Cardigan Flog It!


Cardigan

Paul Martin and experts Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion view a collection of sporting and theatre memorabilia and a silver tea service at Rhosygilwen Mansion.


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Today we're in one of the most beautiful parts of the world, West Wales, and we're here to rescue

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all of those unwanted antiques to find them a new home. Welcome to Flog It!

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Today we're holding our valuation day just outside the town of Cardigan at the Rhosygilwen Mansion

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and this whole area is mainly a Welsh-speaking area full of tradition.

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I know all of these people are so excited

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because someone's going home with a lot of money

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and they've come to ask our experts that all-important question.

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-HE SPEAKS WELSH

-There you go. So I think it's about time

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we got this big crowd out of the orangery into the main hall. Let's start valuing.

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'Helping our crowd discover exactly what they have are our team of experts,

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'headed up by Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion.

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'Charlie's a freelance auctioneer with a passion for cricket. Will he be bowled over by today's antiques?'

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If you're thinking of a month in the Bahamas, I'm afraid it's more like a wet weekend in Tenby.

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Hello. What have we got here?

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'And Christina is an auctioneer and valuer who first became interested in antiques as a child.

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'She's particularly drawn to jewellery and silver.'

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-Is he a relative?

-I don't think so. SHE LAUGHS

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'Coming up, we have a rollercoaster of emotions.

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'Charlie battles with temptation.'

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What an extraordinary collection! They're all fabulously interesting.

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I wish I could buy them myself, but I'm not allowed to.

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-'Christina has to handle some possible disappointment.'

-So it's a cheap brooch.

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-It's mock agate and it's gold plate, not real gold.

-You said that.

-THEY LAUGH

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'And I go from joy...'

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You've made my day. Cos this is what it's all about, regional things.

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'..to panic...' I'm feeling nervous about this!

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'..and back again.'

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They like it.

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'Christina is first at the tables where she is assessing some gold coins.'

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So, Christine and your tour boy Laurence,

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welcome to Flog It! and thank you for bringing these wonderful sovereigns and half sovereigns.

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-Tell me where they've come from.

-One gold sovereign and a half sovereign, I don't know which one it is,

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-originally came from my mother-in-law.

-Right.

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And they were left to my husband,

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who mislaid them for the last 40 years.

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And then he died two and a half years ago and I found them in a tin

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-with a load of coins and that.

-OK.

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-And then Laurence decided to put his four and bring them here today.

-Great!

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So, we've got three sovereigns and three half sovereigns.

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-Mm-hm.

-The sovereign was initially the first one-pound coin.

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And the first sovereign was minted in 1489.

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These, sadly, aren't as early as that. They are Victorian and later.

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You've got a Victorian one here with a nice jubilee head

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which is for 1887.

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You've also got an Edwardian one there. I think that's 1902.

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And a George V one here. So graduating nicely. You've got a nice set of monarchs there. Wonderful.

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-Laurence, where did you get yours from?

-I've had mine since 1951.

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1951? And where did they come from?

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-From two aunts.

-OK. So what happens today? How are we going to split this money-wise?

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-Is it going to be half and half?

-Yeah.

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-Are we happy to sell them as one?

-Yes.

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Yeah? OK, good, cos they are solid gold

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and they do have, especially with gold weight at the moment, which is really peaking,

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very, very high, I think at auction we'll be looking in the region

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of about £150 for each sovereign and probably about £75 for each half sovereign.

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So in total, I think that gives us about £650, slightly over maybe.

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So I think our estimate needs to be somewhere in the region of 650 to 700.

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-Oh.

-I think, at the moment, we'll be fairly safe with a reserve of 650.

-Yes.

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-Laurence, what are we going to put this money towards?

-I've decided that if things go all right,

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we're going to get a mobility scooter for Christine.

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-A mobility scooter for Christine?

-A mobility scooter.

-Oh, fantastic!

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-Cos you've got a bit of a poorly hip, haven't you?

-Yes.

-And he keeps dragging you around.

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To all the agriculture shows and vintage car rallies and I can't keep up with him.

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-So he goes round looking at new wheels and you're going to get a set of new wheels.

-That's right.

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Fantastic. Thank you for bringing them in and I hope we get a really good price.

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'Let's hope the bidders will want to snap them up. People bring a variety of antiques to our valuation days

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'but there's nothing that gets me quite so fired up as furniture.

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'I was so excited to see this next item that I intercepted Holly before she had a chance to get inside.'

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Holly, thank you so much for bringing in a piece of Welsh furniture. You've made my day.

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Cos this is what it's all about, regional things. Wherever we go,

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it's always nice to see something that's made in the vicinity.

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And this chair was made all over Wales, even on the Welsh borders around Herefordshire, as well.

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-Do you know much about it?

-Not a huge amount at all.

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I knew it was Welsh oak and that's it.

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It doesn't get any better than Welsh oak. You know that.

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It's got a completely different colour. I think there's something in the pH in the soil here,

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because Welsh oak is slightly redder than Somerset or Yorkshire oak.

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The patina is very, very good. That's what you buy into.

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The colour, the patina. It's this skin, it's the surface on the skin.

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Because over the years, oak tightens and the grain closes together.

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Because it's so tight, it holds the polish, it doesn't sink in,

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it sits on the surface and that's how you build up a patina.

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All hand-sawn and it's all pegged.

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-Can you see that? See these little pegs?

-Oh, yes.

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All dowels driven right through a mortise and tenon,

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so all of these stretchers, there's a little tenon in there that sits into a mortise

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and to hold it tight, a hole's drilled through there and then a dowel is knocked through.

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Gosh. A lot of work goes into them.

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Yeah. But it stops the joint from moving. And look at that. Look how tight it is.

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You couldn't even put a cigarette paper in that joint, could you?

