Alnwick Castle Flog It!


Alnwick Castle

The team visit Alnwick Castle in Northumberland. Among the antiques spotted are a Napoleonic style bicorn hat, Anita coral jewellery and a Dunhill lighter.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

We love a bit of history here on "Flog It!"

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And it doesn't get any better than this - this is Alnwick Castle,

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the family seat to the Duke of Northumberland.

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It's nicknamed the Windsor of the North and it's our host venue today.

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Welcome to the show.

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There's been a castle here for over 1,000 years,

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built close to the volatile border between England and Scotland.

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It was designed to protect the town against attacks from the Scots.

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And our "Flog It!" crowd is under attack from one of our own Scots,

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expert Anita Manning, who will do anything to draw in the punters.

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You'll all get a wee sherry when we go inside.

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-Wow!

-And if you've got anything good, a big sherry!

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And Anita's flanked by David Fletcher,

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who has a more sober approach.

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Are they both in good condition? That's what's so crucial with these things.

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-You do get tea in there.

-You said sherry!

-Aye, but I was only kidding!

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Well, of course, this is the BBC, after all!

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What a marvellous turnout we have here today

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and I've got a good feeling about this one -

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the sun is coming out - everybody's smiling, look!

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THEY CHEER

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And the great thing is, somebody here in this queue

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has got something that is worth a small fortune and they don't know what they've got yet.

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And nor do we - but it's up to our experts to find it,

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-so I think we should get on with the show, don't you? Shall we go inside?

-ALL: Yes!

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And whilst they make their way into the castle,

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here's a taster of what we've got to look forward to.

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In this intriguing venue, we find all manner of intriguing items,

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each with their special history.

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But which will fetch the most at auction?

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Is it the Art Deco gold Dunhill lighter?

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The Marklin electric train set?

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Or the bi-corn naval officer's hat?

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Everybody is now safely seated inside the outer bailey -

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we are filming outdoors today,

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so fingers crossed it's not going to rain. But what a stunning backdrop!

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It doesn't get much better than that.

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Hopefully, we can have some wizard work by our experts today,

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and Anita Manning is first at the tables,

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so let's get a closer look at what she's spotted.

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Anne, thank you for bringing along these two glass items.

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Can you tell me, where did you get them?

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I inherited them from my sister and she died about 12 years ago.

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She had them out on display in her house and I always admired them

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and then I got them after she died.

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I did intend to try and collect more.

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That would have been a good idea

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-and I love to see lots of glass together...

-That's right.

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I think it looks beautiful, particularly that type of glass.

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-Do you know what this is called?

-I know it as cranberry glass.

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Uh-huh, well done, that's good!

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So these are Victorian,

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they would have been from about 1850 to 1900.

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If you hold it up, look at this - wonderful, mouth-watering tones -

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that sort of pinky-red, and I think that's absolutely lovely.

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Glass-makers have always experimented with colours

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and they coloured glass by including different coloured powders or enamels.

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Cranberry glass was expensive

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because this lovely colour was produced by the addition

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of a gold chloride in and that would give them that wonderful red colour.

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Tell me, do you have it on display?

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I used to, when I lived in the type of property that I thought

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it looked best in, but I live in a more modern bungalow now.

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-So time to pass it on?

-Yes.

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If you look at the items more closely, we will see that

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the jug has this wonderful twisted glass handle and the glass-blower

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would have taken that and twisted it round

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to make this wonderful shape.

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That's an added interest to the item.

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Here, we have a little sugar shaker and this would have sat

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on your summer table when you had your strawberries and cream

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and it would have been used to sprinkle your sugar on.

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The top, with these perforations,

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is silver-plated, and this has been well-used,

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because the plate has started to come off of the lid here.

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-Yes.

-We have to take that into consideration.

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I would like, if we're going to put them into auction,

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to put them as one lot.

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I would put an auction valuation of 45-60.

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-Would you be happy to sell it at that price?

-Yes, I would.

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Good. No sentiment... Will you be sorry to see them go?

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Not really. Not really, no, not now.

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Well, we'll put them in, 45-60,

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and we'll put a reserve price of £40 on them.

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-They might run away at that, Anne!

-Well!

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-And it'll be great fun at the auction.

-Yes.

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Well, we'll look forward to that, Anita.

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Next up, magpie David's spotted some gold.

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-Hello, Richard.

-Hello, David.

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-You've brought along with you three gold items.

-Yes.

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Now, I'm interested in the inscription in the lid, here.

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"Eaton Quality Award." And something similar in this. 1995, this one is.

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-And you were awarded these?

-Yes, they were quality awards.

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OK, and were they personal to you, or did other people...?

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-No, it was a division in the company got it.

-OK.

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Very interesting that they should have given you something which has turned out to be an investment.

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When I retire, I don't suppose I shall get anything.

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But if I do, I hope it's something that will go up in value!

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The sovereign and the gold ingot here have both increased

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substantially in value since the mid-'90s,

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but a gold sovereign today is going to be worth £160-200.

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This little chap here, the ingot, it tells us

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it's 999.9 parts per 1,000 pure gold,

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and there are five grams there,

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so if you put that in at about £20 a gram, you've got another £100 there.

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Now, these are based on melt values,

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but that's not to say they'll be melted.

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That's a bit confusing, sometimes, as people assume that

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if something has a high melt value, it automatically gets melted.

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But that's not the case, because people will buy these as investments.

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This one is a half-sovereign.

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This dates from 1900,

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so this has a bit of extra age and as such has appeal to collectors.

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So we'd expect that to make a little bit more than the melt figure,

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but it is really quite badly worn

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-and I would reckon that at between £60-100.

-Yes.

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-You're happy to sell them, presumably?

-Yes, I am.

-OK.

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So if we think in terms of them having a minimum value

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of about £320, and I'm optimistic that they'll make 360, 370 maybe...

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-Very good.

-Sell them as one lot, with a reserve of £300.

-Yes.

-That's OK, is it?

-Yes.

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We'll go ahead on that basis, Richard, and I'll look forward to seeing you at the sale.

