Stapleford Flog It!


Stapleford

Flog It comes from Stapleford Park in the heart of the Leicestershire countryside. Joining Paul Martin to survey the antiques are Mark Stacey and Elisabeth Talbot.


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Transcript


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Things haven't changed as much over the last 300 years as we think.

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Back in the 17th century,

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it was all about establishing your place in society.

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And this magnificent country pile

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was built to put its owner at the very top of the social ladder.

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So today, here in the heart of the Leicestershire countryside,

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we will be following in his footsteps,

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where only the best is good enough. Welcome to Flog It!

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Our venue today is one of England's finest stately homes,

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Stapleford Park, and the building is a mixture of architectural styles

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and different periods of history.

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This wing is over 500 years old,

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but the gables and the niches have been added later,

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giving it a Flemish flavour.

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Today's experts Mark Stacey and Elizabeth Talbot

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are already trawling the crowd, delving into bags and boxes,

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hoping to discover a treasure or two.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Artificial arm.

-Artificial arm!

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-Articulated arm.

-Yeah, that's right, yeah.

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Mark's rarely lost for words,

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but I think he's met his match with this item.

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I've got a good idea. It comes off the end.

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-Does it?

-Yeah! It ain't what you think.

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-Well, I...

-I don't know!

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And coming up on the show,

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one of our items today goes for close on £1,000,

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but which is it?

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This vintage football programme from 1925?

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It's a really interesting and rare one.

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Or this glorious gramophone?

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Or is it this Art Deco bronze ink stand?

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It'll be really interesting to see what happens.

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Everybody is safely seated inside, so let's get on with the show.

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And this lot are all here to ask our experts that all-important question,

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-which is...

-ALL: What's it worth?

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-And what are you going to do when you've found out?

-ALL: Flog it!

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Mark's up first. Is he ready, do you think?

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-Hello, Rob, hello, Jackie.

-Hello.

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Thank you so much for coming today and bringing your friends along.

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Where on earth did they come from?

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Well, I inherited them from my grandparents.

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I remember them sitting on the dresser since I was knee-high.

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Since my parents died, they've been sitting in our attic.

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Oh, what a shame!

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Well, they are a little bit out of vogue these days.

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They're quite a novelty, they hold a bit of a secret.

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If you just gently sort of nod her head there,

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and the same with the hands... you know, they nod and keep time.

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These are what are generally referred to as bisque figures, painted bisque.

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It has a very sort of dry feel about it,

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and they're unglazed,

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so they're painted straight onto the porcelain.

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And they are copies of ones produced by Meissen.

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And you can get really big ones like this of Oriental gentlemen.

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Obviously, if they're Meissen, the quality is absolutely first class.

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These are not such good quality.

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-One of them, of course, has got a nasty crack.

-Afraid so.

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But they are quite old, actually - they date to probably around 1900,

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so they're well over 100 years old, and they are probably French.

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China and Japan have had a huge influence on European ceramic,

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and the first designs we produced were copying Chinese and Japanese,

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because that's what the rich wanted, so that's what they produced

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before we developed our own styles and the factories got established.

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So they're a family piece, but they've been hidden away.

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Is that why you've decided to come along and flog them?

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-Yes.

-Absolutely right.

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I really quite like them, actually, I think they're quite fun.

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The damage, of course, is going to limit any value.

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Did you have any idea of what they might be worth?

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-No idea at all.

-Absolutely none.

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If they were in good condition,

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they'd be probably be worth around £100, the pair.

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I think, because of the damage,

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we've got to look at half that, really.

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We've got to say maybe 40 to £60, something like that, but who knows?

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Would you want to put a reserve on them?

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I don't know, I don't think we would.

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-I think just let them...run.

-See how they go, absolutely.

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And they might nod us into a big profit.

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And moving swiftly along,

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surely there's a bit more sanity at Elizabeth's table.

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-Hello!

-Hello.

-Thank you for coming to Flog It!

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-Thank you very much.

-Now, what have you brought?

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-It's here.

-What, here?

-Yeah.

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Oh! Oh, it is, it's a table! Oh, my goodness, that's lovely!

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And you've struggled out of the house with this tucked under your arm?

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Well, not exactly, but we've brought it in.

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-Ah...

-My husband had to take it out of the car from here.

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Ah, very good.

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What can you tell me about it, and why have you brought it?

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-Recently, we bought a house, and this was in the house.

-Right, OK.

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An antique, traditionally,

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is defined as something that's 100 years old or more.

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This table is...knocking on the door of being an antique,

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but it's not quite there yet.

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-OK.

-It will date from anywhere between the 1920s

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and probably the late 1930s.

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It's made of oak, and it's a drop-leaf small dining table,

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which copies the traditional style of English oak furniture

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and drop-leaf tables, gate-leg tables of an earlier period.

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This one, however, is machine-cut, it's very smooth and precisely made,

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so this was in an era when they weren't handcrafting them.

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It was machine-made for mass production.

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And this lasted until, I suppose, the Second World War,

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-when it went out of fashion, everybody wanted utility furniture and so on.

-I know.

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As a table, it's not a rarity to find a table like this these days,

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but it's a good, solid table.

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Do you like it? I mean, do you like it as a table?

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It's just the aesthetics doesn't blend with what you have?

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Yeah, I like the table as itself.

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All the other furniture is modern, a bit more modern than this.

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Although it's a table that's got many decades behind it,

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and it's beautifully crafted and it's good solid oak,

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-the value is going to be modest.

-OK.

-So if you're happy to sell it,

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I would advise that you put it into auction for a 60 to £80 estimate.

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-Yeah!

-Not bad for something which came with the house.

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Would you like a reserve on that,

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or do you want to sell it at whatever the market brings?