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This is a lovely thing to have, all these pegs showing.

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But this chair has never been fiddled with because, if you turn it upside down,

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-can you see it's as dry as a bone there?

-Yes.

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If that's been polished, it means it's been polished to match in

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with polished sections of these stretchers, so the seat wouldn't be original.

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But looking at this, it's as honest as the day it was made,

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and that's a lovely thing to have, because I date this chair to the latter part of the 18th century.

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I'd say this is circa 1780, 1790.

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-Gosh.

-Yeah, I would, honestly.

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I've got a favourite part to this chair, apart from its overall look

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and its dynamic, if you want, its personality.

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It's that front stretcher. It's a set of peripheral stretchers that go around.

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But look. Some youngest has rubbed his heels and the soles of his feet

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and can you see that wavy wear?

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-Yes.

-It's almost like a piece of waney-edged oak, isn't it?

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-Yes, it is.

-But see how shiny it is?

-Very.

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That's taken 200 years to do that.

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That's the real McCoy. That's lovely.

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Really nice. So, value.

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How much did this chair cost you?

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I think it was about £60. Certainly no more than that.

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Well, I think we could safely say let's put this into auction

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at a value of £120 to £180, and I think she'll double her money.

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-That's fantastic.

-We'll put a reserve of £100 on.

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This will come in handy to anybody that loves Welsh furniture.

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There's plenty of people here in Wales who'll buy this

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because they'll make up a set around the kitchen table.

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And it doesn't matter if it slightly mismatches another one of the style.

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It may not have these lovely flattened bobbin turnings,

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but that doesn't matter. Harlequin sets look really good.

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-Yes.

-And they're full of character.

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And it will last somebody another 200 years because it's so practical and functional.

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-Yeah?

-Very pleased.

-See you at auction.

-Thank you.

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'I can't wait to see how that does. It's real quality.

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'Back inside, Charlie is just as excited by an interesting but eclectic collection.'

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Gwyn, what an extraordinary collection.

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I've been sifting through here to try and sort out

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the valuable from the less valuable. They're all fabulously interesting

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and there's some splendid West End theatre programmes.

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But they're not the things that really excite me, I have to say.

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-You've got Joe Davis's autograph there, haven't you?

-Yes.

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-Greatest snooker player of all time, do you think?

-Yes.

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-We would think that, wouldn't we? Our generation.

-Yes.

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-And you've got one over here.

-Jimmy Wilde.

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Jimmy Wilde, world flyweight boxing champion. You've got some pretty rare signatures here.

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-I'm glad you say that.

-Ooh, they're things that excite me.

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-The Barbarians rugby team here.

-Yes.

-Trevor Evans.

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-Yes.

-Does that ring any bells with you?

-Yes, he's an old boy of the school.

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-Old boy of your school? Where did you go to school?

-Llandovery.

-Oh, what a rugby school!

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-Rugby was your game?

-Yes, I played hooker in the first team.

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-Tough little nut. Did you have two good props?

-Yes, very good.

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HE LAUGHS Excellent.

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Well, I wasn't as good as you at rugby, I'll say that straight away.

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Cricket was more my game. And that brings me onto this.

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And I've looked at that programme and that's an Indian team programme.

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-It's from about 19...

-1946.

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-'46, is it?

-Yep.

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-And you've got the Nawab of Pataudi's signature.

-That's right.

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-What can you tell me about him?

-Well, all the boys were competing to receive autographs

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so I wrote away to the manager of the Indian side and received that programme back.

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He came over, he went to Oxford University,

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he played cricket for England,

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which is unique. Three times, I think.

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-And he then went on to captain India.

-That's right.

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So he played for England and India. How extraordinary is that?

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-Most interesting to me, you've got here a letter with 10 Downing Street on it.

-Yes.

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I thumbed through to think it might be signed by Churchill, but no.

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-No, no.

-It's signed by somebody completely different.

-It's signed by Dawson, the Australian hooker.

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Here it explains it. "This note paper may be of interest to you."

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I should say. "It came from the Cabinet Room at Number 10 Downing Street when we visited Mr Attlee."

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He took over from Churchill immediately after the war.

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Well, I think it's just the most wonderful collection.

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-Why do you want to sell them?

-Well, they're stuck in the garage

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with a pile of other programmes that I have and...

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I don't think that these generally have much value attached to them. £1 here, £1 there.

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But I do think some of the signatures do.

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Not a huge amount. It would be more exciting if Mr Churchill had signed the one from 10 Downing Street

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and not the Australian hooker, but there you go.

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I think you've probably got 100 quid's worth here. What do you think?

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-Quite happy.

-You happy with that?

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I think we might estimate the lot at £50 to £100.

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-Right.

-And if the internet boils into a frenzy,

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-we might just give you a surprise.

-OK.

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£50 to £100, reserve £50. I wish I could buy them myself but I'm not allowed to.

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'Poor Charlie. I know that feeling well.'

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We're now halfway through our day. This is where it gets exciting

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because we're going to put our first valuations to the test.

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You've probably got your own opinions but right now it's down to the bidders

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at Peter Francis Auction Room in Carmarthen as we put them under the hammer. Here's a quick reminder.

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'Christine and Laurence's selection of gold coins.

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'Holly's beautiful Welsh oak chair that I've fallen in love with.

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'And Gwyn collection of theatre programmes and sporting memorabilia.

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'Commission rates here are on a sliding scale,

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'starting at 17.5% for items under £150

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'and down to 10% for items over £3,000.

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'The duties on the rostrum will be shared today between Jeff Thomas and Nigel Hodson.

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'On the preview day, I managed to grab some time with Nigel

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'to ask him what he thought of Gwyn's collection.'

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Very interesting and mixed lot. We've got theatre memorabilia

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mixed with sporting memorabilia and I think the sporting memorabilia probably outweighs the theatre,

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but I'm not sure. We've got a valuation of £50 to £100.

