Winchester Flog It!


Winchester

Paul Martin is joined by experts James Lewis and Christina Trevanion in Winchester. Paul gets excited about some Rolling Stones autographs.


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Transcript


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We're in the tranquil city of Winchester, but it's not all peace and quiet.

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Just look at that fabulous queue! Hundreds of people have turned up to the Guildhall,

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all hoping to put their antiques and collectibles into auction and go home with a small fortune.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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Winchester's Guildhall is playing host to Flog It today.

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This is where the tension starts to build.

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Even if the weather is a bit inclement, here are our experts,

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already working, Christina Trevanion and James Lewis, the founts of knowledge.

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Of course, they've all come here to ask that all-important question, which is, "What's it worth?"

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Exactly! And what are you going to do when you've found out? Flog it!

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If our experts see an item they like, they put a sticker on the owner,

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and while Christina's found loads, James is still struggling.

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Oh, that's going to take a bit of work!

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-Do we get a sticker?

-Not yet.

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-Why?

-Because it's not something that we probably want to film.

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-My!

-Hands off, James, play fair now.

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-They've got a green sticker on.

-I know, yeah, I know!

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Competition to find the best items is already mounting, but they are friends, really.

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It's now time to get the doors open and get the show on the road.

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-Are you ready, everyone?

-Yes!

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Come on, then.

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Look at that, teddy!

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'And on today's show, one of my idols makes an appearance.'

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Hands up, Rolling Stones fans.

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'Unfortunately, James, well, he can't get no satisfaction.'

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-40, then, £40.

-Oh, come on.

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£30, £30, thank you.

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'Christina is more than satisfied with this cute bear.'

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I've rather taken to him, I have to say. I think he's absolutely wonderful.

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If you go down to Itchen Stoke, you're sure to have a big surprise!

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-'But how much will he fetch at auction?'

-Oh!

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Fantastic, wow!

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Well, there's certainly a buzz in the room.

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Everybody is now safely seated, and we've got a full house.

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And it looks like James Lewis is our first expert to the table,

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so let's take a closer look at what he's spotted.

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And he's over there.

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Ashley, Maureen, thank you so much for bringing in something that reminds me of home.

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Right down in the south of England, and what have you brought to me?

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Something from Derbyshire.

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So how did they come into your hands?

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Well, to the best of my knowledge, they were a wedding present to my parents.

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-OK. When were they married?

-1943.

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So that would figure, OK.

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Well, what you're looking at are two of probably a set of three lambs

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-made at the Denby factory just outside Derby.

-Right.

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These were produced in the 1930s.

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They were made for children's nurseries, really, but a lot of them

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were put out as garden ornaments, because they are,

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at the end of the day, quite plain, quite robust, and people think, "Oh, I'll stick them outside."

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-They look a little bit like lambs out of some sort of horror movie, don't they?

-I don't like them.

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The black eyes, evil!

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But they are still very popular.

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So do they live in pride of place at home?

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-No.

-No.

-In the drawer?

-In the drawer.

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Oh, no! You don't like them?

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No, I don't like the eyes.

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Do you know? I think that's it. I think if they'd actually done something different for the eyes,

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they would have been a lot better sellers.

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Mwah-ha-ha! Flames!

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So childhood memories, do you remember these and play with them as a kid?

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Yes, I did play with them, along with a few other things that

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tended to get broken, but they survived.

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Denby's good and solid.

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And my mother always had them out on the sideboard, pride of place.

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She loved them. They've been around as long as I can remember.

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So why get rid of them with all those memories?

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Well, as we've said, they sit in the cupboard.

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Maureen doesn't particularly like them. I'm not that keen on them, you know.

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We've gone for the minimalist look now so...

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You see, I'm a great one for mix and match.

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Mind you, maybe it's because I have no style.

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No, it's because you're an antique dealer.

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I think that sort of shape, because it's quite plain, goes well

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with a minimalist interior, goes well with a Deco interior as well. They should certainly sell.