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-I think about 40, 50?

-Yeah?

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Do you want to put a reserve on? Put 40 on?

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I think that's very fair, we'll put £40 reserve on it.

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Shall we make that firm,

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or do you want to sell it with discretion?

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-Just sell it.

-Just sell it?

-Yeah.

-And then what would you do?

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Would you buy another table? Are you lacking a table now?

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No, I think we'll probably use the money for grandchildren.

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-Oh, that's nice!

-We've got three grandchildren.

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-Oh, have you?

-Yeah, so we'll buy something for them.

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-They can all share in the excitement of the day.

-Yeah, why not?

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It's great to see some furniture at the valuation day,

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particularly a piece that can only make a profit.

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Stapleford's drawn a fantastic crowd, and the room is buzzing!

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For his next item, Mark's escaped to the sanctuary of the orangery

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to hear about Graham's childhood collection of football programmes.

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-Hello, Graham.

-Hello, Mark.

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-Nice to meet you.

-Yeah, thank you.

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We're sitting in the orangery, nice and cool, isn't it?

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-Very nice.

-It's wonderful.

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You've brought this fantastic collection of football programmes.

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Are they your lifetime collection? Where have you got them from?

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I wouldn't say it's a lifetime collection.

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My brother and I started when we were sort of early teens,

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and we inherited some from relatives and just carried on the collection.

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It wasn't a conscious effort,

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it was just something that evolved over time.

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I'm not the world's biggest football fan...

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BOOING ..I have to tell you, Graham,

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but this programme has been drawn to my attention.

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-This is the 1925 between Cardiff...

-And Sheffield United, yeah.

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-Cardiff won?

-They did, the first time that the FA Cup went out of England.

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-Into Wales.

-Yes, indeed.

-Which is where I'm from.

-Oh, OK.

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So I should be very proud of that, and I am, of course.

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And it's a really interesting and rare one.

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I think so, I think it's obviously 80 odd years old now.

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It's in reasonably good condition.

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-It is, considering, because it's quite flimsy paper.

-That's right.

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Is there any others out of the varied mix here

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that you think are quite interesting to us?

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Probably this Northampton Town one, it's only 1970,

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but it's the Fifth Round FA Cup

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-between Northampton Town and Manchester United.

-Gosh!

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-And a certain George Best scored six goals that day.

-Gosh!

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-The legendary George Best.

-So that one's quite interesting.

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The thing is, there's lots of memories for you,

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but we have to look in terms of auction,

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how we're going to sell them, market them.

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I mean, the feeling is, and I agree with it,

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is that we put the 1925 programme in as a separate lot.

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Yeah, sounds good.

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-800 to £1,200.

-OK.

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And then we put the other collection together as one lot

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at sort of three or 400. Is that all right with you?

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-I think that sounds fine.

-But we will put a reserve, of course.

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-We'll put 800 on the single programme and 300 on the other programmes.

-Yes.

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The auction house should market them properly

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and put them on the internet,

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and of course people find these things,

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so hopefully we'll reach the top ends, if not a bit more.

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Thank you very much, Mark.

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Good luck with that. I tell you what, the queue keeps moving along.

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We have been working flat out.

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You've just seen three cracking items, so I think it's time

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we put those valuations to the test.

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While me make our way over to the auction room,

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here's a quick run-down of what we're taking.

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Will Robert and Jackie be nodding all the way to the bank

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with these cheeky oriental figures, which Mark valued at 40 to £60?

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Finders keepers, but Chitra's decided this old oak table

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isn't quite the right style for her interior design.

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Will it reach Elizabeth's estimate of 60 to £80?

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It's definitely a game of two halves as Mark has split

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the programmes into two separate lots,

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valuing the earlier at 800 to £1,200, and the rest as a group,

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at three to £400.

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Well, the sun is coming out, I'm in a good mood.

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I know our owners are in a good mood as well, but will the bidders be?

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That's the important thing. For our sale today,

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we've come to Gildings Auction Rooms in the heart of Market Harborough.

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Hopefully, there's a packed floor inside. It's time for kick-off.

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Our auctioneer today is John Gilding, and first up,

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it's Graham's 1925 programme.

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It's a great bit of sporting memorabilia we've split into two lots.

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The first is the FA Cup final programme, eight to £1,200.

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It's going under the hammer right now.

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It's supposed to be rare, Paul,

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but I hope we haven't scored an own goal.

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Here we go. The auctioneer said somebody came in and viewed those

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and was very interested.

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£600 I'm bid. 650, 700. And 50.

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800. And 50.

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At £850. Telephone?

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900.

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Out in the room. Out on commission.

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-£900.

-Are you all done?

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Sold and away, then, at £900, all finished?

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-It's gone, £900.

-That's all right.

-That's one down.

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Now, we've got the boxes, quite a few in the box.

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Looking at three to £400.

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Now, we have a collection in two suitcases.

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Ready for you to fly off to your holidays abroad.

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As hand luggage, of course.

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What would you say for that, please?

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The next lot, £200 opens the bidding. £200 I am bid.

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£200, do I see 10 anywhere, quickly? £200, do I see 10 anywhere?

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All finished and quite sure, then, at £200.

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All away, and done at £200.

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Well, I'm sorry I'll have to withdraw that lot.

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-Sorry about that.

-It's all right. Pleased with the first one.

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Very pleased with the first one. Somebody out there really wanted that. That is incredible.

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It just shows you what is the rarity value of these, isn't it?

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900 is over the bottom bed,

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so I think we should be pleased with that.

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Like all footy games, you win some, you lose some,

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but what a great result for Graham's vintage programme.

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Seller's commission today is 16% plus VAT,

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but he'll still make a tidy profit.