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Well, that sounds fine to me. I think there are a couple of issues here.

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What's surprised me so far,

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-in the run up to the sale, is that we've had more interest in the theatre programmes...

-Really?

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-That is a shock.

-I wouldn't have expected that.

-No.

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Usually it's things like rugby programmes, particularly in Wales, that we get a lot of interest in.

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The Australian rugby team is very interesting because it's on 10 Downing Street paper

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and that's a personal letter to a young lad who was playing rugby and I think that's very interesting.

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So it's got lots of different angles to it. But the theatre is where most interest is coming from.

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It seems like we've got someone from the theatre in the room right now playing the piano.

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-Lots of interest going on all around us. Hopefully that person playing the piano...

-You never know.

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-So are we top end or lower end?

-I'm going to hedge my bets and say it'll be somewhere between the two.

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-I don't think it's going to fly away but I think the estimate is very fair.

-OK. Ready for Act One? We are.

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'We'll soon find out if Nigel was right because it's the first lot to go under the hammer.'

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Lots of autographs and they belong to Major Gwyn and he's brought along Helga.

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-How wonderful to meet you. And I've got to say how fabulous you look, as well.

-Thank you.

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A great collection. I had a chat to the auctioneer earlier.

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Interestingly enough, he said the interest lies in...

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-The Australian?

-No, not at all!

-The Indian?

-No!

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I said, "The sporting memorabilia?"

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He went, "No, no, no interest in that. It's the theatre programmes that people are sparked up about."

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You'll be interested to know, I took a photocopy of the Australian team down to Cardiff

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and I saw a very nice couple walking along the road

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and I said, "Have a look at this memorabilia".

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And what do you think? He turned around and said, "That's my grandfather".

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-No!

-Wow!

-On my honour.

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-Was that a rugby player or...?

-Winton.

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-I saw the match.

-Cricket.

-Oh, no!

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-Good grief!

-He played in that team in 1948.

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-Did you tell him to come to the auction?

-Is he here?

-No.

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-Oh, you missed a trick there!

-He would've paid twice as much!

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That's the kind of thing you just dream of finding.

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-Yeah.

-I was disappointed I didn't take his name and address

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-because I've got a spare programme at home.

-Ohh.

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-Missed out.

-But he played and Wales won 6-nil.

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-Ooh!

-In the days when Wales used to win Rugby matches.

-Regularly.

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-You're right.

-Let's just hope the sporting memorabilia does give it an extra boost.

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They're going under the hammer now. This is a great lot. Watch this.

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Collection of theatre programmes and sporting ephemera.

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West End and other theatres. Crazy Gang, et cetera.

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Start me there, what should I ask you on this lot? Start me at £100.

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80? 50 to go, then. 50 I am bid.

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-At 50. 50.

-We're selling, Gwyn.

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70. 80. At £80 bid. At 80.

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At 80. 90 now. At £80 bid.

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At 80. Are you all done at £80?

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-Hammer's gone down.

-Yep.

-£80. Happy with that?

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-£50 to £100 we put on that.

-I'm cleaning the garage now.

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-Are you having a sort out?

-Yes.

-Are you?

-Yes.

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-Many more to come.

-Is there lots more?

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-Yes.

-You count yourself lucky you won't get it.

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THEY LAUGH

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'I think Charlie would like nothing more than to have a root around in that garage.

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'Next we're going to see if the crowd can be tempted with a bit of gold.'

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Christine and Laurence, this is a great time to sell gold

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and, believe me, gold's been flying out of the room.

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Famous last words. You know what happens at auction. It doesn't always go right.

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-Good luck. Three full sovereigns, three half sovereigns. Let's get top estimate.

-Best of luck.

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So there we are, three sovereigns and three half sovereigns.

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What are they worth? About £600?

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Thank you, at £600 I'm bid. At 600.

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Can I say 620 now? At £600.

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At £600. 620 may I say? At £600.

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620 is it now? 20. 620.

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-640.

-Good.

-640. 660 do you want?

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£640 in the room, 640 and I will be selling.

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At 640. 660 do you want now?

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-Selling in the room. £640.

-HAMMER BANGS

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-Sold.

-Close.

-Yeah, close. Happy?

-Yes.

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-There's commission to pay, don't forget, 15%.

-That's great.

0:17:570:18:01

'So, Nigel used a bit of discretion there and they sold, but it was for a surprisingly modest amount.

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'Now, I'm starting to get cold feet about our next item.'

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I keep saying bring lots of furniture in, we love seeing furniture.

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Bless Holly, she did just that, a lovely Welsh regional chair.

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It's about to go under the hammer. Fingers crossed. I'm really nervous.

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I know everybody in the trade keeps saying, "Brown furniture is on its knees and it's a good time to buy".

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-OK, it is a good time to buy, but hopefully it's going to be a good time for you to sell.

-Yes.

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-This has got personality.

-It has.

-It's got great personality. Let's see what happens.

0:18:320:18:37

At late-18th century Welsh oak single chair. Lot 184.

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What should I ask for this one? Start me at 180.

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150. £100 I'm bid.

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£100 I've got. 100. At 100. 120. 140.

0:18:510:18:55

At 140. 160. 180. At 180 bid.

0:18:550:18:59

-At 180.

-Brilliant.

-At 180. 200 do I hear now?

0:18:590:19:01

At 180. 200. 200. 220 with me.

0:19:010:19:05

220. At 220 bid. At 220.

0:19:050:19:08

-40 is it now? At 220.

-They like it.

-Yes.

0:19:080:19:12

40 is it, then? At 220. I'll let it go, then.

0:19:120:19:15

With me at £220. All quiet.

0:19:150:19:19

-Hammer's gone down. £220. Not bad, top end.

