cloth halls.

0:18:390:18:44

Built in 1779, the architecture is inspired by Imperial Rome.

0:18:470:18:53

It's splendid. It's full of romance and mad ambition.

0:18:530:18:57

You could say it's like a little piece of Italy, even if the weather isn't quite up to scratch.

0:18:570:19:04

The elegant courtyard and galleried walkways seems somewhat out of place here in West Yorkshire.

0:19:060:19:11

An unlikely match almost.

0:19:110:19:13

But Halifax and Piece Hall were initially very well suited.

0:19:130:19:17

Their union has lasted over 230 years. But now, sadly, the relationship is in jeopardy.

0:19:190:19:25

The local people here are struggling to find a meaningful use for this building in the 21st century.

0:19:270:19:34

There are a few shops dotted around and there's a stage down there for performances,

0:19:340:19:39

but it doesn't really have any clear purpose.

0:19:390:19:42

The Piece Hall ought to be one of the major attractions in England.

0:19:420:19:47

Yet, even in Yorkshire, somehow I get the feeling that it is in danger of being taken for granted.

0:19:470:19:52

But before we decide its future, it's worth understanding its past.

0:19:530:19:59

The common bond that linked the town and the all was cloth.

0:19:590:20:04

As Franne Wills from the Bankfield Museum explains.

0:20:040:20:06

What Halifax and Calderdale benefited from was that we had all the right raw materials

0:20:060:20:11

to make really good quality cloth.

0:20:110:20:14

We had the water which is really important to the process,

0:20:140:20:16

we had workers who were looking for diversification.

0:20:160:20:20

We had individual weavers and they were producing this fantastic quality cloth called Kersey.

0:20:200:20:25

What is so special about the quality?

0:20:250:20:27

Kersey is a very hard wearing fabric, particularly popular with the British Army

0:20:270:20:32

-and other armies at that time.

-For uniforms?

-For uniforms.

0:20:320:20:36

You need something that's going to be hard wearing and do everything you needed it to do.

0:20:360:20:41

-And a mass order.

-And a mass order.

0:20:410:20:43

So it was the success of the cloth and the money that it brought in

0:20:430:20:47

that encouraged the merchants to build what we have today, Piece Hall. All of this?

0:20:470:20:51

Yes, they could see obviously, the Halifax and Calderdale people,

0:20:510:20:55

to make the most of all business opportunities that they can,

0:20:550:20:59

they wanted a statement piece and that is what you have in the Piece Hall.

0:20:590:21:03

A statement piece of architecture saying, we're at the top of our game.

0:21:030:21:06

We are producing the very best.

0:21:060:21:09

It is encompassed in the architecture of the Piece Hall itself, I think.

0:21:090:21:14

The exterior of the building was plain for security reasons, to protect the valuable cloth within.

0:21:150:21:21

But once you got through these big heavy doors, this gateway,

0:21:210:21:26

through this grand entrance... Well!

0:21:260:21:30

It must have been love at first sight.

0:21:320:21:35

Despite its Italian influence, it was a local man who designed Piece Hall.

0:21:360:21:41

Thomas Bradley was just 22 when construction began.

0:21:410:21:45

It took four years to complete.

0:21:450:21:49

And, oh boy! Was it worth it!

0:21:500:21:52

Bradley had several challenges to overcome.

0:21:520:21:55

One of the main ones being a sloping plot of land which we're walking down now.

0:21:550:21:59

But he dealt with that quite cleverly by designing two floors at the top end

0:21:590:22:04

and at the lower end at the bottom, three floors.

0:22:040:22:08

Genius!

0:22:080:22:10

On the top floor, you've got this wonderful colonnade of Tuscan columns which look so rich.

0:22:100:22:15

The middle floor, supported by square chamfered columns

0:22:150:22:19

and on the lowered ground floor you've got this wonderful big, solid square plinths

0:22:190:22:24

holding up a repetitive form of Tuscan arches.

0:22:240:22:27

Bella!

0:22:270:22:29

But beauty doesn't come cheap.

0:22:310:22:33

The building work cost almost £10,000 - astronomical at the time.

0:22:330:22:38

It was mostly paid for by the manufacturers, renting 12x7 foot rooms to sell their cloth from.