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-I would put, say, 50-80 as an estimate. If it makes 100, then we've really done well.

-Right.

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If we get sort of 50 plus for them...

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-Yeah?

-..I'd be quite happy, yes.

-You just don't like them, do you?

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-No, I don't.

-No, that's the real reason!

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Oh, poor little lambs. I'm sure someone out there will love them.

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Now, over at Christina's table, Ruth has brought in a gold watch for her to value.

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So, Ruth, they say that time flies.

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Let's hope it does in this case.

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Tell me a little bit about this little watch that you've brought in.

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It just came into the possession of my husband the year before we married.

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-Right.

-And it's been sat in a drawer ever since.

-Right.

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-Just the occasional look at, put back.

-So you don't wear it?

-No.

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-Well, it started life, actually, as a little lady's fob watch.

-Oh.

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Rather than a wristwatch.

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Wristwatches were developed by a nanny, funnily enough, in the early 1900s.

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She was so fed up of having it dangling, because they used to wear them on here...

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She was so fed up of the children grabbing for it,

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-she actually put some cord around it and wore it as a wristwatch.

-Right.

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So a complete accident, but that's how we get wristwatches today.

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On this one, these two little arms,

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where the strap is attached to it, have actually been soldered on at a later date.

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So we've got this really pretty face, but it's got an equally decorative back, hasn't it?

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Which would explain why it was a fob watch originally.

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You see, looking at the back, we've got this wonderful engraving and a vacant cartouche, where

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usually you would have had your initials engraved, but in this case it's vacant.

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If we open up the back,

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we've got the 18ct gold hallmark in the back cover, and we've also got

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-an inscription here, "To Emmanuel, Southampton."

-All right.

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So it's been here since 1917 in the Hampshire area, which is quite nice.

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Nice local watch.

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And then if we open up the inside back cover again,

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we've got, in here,

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another 18ct gold mark on there.

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We've also got this movement here, which is quite a modern movement,

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so it ties in with the date of about 1915.

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Unfortunately, I'm slightly concerned that it's now a wristwatch.

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-Yes.

-Because it will put watch collectors off, there's no denying that, sadly.

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-But I still think, at auction, we might be looking somewhere in the region of £50-70.

-Oh, right.

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-Maybe slightly more on a good day, because there's quite a lot of gold to it.

-Yes.

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-So is that acceptable?

-Oh, I think so, yes.

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-OK, what do we think, ladies?

-Yes.

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-Should she flog it?

-Yes.

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Good!

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'Well, I'm searching the queue looking for items that might catch my eye.'

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It's not marked,

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but we've got an engraving of an elephant and a palm tree on the back. It tests as 22ct.

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-Oh!

-Feel the weight of it.

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That's beautiful.

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I think this is absolutely fascinating.

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-Have you come all the way up today?

-Yes.

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Ah... Well, this could be your lucky day!

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Now, while I'm looking at this map, this is quite interesting,

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-can you see this little village called Chawton?

-Yes.

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-Later on, I'm going to go off and visit that village.

-Right.

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-And it's Jane Austen's village, isn't it?

-Yes.

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I'm going to learn all about the history of women's literature.

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-Thank you very much for showing me that.

-OK.

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Now to my first item of the day, some rock and roll memorabilia.

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Maureen, thank you for bringing these autographs.

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Now, you were either a Beatles fan or a Rolling Stones fan,

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and this applies to you at home as well.

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OK, hands up, Beatles fans.

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Oh, there's quite a lot, isn't there? Most of you.

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Hands up, Rolling Stones fans.

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Yeah, we won!

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Well, it's a nation divided. But both bands contribute so much to rock and pop history worldwide.

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-Great rock and roll bands. Were you lucky enough to see the Rolling Stones?

-No.

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No... Oh, dear!

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-I never did get to see them.

-How did you come by their autographs?

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My pen friend, Nicki, who lives in America,

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she sent them to me because she knew I liked the Rolling Stones.