-Amazing!

0:19:190:19:22

I was really, really frightened

0:19:220:19:26

because the furniture had just come in and there were half a dozen chairs before our lot,

0:19:260:19:30

a mixed lot, a harlequin set, £180, six of them!

0:19:300:19:35

That one did £220. I'm ever so pleased.

0:19:350:19:37

'What a lovely artisan piece.

0:19:370:19:40

'But there's another area of Welsh craft

0:19:400:19:42

'that's currently experiencing something of a revival and I'm off to find out more.'

0:19:420:19:47

For centuries, the wool industry has shaped the British landscape

0:20:000:20:03

and provided livelihoods for generations of families.

0:20:030:20:07

But here in Wales, it's particularly deeply woven into the country's social fabric.

0:20:070:20:13

'Spinning and weaving have been an integral part of Welsh culture from the earliest of times.

0:20:160:20:22

'Starting off as little more than a domestic pursuit,

0:20:220:20:25

'large and successful woollen mills emerged and thrived

0:20:250:20:29

'to make it one of Wales's most important manufacturing businesses.'

0:20:290:20:33

By 1895, the three counties of Dyfed,

0:20:340:20:38

Carmarthenshire, Cardiganshire and Pembrokeshire,

0:20:380:20:41

boasted 325 wool mills between them.

0:20:410:20:44

But by the end of the Second World War, sadly the price of wool drastically plummeted,

0:20:440:20:49

forcing the mills to close down.

0:20:490:20:52

'The 1960s and 1970s saw a revival when tapestry-style cloth suddenly became fashionable

0:20:540:21:01

'and top designers, including Mary Quant, were keen to use it.

0:21:010:21:04

'But unfortunately, the interest didn't last.

0:21:040:21:08

'Blankets from that era and earlier have now become highly-prized collector's items.'

0:21:080:21:14

But Welsh weaving is definitely not an historical remnant.

0:21:180:21:22

There might only be 13 working mills left here in the country

0:21:220:21:26

but they're still producing exciting and innovative work

0:21:260:21:30

in this beautiful whitewashed stone building hidden away in a wooded valley on the Pembrokeshire coast.

0:21:300:21:36

'There's been a mill on this site since the 17th century

0:21:410:21:45

'when local farmers would bring their fleeces to be spun into yarn

0:21:450:21:48

'which was woven into fine Welsh woollen blankets.

0:21:480:21:51

'The current mill, Melin Tregwynt, has been in the hands of the same family since 1912.'

0:21:510:21:56

Today it's a thriving design and manufacturing business employing around 20 local people,

0:22:010:22:06

supplying fabrics that are in demand all over the world.

0:22:060:22:10

'It's owned and managed by husband and wife team Eifion and Amanda Griffiths.'

0:22:130:22:18

-So when did you both get involved in the business?

-I was born into it.

0:22:180:22:22

-Did you try and escape out of it?

-Yes, I did.

0:22:220:22:26

I trained as an architect and I went away and did it for a while

0:22:260:22:29

but I was an only child, so it was an opportunity to come back.

0:22:290:22:33

-If I didn't come back, nobody else would have.

-OK.

0:22:330:22:36

So I tried it, came back in the 80s and stayed.

0:22:360:22:40

What about you?

0:22:400:22:42

I came here about 25 years ago.

0:22:420:22:45

He made me an offer I couldn't refuse and I've been here ever since.

0:22:450:22:49

Was it always like this in this area when your grandfather was here?

0:22:510:22:54

Yeah. The mill hasn't changed that much.

0:22:540:22:57

He'd recognise it if he went in there now.

0:22:570:22:59

He wouldn't know the machines as they are but he'd know what was going on.

0:22:590:23:03

Some things have changed.

0:23:030:23:06

In his day, we used to do a little bit more of the processing of the wool.

0:23:060:23:09

-Sure. Cos that was more on site.

-Yeah.

-Local wool.

0:23:090:23:12

-Yes.

-Cos people didn't mind putting up with Welsh wool, which is quite coarse.

0:23:120:23:17

-It's not very nice on your face.

-No. I think, in those days.

0:23:170:23:20

you relied on local suppliers.

0:23:200:23:23

But that changed in the 50s

0:23:230:23:25

and I think my grandfathers was not very happy losing the connection with the local farmers,

0:23:250:23:30

but my father, being perhaps slightly more of a businessman, could see the advantages,

0:23:300:23:35

having a wider choice of raw material.

0:23:350:23:38

-And I guess the raw material, the sheep's wool, was coming from New Zealand.

-That's right.

0:23:380:23:43

How many men did he employ back then? Was it a bigger concern?

0:23:450:23:48

No, not really.

0:23:480:23:50

My grandfather worked in the mill, my father worked with him in the mill.

0:23:500:23:54

-We're talking half a dozen, if that.

-Right, OK.

0:23:540:23:58

I think what happened in those days was, the mill was roughly the same size as it is now

0:23:580:24:02

but they had more processes and they probably would take the product

0:24:020:24:08

virtually from the beginning through to the end.

0:24:080:24:11

So they'd be doing one thing at a time and perhaps moving onto the next machine.

0:24:110:24:15

So although we still occupy the same amount of space, we're more labour-intensive

0:24:150:24:19

and we make more than they did.

0:24:190:24:22

Interestingly enough, we're saying about the materials were cheaper abroad,

0:24:250:24:30

yet your clients are mostly overseas anyway, aren't they? You export all over the world.

0:24:300:24:35

Yeah, we do. Japan is a good customer of ours and they like the authentic part of it,

0:24:350:24:40

the fact that it's still made, in many ways, in the same way as it was in my grandfather's day.

0:24:400:24:45

And they like something with a story attached. And that, we find, is increasingly important.