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Up next, it's Chitra's table.

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Going under the hammer right now, we have some furniture.

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It's a 1930s oak gateleg dining-room table.

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It belongs to Chitra, who is right next to me, and you look fabulous.

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-Who have you brought along? What's your name?

-Tasheel.

-Hello there.

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-How old are you?

-Six.

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-Six years old. Is this your first auction?

-Yes.

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-What do you think, isn't it exciting?

-Yeah.

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What's Grandma doing? She's selling a table she found in the house?

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-It's actually my uncle's house.

-It was in your uncle's house?

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What else did they leave in the house? Anything else?

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Some other furniture, but I don't think it was worth anything.

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I like your shoes. They're lovely, aren't they?

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The auctioneer's up there right now, and he's just about

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to call your lot number, so get ready for this. Here we go.

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The gateleg, lot 500. £35. On commission at 35.

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Do I see eight anywhere quickly? £35, all done?

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Quite sure then, finished away at £35.

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It was good value for money, £35.

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You can buy a table in auction for £35,

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but it didn't cost you a penny anyway.

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Every little penny helps.

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-Someone's going to be happy with that, aren't you?

-Yes.

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Students, take note. That's a lot of table for not very much money.

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Now, let's see if Mark's still in Noddyland.

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Good luck, Robert and Jackie.

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Let's hope this little touch of the Orient

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sells well here in Market Harborough.

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I like it, I really do like it. Basic as well.

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Why are you selling this?

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-They've just been in the loft for the last seven years.

-Didn't like it?

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Not especially.

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I know someone that was attracted to it, and he's right here.

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I did like them.

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They are great fun, and I haven't seen a nice pair for ages.

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-They're continental, aren't they?

-They're French, I think.

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Copies of the Mason ones we talked about.

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The quality's still reasonably good.

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One's got a little bit of damage on it,

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so we've put 40 to 60 on it with no reserve, and they should make that.

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Here we go, we're going to find out right now.

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Let's hope the bidders aren't

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sitting on their hands right now. This is it.

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-91, pair of nodding head figures.

-There's no pressure, really.

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-We've got no reserve, have we, Jackie?

-We decided not to.

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At 38, but 38. 40, 42, 42. 45.

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You're out on the neck. £45 seated.

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Look, someone waving their hand at the back of the sale room.

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Gentleman standing at £55.

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Have you all done, quite sure then? Finished away at £55.

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-That's a good result, isn't it?

-Brilliant, yes.

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That really is, I'm quite surprised at that.

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I think we can all nod to that, can't we?

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That concludes the end of our first session in the auction today.

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We are coming back here later on in the programme, so don't go away.

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So far, so good. While we were up here in the area,

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I thought I'd go off and do some exploring. Take a look at this.

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I'm here surrounded by sheep on the Leicestershire/Derbyshire borders,

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and I'm off to see Calke Abbey.

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I have to admit, I hadn't heard of the place before,

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and I hadn't seen it, so my sense of anticipation is really building.

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It's a wonderful estate.

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We've got this gorgeous long approach,

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we've got mature planted lime trees

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either side of this wonderful avenue.

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I'm pretty sure at the end of this,

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we're going to see a spectacular house.

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And here it is. Just look at that. Isn't it pleasing on the eye?

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My first impressions are it's a mixture of architectural styles -

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a bit of Baroque, a bit of Palladian.

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But look at it on this vast estate, tucked in that hollow.

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It just says one thing to me - wealth.

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But first impressions can be deceiving

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and on closer inspection, all is not what it seems.

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Look at these sandstone columns.

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Rather soft, but look at the ravaging it's had

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over the centuries from the elements.

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It's starting to perish and peel away.

0:18:410:18:43

It's losing the definition on all the capitals.

0:18:430:18:46

In fact, the stucco mouldings up there are crumbling as well.

0:18:460:18:49

This house has seen better days.

0:18:490:18:52

There's been a building here since the 12th century.

0:18:530:18:57

This Baroque incarnation dates from 1704,

0:18:570:19:00

and was built by the 4th Baronet of Calke, the wealthy Sir John Harpur.

0:19:000:19:05

But since its glittering prime, time has been a cruel mistress.

0:19:060:19:11

The house's dual personality continues on the inside.

0:19:110:19:15

One room's lavishness is in stark contrast to the neglect of others.

0:19:150:19:20

This magnificent room was once the original entrance hall

0:19:290:19:32

when the house was first built in the early part of the 18th century.

0:19:320:19:36

I must say, it would have made a very impressive first impression.

0:19:360:19:40

It's a raised ground floor, so there would have been a wonderful

0:19:400:19:43

flight of stone steps leading up to it.

0:19:430:19:46

What we see today is mainly its Victorian incarnation,

0:19:460:19:49

but clearly, somebody in the family had a passion for natural history.

0:19:490:19:53

There are just cabinets full of seashells, precious stones

0:19:530:19:57

and items of taxidermy.

0:19:570:20:00

It was the 9th baronet, Sir John Harpur-Crewe,

0:20:000:20:03

who started the natural history collecting,

0:20:030:20:06

decorating the house with his deer and cattle trophies.

0:20:060:20:09

His son, Sir Vauncey, outdid his father.

0:20:090:20:12

His collecting was obsessional.

0:20:120:20:14

I must say, the items are beautifully displayed, aren't they?

0:20:160:20:20

This is a technique, taxidermy, that dates back to

0:20:200:20:24

the ancient Egyptians, and in fact, there word taxidermy comes

0:20:240:20:28

from the ancient Greek -

0:20:280:20:29

dermi, skin, and taxi, to move around.