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Wow... Pen friends, I mean, that was the thing, wasn't it?

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Yes, she was president of the Californian Rolling Stones branch.

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-She would have access to the Stones when they toured there.

-That's right.

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I love it to bits, and I think Mick Jagger is a great-looking guy, don't you?

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I mean, he is, isn't he? Beautiful man.

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You've got Keith Richards' signature there, Bill Wyman, bass guitarist,

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-Charlie Watts, Mick Jagger and Brian Jones on lead guitar, who tragically died.

-Yes.

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The condition is not brilliant. The paper's getting a bit tatty.

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You could double the value of these signatures

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if they were on a photograph so you could see all their faces.

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Even better, if it was, let's say,

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a promotional poster with the date and the venue.

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But we've got something because we've got the photographs from your pen friend, which is fabulous.

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I'm taking your word for it that these are genuine.

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With the surrounding photographs, the whole thing looks presentable

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and genuine so I'm confident they are.

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I'd like the auction room just to do a bit of research themselves, OK?

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If they're right, I think we're looking at a value of around...

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£250-350.

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-Ooh, very nice.

-Is that all right?

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-Yes, I wasn't expecting that much.

-Happy?

-Yes, very happy.

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Somebody's trash is somebody else's treasure,

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that's what we keep saying but let's put that maxim to the test.

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Let's get over to the auction room. We've got our first batch to sell.

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Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks. Here's a quick recap

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from our experts of what we're taking and why.

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These aren't the finest antiques in the world

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but they've got character and I love them.

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What's more, they remind me of home.

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The Rolling Stones, one of the greatest

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rock and roll bands in history.

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Let's put the autographs into auction. Hopefully we'll get some satisfaction.

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This wrist watch used to be a fob watch but let's hope

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that doesn't put too many of the purists off in the auction room.

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At £180.

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Our sale today is just down the road from Winchester.

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We're at Andrew Smith and Sons.

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I'm looking forward to this moment.

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It's auction time, where we put our valuations to the test.

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We'll do it in this gorgeous sale room.

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What a wonderful setting, a perfect place to sell antiques

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in a little village called Itchen Stoke.

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Every time I say that, it puts a big smile on my face. It's such a lovely name.

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We have two auctioneers on the rostrum today, Nick Jarrett and Andrew Smith.

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Yesterday I caught up with Andrew Smith

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and this is what he said about one of our items.

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It's that rocking collection of autographs and photos.

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Who were you listening to as you were growing up

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or still listening to now?

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Either Beatles, Rolling Stones, Led Zep or Genesis...

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-It was the Beatles.

-I had a hunch it might be, I had a hunch.

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I grew up listening to the Rolling Stones, I'm still a big fan.

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I've seen them many times live. I had to take these on the show.

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They belong to Maureen.

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Her pen friend in the States

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was a member of the Rolling Stones fan club.

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In fact she helped organise many events.

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She got behind the scenes. This is her there.

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Provenance will make the difference. In fact, it has.

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We have a lot of interest on the internet already.

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Yeah, hopefully a lot of satisfaction.

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Boom, boom!

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'Well, enough of my bad jokes. On with the sale.'

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-At £35 then, any more?

-'First up, those two ceramic lambs.'

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Going under the hammer now,

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we have two Denby lambs that belong to Maureen and Ashley here.

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-They were your parents'?

-They were.

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-Wedding present. They don't do a lot for you.

-No.

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-It's the eyes, isn't it?

-That's right.

-There are so spooky.

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Do you like these?

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I have to say yes because they're Denby, it's close to home.

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Somebody'll love them, you know who they are.

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Always a market for something.

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-I'm going to buy a small tree with the money.

-Are you? Plant a tree?

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-We're keen gardeners.

-A fruit tree. Fruit tree?

-Yeah.

-Good for you.

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Let's find out what the bidders think of these lambs.

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They're going under the hammer now.

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There's a set of two Bourne Derby pale-green lambs.

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Start me at £50. £50. £40.

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-Oh, come on.