0:24:450:24:51

-And the fact that we'll be 100 years old in 2012.

-You will? Wow!

0:24:510:24:55

-Yeah.

-Congratulations! And the products today will carry on for another 100 years.

0:24:550:24:59

Those throws and those blankets will last a long, long time, won't they?

0:24:590:25:04

-They will.

-Yes, I think so.

0:25:040:25:06

What's the latest thing you've designed?

0:25:090:25:12

-Have we got something nearby?

-There's probably a couple of cushions behind you.

-On the bed.

0:25:120:25:17

-Those ones?

-Yes.

-Shall I grab one?

-Yes, by all means.

0:25:170:25:21

-And the throw on the bed.

-Oh, this throw? That's beautiful.

0:25:210:25:24

-That's going back to a 60s design.

-Yep.

0:25:240:25:26

-But recoloured and reworked.

-Yeah.

-Palatable shades.

0:25:260:25:31

-Yes.

-Muted colours.

-Yep.

0:25:310:25:33

But then you've got bright, vivid colours, as well, so it's working for you really well, isn't it?

0:25:330:25:39

'Melin Tregwynt's on-trend fabrics are coveted by designers all over the world

0:25:400:25:46

'and it's a driving force behind the resurgence of interest in Welsh fabric.'

0:25:460:25:50

There's about 13 working mills left in Wales.

0:25:510:25:53

Are they all over Wales or are there a few concentrated in this area? Is this a good area?

0:25:530:25:59

Originally, this wouldn't have been one of the main areas, but I think because it's a tourist area,

0:25:590:26:04

it's meant that some of the mills have been able to survive here by selling to tourists.

0:26:040:26:09

But there were a lot of mills and it's now down to single figures.

0:26:090:26:13

-It is really?

-Yeah, virtually.

0:26:130:26:14

Well, long may it last for you two, that's all I can say.

0:26:140:26:17

-HE LAUGHS

-I'm surrounded by quality.

0:26:170:26:21

-Thank you.

-That's what we always look for in antiques, as well.

-Thank you very much.

0:26:210:26:25

I think it's absolutely marvellous that traditional Welsh skills are still being kept alive

0:26:310:26:36

by mills like this employing local people. It doesn't get any better than that.

0:26:360:26:40

And they've got that combination just right. Heritage meets contemporary designs.

0:26:400:26:44

It's onward going. There's a sense of connection to our past

0:26:440:26:48

but there's also inspiration for the future.

0:26:480:26:50

'Back at our valuation day at Rhosygilwen Mansion,

0:26:550:26:58

'there are still lots of antiques left to inspect.

0:26:580:27:01

'But Christina is pleased to have bumped into Vicky because she is very partial to a bit of jewellery.'

0:27:010:27:07

-I see you're a brooch fan.

-Yes.

-I'm a brooch fan.

-Yes.

0:27:070:27:10

-And you've brought a brooch in to show us today.

-I have.

-Tell me who it belonged to.

0:27:100:27:14

It was handed down in the family.

0:27:140:27:16

I presume it belonged to my grandmother and then my mother and then it came to me.

0:27:160:27:22

-Goodness me, that is a very long pedigree history.

-Yes.

0:27:220:27:26

The brooch dates to around 1880, 1890, something like that.

0:27:260:27:30

-Would that tie up with great-granny's dates?

-My mother was born in 1896.

0:27:300:27:35

-Right.

-So that would tie in.

-It would, wouldn't it? OK.

0:27:350:27:39

So we've got this wonderful star motif here, which is absolutely fantastic.

0:27:390:27:44

It's actually made of glass. The glass would've been made in layers, like a glass sandwich,

0:27:440:27:50

and then they would've carved it to produce this wonderful stellar, or star effect here.

0:27:500:27:55

It's trying to be hard-stone agate.

0:27:550:27:57

-Only trying.

-It's trying, yes, it's trying very hard.

0:27:570:28:01

And it would've been much more costly material to produce this in.

0:28:010:28:05

It would've been a mourning brooch originally and we can see that

0:28:050:28:08

-because it's got the plaited hair of somebody in the back of it.

-Yes.

0:28:080:28:12

-Might that have been great-granny's?

-I hope so.

0:28:120:28:15

I wish I had a name, but unfortunately I don't.

0:28:150:28:17

OK. Now, the Victorians were very involved with their mourning.

0:28:170:28:21

They really did mourn pretty much everything.

0:28:210:28:23

When Victoria lost Albert, she went into deep mourning and all Victorians had to follow suit.

0:28:230:28:29

And this was classic of that time. You carried a piece of them with you in your everyday life.

0:28:290:28:34

-I think it's quite a charming memento.

-Absolutely, it really is.

0:28:340:28:39

And, of course, from the front, you wouldn't know it at all.

0:28:390:28:43

I think this yellow metal here, having studied it quite carefully, is actually gold plate.

0:28:430:28:48

So it's a cheap brooch, it's mock agate and it's gold plate, not real gold.

0:28:480:28:54

-You said that.

-THEY LAUGH

0:28:540:28:57

Now, here we come to the crunch point.

0:28:570:29:00

I'm not going to get too excited at this stage.

0:29:000:29:03

Sadly, I think, because it's a bit tired

0:29:030:29:07

and because some people get a little bit squiffy about having mourning pieces

0:29:070:29:14

and having someone else's hair in the back of their brooch,

0:29:140:29:17

which is why so often now we see them empty,

0:29:170:29:20

that I think the value really is going to be relatively low.

0:29:200:29:25

Well, that's all right. It's just staying at home in a box so it might as well go to the auction.

0:29:250:29:31

If it doesn't get the reserve, then I'll keep it. Either way, I'm happy.