0:20:290:20:31

I must say, between the two of them,

0:20:310:20:34

they would have kept many taxidermists in business.

0:20:340:20:37

The next room epitomises the opulence and grandeur

0:20:440:20:47

once enjoyed by the house.

0:20:470:20:49

This is the drawing room, which is sumptuously decorated in the 1880s.

0:20:490:20:53

It's typical of a Victorian drawing room and parlour.

0:20:530:20:57

Everything is gilded. The picture frames,

0:20:570:21:00

the architectural detail on the cornice, the dado rail,

0:21:000:21:03

the panelling on the shutters.

0:21:030:21:04

It just highlights things, glittering everywhere.

0:21:040:21:07

After these elegant and impressive rooms, what comes next,

0:21:150:21:19

I must say, is a bit of a shock.

0:21:190:21:21

Different, isn't it?

0:21:360:21:38

All of this plus those wonderfully elegant state rooms we've just

0:21:380:21:41

seen at the front of the house is exactly how the National Trust

0:21:410:21:44

found the property back in 1984.

0:21:440:21:48

As the years went on,

0:21:480:21:50

the house became more and more costly to maintain.

0:21:500:21:54

While Sir Vauncey's descendants were struggling to keep

0:21:540:21:57

the state rooms in order, understandably, they left

0:21:570:22:01

the rest of the house, gradually, room by room,

0:22:010:22:05

to fall into disrepair.

0:22:050:22:06

They abandoned other parts of the house. Incredible.

0:22:060:22:12

This is the 7th Baronet's bedroom, again, just as it was

0:22:220:22:26

when the National Trust took over the property.

0:22:260:22:28

This is Nettie Cook, one of the conservators

0:22:280:22:31

who worked on the project virtually from day one, I gather?

0:22:310:22:34

Just about. Day two, actually.

0:22:340:22:36

You must have seen and learnt an awful lot.

0:22:360:22:38

Absolutely, it's a phenomenal collection, and so much to learn.

0:22:380:22:41

-So varied. I'm still learning now.

-Whose idea was it?

0:22:410:22:44

Well, it was the vision of one man, the then-curator, John Cheshire,

0:22:440:22:49

who visited the property before it ever came to the National Trust.

0:22:490:22:53

He was absolutely stunned at the amazing collections

0:22:530:22:58

housed in this enormous property, but a property in decline.

0:22:580:23:03

Literally about to collapse, in some areas.

0:23:030:23:06

He wanted that wonderful, overwhelming feeling to be passed on

0:23:060:23:10

to visitors, which is why it's presented in this particular way.

0:23:100:23:14

I must say, it is fascinating to go behind the scenes, as it were.

0:23:140:23:18

Now, obviously, it's open to the public so we can all view this,

0:23:180:23:21

but to see the rooms full of clutter,

0:23:210:23:23

wonderful items just cluttered around left exactly how they were.

0:23:230:23:27

One thing is missing, though.

0:23:270:23:29

The cobwebs and the dust and the dirt, that's all gone,

0:23:290:23:32

-and there's no sign of damp anymore.

-Well, no,

0:23:320:23:35

because those sorts of issues are addressed, and there is

0:23:350:23:38

a team of housekeepers here who work very hard to care for the contents.

0:23:380:23:42

A lot of visitors come in, about 120,000 a year,

0:23:420:23:46

they bring in dirt, dust, skin, hair.

0:23:460:23:48

The housekeepers have to remove this sort of debris.

0:23:480:23:53

Is it easier to keep the room as it is now or to restore it?

0:23:530:23:57

The whole ethos of things looking as if they haven't been conserved

0:23:570:24:03

is a difficult one for some conservators to actually carry out.

0:24:030:24:08

It could well be that, if there was remedial conservation

0:24:080:24:11

needed in this room, one conservator may actually just go too far.

0:24:110:24:17

There is such a contrast between these rooms and the state rooms,

0:24:170:24:21

and do you know something?

0:24:210:24:22

I prefer these rooms, because they come alive.

0:24:220:24:24

There's an atmosphere about them, isn't there?

0:24:240:24:27

There really is,

0:24:270:24:28

and there's a smell, the musty-ish smell which you get.

0:24:280:24:31

-Yes!

-Because all the surfaces are dry, there's no polish anywhere,

0:24:310:24:34

so you get this dryness to everything.

0:24:340:24:36

What do the visitors think when they come behind the scenes?

0:24:360:24:40

Well, I think some of the visitors really struggle

0:24:400:24:43

with the whole concept, because, of course, it does look as if

0:24:430:24:46

it's a house in decline. We know it's not because there's been

0:24:460:24:49

a phenomenal amount of conservation work, restoration work,

0:24:490:24:52

that's gone on to both the building and the contents. Some of

0:24:520:24:56

the visitors do wonder what on earth is happening.

0:24:560:24:58

But John Cheshire did say that if visitors actually came

0:24:580:25:02

and asked him where the work had been done,

0:25:020:25:04

then he would have actually achieved his goals.

0:25:040:25:08

-Great!

-Perhaps he knew.

-He was a man with vision.

0:25:080:25:11

-Absolutely.

-Thank you for having a chat to me.

0:25:110:25:13

I'm going to enjoy the rest of the house. It's a real eye-opener.

0:25:130:25:17

Jolly good! Excellent.

0:25:170:25:18

Calke is a wonderful, unique survivor,

0:25:260:25:28

and the National Trust's decision to maintain it exactly as they found it

0:25:280:25:33

back in the 1980s is a very bold one indeed.

0:25:330:25:36

They were faced with a collection of over 10,000 different objects,

0:25:360:25:39

and their aim was to preserve it exactly how they found it,

0:25:390:25:43

whilst preventing any other further decay.