-£40. 30 to get it going.

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-£30, surely. £30, thank you and two.

-It's going the wrong way.

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I can get a small tree.

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At £37, any more? At 40, 42.

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45? 47? 47 down here. 50, and five.

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-60...

-It's reached the reserve.

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55 at the front here. Is there 60?

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-At £55.

-Go on.

-One more. Yes, there's fresh legs there.

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70, you sure?

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-One more, go on.

-Make it 70? At £65, at the front and selling,

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at £65 for the very last time...

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-That's good.

-That's all right.

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You'll get yourself two or three decent fruit trees for that.

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-Yes, indeed.

-Won't you?

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Because we enjoy the garden more than the lambs so...

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Yes, I'm with you on that one. Do you know that?

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Baa-ye baa-ye, sheep.

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Not a fortune but enough for Maureen and Ashley to buy a few trees.

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It's my favourite item of the show so far, the Rolling Stones autographs.

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I'm relying on Mick Jagger and all the boys to help me out now.

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You know what I'm talking about - the Rolling Stones autographs.

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They belong to Maureen who's right next to me.

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You're looking for £250-350. I'm pretty sure we'll get the top end.

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-Yes.

-Shame about the tatty paper.

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But nevertheless, it's still great and Brian Jones' signature there, which is really good.

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-Nice touch.

-Yes.

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So it's time to wave goodbye. It could be a sentimental journey

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of rock-and-roll going on right now, couldn't it?

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The Rolling Stones autographs, various here. Now, I've got

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several bids here.

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# Hey, hey, you, you, get off my cloud. #

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-Four bids at 320.

-Straight in at the top end, virtually.

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320, 340 I'm looking for.

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At 320 with me and make no mistake, I'm selling it at that. At £320.

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340, is it? At £320. All done at 320, then?

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Straight in, straight out. There you go, it's gone.

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Wow, that was quick!

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It was, wasn't it? That's it, it's all over and done with.

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-Have you had a good time?

-Yes, lovely.

-Did you come by yourself?

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-No, I came with my husband over there.

-That's him?

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-What's his name?

-Barry.

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He's got a big grin on his face, there he is.

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-Look, enjoy the rest of the day.

-OK, thank you.

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Don't we all wish we had pen friends like Maureen's?

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From rockers to rock solid, our third lot today

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is Ruth's 18ct gold watch

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and she's selling it to pay for her hobby - sailing.

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-So you have a yacht somewhere?

-Yes.

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Peace and tranquillity, no road rage at sea, nothing like that.

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No, only my husband keeping me on the tiller.

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With a gin and tonic in hand! Look, enjoy those sunny evenings.

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They're coming up soon. Here we go, going under the hammer. Good luck.

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The 18ct wrist watch here. Emanuel of Southampton.

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-I have several bids as you might imagine.

-Excellent news.

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I'm going to start you, declared bids at 140.

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-Oh, brilliant!

-£140.

-It is a good time to sell gold.

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180, 190? No? At 180 with me, then.

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That's a longer holiday than you expected.

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190, new bidder. 220?

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At 220. Towards the back at 220. Gentlemen's bid at £220, are you in?

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They're still going.

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At £220 then, anybody else in at 220,

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-last chance at £220...

-It's gone.

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-Under the hammer, there we go, £220.

-Well done, that's brilliant!

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I thought I'd be taking it home.

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-That's a good result, that's a surprise.

-Yes.

-Well done.

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I think the Southampton connection

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and the fact that gold is so high...

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-Oh, are you OK?

-I want to be off-camera. No, please!

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-Brilliant news, I'm really pleased for you.

-Thank you very, very much.

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-You're more than welcome.

-Lovely.

-Great. Get on that yacht.

0:16:340:16:39

Well over estimate and that leaves Ruth sailing away with a tidy sum.

0:16:390:16:42

We'll be back at the auction room a little later on

0:16:420:16:46

with more items to sell and hopefully more happy owners.