0:29:310:29:34

Good. OK, well, I think at auction, we'd be looking at

0:29:340:29:37

putting an estimate of £20 to £30, something like that,

0:29:370:29:41

-and hopefully we can find it a new home with someone who will wear it.

-Exactly.

0:29:410:29:45

-So what about a reserve? Generally, we tend to put the reserve at the bottom end of the estimate.

-Yes.

0:29:450:29:51

I think I'm going to be cheeky and put a reserve of 30.

0:29:510:29:54

-30?

-Yes.

-Gosh, OK. So that means we have to put the estimate at £30 to £40.

0:29:540:29:58

-Yes.

-OK.

-Which is being a bit optimistic, obviously.

0:29:580:30:02

I think it might be slightly optimistic, but I'm willing to give it a go

0:30:020:30:05

-and hopefully...

-Well, I won't get too excited and I don't mind either way,

0:30:050:30:10

-so that's the best way to be, really.

-Exactly, yes. Well, let's keep our fingers crossed and let's go for it.

0:30:100:30:16

-OK.

-All right!

-Thank you.

-You're welcome.

0:30:160:30:19

'On a good day, I think it could do it, but as Christina suggested,

0:30:190:30:23

'it might well be a tricky sell.

0:30:230:30:26

'Next, Keith and Margaret are hoping Charlie will be able to give them some good news about their dolls.'

0:30:260:30:32

-Good afternoon!

-Good afternoon.

-Married couple?

-Yes.

0:30:320:30:35

-You look happy to be a married couple.

-We are.

0:30:350:30:38

-How many years?

-43, sir.

0:30:380:30:40

-That's fantastic! You've put up with him for 43 years?

-I have, yes.

0:30:400:30:43

-Has it been easy?

-No. THEY LAUGH

0:30:430:30:47

Right answer! Now, whose dolls are they?

0:30:470:30:49

-Mine. Well, my aunt's.

-Your auntie's?

-Yeah.

0:30:490:30:53

-You inherited them from her?

-Well, when we cleaned the house out after she passed away, they were there.

0:30:530:30:59

-You found these. How long ago was that?

-About ten years.

0:30:590:31:03

The trouble is today, they're the sort of things that live in a box.

0:31:030:31:07

It's nice to think of children playing with them, but they're porcelain-headed

0:31:070:31:11

and they're very easy to damage and then they're not worth anything.

0:31:110:31:14

-Do you have children or grandchildren?

-We've got a little grandson, 10 months old.

0:31:140:31:19

-He won't be interested in these.

-No.

-Do you know where they were made?

0:31:190:31:23

-I think they might be German.

-You think they might be German.

0:31:230:31:27

They date from about 1920.

0:31:270:31:30

So they're the best part of 100 years old.

0:31:300:31:32

They are indeed German-made. I've had a look...

0:31:320:31:36

The place to look at a doll is on the nape of the neck, at the base.

0:31:360:31:41

-I don't know if you've ever done that, have you?

-No.

0:31:410:31:44

No. So what we've got with one of them is simply "Made in Germany"

0:31:440:31:49

with a number, which is a model number.

0:31:490:31:53

The other one is plain. But this has got a name that I was hoping to find.

0:31:530:31:58

If we turn this over, take the hat off,

0:31:580:32:02

on the back here we've got a number

0:32:020:32:05

and I can just seen the D of Armand and the M of the Marseille.

0:32:050:32:11

That's all I need to see. So Armand Marseille.

0:32:110:32:14

Good maker. Beautiful maker.

0:32:140:32:17

The workmanship in these is phenomenal.

0:32:170:32:19

And to a great extent, I think they've got their own original clothes,

0:32:190:32:24

which is absolutely lovely.

0:32:240:32:26

Falling to bits really, but the lace is in good order

0:32:260:32:31

and I think somebody would like to buy these and do them up.

0:32:310:32:35

-Did you have an idea of what they might be worth?

-Not really, no. I thought £200, £250.

-Did you?

0:32:350:32:41

-Each or for the three?

-Well, for the three.

0:32:410:32:44

Yeah. I think you would've been right had you brought them to Flog It! five years ago.

0:32:440:32:50

I'm afraid to say it, but you're probably looking at £140 to £160

0:32:500:32:56

-with a reserve of about £120, in my opinion.

-Right, fine.

0:32:560:33:01

-So we fix the reserve at £120 and I think they'll find a buyer.

-Fine.

0:33:010:33:05

-So you'll get a little bit of money to celebrate your next 43 years of married bliss.

-Thank you very much.

0:33:050:33:11

'I hope the doll collectors will be out in force at the auction.

0:33:130:33:17

'Our last find of the day is down to Serena,

0:33:170:33:20

'who has some silver bearing the name of one of our finest retailers.'

0:33:200:33:24

-Time for tea?

-No. THEY LAUGH

0:33:240:33:28

Wow. Goodness me. Have you got very fond memories of cleaning this?

0:33:280:33:31

-My mother does.

-Oh, really?

0:33:310:33:34

My mother has very fond memories of keeping this very clean.

0:33:340:33:37

So I don't know anything about it. All I know is it's been used and loved

0:33:370:33:42

-since I was a child. And

-she actually used it every day?

0:33:420:33:46

-Yes.

-Oh, my goodness. How decadent!

0:33:460:33:48

Right, so, we've got a bit of a mixed bag here, haven't we?

0:33:480:33:52

We've got this wonderful four-piece service which is all solid silver.

0:33:520:33:57

It's got the most wonderful hallmark on the bottom of it.

0:33:570:34:01

It's got a nice lion passant for sterling silver,

0:34:010:34:04

a London town mark for the leopard's head

0:34:040:34:07

and then we've also got the date letter for 1942, London 1942.

0:34:070:34:13

And then, creme de la creme, we've got a retailer's stamp for Harrods, as well.

0:34:130:34:18

One of the best retailers at the time. So it's absolutely fantastic.