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That's a golden opportunity for someone to put aside

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an investment for the future.

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Back on Anita's table, she's joined by Ada, who's getting the sharp end of the stick.

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Thank you for bringing along this sweet little collection of tie pins.

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Can you tell me, where did you get them?

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Well, they're not mine, actually.

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They were collected by my husband - I think he started in the '60s

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and I just thought I would bring them along.

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-Tell me, did he wear these?

-Well, of course, everyone wore ties then.

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-It was a different age!

-It was.

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And do you think it was just a wee thing to satisfy a collecting bug?

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Yes, he certainly wasn't a person for collecting jewellery, as such,

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cos he didn't wear anything except a plain gold ring,

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I think it was just the collecting.

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Uh-huh. It's the fun of going out and searching and finding something that you haven't got.

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Let's have a wee look at them - we've got 15 here.

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And a variety of different types.

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I particularly like that one there, and that is a nine-carat gold one,

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probably from the Edwardian era, 1900-1910.

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What we have here is a peridot, which is that lovely green stone

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and two tiny seed pearls here - it's almost like a baby bar brooch.

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Yes, it is.

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Here again, we have a gold one, and in the centre here,

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we have a tiny little diamond chip, so that's quite a nice one as well.

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-That's my favourite, actually.

-That's your favourite? Ah!

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And I quite like this one, which has a piece of turquoise

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and a little tiny diamond chip, so three rather nice ones here.

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And we have maybe more typical ones. He must have liked these sort of

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floret shapes - here it's almost like a starfish, with seed pearls...

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It's very delicate, isn't it?

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We've got a four-leafed clover and this looks like little milky opals.

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-Oh, they're opals, are they? Right.

-We have a sweet variety here.

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A couple of them are gold, most are gold-plated

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and they're not containing any precious stones.

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What about value, what do you think?

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I honestly don't know what they're worth. I don't think they're worth very much,

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but I just think someone else should have them.

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I think you're absolutely right.

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-I think we should put them into sale at say, £50-70.

-Right.

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We've got 15 there and let's hope that we go towards the top estimate.

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We can put a reserve price on them and I would suggest that

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the reserve price would maybe be in the region of £45.

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-Right. That's fine.

-Would you be happy enough with that?

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-I would, yes, fine.

-OK, let's put them there.

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Will you be sad to see them go?

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No, because I'll be pleased that somebody else can have them.

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-It's a good thought, isn't it?

-Yes.

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And hopefully, they will go higher than the bottom estimate

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and towards the top estimate.

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Well, that would be good.

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What a lovely little collection.

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It looks like eagle-eyed David has been train-spotting.

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-Hello, Mary.

-Hello.

-Thank you for bringing this in for us today.

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-Are you interested in trains and locomotives?

-Mainly toys.

-OK.

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-And do you collect them?

-Yes.

-And this is part of your collection.

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-Well, yes.

-Why are you selling it?

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It's been on top of my wall unit for the last 20 years

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and I wanted to sell it to try and make some money

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for one charity of mine and some trips away, I think.

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OK, splendid.

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You probably know as much about this as I do if you're a collector.

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The tender is known as a steeple car,

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made by a firm called Marklin,

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a very well-known firm of German tin-plate toy manufacturers.

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A particular type of locomotive, as you can see, really -

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rather strange in appearance.

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But I gather a very functional type of locomotive.

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It has an electric motor -

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the power is picked up through the pantograph, it's a 220-volt motor.

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With that amount of voltage flooding through it,

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it's capable of whizzing along.

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And it tows this carriage - also by Marklin -

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I forget the name of that type of carriage. Can you help me?

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-I think it's a Mitropa.

-A Mitropa carriage, exactly right.

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We can date this to about 1926.

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I mean, there are various early features that enable us to do that.

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Not least, the way these rivets are painted,

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little dots painted onto the green ground.

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The carriage itself is lithograph, that's not hand-painted,

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that's printed, that decoration.

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And the mark also, which is an MC, formed in a monogram.

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Look at it, not unlike the MCC as in Marylebone Cricket Club monogram,

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which helps us to determine that it's of a relatively early date.

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It's an incredibly realistic thing

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and any child would just love to play with this,

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and they were made for children, of course.

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I think they've become boys' toys really

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and you're probably quite unusual in being a lady who collects.

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-Strange.

-I wasn't saying it was strange at all,

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I think it's charming. Good for you, buck the trend, I say.

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Have you any other similar tin-plate toys in your collection?

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-I have a few wind-up toys, horses that jump...

-OK.

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-..a bartender whose nose goes red and blows smoke out of his ears.

-As you'd expect.

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But where they are, I haven't a clue.

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-They're there somewhere.

-But you might dig them out one day?

-Yes.

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I think this is going to make somewhere between £200 and £300.

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-Lovely.

-And a reserve of £200.

-Yes, that's lovely.

-Excellent.

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Did you buy it yourself or did you inherit it?

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I bought it from the salerooms just round the corner.

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-Can you remember what you paid?

-About £30, I think.

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With any luck, we'll be adding a nought to that.

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OK, so off we chug, "chug" is the wrong word,

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because it's an electric locomotive.

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Off we whizz to the sale room with it.

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I'll sit in the front, you can sit in the back. And I'll see you there.

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'Mary's train set may have been designed as a child's toy,

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'but there's nothing childish about the price they can command in the saleroom.

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'Back in 2008, we saw this collection of popular Hornby engines

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'sell for a steamy £550.

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'But it's pre-war Marklin

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'locomotives that fetch the most

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'and really desirable models like this one are worth over £2000.

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'Let's hope the price Mary gets

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'for hers goes off the rails.'

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Well, that's it, that's our last item found this morning.

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Now it's time to put those valuations to the test,

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as we head over to the auction room for the first time.

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And while we make our way over there, here's a quick recap,

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just to jog your memory of all the items going under the hammer.

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Anne's Victorian cranberry glass is right up Anita's street,

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but will the bidders love it?

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David thinks Richard's

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gold collection will appeal to collectors,

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rather than scrapdealers.