0:25:430:25:47

It was a monumental task for conservators.

0:25:470:25:50

But a very worthwhile one.

0:25:510:25:53

It's a fascinating glimpse at a country house frozen in time.

0:25:530:25:57

There's nothing ghostly about Stapleford Park.

0:26:060:26:09

Our valuation day is bursting with life.

0:26:090:26:12

The crowd are waiting to hear what our experts have to say.

0:26:120:26:16

-Do you trust our experts?

-ALL: Yes!

-Of course they do.

0:26:170:26:20

Let's hand the show over to them, and see what they've spotted.

0:26:200:26:23

And Elizabeth's up first.

0:26:230:26:25

Two pieces of Victorian green glass brought together.

0:26:270:26:30

Do they belong to you, Jean, or you John, or are they a joint concern?

0:26:300:26:34

They're mine.

0:26:340:26:36

They were my grandparents', and then went to my father, and now, me.

0:26:360:26:39

-Your inheritance? And do you like them?

-No, I hate them!

0:26:390:26:44

-Hence you bring them today to see if they have any value?

-Yes!

0:26:440:26:47

Victorians loved glass.

0:26:470:26:49

They made glass in all sorts of colours and forms, and practiced

0:26:490:26:53

and experimented in all sorts of techniques to create objects.

0:26:530:26:56

They probably date from about 18...

0:26:560:26:58

..70, 80, that period, so they're just over 100, 120 years old.

0:26:580:27:03

Do you like them, John? Are they your taste?

0:27:030:27:06

To tell you the truth, I hadn't seen them until yesterday!

0:27:060:27:09

After how many years?

0:27:100:27:13

Jean's had them 13 years, 13 years since her mother died.

0:27:130:27:18

You weren't so embarrassed you didn't show them to John, were you?

0:27:180:27:22

I don't think they're as hideous as Jean does.

0:27:220:27:26

I'm quite intrigued by this one, particularly the motif on it.

0:27:260:27:30

It reminds me of something out of a science-fiction film, with aliens.

0:27:300:27:34

Yes, I see what you're saying on that.

0:27:340:27:36

But obviously, it goes back to 1870.

0:27:360:27:38

So they've always, to your knowledge, lived together?

0:27:380:27:41

Always been together, as far as I know.

0:27:410:27:44

Good friends and companions?

0:27:440:27:46

Now with this one, when I first saw it,

0:27:460:27:48

I thought, "Oh, what a lovely picture of a stag!

0:27:480:27:50

"How delightful and Victorian!"

0:27:500:27:53

When we turn it round, I see the full story emerging,

0:27:530:27:56

of a heartless huntsman!

0:27:560:27:58

But again, if you think about the period,

0:27:580:28:02

you go back to Victorian times, to hunt, shoot

0:28:020:28:05

and display the mounted trophies you'd get from hunting a stag,

0:28:050:28:09

it was very much of high fashion, so this is typically of its time.

0:28:090:28:13

I do notice that both of them

0:28:130:28:15

have suffered some damage in their long life.

0:28:150:28:19

This one has a chip to the rim. This one, here,

0:28:190:28:22

has a crack just the other side of the handle, there.

0:28:220:28:25

So it will impact on the value.

0:28:250:28:27

How do you take them home today?

0:28:270:28:30

Would you put them back in the cupboard and keep for posterity?

0:28:300:28:34

I would probably have binned them!

0:28:340:28:36

Put them in the bin! That's sacrilege! My goodness!

0:28:360:28:39

Would you have rushed out and rescued them, John?

0:28:390:28:42

No, I don't like them that much!

0:28:420:28:44

As I say, value, commercially, is not going to be high,

0:28:440:28:47

because of the damage, primarily.

0:28:470:28:49

I would have thought, realistically,

0:28:490:28:52

you're looking at between 15 and £25, maybe 20 to 30 on a good day,

0:28:520:28:56

but it's more likely to be between 15 and £25, and I'm assuming,

0:28:560:29:00

correct me if I'm wrong, that you don't require a reserve?

0:29:000:29:03

-You'd be happy to see them gone?

-Just let them go.

0:29:030:29:06

Thanks for bringing them in.

0:29:060:29:08

If you have any antiques and collectables

0:29:080:29:10

you'd like to sell, we would love to see you.

0:29:100:29:13

Bring them along to one of our valuation days,

0:29:130:29:15

just like the people have here, today.

0:29:150:29:17

And I can guarantee you, it is a fun-packed day out.

0:29:170:29:21

Just log on to bbc.co.uk/flogit.

0:29:210:29:23

Follow the links. All the information's there.

0:29:230:29:26

Hopefully, we're coming to a town near you.

0:29:260:29:28

If you don't have a computer, check the details in your local press.

0:29:280:29:32

We would love to see you.

0:29:320:29:34

For his next item, Mark shows off a soft spot for some big cats.

0:29:350:29:40

-Hello Janet. Hello, Gavin.

-Hello.

-Hello, Mark.

0:29:400:29:42

What a lovely piece of bronze you've brought in to show us today.

0:29:420:29:46

Tell me all about it.

0:29:460:29:48

We purchased it

0:29:480:29:49

about ten years ago, from an antiques fair in Chelsea, I believe,

0:29:490:29:54

and it wasn't the main purchase.

0:29:540:29:58

I bought another bronze lion,

0:29:580:30:02

and this one came with it, in a way.

0:30:020:30:05

-And I just like the animals, the two lions.

-It is rather charming.

0:30:050:30:10

If you bought it in Chelsea, I am very worried about the prices

0:30:100:30:14

paid for it! I can see why you fell in love with it.

0:30:140:30:18

Are you bronze collectors? Do you like them?