0:34:180:34:22

-It really is everything you could want in a silver tea service.

-I think this is a wedding present.

0:34:220:34:27

-Oh, really?

-Because my parents got married in November '43.

0:34:270:34:30

-Oh, well, that would make sense, wouldn't it?

-Yeah.

-Fantastic.

0:34:300:34:34

This sort of date, 1942, we're really looking at the war period

0:34:340:34:40

and the shape of it, the fact that it's very sleek and very stylish,

0:34:400:34:44

reminiscent of the sleek lines of spitfires and the modern age of technology and steam.

0:34:440:34:49

-It's wonderful.

-So what about the handles? What are they?

0:34:490:34:53

Well, the handles are an ebonised composite.

0:34:530:34:56

Because wood kept breaking, they developed this early form of Bakelite or composite

0:34:560:35:02

-which was heat-resistant, so you could pick up the tea service without being burnt.

-Yes.

0:35:020:35:08

-But, surprise, surprise, where's this come from?

-I don't know.

0:35:080:35:11

-I don't know. I vaguely remember that sitting in a dresser, my father's dressing table.

-Right.

0:35:110:35:18

Cos this is silver plate, not silver,

0:35:180:35:20

but it does go quite nicely with this service. It's got that sleek line to it, that sleek silhouette,

0:35:200:35:26

that matches it really quite nicely.

0:35:260:35:28

Possibly a very similar date.

0:35:280:35:31

Moving onto the rest of the items here,

0:35:310:35:34

a set of three little salts.

0:35:340:35:36

The marks are very rubbed on those. It's quite difficult to see the marks.

0:35:360:35:40

We've got a silver eggcup. Tell me about that.

0:35:400:35:44

That I bought in the late 70s.

0:35:440:35:48

It was a christening present for my niece.

0:35:480:35:50

I got it home and I actually took it out and looked at it

0:35:500:35:54

and I thought, "I don't like those faces. She's a baby."

0:35:540:35:57

Those faces are spooky.

0:35:570:36:01

-Oh, my goodness!

-They are spooky.

-It has got some quite scary faces on it.

0:36:010:36:05

If we look at the bottom of it, it actually tells us this probably came from an egg cruet originally,

0:36:050:36:12

so it was probably one of about four or six on a stand.

0:36:120:36:16

So have we got the rest of its friends or is it just the one?

0:36:160:36:19

No, that was expensive enough. SHE LAUGHS

0:36:190:36:22

We've also got these here. Have we got sets of these or are these just individual?

0:36:220:36:27

Just bits, really. I can't say for those at all.

0:36:270:36:31

OK. I think... In all honesty, I think we're probably best selling it all as one lot.

0:36:310:36:38

Because we've got quite a few other entities going on here, these are relatively low value.

0:36:380:36:43

Your main value, really, is in the four-piece tea service.

0:36:430:36:46

-Yes.

-And I think we're looking somewhere in the region of about £300 to £500,

0:36:460:36:51

something like that. How does that sound?

0:36:510:36:54

-Nice.

-Excellent. I would suggest a reserve of £300 with some slight discretion.

0:36:540:37:00

So we'll leave it up to the auctioneer just to give him that little bit of leeway.

0:37:000:37:04

-But it's brilliant. I'm sure it'll do really well for you.

-Thank you.

-You're welcome.

0:37:040:37:08

Well, that's it. We've now found our final lots to take off to the auction room.

0:37:100:37:15

I don't know about you, but I'm getting really excited. While I make my way over there,

0:37:150:37:19

I'm going to leave you with a quick rundown of all the items our experts have just picked.

0:37:190:37:24

'There's that pretty Victorian mourning brooch belonging to Vicky.

0:37:240:37:28

'The three German porcelain dolls inherited by Margaret.

0:37:310:37:35

'And last but not least, that large collection of silver, including the tea set from Harrods.

0:37:360:37:42

'So, we're back in Carmarthen and that packed auction room.

0:37:470:37:50

'The first lot up for grabs are the dolls.'

0:37:500:37:52

We got a valuation of £140 to £160 on these. Good luck.

0:37:540:37:58

-Because I know you don't like them, do you?

-No.

0:37:580:38:01

They don't do a lot for me, either. I'm frightened of them. But there are people that do like them.

0:38:010:38:06

-But not as much as they used to.

-No, but that's why you've put that valuation on it and not 300 to 400.

0:38:060:38:11

-Cos they would've done.

-They would've made £100 each a few years ago.

-Exactly.

0:38:110:38:15

-They'll still sell.

-Here we go. This is it.

0:38:150:38:19

This is three early 20th century German bisque-headed dolls.

0:38:190:38:24

Armand and Marseille, which sounds very French, but they are German,

0:38:240:38:29

early 20th century. What do we say for those?

0:38:290:38:33

They're in your hands again. What are they worth? £100 away on these?

0:38:330:38:37

-100 for these? Some interest with me.

-Get your hands up.

0:38:370:38:41

-60. At 60.

-For goodness sake!

0:38:420:38:45

There's one doll there worth a couple of hundred!

0:38:450:38:48

90. 100.

0:38:480:38:51

120. 140 still here. On the book at 140. All quiet in the room.

0:38:510:38:57

-At £140 on the book.

-He's going to sell at 140.

0:38:570:39:00

-Going, then, at £140 for the three.

-Hammer's going down.

0:39:000:39:05

Sold. Sold. Just got them away.

0:39:050:39:08

-Happy with that?

-Yes.

-Didn't like looking at them, did you?

-No.

0:39:080:39:12

THEY LAUGH

0:39:120:39:15

You'll have a good night's sleep now.

0:39:150:39:18

'Well, for a while there, I was worried, but we got them away.