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Anita hopes these 15 delicate tie pins

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will be a success in the sale room.

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And David's also confident

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about his train set.

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He's valued it for ten times the original price.

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We're travelling an hour down the north-east coast

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to Boldon Auction Galleries in Tyne and Wear.

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Commission rates do vary,

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but here, sellers pay 17.5%, plus VAT.

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As you can see, it's a packed saleroom. There's two floors here.

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Hopefully, a lot of these people are going to be bidding on our lots. We'll find out a bit later.

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We could have one or two surprises. Don't go away, anything can happen.

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Auctioneer Giles Hodges is raring to go,

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the bidders are primed and here's our first lot.

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It's Anne's jug and sugar sifter.

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Not you at all?

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-You didn't like the cranberry glass?

-I did like it.

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-Why are you selling them?

-It was handed down through the family

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and I'd like to share the money with my grandchildren.

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65, £70?

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Well, cranberry glass isn't getting as much as it was getting five or six years ago,

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but these are nice pieces and they're in good condition.

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-Not my cup of tea, I've got to say.

-We're subject to fashion and fad,

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the same as any other type of business,

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and this is a wee outer taste into these markets.

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Well, let's find out what the bidders think, shall we?

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It's going under the hammer right now. Good luck, both of you.

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We've got the Victorian cranberry glass jug,

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with the clear glass handle

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and the sifter with the plated mount to match.

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There we go, and a £20 bid.

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At 20, for the bid of cranberry. 25. 30, 35, 40.

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This is OK, it's going.

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-£40, latest bid on the front row. At £40. 45.

-Yes.

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50. Five. £55, it's on the balcony.

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At £55. 60, anybody?

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In the room, on the balcony, at £55.

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-Yes. Sold, good valuation.

-That's not a bad price for them.

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-Much better, a wee bit better than I thought.

-I'm delighted.

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Happy, happy, everyone?

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THEY LAUGH

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-Yes, thank you.

-Are you happy?

-Job done.

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Let's hope the new owner is just as happy as us three.

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Well, it certainly is a good time to sell gold

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and that's exactly what we're doing.

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Richard has three gold awards,

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lovely coins, in a way, but they're awards.

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-Awards, yes.

-Why are you selling these now?

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I've had them for many years, I got them in the 1990s

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and I just thought, gold's at a good price.

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-It is. You were aware of that, weren't you?

-Yes.

-Exactly.

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We have the 22-carat gold sovereign,

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dated 1980, the half sovereign,

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and a little medal as well, roughly about 17 grams.

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I have, again, four bids.

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380 to start me.

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-At 380. 390...

-That's the scrap value.

-Yes, I think.

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400, 410, 420, 430,

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440, 450, 460.

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-460, with me. It's on commission at £460, are we all done?

-Straight in.

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Still on the internet at £460.

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That's OK, we'll take that.

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It's done far better than it would've done in an ISA,

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or stocks and shares, or a building society.

0:18:230:18:25

It's something tangible to look at and talk about.

0:18:250:18:27

You can't show off your ISA to a friend.

0:18:270:18:30

You can't invite them round and say, "Look at my ISA."

0:18:300:18:32

But at least you can say, "Look at these, these are nice."

0:18:320:18:35

And you can boast about what you sold your gold for on Flog It! You can't boast about your ISA.

0:18:350:18:40

And let's see if our next lot is something to boast about.

0:18:400:18:46

Going under the hammer right now, a collection of 15 tie pins.

0:18:460:18:50

Something that wouldn't really suit me, Ada,

0:18:500:18:52

-because I've actually only worn a tie on TV once.

-Scruff.

0:18:520:18:58

-Lovely collection though, Ada.

-Yes, I think so. Yes.

0:18:580:19:01

-I'm sure these are going to find a home right now.

-I hope so.

0:19:010:19:05

Happy with the valuation?

0:19:050:19:06

Yes, well, 45 is not dear. I think we have two or three gold ones

0:19:060:19:10

there and there is such a variety

0:19:100:19:12

in tie pins that people like to collect them.

0:19:120:19:15

Let's find out what the bidders think. They're going under the hammer right now.

0:19:150:19:18

A collection of 15 various tie pins, some of them nine carat.

0:19:180:19:24

I'm bid 30 to start them, at £30.

0:19:240:19:27

35, 40, 45. On the balcony at £45. 50, anybody?

0:19:270:19:32

-We're in.

-At £45. On my right, at £45.

0:19:320:19:37

This is good.

0:19:370:19:38

Ladies and gentlemen, at 45.

0:19:380:19:41

Yes, he sold them, hammer's gone down, 45.

0:19:410:19:45

That's a good valuation.

0:19:450:19:47

I would've liked a wee bitty more, but that's what happens.

0:19:470:19:51

They've gone to a good home, I imagine.

0:19:510:19:53

-Somebody's going to use those.

-Yes.

0:19:530:19:55

But not me. You can't pin me down and make me wear a tie, Anita!

0:19:550:20:00

Going under the hammer right now,

0:20:000:20:03

Mary's train set, with a value of £200-300.

0:20:030:20:05

-You're a bit of a toy collector.

-Yes, that's right.

0:20:050:20:08

You got this in auction, 30 years ago? How much did you pay for it?

0:20:080:20:11

-I think about £30, I'm not sure.

-That's not too bad, is it?

0:20:110:20:16

Hopefully, we can turn it into 200 to 300?

0:20:160:20:18

-That's what we're hoping to do.

-Lovely, good.

0:20:180:20:21

I'm pretty confident, I'm not 100% confident, but pretty confident.

0:20:210:20:25

Let's find out. I was going to say, it's a boy's toy, but obviously not, it's a girl's toy as well.

0:20:250:20:30

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:20:300:20:32

We have the pre-war Marklin electric four-wheel speed loco

0:20:320:20:37

and the little single carriage.

0:20:370:20:39

I'm bid £200.

0:20:390:20:40

At 200. 20, anybody?

0:20:400:20:43

-It's placed.