0:16:460:16:49

OK, here's a question for you.

0:16:540:16:56

What connects one of Britain's most famous authors,

0:16:560:16:58

Jane Austen, from about 200 years ago, to the modern day, the present

0:16:580:17:02

phenomena of the internet, e-mails, computers, laptops?

0:17:020:17:06

Well, I can tell you. It's this place, Chawton House.

0:17:060:17:10

Once her brother's home. Now owned by a Silicon Valley millionairess.

0:17:100:17:15

You probably haven't heard of her but American computer expert

0:17:170:17:20

and entrepreneur, Sandy Lerner,

0:17:200:17:22

bought Chawton House in Hampshire in 1992.

0:17:220:17:25

Although she's never lived here, she's spent eight years

0:17:250:17:28

and £10 million turning this rundown shell...

0:17:280:17:32

..into this restored architectural delight.

0:17:340:17:37

Looking at the house today, it's a labour of love

0:17:390:17:41

and love is how it started.

0:17:410:17:43

The legend is that Sandy Lerner made her money by inventing a new

0:17:430:17:48

computer system so she could send her boyfriend romantic messages.

0:17:480:17:53

Now, that story was just clever PR, really.

0:17:550:17:57

But the work was a huge leap forward in computer development

0:17:570:18:01

and it made Sandy Lerner a multi-millionaire.

0:18:010:18:04

So what's that got to do with Jane Austen?

0:18:040:18:06

If you've got millions of pounds to spend, disposable cash,

0:18:060:18:09

you spend it on your passion.

0:18:090:18:11

Sandy's passion is women's literature.

0:18:110:18:14

Just look at this incredible collection.

0:18:140:18:17

Many of them are first editions or early ones

0:18:180:18:20

and the condition is incredible.

0:18:200:18:23

Such a sense of history in this room.

0:18:230:18:25

Sandy Lerner donated her personal collection

0:18:280:18:31

and built an international study centre for women's literature

0:18:310:18:35

from the 1600s to the 19th century and now it numbers 9,000 books.

0:18:350:18:41

Jane Austen lived nearby in a cottage in the village but she often

0:18:420:18:46

visited Chawton House because this was her brother Edward's home.

0:18:460:18:50

While she was living in the village she finished Sense And Sensibility

0:18:500:18:54

and Pride And Prejudice and started Emma.

0:18:540:18:56

And here is a wonderful edition printed in Philadelphia in 1833.

0:18:570:19:02

It just goes to show the worldwide appeal of her work.

0:19:020:19:05

What an accolade for an author, even by today's standards

0:19:050:19:08

to have your work published overseas, around the globe.

0:19:080:19:11

But back then, in 1833...

0:19:110:19:13

Emma has descriptions which reflect Chawton House

0:19:200:19:23

and the landscape here is said to have inspired some of the passages.

0:19:230:19:27

Some of the characters may even have been based on

0:19:270:19:30

the owners of the House, the Knight family.

0:19:300:19:32

"Dear Diary,

0:19:340:19:36

"I tried not to think about Mr Knightley.

0:19:360:19:39

"I tried not to think about him when I discussed the menu with the cook,

0:19:390:19:43

"I tried not to think of him in the garden,

0:19:430:19:45

"where I thrice plucked the petals of a daisy

0:19:450:19:48

"to ascertain his feelings for Harriet.

0:19:480:19:50

"I don't think we should keep daisies in the garden,

0:19:500:19:53

"they really are such a drab little flower."

0:19:530:19:55

"And I tried not to think about him when I went to bed.

0:19:560:20:00

"But something had to be done."

0:20:000:20:02

Now, we've all heard of Jane Austen, but even before her

0:20:030:20:05

there were many women making their mark

0:20:050:20:08

in a male-dominated world, through writing.

0:20:080:20:10

This beautiful portrait is of Mary Robinson.

0:20:100:20:13

She was an actress who became the mistress to the Prince Regent

0:20:130:20:16

in 1779.

0:20:160:20:17

He later went on to become George IV.