0:22:380:22:45

But considering its architectural extravagance, its trading times were frugal,

0:22:450:22:51

as local heritage guide David Nortcliffe told me.

0:22:510:22:54

This hall, as surprising as it seems, only opened two hours a week on Saturday morning.

0:22:580:23:04

That's incredible, isn't it?

0:23:040:23:06

They wanted to concentrate the trade into that period of time

0:23:060:23:11

so that it was worth the merchants coming because they knew there would be plenty of cloth to go at.

0:23:110:23:16

It was worth the producers who were individual producers from the hills coming in at that time

0:23:160:23:22

because they knew there would be plenty of merchants to deal with.

0:23:220:23:26

It was hectic, frantic, during that period, as people were looking,

0:23:260:23:30

buying, feeling, sampling and arguing.

0:23:300:23:34

Then, at 12 o'clock, the bell at the Westgate rang. End of story.

0:23:340:23:39

No more trading. That was it for a week.

0:23:390:23:42

It worked.

0:23:420:23:45

The honeymoon period lasted for 35 years.

0:23:450:23:49

But then, without warning, something new started to turn the heads of the local men.

0:23:490:23:56

Mechanisation.

0:23:560:23:57

By the third decade of the 19th century, trade was increasingly centred at the large mills

0:23:570:24:02

rather than through the small individual tradesmen.

0:24:020:24:06

Industrialisation meant that, by 1830,

0:24:060:24:10

less than 200 of the 350 rooms available here were occupied.

0:24:100:24:16

For the next 50 years, the hall managed to survive

0:24:160:24:19

by marketing itself as a focal point for entertainment to the broader population.

0:24:190:24:26

Things like balloon rides took place here, horse fairs.

0:24:260:24:29

It was even frequented by internationally famous tightrope walkers doing their act.

0:24:290:24:36

But in 1867, the Piece Hall could no longer pay its way

0:24:360:24:41

and was given to Halifax Corporation as a gift.

0:24:410:24:44

It had a new role as a wholesale fruit and vegetable market

0:24:460:24:50

for, not just Halifax, but the area around.

0:24:500:24:53

Temporary buildings were put up in the middle here

0:24:530:24:56

and up against the walls and so from the 1870s to the 1960s it flourished.

0:24:560:25:03

So the place was really bustling, but I imagine some of the grandeur

0:25:030:25:06

would've been lost.

0:25:060:25:07

Well it had, because the place was cluttered frankly.

0:25:070:25:11

It no longer looked like the impressive building

0:25:110:25:14

-it deserved to be.

-When did it start to go wrong?

0:25:140:25:17

It started when changes in retailing,

0:25:170:25:20

like the advent of supermarkets, came on the scene.

0:25:200:25:24

It was also the fact that all these operations started to be more

0:25:240:25:28

concentrating on mechanical handling rather than gangs of men

0:25:280:25:33

lifting bags and bales about.

0:25:330:25:35

So this was no longer suitable. The wholesale boys moved out.

0:25:350:25:39

By the 1960s, the situation had reached a crisis point.

0:25:400:25:44

Nobody knew what to do

0:25:440:25:46

with the grand but seemingly redundant Piece Hall.

0:25:460:25:49

Now, even though it was a Grade I listed building,

0:25:490:25:52

there were suggestions it should be turned into

0:25:520:25:55

an open air swimming pool

0:25:550:25:57

or even converted into houses for old soldiers.

0:25:570:26:00

In the 1970s, there were plans afoot to demolish this

0:26:000:26:03

and turn it into a big carpark.

0:26:030:26:05

But luckily, once again, the hall's fortunes changed.

0:26:070:26:10

The Piece Hall was refurbished

0:26:100:26:12

and re-opened to the public in 1976.

0:26:120:26:15

Since then, it's hosted entertainment events,

0:26:150:26:18

specialist shops have opened and there is even an art gallery.

0:26:180:26:23

How do you think the people of Halifax see the Piece Hall today?

0:26:240:26:28

I think everybody finds it to be a great building,

0:26:280:26:32

a worthwhile thing to have, an interesting feature in Halifax.

0:26:320:26:36

But why should they come here?

0:26:360:26:39

The shops are small and specialist.