-220, 240,

0:20:430:20:45

260, 280, 300.

0:20:450:20:49

To my left at £300. Another 20 now.

0:20:490:20:53

-At £300, to my left.

-That's good.

0:20:530:20:56

-That's very good, 300.

-£300, anybody on the net?

0:20:560:21:00

£300, are we all done, ladies and gents at £300?

0:21:000:21:06

That was worth hanging on to, wasn't it?

0:21:060:21:08

Bought for £30, sold for £300. Everything has a value over time.

0:21:080:21:12

It's sort of affordable, I suppose.

0:21:120:21:14

-Somebody else can look after it now.

-Yes.

0:21:140:21:18

That's the end of our first visit to the auction room today.

0:21:210:21:24

You've heard what our experts' opinions were

0:21:240:21:26

and you've seen what the bidders' reactions were.

0:21:260:21:29

We are coming back later on in the programme, don't go away.

0:21:290:21:32

But the great thing about antiques is they have not just a good life,

0:21:320:21:35

they have a second life, third life and fourth life

0:21:350:21:38

under a different owner, in a different guise.

0:21:380:21:41

They just keep going around and around.

0:21:410:21:43

While I was up here in the area,

0:21:430:21:45

I took the opportunity to go off and film a building

0:21:450:21:47

that's had many different guises over the centuries,

0:21:470:21:50

and it's absolutely fascinating. Take a look at this.

0:21:500:21:53

Lindisfarne Castle, on the Northumberland coastline,

0:21:580:22:02

is cut off from land twice a day by three miles of the North Sea at high tide.

0:22:020:22:06

Now, that building behind me has to be the ultimate grand design.

0:22:060:22:11

But is it a 16th-century fort,

0:22:110:22:13

built to protect Lindisfarne harbour from the invading Scots?

0:22:130:22:17

Maybe it's a coastguard's lookout, a Jacobite hideaway,

0:22:170:22:20

inspiration for Charles Rennie Mackintosh,

0:22:200:22:23

or even a luxury holiday home for a London publishing tycoon.

0:22:230:22:27

Over the last 400 years, Lindisfarne Castle

0:22:270:22:31

has been all of those,

0:22:310:22:32

and I'm here today to find out how one place

0:22:320:22:35

can have so many different owners.

0:22:350:22:37

The story starts back in 1570.

0:22:370:22:40

It was decided that the island and harbour

0:22:400:22:43

needed greater protection from the Scots, and so a fort was built here.

0:22:430:22:48

Now, imagine how bleak it must have felt being posted here

0:22:480:22:52

on the highest point of the island in the deepest of winter.

0:22:520:22:55

Luckily, the fort had a relatively easy life.

0:22:580:23:01

There were never any bloodthirsty battles here.

0:23:010:23:04

In 1603, the accession of James VI of Scotland to the English throne

0:23:040:23:09

united the two kingdoms.

0:23:090:23:11

So there was no longer a need for Lindisfarne to have a border fort.

0:23:110:23:15

However, for the next three centuries,

0:23:150:23:17

a detachment from the Berwick garrison were stationed here

0:23:170:23:21

to defend the harbour against various enemies.

0:23:210:23:23

And in 1893, the building became a coastguard station.

0:23:230:23:27

Then in 1901, Edward Hudson, the editor of Country Life magazine,

0:23:300:23:35

discovered the empty remains of the castle whilst on holiday.

0:23:350:23:39

He scaled the walls and looked around.

0:23:390:23:41

The coastguards had left it in squalor,

0:23:410:23:43

but Hudson saw the castle's potential

0:23:430:23:45

and he fell in love with it.

0:23:450:23:49

As a Londoner, he had a romantic view of the country

0:23:490:23:52

and aspired to have the same lifestyle

0:23:520:23:54

that his magazines promoted.

0:23:540:23:56

Hudson leased the castle from the local landowner

0:23:560:23:59

and immediately commissioned his good friend

0:23:590:24:02

and architect Edward Lutyens to transform the fort

0:24:020:24:05

into a dream holiday home within its Tudor walls.

0:24:050:24:09

It was a challenge that Lutyens was certainly up for.

0:24:090:24:13

He embraced the project.

0:24:130:24:15

At the age of 33, he'd already established himself

0:24:150:24:18

as England's leading country house architect.

0:24:180:24:21

He was fit for the challenge.

0:24:210:24:23

It got him away from that picturesque Surrey house look

0:24:230:24:26

and he was able to embrace local materials.

0:24:260:24:29

So how did Lutyens go about creating a modern holiday home

0:24:320:24:36

from a castle fort?

0:24:360:24:38

He extended the building, playing with the rise and fall of levels,

0:24:380:24:42

angles and contrasts between stone, grass and skyline.

0:24:420:24:47

Inside, he leaded windows and created fantastic columns

0:24:480:24:52

and rounded arches.

0:24:520:24:53

The rooms are linked with dramatic corridors

0:24:540:24:58

and play on the subtle combinations of stone, bricks, slate and cobble.

0:24:580:25:03

The almost seamless integration of the materials and textures

0:25:030:25:07

gives the impression the rooms are carved from the rock itself.

0:25:070:25:13

Lutyens embraced the castle's original features

0:25:150:25:18

with his own arts and crafts details,

0:25:180:25:21

something typical of his early style.

0:25:210:25:24

This is part of the original fort building.

0:25:240:25:26

That huge red brick fireplace, and these windows

0:25:260:25:29

have been cleverly incorporated into an old gunpowder magazine.

0:25:290:25:33

The vaulted ceiling above dates to the 18th century.

0:25:330:25:37

That was cleverly installed to take the weight of a new gun battery,

0:25:370:25:41

right above our head.

0:25:410:25:42

But the attention to detail is quite exquisite.

0:25:420:25:45

It runs throughout this entire building.

0:25:450:25:48

Some of it is obvious, some of it is subtle.

0:25:480:25:50

For instance, these curtains just pull back on these rods.

0:25:500:25:53

They swing back.

0:25:530:25:56

The curtains aren't bunched in a tight group when they're drawn back.