0:30:180:30:20

Yes, my husband does like to collect animalia,

0:30:200:30:23

so that was the main thing.

0:30:230:30:26

Not the inkstand at the side, it was the actual animals.

0:30:260:30:28

You have pre-empted me, really, because you think, "What is it?"

0:30:280:30:33

Of course, if we lift the lid here, we can see it is a desk stand,

0:30:330:30:37

so you would put your inkwell in there.

0:30:370:30:39

The designer, Friedrich Gornik,

0:30:390:30:42

was in operation, really, from the late 19th century

0:30:420:30:45

up to the 1940s, but I think, stylistically, this is about 1910.

0:30:450:30:51

And it's rather fun, because you've got a lovely pair of lions,

0:30:510:30:55

in an almost art nouveau setting.

0:30:550:30:59

Very well modelled, I mean, what can you say,

0:30:590:31:01

there's a lot of feeling in the lions. They've obviously come

0:31:010:31:05

to a watering hole,

0:31:050:31:06

but not a watering hole they usually go to, it's a little flowing lake.

0:31:060:31:11

The whole thing sits very comfortably, doesn't it?

0:31:110:31:13

It's a very attractive piece. Do you have a lot of bronzes, Gavin?

0:31:130:31:17

Yes, quite a few.

0:31:170:31:19

Mainly French sculptures,

0:31:190:31:22

-Barry, and one or two others.

-Yes.

0:31:220:31:27

-And a lot of the big cats.

-Big cat people.

0:31:270:31:31

This sort of subject is quite commercial.

0:31:310:31:35

You've got art nouveau collectors

0:31:350:31:37

and people who like animals.

0:31:370:31:39

My feeling is, if you were thinking of selling it,

0:31:390:31:43

is around about five to 700,

0:31:430:31:45

and maybe tacking the reserve just under, 450 fixed.

0:31:450:31:49

-Would that fit in with your expectations?

-Yes, certainly would.

0:31:490:31:53

You'd be happy with that? We never know,

0:31:530:31:55

I mean, his work, for his figures, can make more than that.

0:31:550:31:59

They can make 650, 850, something like that, and some time ago.

0:31:590:32:04

If the market judges it right, we might get up nearer to the 700.

0:32:040:32:09

Thank you so much for bringing it in.

0:32:090:32:11

Be really interesting to see what happens at the auction, actually.

0:32:110:32:15

-That would be great fun.

-It might roar successful on the day.

0:32:150:32:18

Might not!

0:32:180:32:20

I'm sure it will. That's a quality piece in anybody's book.

0:32:200:32:24

And now, for our final act.

0:32:240:32:28

If you'd like to form an orderly queue this way,

0:32:280:32:31

your antiques will be valued!

0:32:310:32:33

And you'll find out more about this in just a moment,

0:32:330:32:37

because Elizabeth Talbot is just about to put a valuation on it.

0:32:370:32:41

I'm impressed by this, Chris. What can you tell me

0:32:430:32:46

about your fantastic gramophone?

0:32:460:32:48

It belonged to my grandfather.

0:32:480:32:51

He bought it in the early 1900s as a young man,

0:32:510:32:55

when he first started working.

0:32:550:32:58

A lot of happy memories of grandfather playing this

0:32:580:33:00

as young children.

0:33:000:33:02

I can imagine, for a child,

0:33:020:33:05

it has quite a magical shape and produces wonderful sounds,

0:33:050:33:09

and it is quite a memorable sort of thing to see in action.

0:33:090:33:13

Why have you brought it today, then? It's obviously, sort of,

0:33:130:33:16

an heirloom that's gone back through several hands.

0:33:160:33:18

Yes, basically, myself and my brother have got young families,

0:33:180:33:22

and it would be a shame for it to be kept out of the way,

0:33:220:33:26

nobody looking at it, so we thought we'd rather bring it here

0:33:260:33:30

and get it valued and see if somebody would like to buy it,

0:33:300:33:34

go to a really good home, somebody who would care and love it.

0:33:340:33:37

It's now over 100 years old, or about 100 years old, in date.

0:33:370:33:42

The condition of it is just lovely.

0:33:420:33:44

It's actually been very happy.

0:33:440:33:46

Wherever it's been, throughout the family,

0:33:460:33:48

the conditions have been right.

0:33:480:33:51

You have this lovely blond oak base,

0:33:510:33:52

and it's very typical of the early part of the 20th century.

0:33:520:33:56

A lot of fine art furniture was made in this lovely oak,

0:33:560:33:59

a lovely honey rich colour,

0:33:590:34:01

and that's kept its colour really beautifully.

0:34:010:34:04

These sort of fluted pillars at the corners are typical

0:34:040:34:07

of a lot of detail on case furniture,

0:34:070:34:09

so it's a piece of cabinet making, at the bottom, there.

0:34:090:34:13

We go up to this fantastic horn.

0:34:130:34:16

For it to have its horn at all is lovely,

0:34:160:34:19

because so often, the bases and the horn become separated.

0:34:190:34:23

When I saw it from a distance, I thought it was grained metal,

0:34:230:34:26

it had been made to imitate, with a lithographic finish,

0:34:260:34:29

the grain of wood. In fact, it's the wooden horn, and for that to

0:34:290:34:33

be in such a lovely condition after all this time, is also exciting.

0:34:330:34:36

It's made by HMV - His Master's Voice company.

0:34:360:34:40

The internal movement is in beautiful order,

0:34:400:34:44

and everything looks as though it's all raring to go.

0:34:440:34:47

The only damage is superficial.