0:26:390:26:41

It's short of people coming through

0:26:410:26:43

That's one thing that's got to be addressed.

0:26:430:26:46

-Plans afoot?

-It needs some development work doing on it

0:26:460:26:49

whilst keeping the character. That's equally important.

0:26:490:26:53

There's a scheme afoot at the moment

0:26:530:26:55

to apply for a grant from national sources

0:26:550:26:58

to do things with it.

0:26:580:27:00

That could make it more useful for big events

0:27:000:27:03

and this might well become the equivalent of a town square.

0:27:030:27:07

-Exactly. It's got the potential.

-Sure.

-It really does have.

0:27:070:27:10

The council have submitted an application to

0:27:100:27:13

the Heritage Lottery Fund for £7 million to go towards transforming

0:27:130:27:16

the Piece Hall, possibly turning the space into something like this.

0:27:160:27:20

I hope they find a way to return the hall to its former vitality.

0:27:200:27:25

Because I, for one, think this splendid building

0:27:250:27:28

should be at the heart of Halifax life once again.

0:27:280:27:31

Welcome back to our valuation day venue,

0:27:390:27:41

the Victoria Hall in Saltaire. Now let's catch up with our experts

0:27:410:27:44

and see what other treasures we can find.

0:27:440:27:46

Andy, thank you so much for bringing it in,

0:27:500:27:52

this absolutely marvellous and curious box.

0:27:520:27:56

My pleasure.

0:27:560:27:57

-Are you a box collector?

-No, not by any means, no.

0:27:570:28:00

So where did this fellow come from?

0:28:000:28:02

Well, it came into my possession I would say 35 years ago,

0:28:020:28:06

when my grandmother went into a care home at the time

0:28:060:28:09

and we sort of took everything from the house.

0:28:090:28:12

And this was just an item that nobody else wanted.

0:28:120:28:16

Well, I've always been a bit of a hoarder

0:28:160:28:19

and nobody else wanted it really.

0:28:190:28:21

You couldn't bear to...?

0:28:210:28:24

I found inside it, in particular, was attractive.

0:28:240:28:27

-It's an interesting looking thing.

-Did you know what it was made of?

0:28:270:28:31

Well, I thought it was porcupine quill.

0:28:310:28:33

But I'm not sure whether this is ebony

0:28:330:28:35

or if the inlay is ivory or bone or something.

0:28:350:28:38

You're absolutely right.

0:28:380:28:40

Porcupine quills that have been cut and fixed into panels

0:28:400:28:43

into this wooden frame, which I'm sure is ebony.

0:28:430:28:47

I mean, you get various tones of ebony. It's not just black.

0:28:470:28:51

You can have these flecks and variations in it.

0:28:510:28:54

If we open it up, as you say

0:28:540:28:56

-the inside is a bit more special, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:28:560:28:59

We've got this fabulous inlay.

0:28:590:29:01

It's difficult to say whether it is bone or ivory.

0:29:010:29:05

I know we've got an elephant in there.

0:29:050:29:08

Maybe the plaque of the elephant is ivory.

0:29:080:29:11

But it would be quite expensive work to do.

0:29:110:29:14

Do you think it's Indian?

0:29:140:29:16

I think... Now this has tested me slightly.

0:29:160:29:20

I've seen these variously described as African or Indian.

0:29:200:29:24

But I think, especially with the use of ebony,

0:29:240:29:27

they were made in Ceylon. I would be happy to be corrected,

0:29:270:29:31

but as far as I consider it, it's a Ceylonese box.

0:29:310:29:35

It is made for the tourist market.

0:29:350:29:38

If you one ring handle and I'll get the other and heave,

0:29:380:29:41

I dare say we've got all these fitted boxes here.

0:29:410:29:45

I would imagine these would be for sewing requisites,

0:29:450:29:49

they would be for jewellery,

0:29:490:29:51

basically anything you wanted to put in them.

0:29:510:29:55

But they're more a tourist purchase

0:29:550:29:57

rather than a functional day-to-day object.

0:29:570:29:59

When you go on your holidays and you bring back, you know,

0:29:590:30:04

an unusual Spanish vase or that odd piece of pottery,

0:30:040:30:09

this is what you would bring back maybe 100, 120 years ago,

0:30:090:30:13

when you were a bit more well-heeled.