0:25:560:26:00

It allows the maximum amount of light to flood through the window.

0:26:000:26:04

Something on a more subtle note.

0:26:040:26:06

The architectural detail on the door over there. I'll show you.

0:26:060:26:10

All the doors in this building have the most wonderful latches.

0:26:100:26:14

Just look at this.

0:26:140:26:16

All incorporated with a lead weight in them.

0:26:160:26:19

The idea of that is, it moves the bolt across.

0:26:200:26:23

It not only shows off Lutyens' unique style,

0:26:230:26:25

but it embraces the whole of the arts and crafts ethos.

0:26:250:26:29

Something born of good craftsmanship.

0:26:290:26:32

Something beautiful to look at,

0:26:320:26:34

and something practical.

0:26:340:26:37

And that ticks all the boxes.

0:26:370:26:40

Perhaps the most unusual feature in this building is this,

0:26:470:26:52

the internal wind indicator.

0:26:520:26:54

It's something that Lutyens installed

0:26:540:26:56

in many of the fine buildings he designed.

0:26:560:26:59

This was painted by the artist MacDonald Gill in 1912.

0:26:590:27:03

Gill and Lutyens share the same sense of fun and vibrancy

0:27:030:27:07

in their work.

0:27:070:27:09

This is a good example. It's full of ambiguities.

0:27:090:27:11

There are several stories going on at once

0:27:110:27:14

within the main theme.

0:27:140:27:16

In this case, the main theme

0:27:160:27:18

is the effects of the unfavourable winds.

0:27:180:27:20

This depicts a scene from 1588.

0:27:200:27:23

In the centre, you see Lindisfarne.

0:27:230:27:25

But around it, the defeated Spanish fleet being blown up the east coast,

0:27:250:27:29

with the English fleet in hot pursuit.

0:27:290:27:32

Around it, here, all the other castles protecting Northumberland.

0:27:320:27:36

Places like Alnwick and Bamburgh.

0:27:360:27:39

Isn't that marvellous? There's the dial.

0:27:390:27:42

It's linked to this weathervane, using a series of cogs and rods.

0:27:420:27:45

And it still works.

0:27:450:27:46

At the moment, the dial says 'West South Westerly'.

0:27:460:27:50

In its heyday, the castle played host to magnificent parties

0:27:540:27:57

and welcomed a number of distinguished guests,

0:27:570:27:59

including the future King George V,

0:27:590:28:02

and the cellist Medim Suggia.

0:28:020:28:05

Just imagine the atmosphere at one of these parties.

0:28:050:28:08

It had become a home that exuded warmth and comfort.

0:28:080:28:12

Perfect for entertaining,

0:28:120:28:14

and a million miles away from the cold and functional fort

0:28:140:28:17

of its former life.

0:28:170:28:19

Hudson bought the castle in 1918.

0:28:190:28:22

But without an heir to leave it to,

0:28:220:28:24

and an increasing workload back in London,

0:28:240:28:27

he decided to sell it three years later, in 1921.

0:28:270:28:29

It then passed through the hands of two private owners,

0:28:290:28:32

before being given to the National Trust in 1944.

0:28:320:28:37

The incredible transformation this castle has gone through

0:28:370:28:40

over the centuries

0:28:400:28:41

makes it a building like no other.

0:28:410:28:43

It'll be fascinating to see what it looks like,

0:28:430:28:46

and who its visitors are in another 100 years' time.

0:28:460:28:50

From Lindisfarne Castle,

0:28:580:29:00

it's back to Alnwick Castle, our spectacular valuation day venue.

0:29:000:29:03

It's time to seek refuge inside,

0:29:030:29:05

because the weather hasn't won its battle.

0:29:050:29:08

Louise, I think your coach awaits you here.

0:29:080:29:11

It's ready to take you home.

0:29:110:29:13

What have you brought in to show us today?

0:29:130:29:15

I've brought in this Bicorne hat I found in the house I've just bought.

0:29:150:29:18

It's an old vicarage.

0:29:180:29:21

-Is that far from Alnwick?

-It's about 40 miles from here.

0:29:210:29:24

So you've just bought an old vicarage,

0:29:240:29:27

-and now you're doing it up?

-I am, yes.

0:29:270:29:29

And you found this in the house?

0:29:290:29:31

There was a lot of old boxes left in the attic,

0:29:310:29:33

and when we cleared out the boxes,

0:29:330:29:35

this was in the bottom of one of the boxes.

0:29:350:29:37

We've seen these on the show before.

0:29:370:29:40

There is great interest in maritime memorabilia.

0:29:400:29:43

Have you seen what's inside here yet?

0:29:430:29:46

-No.

-Do you know

0:29:460:29:47

what we're talking about?

0:29:470:29:49

It's an officer's hat. Look at that.

0:29:490:29:52

Bicorne, meaning 'two sides to it'.

0:29:520:29:54

There are tricornes, that point at the front.

0:29:540:29:56

I think possibly the most famous

0:29:560:29:59

person to wear a bicorne

0:29:590:30:01

would be Napoleon Bonaparte.

0:30:010:30:02

You hold this, will you?

0:30:020:30:04

Can we have a model

0:30:040:30:07

that can wear this?

0:30:070:30:09

-What's your name?

-Thomas.

0:30:090:30:11

Are you ready? Here we go.

0:30:110:30:12

Gosh, this chap had a tiny little head, didn't he?

0:30:120:30:16

-How d'you feel, Thomas?

-THEY LAUGH

0:30:160:30:19

A little bit silly, probably!

0:30:190:30:21

Look at the work and detail that's gone into that.

0:30:210:30:24

-There's a name on the front, isn't there?

-Yes.

0:30:240:30:27

Have you done any research on this?

0:30:270:30:29

I couldn't find anything on the name.

0:30:290:30:31

'MH Piuie Esquire'.

0:30:310:30:35

It's a shame. If we knew who owned this,

0:30:350:30:37

we could trace the vessel he was on.

0:30:370:30:39

So the whole thing would have provenance, more history.