0:39:190:39:22

'Now, will we manage to do the same for Vicky's brooch?'

0:39:220:39:25

-Vicky, you're up next.

-Yes.

-With the mourning brooch.

0:39:250:39:28

£30 to £40. There's the part for the hair at the back, as well.

0:39:280:39:33

-It's a nice little thing, actually, if you collect this kind of thing.

-Absolutely.

0:39:330:39:37

-You were very determined about the reserve of 30.

-I'm afraid so.

0:39:370:39:41

And if it doesn't sell, you'll have it back. So winners all round.

0:39:410:39:44

I never wear it so I'm happy for it to sell but I'm happy to take it home again.

0:39:440:39:49

-Well, let's keep our fingers crossed.

-It's a win-win situation.

0:39:490:39:52

Let's find out what the bidders think right now.

0:39:520:39:55

A Victorian overlay glass leaf design pin brooch.

0:39:560:40:00

Pretty pin brooch with the woven hair panel to the back.

0:40:000:40:04

What's that worth, little memorial brooch? £50?

0:40:040:40:07

50 for it.

0:40:070:40:09

Surely. 30 to put me in, then. 30.

0:40:090:40:13

-Oh, 20 then, somebody.

-Come on. It's worth that.

0:40:130:40:17

20 I'm bid here. At 20.

0:40:170:40:19

Who says 30 now? At 20 only. At 20. 5. 25.

0:40:190:40:24

30 may I say? At 25. You want 30, madam?

0:40:240:40:27

At 25 only. At 25. At 25. 30 is it?

0:40:270:40:31

At £25 only. May I say 30 on the brooch? No more?

0:40:310:40:34

-It's not going to sell, is it?

-No, well, I'll take it home and love it.

0:40:340:40:39

Not to go then, I'm afraid.

0:40:390:40:41

-Take it home and love it.

-Exactly.

0:40:410:40:44

I just think, unfortunately, because they are quite heavy,

0:40:440:40:47

they're difficult to wear and some people are a little bit squeamish about mourning brooches.

0:40:470:40:52

So I think take it home, love it, wear it.

0:40:520:40:55

-And it's quite nice that it's staying in the family.

-Exactly.

0:40:550:40:59

'Just short of 30, but Vicky wasn't willing to let it go for any less. And quite right, too.

0:40:590:41:05

'Now it's time to sell our last item. But will we get a top price for the top-of-the-range tea set?'

0:41:060:41:12

Going under the hammer now we've got a top people's lot.

0:41:120:41:15

-It belongs to Serena, but not for much longer. This was your mum's.

-Yes.

0:41:150:41:19

-It was made for Harrods.

-Yes.

-Silver tea service.

-Yes.

0:41:190:41:21

-What are you hoping for?

-I'm not.

0:41:210:41:24

-You must secretly be hoping for something.

-No, no, no.

0:41:240:41:28

-Top end plus a bit more?

-Oh, definitely.

-Definitely.

0:41:280:41:33

It's time to find out what this big crowd here in Carmarthen think. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:41:330:41:39

This is a silver four-piece, plain-design tea set.

0:41:400:41:44

Made for Harrods. You don't have a better recommendation than that.

0:41:440:41:48

What can I say for the lot there? £300 away for the lot.

0:41:480:41:53

300. 200, then, to go. £200 I'm bid. 220 may I say?

0:41:530:41:57

At £200. In the room at £200 only.

0:41:570:42:00

240. Two bidders online.

0:42:000:42:03

260. 260 in the room.

0:42:030:42:05

Against you both online at 260. 280. 300.

0:42:050:42:09

At £300 in the room. Against you online at 300.

0:42:090:42:12

320. 340.

0:42:120:42:15

Taken 340 in the room. Against you online.

0:42:150:42:18

At 340 in the room. 360 online.

0:42:180:42:21

-380.

-Mum will be amazed.

-Mum will be watching now.

0:42:210:42:26

-Yep.

-At 420. 440 may I say?

0:42:260:42:30

-440!

-460.

-What's your mum's name?

-Pat.

-Pat.

0:42:300:42:34

480 may I say? Selling in the room at 460.

0:42:340:42:37

-Pat, it's at 460.

-480. 480. 500.

0:42:370:42:41

-500.

-At £500 bidding in the room. 520 may I say?

0:42:410:42:45

-At £500. Selling in the room against you all online at 500.

-Brilliant!

0:42:450:42:48

Is there any more? £500.

0:42:480:42:51

-Hammer's gone down.

-Well done.

-£500. Well done.

0:42:510:42:56

Pat, I bet you're pleased! Ohh!

0:42:560:42:59

-Get the kettle on!

-That's great news.

0:42:590:43:02

-She hasn't got a teapot any more!

-Oh, no!

-THEY LAUGH

0:43:020:43:05

-Get the coffee on!

-THEY LAUGH

0:43:050:43:08

'Great to end with such a fabulous lot.

0:43:080:43:11

'The bidders obviously recognised the quality.'

0:43:110:43:13

That is it. It's all over. What a marvellous time we've had here.

0:43:150:43:19

A big thank you to Peter Francis Auction Rooms and to you, our owners.

0:43:190:43:22

Without you, we wouldn't have a show. It wouldn't be possible.

0:43:220:43:25

You keep brightening up our days. Please bring in your unwanted antiques. We love to see you.

0:43:250:43:30

For now, from Carmarthen, it's goodbye.

0:43:300:43:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:340:43:38

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:380:43:42

.

0:43:420:43:42

Paul Martin and experts Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion visit Rhosygilwen Mansion, just outside Cardigan in the west of Wales. They come across a quirky array of items including a collection of sporting and theatre memorabilia, a top quality silver tea service and a lovely piece of local furniture. Paul visits Melin Tregwynt, a woollen mill known for its cutting edge fabrics and designs.


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