0:30:130:30:16

I think this dates 1870 up to 1900.

0:30:160:30:19

-Right.

-We do see them.

0:30:190:30:21

I mean, you see then in larger sizes, smaller boxes.

0:30:210:30:25

This is actually in not bad condition.

0:30:250:30:29

Some of the inlay is missing,

0:30:290:30:31

but nothing's actually falling apart

0:30:310:30:35

or hanging off or missing in a big way.

0:30:350:30:37

-So, shall we lift that back in?

-Yeah.

0:30:370:30:40

-Any idea what it might be worth?

-None at all.

0:30:400:30:43

I thought £30 or £40 maybe?

0:30:430:30:46

Oh, I'd give you £30 all day long for it.

0:30:460:30:50

I think let's be conservative and say £80 to £120.

0:30:500:30:54

-Oh, yeah.

-Which is a bit on the low side.

0:30:540:30:56

We'll put a reserve of 80, but if it made £100 to £150 on the day...

0:30:560:31:00

-That'd be brilliant.

-It wouldn't surprise me at all.

0:31:000:31:03

-It's in basically nice condition.

-I didn't think it'd be worth that.

0:31:030:31:08

-Should've kept it low, we could have a surprise.

-Should have taken 30!

0:31:080:31:11

-Are you happy to put it into auction?

-Yes, I am. Yes.

0:31:110:31:14

You've lived with it for 35 years. Won't you miss it?

0:31:140:31:18

Is 36 years too long to live with it?

0:31:180:31:20

I think I can live without that, yeah.

0:31:200:31:23

Now, Wendie, you're going to tell me

0:31:280:31:30

something about the acquisition of these lovely, lovely watercolours.

0:31:300:31:34

Yes.

0:31:340:31:35

-You bought them a fortnight ago?

-About that, yes.

0:31:350:31:38

-And this was from a car boot sale.

-Yes.

0:31:380:31:41

-How much did you pay for them?

-I paid a pound each.

0:31:410:31:44

-£2?!

-A whole £2.

0:31:440:31:47

Ooh! Why did you pay so much?

0:31:470:31:50

Because I wasn't sure whether they were just prints.

0:31:500:31:53

These are delightful, delicious watercolours.

0:31:530:31:57

-Aren't they lovely?

-They are very, very nice indeed.

0:31:570:32:02

It's clearly signed here, 'Sydney Lawrence.'

0:32:020:32:04

We can trace him. He's a well-known artist. American.

0:32:040:32:08

-American?

-He was born round about 1858 and he died in the 1940s,

0:32:080:32:12

so he had a long life.

0:32:120:32:15

Round about 1889, he came over to England

0:32:150:32:19

and he also lived at St Ives, which was a great centre

0:32:190:32:23

for artists in the late 19th, early 20th century.

0:32:230:32:28

So he was well-regarded for painting romantic landscapes.

0:32:280:32:33

Now it's so nice because this is a pair.

0:32:330:32:37

These are comparatively new frames which might have led you

0:32:370:32:40

-to think that they were prints.

-Yes.

0:32:400:32:43

We have a well-known artist, a very descriptive

0:32:430:32:47

artist in watercolours, and the choice of subject is beautiful.

0:32:470:32:52

These are of Palestine,

0:32:520:32:54

and the caption underneath here is the Khayloum,

0:32:540:32:58

which is this sort of area here

0:32:580:33:01

which looks very much like a sultan's palace.

0:33:010:33:04

And we have a view of the tower here

0:33:040:33:07

and this is at, I suppose, midday.

0:33:070:33:11

-Everything's light, it's full of freshness.

-The colours are lovely.

0:33:110:33:15

Greens and blues reflected in the water.

0:33:150:33:17

And you've got interesting details of figures all in perspective

0:33:170:33:21

and this arrangement with the boat here, they are exquisite.

0:33:210:33:25

And then you've got this picture here, which is the other

0:33:250:33:28

side as viewed from that direction, because there's the tower.

0:33:280:33:31

-Can you see that?

-Oh, right.

0:33:310:33:34

So you're looking at it from the other side.

0:33:340:33:37

And this is at sunrise, so this is a lovely pair,

0:33:370:33:41

always intended to be together.