0:30:390:30:41

Normally, it's the provenance that puts the weight of value

0:30:410:30:44

onto an item like this.

0:30:440:30:46

The hatbox itself is really interesting.

0:30:460:30:49

That's quite collectible in its own right.

0:30:490:30:51

I've a feeling the hatbox and the hat

0:30:510:30:53

are virtually the same value each.

0:30:530:30:55

I think you had a good find.

0:30:550:30:57

Let's put a valuation of £60 to £100 on it.

0:30:570:30:59

I know this will get snapped up by maritime collectors.

0:30:590:31:03

-Are you happy with that?

-Very happy.

0:31:030:31:06

-Do you know why they fold flat like this?

-No.

-No, I don't know.

0:31:060:31:10

It's because they're designed to be tucked under the arm for comfort,

0:31:100:31:14

when you walk along when you're not on duty.

0:31:140:31:18

Wonderful little thing.

0:31:180:31:19

They're worn right up until 1914, in the British Navy.

0:31:190:31:22

We'll put that back inside,

0:31:220:31:25

and take that over to the auction room for you.

0:31:250:31:27

Hopefully, we'll get the top end of the estimate.

0:31:270:31:30

I think that's rather good.

0:31:300:31:32

-A classic bit of antique recycling. That's what it's all about.

-Thanks.

0:31:320:31:36

'What a fascinating piece of history.

0:31:360:31:38

'Now, over to the guest hall, where David's head's been turned

0:31:380:31:42

'by a small, but perfectly formed, collectible.'

0:31:420:31:45

-Hello, Susie.

-Hello, there.

0:31:450:31:47

This is a stylish thing, isn't it?

0:31:470:31:49

A cigarette lighter, of course.

0:31:490:31:53

It appears to be gold. I'll look in a moment.

0:31:530:31:57

I'm pretty certain it's by Dunhill.

0:31:570:32:00

What's more, it looks to me that it was made between the wars.

0:32:000:32:03

It's sort of in the Art Deco style.

0:32:030:32:06

Reminds me a bit of a skyscraper.

0:32:060:32:08

That very modern style of architecture sweeping America

0:32:080:32:11

in the 1930s.

0:32:110:32:13

Above all else, it's just a cool thing to own.

0:32:130:32:17

You can imagine sitting on your sun chair on your yacht

0:32:200:32:24

in Monte Carlo, flicking it and lighting your very long cigarette.

0:32:240:32:28

Perhaps in a holder as well.

0:32:280:32:30

It is SO cool. Let's have a look

0:32:300:32:32

and see if I'm right.

0:32:320:32:34

I am. It's clearly marked 'Dunhill'.

0:32:360:32:39

It also states, on the base, 'Cartier Licence'.

0:32:390:32:42

So it was made under licence to a Cartier design.

0:32:420:32:45

What a combination of names,

0:32:450:32:47

Cartier and Dunhill.

0:32:470:32:48

We also have the assay mark,

0:32:480:32:50

which tells us that it's nine-carat gold.

0:32:500:32:53

Engine-turned decoration, very understated base,

0:32:530:32:57

and capital, echoing the architectural theme.

0:32:570:33:02

Tell me how you came to own it.

0:33:020:33:03

Last year, we were at a car-boot sale,

0:33:030:33:06

and wandering around, and picked it up,

0:33:060:33:08

because I thought it was a cute piece,

0:33:080:33:10

which was up for sale for £7.

0:33:100:33:13

-£7?

-Yes.

0:33:130:33:15

And the boyfriend bartered it down to £4.

0:33:150:33:18

We knew it was a Dunhill lighter,

0:33:180:33:20

cos it was at the bottom,

0:33:200:33:23

but when we got it home

0:33:230:33:25

and took the filler cap off,

0:33:250:33:26

there was some engraving on the inside.

0:33:260:33:29

I said, "here, it says .375."

0:33:290:33:32

I said, "That's nine-carat gold."

0:33:320:33:34

Exactly.

0:33:340:33:35

That was a fantastic buy. Did you do any homework?

0:33:350:33:39

A little bit, yes.

0:33:390:33:41

And you found out much what I've told you?

0:33:410:33:43

-Yes. A 1934 hallmark.

-1934? That's the hallmark.

0:33:430:33:47

-It came as no great surprise to you when I told you what it was?

-No.

0:33:470:33:52

OK. So it cost you £4?

0:33:520:33:54

-Have you any idea what it might be worth?

-No.

0:33:540:33:58

Well, you have to bear in mind it's gold.

0:33:580:34:00

There's going to be a significant melt value in the case.

0:34:000:34:03

But it's worth far more than its melt value.

0:34:030:34:06

You have to bear in mind the mechanics aren't gold.

0:34:060:34:09

I think they're probably brass.

0:34:090:34:11

I think it's worth something between £250 and £350.

0:34:110:34:16

-I would suggest a reserve of £250.

-Lovely.

0:34:160:34:19

Which is quite a profit on £4.

0:34:190:34:21

Well done, your boyfriend and you.

0:34:210:34:26

I think we'll do very well for you.

0:34:260:34:28

It's a wonderful object.

0:34:280:34:29

Smoking is no longer fashionable,

0:34:290:34:31

but its paraphernalia

0:34:310:34:34

is still very popular.

0:34:340:34:36

Zippo and Ronson models are the most collected.

0:34:360:34:38

But good news for Susie, it's Dunhill that fetches the most.

0:34:380:34:43

In 2011, "Flog It!" saw this aquarium lighter

0:34:430:34:46

go under the hammer

0:34:460:34:47

for an impressive £1,510.

0:34:470:34:50

Collectors of the brand can pay

0:34:500:34:53

up to £10,000

0:34:530:34:55

for a gold concealed

0:34:550:34:56

watch lighter like this one.

0:34:560:34:58

Now, still burning through their valuations,

0:34:580:35:01

over to Anita.

0:35:010:35:03

Thank you for bringing along this

0:35:030:35:06

lovely little suite of jewellery.

0:35:060:35:07

Can you tell me, where did you get it?