0:34:470:34:50

The felt, which is probably the most fragile of all the components,

0:34:500:34:54

has just worn through usage,

0:34:540:34:56

and possibly that's reacted to any climatic changes it's been

0:34:560:35:00

involved with over time more quickly than anything else.

0:35:000:35:03

Have you any concept of value at this stage,

0:35:030:35:06

have you researched it or thought about it?

0:35:060:35:08

No, no, not really, no, not at all.

0:35:080:35:10

I actually think that, realistically,

0:35:100:35:13

it shouldn't do less than £250, £350.

0:35:130:35:17

I wouldn't be surprised, given its condition,

0:35:190:35:21

if it didn't make slightly more than that.

0:35:210:35:23

My advice would be a £300 to £400 estimate,

0:35:230:35:27

with a £300 reserve discretionary for the auctioneer's discretion.

0:35:270:35:30

And hopefully, it will just carry itself away

0:35:300:35:33

and, you know, make more.

0:35:330:35:35

Well, that's it. We've now found our final three items

0:35:400:35:43

to take off to auction. So, it's time to say a fond farewell

0:35:430:35:46

to our host location for today, Stapleford Park.

0:35:460:35:49

So, let's just recap on what we are taking with us.

0:35:490:35:52

Rescued from the dustbin in the nick of time,

0:35:520:35:55

Elizabeth valued Jean's Victorian glassware at 15 to £25.

0:35:550:36:00

Gavin and Janet's bronze ink stand with those fine lions

0:36:000:36:04

has great pedigree.

0:36:040:36:05

Mark valued it at 500 to £700.

0:36:050:36:09

Finally, His Master's Voice is another top brand,

0:36:090:36:12

and Chris's gramophone is sure to inspire the bidders.

0:36:120:36:16

Elizabeth valued it at three to £400.

0:36:160:36:19

We're back at Gilding's auction rooms

0:36:210:36:23

for the second half of our items.

0:36:230:36:25

So don't go away, this could be a rollercoaster ride.

0:36:250:36:28

Our owners are all buckled up, and I'm off to join them.

0:36:280:36:31

And first up, it's Jean's glassware. Will the bids go orbital?

0:36:310:36:35

Going under the hammer right now, we've some Victorian green glass,

0:36:370:36:40

which Jean and John kindly brought in to the valuation day.

0:36:400:36:44

-A bit of damage, not a lot of money.

-No.

-OK?

0:36:440:36:46

So we are not biting our fingernails here, there is no reserve.

0:36:460:36:50

Hopefully, we'll get more than £15.

0:36:500:36:51

It's a jug and a vase. I gather they didn't like it, Elizabeth?

0:36:510:36:55

They didn't.

0:36:550:36:56

In the tradition of Flog It!, they came to sell it, which was

0:36:560:36:59

helpful on the day, wasn't it?

0:36:590:37:01

-So, where have they been? In the cupboard all these years?

-Yes.

0:37:010:37:05

I've had them for 13 years, and John didn't see them

0:37:050:37:08

until the night before the valuation.

0:37:080:37:10

THEY LAUGH

0:37:100:37:11

-What else are you hiding?

-Oh, loads!

-Loads!

0:37:110:37:15

Hopefully, here's a buyer for them. Someone will love them.

0:37:150:37:18

We're going to find out right now.

0:37:180:37:21

More tinted glass. Two pieces, in fact.

0:37:220:37:25

£10 bid. 10, 10, £10 for the green.

0:37:250:37:28

-Come on.

-The glass here. At £10.

0:37:280:37:30

I'm bid 10, do I see 12?

0:37:300:37:33

Uh-oh, this is looking worrying. They could be going home, John.

0:37:330:37:36

Are you all done? Finished and sold at £10. 12.

0:37:360:37:41

-Oh.

-£12. I'm bid at £12 in the room.

-Late, late.

0:37:410:37:44

At 15. I'm bid 15.

0:37:440:37:46

£18. I'm bid 18. 18 along the line.

0:37:460:37:50

Standing at £18.

0:37:500:37:53

I told you it was going to be a rollercoaster ride.

0:37:530:37:57

We were teetering on £10, but hey.

0:37:570:38:00

Thanks for bringing in, it was fun.

0:38:000:38:02

There you go. Don't bin it, flog it!

0:38:020:38:06

Next up, the bronze inkwell. This is what I've been waiting for.

0:38:060:38:09

-Gavin and Janet. Hello there.

-Hello.

0:38:090:38:12

We've got £500 to £700 on this. Hopefully we can get that for you.

0:38:120:38:16

Had a chat to the auctioneer yesterday, the preview day,

0:38:160:38:20

and he said he would be cautious.

0:38:200:38:24

He's hoping it's going to sell,

0:38:240:38:25

but he thinks it may sell at the lower end.

0:38:250:38:27

I think he's right, actually.

0:38:270:38:29

I think the market is very different.

0:38:290:38:31

You know, if you're buying privately and you want to buy

0:38:310:38:34

from a respectable dealer, you're paying that end-user price.

0:38:340:38:38

If I was an auctioneer and that came in over the counter,

0:38:380:38:41

I would have probably wanted to settle for three to five.

0:38:410:38:43

Ooh, well, we're going to find out right now.

0:38:430:38:46

Anyway, it's down to the bidders. Here we go.

0:38:460:38:49

114. This lovely big bronze desk stand.

0:38:490:38:54

-Featured well, please, on the internet here.

-Looks great.

0:38:540:38:58

I mean, it is fabulous quality. Fabulous quality.

0:38:580:39:01

Bid 340.

0:39:010:39:03

£340, I'm bid 340.

0:39:030:39:06

At 360, I'm bid 360. 380. 400.

0:39:060:39:09

I'm bid at 420, bid 420, 450.

0:39:090:39:11

-At 450, I'm bid 450.