0:33:410:33:43

And they would have been in a home

0:33:430:33:45

from the beginning of the 19th century

0:33:450:33:47

and they would have had one in each recess.

0:33:470:33:50

Because when you have pairs, they were always very good to hang

0:33:500:33:54

either side of a doorway, either side of a window,

0:33:540:33:58

either side of a fireplace.

0:33:580:33:59

-I was lucky to get two.

-You were very lucky to get two.

0:33:590:34:02

You were exceptionally lucky

0:34:020:34:06

to buy them for £2.

0:34:060:34:08

-How often do you go to car boot sales?

-At least every Sunday.

0:34:080:34:11

Every Sunday? There's one local, is there?

0:34:110:34:13

Very early at daft o'clock.

0:34:130:34:15

-Now did you buy them with the sole intention of reselling?

-No.

0:34:150:34:20

I'm more interested in their value, who painted them

0:34:200:34:23

-and that they were real.

-They are real.

0:34:230:34:26

Well, we're going to put these up for sale for you

0:34:260:34:29

and I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

0:34:290:34:32

I estimate these would go for something in the region

0:34:320:34:34

of about £120 - £150.

0:34:340:34:37

I would be happy if I could put a reserve of £100 on these.

0:34:380:34:42

That gives you £100 to spend at your next car boot sale.

0:34:420:34:46

-Super.

-I wish I was coming with you if you spot these bargains!

0:34:460:34:51

-Wendie, thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

0:34:510:34:54

Wendie, with an eye for a bargain like that you can take me

0:34:540:34:57

car booting any time you like!

0:34:570:35:00

As one of the country's leading silver experts, it's no surprise

0:35:000:35:04

that Michael's sniffed out yet more of the stuff.

0:35:040:35:07

He seems enthralled by Marjorie's collection.

0:35:070:35:09

These look untouched. Where have you got them from?

0:35:110:35:14

I inherited them about 20 years ago.

0:35:140:35:17

I've never used them

0:35:170:35:19

and I doubt whether the aunt I got them from ever used them either.

0:35:190:35:23

Well, they're the wedding gift or silver anniversary present

0:35:230:35:27

-that no-one ever uses.

-It was a silver wedding gift, yes.

0:35:270:35:29

-It was?

-I mean, they're wonderful things.

0:35:290:35:32

They're little salt cellars of course.

0:35:320:35:35

Now if we pop one out,

0:35:350:35:37

there we've got the four little spoons as well to go with it.

0:35:370:35:41

But they're not tremendously practical and they are really made

0:35:410:35:44

as a gift for a time when you would put these things out

0:35:440:35:48

polished on a table for Sunday afternoon tea and guests would come,

0:35:480:35:53

they'd be in their finery, and we don't do that anymore.

0:35:530:35:57

-I don't think we really did it 50 years ago, did we?

-No.

0:35:570:36:01

The upside from that is you collect small silver

0:36:010:36:04

and pieces like this, they're in lovely condition.

0:36:040:36:07

They're all hallmarked on the lip there.

0:36:070:36:09

We've got the mark of The Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company Ltd.

0:36:090:36:14

They're a manufacturer I see a great deal of silver from.

0:36:140:36:17

They were very prolific at the beginning of the 20th century.

0:36:170:36:21

We've got basically the tower mark for London

0:36:210:36:24

and the date letter for 1913.

0:36:240:36:26

I didn't think they would be as old as that.

0:36:260:36:28

Well, yeah. They're typically late Edwardian, early George V in style.

0:36:280:36:33

You'd see a set like this probably even 20 years earlier

0:36:330:36:38

in the Victorian period although,

0:36:380:36:39

as time goes by, salt cellars get smaller.

0:36:390:36:43

I don't know whether they're health conscious,

0:36:430:36:45

but it's something that happens. The lovely thing is

0:36:450:36:48

you've got all the original spoons

0:36:480:36:50

and they're all marked as well, all 1913.

0:36:500:36:53

So it's one maker, one date and it's complete.

0:36:530:36:57

-Even the case closes as well.

-Yeah.

-Which is a lovely feature.

0:36:570:37:01

So as a gift today, it's ready to go.