0:35:070:35:09

From my mother, just before she died.

0:35:090:35:11

It had apparently belonged to her grandmother

0:35:110:35:14

and had come down through the family.

0:35:140:35:16

-Are you married, John?

-I am, yes.

0:35:160:35:18

-Did your wife wear that at all?

-No, she didn't.

0:35:180:35:21

She thought it was a bit too flamboyant.

0:35:210:35:23

That's right. A bit ornate for today's tastes.

0:35:230:35:26

What I find delightful, first of all,

0:35:260:35:30

is that it's in its original box.

0:35:300:35:31

That's always good, in the buying of jewellery.

0:35:310:35:36

The date, somewhere between 1880 and 1900.

0:35:360:35:41

It's made of coral, and it's all small pieces of coral

0:35:410:35:44

which have together been gathered.

0:35:440:35:47

We can see the little child lying in a bed of flowers and leaves.

0:35:470:35:51

Quite a romantic thought.

0:35:510:35:54

If we turn it round the back,

0:35:540:35:55

we can see there is a brooch or pin mechanism here,

0:35:550:36:00

so it can be worn as a brooch.

0:36:000:36:02

But we also have a hook, so it can be used as a pendant.

0:36:020:36:06

And we have these long drop earrings,

0:36:060:36:09

which were very popular in Victorian times.

0:36:090:36:12

It's a nice little suite, John.

0:36:120:36:15

I like the colour of coral. I think it's beautiful and it's warm.

0:36:150:36:18

I quite like the flamboyance of it.

0:36:180:36:21

I would wear that with a yellow jumper, or whatever.

0:36:210:36:25

-Have you had it valued before?

-No.

0:36:260:36:30

We're not talking about precious stones here.

0:36:300:36:33

It is a natural substance.

0:36:330:36:36

If it was coming into auction, I would put it

0:36:360:36:39

in the region of £50 to £80.

0:36:390:36:41

It may do more than that, John.

0:36:410:36:44

That may be a conservative estimate.

0:36:440:36:47

-But I think it's the proper estimate to draw the bidding in.

-Right.

0:36:470:36:52

Would you be happy to put it in with a reserve on the lower estimate?

0:36:520:36:56

Well, I'd prefer to see the lower end up a bit,

0:36:560:37:01

-if that's possible.

-It is, of course.

0:37:010:37:04

In the end, John, we want you to be happy.

0:37:040:37:08

But we certainly can't put the reserve above the lower estimate.

0:37:080:37:11

If we take the lower estimate up,

0:37:110:37:15

you might feel more comfortable with that?

0:37:150:37:17

Yes, I would.

0:37:170:37:20

£60 to £80, with a FIRM reserve of £60?

0:37:200:37:23

Right, fine. I hope people fight over it.

0:37:230:37:25

They will. I think it'll go at least to the higher estimate.

0:37:250:37:30

And we might get a wee surprise.

0:37:300:37:32

Yeah. Fingers crossed.

0:37:320:37:34

Not long to go before we find out.

0:37:340:37:38

Sadly, it's time to say farewell to these magnificent people

0:37:380:37:41

that have turned up today, without whom we would not have a show.

0:37:410:37:45

A big thank you there, and also to our magnificent backdrop,

0:37:450:37:48

Alnwick Castle.

0:37:480:37:50

Let's get straight over to the saleroom.

0:37:500:37:52

Here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

0:37:520:37:55

Louise rescued this officer's hat from her loft.

0:37:590:38:02

I'm confident it will be snapped up by a naval collector

0:38:020:38:04

on the double.

0:38:040:38:06

Susie paid just £4 for this stylish Dunhill lighter,

0:38:080:38:11

which certainly set alight

0:38:110:38:14

David's imagination.

0:38:140:38:16

Anita thinks the vibrant coral jewellery will draw the bidders in,

0:38:160:38:20

with a conservative estimate.

0:38:200:38:22

We're back at Boldon Auction Galleries

0:38:280:38:30

in Tyne and Wear.

0:38:300:38:33

Remember, if you're buying or selling at auction,

0:38:330:38:36

there is commission to pay.

0:38:360:38:38

Here, it's 17.5%, plus VAT.

0:38:380:38:41

So check the details in the catalogue, because it does vary

0:38:410:38:45

from auction room to auction room.

0:38:450:38:47

Going under the hammer right now, the hatbox belonging to Louise,

0:38:500:38:54

with a value of around £60.

0:38:540:38:56

It might do £100, but it's somewhere in that margin.

0:38:560:38:59

-We might be taking this home.

-OK.

0:38:590:39:01

I hope not.

0:39:010:39:02

-Nevertheless, it was a good find in the house, wasn't it?

-Yes, it was.

0:39:020:39:06

How are the restoration works going so far?

0:39:060:39:08

Slowly, but surely.

0:39:080:39:10

We were knocking a wall down yesterday, so I had my hard hat on.

0:39:100:39:13

Hopefully, we can have some proceeds from this

0:39:130:39:16

-to go towards that.

-Yes.

-I hope!

0:39:160:39:18

Here we go. This is it.

0:39:180:39:21

An old, Napoleonic-style hat.

0:39:220:39:24

Inscribed 'M H Piuie, Esquire'.

0:39:240:39:26

I have one, two, three

0:39:260:39:28

-four commission bids before we start.

-Great.

0:39:280:39:31

We are starting at £100.

0:39:310:39:36

£10, anybody? At £100. £10, anybody in the room?

0:39:360:39:39

At £100, or the net.

0:39:390:39:41

At £100.

0:39:410:39:43

With me, on the commission. So, the maiden bid's going to get it.

0:39:430:39:46

-At £100, we're away.

-Yes!

0:39:460:39:49

At £100, thank you.

0:39:490:39:51

Thank goodness for that.

0:39:510:39:53

That'll get all your plaster, hopefully.

0:39:530:39:55

-Bags of plaster.

-Yes.

-And a bit of cement.

-Hopefully.

0:39:550:39:58

Good luck with the rest of the project, and thanks so much

0:39:580:40:02

-for bringing that in.