-Well, we've got the reserve.

0:39:110:39:14

-Yeah.

-In the door. £450 I'm bid.

0:39:140:39:17

You're out on the net. You can't dwell. The bidding's brisk.

0:39:170:39:20

And you've finished. Sold at 450.

0:39:200:39:23

-We've done it, right on the reserve. Pleased?

-Yes, I'm happy.

0:39:230:39:26

-Happy with that?

-Very happy.

-Fabulous quality.

0:39:260:39:29

It's so good to see things like that on the show,

0:39:290:39:31

it educates us all.

0:39:310:39:32

What a great result.

0:39:320:39:35

And now for some old-time music.

0:39:350:39:38

SCRATCHY RECORDING PLAYS

0:39:430:39:46

HE LAUGHS

0:39:490:39:51

That is a vintage sound, isn't it? Full of nostalgia.

0:39:540:39:57

I expect you've seen and sold many of these before, John, haven't you?

0:39:570:40:01

Not many, but we've definitely seen them before.

0:40:010:40:04

-With wooden horns?

-That's the one that's separate.

0:40:040:40:08

They nearly always come without the horn, or a replacement horn.

0:40:080:40:11

That's where the value is, isn't it?

0:40:110:40:13

I would have thought so.

0:40:130:40:15

It was his grandparents', so it's been in the family since the 1900s.

0:40:150:40:18

We put a value of three to £400 on this.

0:40:180:40:21

You have?

0:40:210:40:22

Well, that is a possibility.

0:40:220:40:26

-In my estimation, I'd put it in at, like, two to three.

-OK.

0:40:260:40:30

I like to be able to say, "Come and get me," sort of thing.

0:40:300:40:33

Of course, you're an auctioneer. Your top end is virtually our lower.

0:40:330:40:37

-That's it.

-We're kind of getting there.

-I'm sure you'll be there.

0:40:370:40:40

OK, OK.

0:40:400:40:42

-Fingers crossed.

-I shall work very hard.

0:40:420:40:45

Well, we'll soon find out. It's coming right up.

0:40:450:40:48

So far, so good. Right now,

0:40:500:40:51

I've just been joined by Chris and Elizabeth, our expert,

0:40:510:40:54

and we're talking about that wonderful gramophone with

0:40:540:40:57

the wooden horn, which is quite unique.

0:40:570:40:59

Not many of these have come on the market lately.

0:40:590:41:01

There's something evocative about these.

0:41:010:41:03

They take you immediately to the past. That's such a lovely example.

0:41:030:41:07

Well, it's either going to go to a collector or a decorator,

0:41:070:41:10

because, architecturally, it's got that look, so interesting,

0:41:100:41:13

isn't it, it's, as you say, nostalgic.

0:41:130:41:17

We couldn't get a better condition one really, even the workings.

0:41:170:41:20

Very, very good. Collector will get that, I would think.

0:41:200:41:23

It's more of a museum piece, really.

0:41:230:41:25

And we're going to find out right now. Here we go.

0:41:250:41:28

247. This lovely wind-up gramophone.

0:41:280:41:33

Particularly with the segmented wooden horn.

0:41:330:41:36

What would you say to that, please? Lots and lots of interest here.

0:41:360:41:40

And commission bids start me at £280.

0:41:410:41:44

-Ooh.

-Wow, come on.

0:41:440:41:47

£280, I'm bid 280.

0:41:470:41:49

You and me then, Mary, at £280.

0:41:490:41:51

-One phone line.

-300.

0:41:510:41:52

-And internet.

-Somebody bidding on the internet.

0:41:520:41:55

320, I'm bid 320, and you're out on the net? £320 I'm bid.

0:41:550:41:58

Just looks so fabulous.

0:42:010:42:02

380, 400.

0:42:040:42:06

420, 450.

0:42:070:42:09

480 on the telephone, and the commission's lost. £480 I'm bid.

0:42:090:42:15

At 480, 500 on the net.

0:42:150:42:18

50 to bid. 550 I'm bid on the telephone.

0:42:180:42:21

At £550, I'm bid 550. The telephone's in.

0:42:210:42:25

The internet's out.

0:42:250:42:26

£550 I'm bid. You all done? Quite sure, then?

0:42:260:42:31

All out in the room?

0:42:310:42:33

All out on the net. Sold at £550.

0:42:330:42:35

-His hammer's gone down. Happy with that?

-Very, very.

0:42:350:42:38

-I'm over the moon.

-That's really pleasing.

0:42:380:42:40

-Good for you, wasn't it?

-Quality always sells, and that was special.

0:42:400:42:45

That was special.

0:42:450:42:46

Well, that's it. It's all over for our owners.

0:42:490:42:51

Another day in another auction room. We've had a fabulous time here.

0:42:510:42:55

Everything's sold. Everyone's gone home happy.

0:42:550:42:57

And the highlight of the day for me had to be

0:42:570:43:00

that wonderful gramophone brought in by Chris,

0:43:000:43:02

with a wooden horn.

0:43:020:43:03

It flew out above estimate, and he's a very happy man.

0:43:030:43:06

Join me for many more surprises the next time.

0:43:060:43:09

Until then, from Market Harborough, it's goodbye.

0:43:090:43:12

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:330:43:36

Flog It comes from Stapleford Park in the heart of the Leicestershire countryside. Joining Paul Martin to survey the antiques and collectables are experts, Mark Stacey and Elisabeth Talbot.

Elisabeth is entranced by an exquisite early gramophone and Mark reveals a soft spot for some big cats. Paul visits Thrumpton Hall to marvel at its opulent Restoration staircase and discovers a connection with Lord Byron through some very interesting relics.


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