0:37:010:37:04

No initials on it, pristine condition.

0:37:040:37:07

So it's what dealers like to buy.

0:37:070:37:09

That's the good news, I mean, you don't use it.

0:37:090:37:12

Is that why you've decided to sell it now?

0:37:120:37:15

I've never used it. In fact, my sister has never even seen it.

0:37:150:37:20

It's not been out of the sideboard.

0:37:200:37:23

It's so often the story that these things are packed away,

0:37:230:37:27

never to see the light of day until it's too late

0:37:270:37:29

and they get moved on to somewhere else.

0:37:290:37:32

I think we need to put them into the auction

0:37:320:37:35

with a value of £100 to £150.

0:37:350:37:37

If you'd be agreeable, we'll set the reserve slightly under that at 90.

0:37:380:37:43

-If you're happy to do that?

-I'm very happy with that, yes.

0:37:430:37:46

-I think they're going to do very well.

-Thank you.

0:37:460:37:49

Well let's hope so - or else it will be salt in the wound for Michael.

0:37:490:37:53

Well, that's it. We found our final three items to take off to auction,

0:37:550:37:59

so it's time to say goodbye to this magnificent host location,

0:37:590:38:03

Victoria Hall, and of course to Saltaire.

0:38:030:38:06

And a big thank you to all the people that have turned up today.

0:38:060:38:09

We're going to the auction room now. Here's a rundown of what we're taking.

0:38:090:38:13

Michael thinks Marjorie's unwanted salt cellars

0:38:130:38:17

will make a great gift for someone.

0:38:170:38:20

Wendie picked up this pair of watercolours for just £1 each

0:38:200:38:23

and David thinks they're worth a hundred times that value.

0:38:230:38:28

And let's hope the bidders aren't spiky

0:38:280:38:31

when it comes to Andy's porcupine quill box.

0:38:310:38:35

We're heading back over to the auction house to sell our lots.

0:38:360:38:41

Auctioneer Ian has been doing a sterling job so far,

0:38:410:38:45

and speaking of sterling, here comes some silver.

0:38:450:38:49

Going under the hammer right now we have a set of silver salt servers.

0:38:490:38:53

We have those, but we don't have Marjorie.

0:38:530:38:56

-She's on holiday enjoying herself.

-Lucky for some, isn't it?

0:38:560:38:59

Yes, it is. But hopefully she'll have some good news

0:38:590:39:02

when she comes home that these have sold at the top end.

0:39:020:39:05

Well, top end or they don't sell.

0:39:050:39:07

-They're a good, tidy lot ready to go in the fitted case.

-OK.

0:39:070:39:11

No initials, so as a gift or anything.

0:39:110:39:13

-A good trade lot?

-Good trade lot.

0:39:130:39:15

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:39:150:39:17

Lot number 357. The case set of four silver circular salts.

0:39:170:39:22

I'm going to open this at £100.

0:39:220:39:26

-£110...

-Good, straight in.

0:39:260:39:28

I have 120. Are we all done?

0:39:280:39:31

-It was sure to swing it, wasn't it?

-Ooh, they've gone on.

0:39:310:39:34

It's going to another bid.

0:39:340:39:36

140. I'll take five, 145.

0:39:360:39:38

I have 150 on a commission bid. 155.

0:39:380:39:42

155 and I'm out at 155.

0:39:420:39:45

155...

0:39:450:39:46

GAVEL BANGS

0:39:460:39:47

-Top end.

-Clean. In and out.

0:39:470:39:50

I just wish Marjorie was here to enjoy that.

0:39:500:39:52

I know she's enjoying herself. Hope you come back with a lovely tan.

0:39:520:39:56

Next up, it's those watercolours that Wendie picked up

0:39:580:40:02

for just £2 at a car boot sale.

0:40:020:40:04

And we could be looking at £150 here. What do you think, David?

0:40:040:40:07

-Will we get top end today?

-We should do. They're quality watercolours.

0:40:070:40:11

-They've always been together as a pair.

-And they will stay as a pair.

0:40:110:40:14

-I hope so.

-Let's find out what the bidders think.

-Yes.

-Here we go.

0:40:140:40:18

Lot 127, the Sydney Lawrence.

0:40:180:40:20

A charming pair of coastal scenes.