-Thanks.

-Phew!

0:40:020:40:04

Next up, the gold Dunhill lighter belonging to Susie.

0:40:070:40:10

I have good news for you.

0:40:100:40:12

Since the valuation day, about six weeks ago,

0:40:120:40:15

the price of gold has shot up in value.

0:40:150:40:17

Had a chat to Giles yesterday. He said it's gone up

0:40:170:40:19

at least £100.

0:40:190:40:21

A little bit more.

0:40:210:40:22

-That's not bad going, is it?

-It's not.

0:40:220:40:25

It's worth the wait!

0:40:250:40:26

So it's made by Dunhill, retailed by Cartier.

0:40:260:40:29

Top names. A nice little thing.

0:40:290:40:31

The nine-carat gold Dunhill-Cartier tall boy lighter.

0:40:310:40:36

London, 1934.

0:40:360:40:38

With the engine-turned case.

0:40:380:40:41

-I've two commission bids.

-(That's good!)

0:40:410:40:43

-Starting at four...

-Four...?!

0:40:430:40:46

£460 starts me.

0:40:460:40:48

That's great!

0:40:480:40:50

At £460.

0:40:500:40:51

£480, now.

0:40:510:40:53

At £460. £480, anybody?

0:40:530:40:57

At £460,

0:40:570:40:59

are we all done?

0:40:590:41:00

The internet's quiet.

0:41:000:41:02

-At £460...

-That's not bad, Susie, is it?

0:41:020:41:06

We're away, at £460.

0:41:060:41:08

That was virtually straight in, wasn't it?

0:41:080:41:10

At £460. Bang! Sold.

0:41:100:41:13

-Well, your chap turned a good profit on that.

-Yes, he did.

0:41:130:41:17

-What a cool item. Very Noel Coward, isn't it?

-Very.

0:41:170:41:20

-Thank you so much for bringing that in.

-Thank you very much.

0:41:200:41:23

Not a bad profit on a £4 investment, Susie.

0:41:230:41:27

Going under the hammer now, something really stylish.

0:41:270:41:31

Coral brooch and some long drop earrings, belonging to John.

0:41:310:41:35

Well, they weren't really John's, were they?

0:41:350:41:38

But they were your grandmother's?

0:41:380:41:40

Great-grandmother's.

0:41:400:41:41

Gosh! They've been in the family a long time.

0:41:410:41:43

I'm not quite sure how they came down,

0:41:430:41:45

but I ended up getting them from my mother.

0:41:450:41:48

I don't think the box has been opened for about ten years.

0:41:480:41:51

-I love this.

-There's not a lot of money here. A reserve of just £60.

0:41:510:41:55

They might do better than that. They aren't a precious stone.

0:41:550:41:58

We don't have gold, silver, or diamonds.

0:41:580:42:01

-But they have the look.

-They have the look.

0:42:010:42:03

-So, hopefully, we're looking for twice that!

-Or three times!

0:42:030:42:07

Fingers crossed, here we go. It's going under the hammer.

0:42:070:42:10

We have this Victorian coral brooch,

0:42:100:42:13

with the matching earrings,

0:42:130:42:15

and in its original box.

0:42:150:42:17

And I'm bid £40 to start it.

0:42:170:42:20

£45, £55.

0:42:200:42:22

-£65.

-That's good, it's bouncing

0:42:220:42:23

backwards and forwards.

0:42:230:42:25

£65. £70. Fresh place.

0:42:250:42:28

£75. £85.

0:42:280:42:30

£90. £95. £100.

0:42:300:42:32

-£105.

-The commission bid

0:42:320:42:34

he's working from the book.

0:42:340:42:35

£115, £120. £125.

0:42:350:42:38

£130.

0:42:380:42:39

£135. £140.

0:42:390:42:42

-£145.

-They LOOK expensive, let's face it.

0:42:420:42:46

Bidders upstairs. Now the net.

0:42:460:42:48

-£180.

-£180!

-£190.

0:42:480:42:51

£220.

0:42:530:42:54

He's off the book. It's all going on in the room.

0:42:540:42:57

It's in the room at £230.

0:42:570:42:59

£300.

0:42:590:43:01

£320. £380.

0:43:010:43:04

-Wow, John.

-£400.

0:43:040:43:08

Got £400 on the internet.

0:43:080:43:10

£420. It's in the room at £420.

0:43:100:43:12

-That's a good price.

-We've quadrupled it.

0:43:120:43:14

First and the last time.

0:43:140:43:16

At £420...

0:43:160:43:18

£440.

0:43:180:43:20

Wow.

0:43:200:43:22

At £440. You're all out upstairs.

0:43:220:43:25

At £440, and we're away!

0:43:250:43:28

At £440.

0:43:280:43:31

Wasn't that wonderful?

0:43:310:43:34

-Wasn't that wonderful?

-Result!

0:43:340:43:37

The thing is, you couldn't ask someone to make them today,

0:43:370:43:40

at that sort of price, £440.

0:43:400:43:43

So that's how you can gauge values, in a way.

0:43:430:43:46

They were worth every single penny of that.

0:43:460:43:48

Proper quality.

0:43:480:43:49

I told you there'd be a good surprise at the end.

0:43:490:43:52

I hope you enjoyed that. I know John did.

0:43:520:43:54

He's going home with lots of money!

0:43:540:43:56

Join us next time, but from Boldon, here, on the north-east coast,

0:43:560:43:59

-it's goodbye from us. Well done, John!

-Yeah, that was brilliant!

0:43:590:44:02

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:44:240:44:27

Presenter Paul Martin is joined by antiques experts Anita Manning and David Fletcher at Alnwick Castle in Northumberland. Paul's imagination is captured by a Napoleonic style bicorn hat, Anita picks out some coral jewellery that surprises everyone in the saleroom and David spies a Dunhill lighter which was bought for just £4 at a car boot sale.

Whilst in the area, Paul travels up the Northumberland coastline to explore the tidal island of Lindisfarne and its unusual arts and crafts castle.


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