0:40:200:40:24

Right, who'd like to start? £100

0:40:240:40:26

£80. 50 to start for the pair. £50.

0:40:260:40:30

And 60, do I see? And 60, and 70.

0:40:300:40:33

80 here. £80, and 90...

0:40:330:40:36

-Come on, come on.

-90 for the pair.

0:40:360:40:39

-They're worth £100.

-£90. At £90.

0:40:390:40:42

We're not quite there in the market at £90. £100 do I see?

0:40:420:40:46

-At £90, are we all done?

-Oh, no!

-At £90.

0:40:460:40:49

BANGS GAVEL

0:40:490:40:51

-I can't believe that. A pair of watercolours.

-Never mind.

0:40:510:40:54

Are you going to take them home and put them on the wall?

0:40:540:40:58

I can live with them. I like them.

0:40:580:41:00

I'm very disappointed. I thought they were superb watercolours.

0:41:000:41:04

I've a feeling that if Wendie gave those watercolours

0:41:040:41:07

another go at auction, she'd get that £100 reserve.

0:41:070:41:11

Andy, I love this next item. Big fan of these boxes made in Ceylon.

0:41:130:41:17

It is 20th century, but it's porcupine quill and bone.

0:41:170:41:21

As Michael probably said at the valuation day,

0:41:210:41:24

if it was 18th century you'd be looking at £2,000 and more.

0:41:240:41:28

Yeah, I'd put it in as a "Come and buy me," just to see how it goes.

0:41:280:41:32

-I dropped the reserve slightly.

-Did you?

-Yeah.

0:41:320:41:35

-Oh, there's no need to worry! Gosh!

-I just didn't fancy taking it home.

0:41:350:41:39

Let's watch this, because this could be interesting.

0:41:390:41:43

-Here we go.

-Lot 56, the early 20th century Ceylonese box.

0:41:430:41:46

What bid on this box? Start with £50.

0:41:460:41:50

That's very low, but there are a few hands, Michael.

0:41:500:41:53

-They're poised, aren't they?

-Yes. That hand's not going down.

0:41:530:41:56

110, sir. 110. 120 in the back. 130, 140.

0:41:560:42:00

There's two hands there. 140.

0:42:000:42:02

I've got you, 140. 140...

0:42:020:42:05

-Confusion.

-Yeah.

0:42:050:42:07

150, 160, 170.

0:42:070:42:10

180, 190, 200.

0:42:100:42:12

And ten. 220...

0:42:120:42:15

-This is more like it.

-Fantastic.

0:42:150:42:17

240, 250, at £250.

0:42:170:42:20

£250, the chap in the back. 250.

0:42:200:42:23

-GAVEL BANGS

-It sold at £250.

-Wow, fantastic.

-Well done.

0:42:230:42:27

-Yeah, brilliant.

-Top end. Hopefully you'll use that wisely.

0:42:270:42:31

Go off and buy some more antiques, maybe?

0:42:310:42:33

-I'd like a bit of fishing tackle.

-Oh, you fish?

-Yes.

0:42:330:42:36

Good for you. What's the biggest catch?

0:42:360:42:38

Well, this season it's a 14 pound common carp.

0:42:380:42:41

That's not bad going, is it?

0:42:410:42:43

You don't need a box to keep your tackle in, do you? He just sold it!

0:42:430:42:48

Well, that's it. It is all over, another day

0:42:530:42:55

in another auction room for Flog It!

0:42:550:42:57

I tell you what, after that one, because it was tough-going,

0:42:570:43:01

I think I deserve a sit down. My voice is going as well.

0:43:010:43:04

But I tell you, we've had great fun making this show

0:43:040:43:07

and I hope you've enjoyed watching it.

0:43:070:43:09

All credit to our experts and to Ian Peace,

0:43:090:43:11

the auctioneer on the rostrum.

0:43:110:43:13

So until the next time, from the Calder Valley, it's goodbye.

0:43:130:43:17

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:330:43:36

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:360:43:39

Paul Martin and the Flog It team are in the historic village of Saltaire, West Yorkshire. Paul visits a Grade 1 listed building and Michael Baggott finds one of his favourite things. But will David Barby's tea service be in vogue when it gets to auction?


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