0:20:170:20:19

And Mary Robinson later went on to champion women's rights.

0:20:190:20:24

Beautiful woman!

0:20:240:20:26

She led somewhat of a scandalous life, yet wrote romantic poetry.

0:20:260:20:30

In the collection there's a wonderful first edition,

0:20:300:20:33

first printed in 1791, of her works.

0:20:330:20:36

And there's a gorgeous steel engraving of her,

0:20:360:20:39

yet, looking up on a profile sideways, rather than straight on,

0:20:390:20:42

which is rather unusual.

0:20:420:20:44

Superb.

0:20:440:20:46

"Shedding soft lustre on the rosy hours,

0:20:460:20:49

"when the dawn unfolds its purple splendours amid the dappled clouds

0:20:490:20:53

"of heaven's own radiance with one vast light,

0:20:530:20:56

"thou smilest triumphant."

0:20:560:20:59

Now, even earlier than that,

0:20:590:21:01

Aphra Benn was one of the first professional female writers

0:21:010:21:04

and this one is titled Love Letters Between A Nobleman And His Sister.

0:21:040:21:08

It was an incestuous story, a love story between a brother

0:21:080:21:11

and a sister.

0:21:110:21:12

So it was incredibly scandalous in its day.

0:21:120:21:15

Benn was born in 1640 and, like most women of her day,

0:21:150:21:17

she had no formal education.

0:21:170:21:20

She travelled the globe.

0:21:200:21:21

Basically, she enjoyed life to the full, she did what she wanted to do.

0:21:210:21:26

"Her rising breasts with nimble emotions pant.

0:21:280:21:33

"Her dying eyes assume new fires.

0:21:330:21:35

"Now, to the height of languishment, she grows.

0:21:350:21:40

"We sigh and kiss."

0:21:400:21:41

"Twas but a dream but in my heart I knew."

0:21:420:21:46

So much romance in such a romantic setting

0:21:460:21:49

and it's all down to one free-spirited woman on a mission.

0:21:490:21:52

It's a great place being Jane Austen's village,

0:21:520:21:55

it's just such a wonderful place to come and to decompress

0:21:550:21:58

and find kind of a quiet corner and immerse yourself.

0:21:580:22:01

The Library needed a home, it's a wonderful home.

0:22:010:22:04

It's a good thing to have done.

0:22:040:22:06

Sandy Lerner still comes here regularly.

0:22:080:22:11

She's a chairman of the trustees, she's still passionate

0:22:110:22:13

and dedicated about the place.

0:22:130:22:15

She's hands-on, very enthusiastic

0:22:150:22:17

and it's thanks to her dedication and her passion that

0:22:170:22:21

members of the general public can come here, look at the collection,

0:22:210:22:24

read the books and learn more about early women's literature.

0:22:240:22:28

And, well, if I had loads of money,

0:22:280:22:30

this would be something I would love to do as well.

0:22:300:22:32

It's well worth a visit, so please do check it out.

0:22:320:22:36

We're in Winchester,

0:22:420:22:44

where we're hoping for some fairy-tale endings of our own.

0:22:440:22:47

# If you go down to the woods today

0:22:470:22:49

# You're sure of a big surprise

0:22:490:22:51

# If you go down to the woods today

0:22:510:22:52

# You better go in disguise

0:22:520:22:54

# For every bear there ever was

0:22:540:22:56

# Will gather there for certain cos today's the day

0:22:560:22:58

# The teddy bears have their picnic. #

0:22:580:23:01

Aw, teddy bear, look at that. Teddy!

0:23:010:23:04

Have you given your teddy bear a name?

0:23:040:23:06

Yes, he's called Albert.

0:23:060:23:08

-He's not for sale, is he?

-No.

0:23:080:23:09

No. You just want an evaluation.

0:23:090:23:12

Albert's not for sale, but these two are.

0:23:120:23:15

They've been brought in by Kenneth and his daughter Gail.

0:23:150:23:18

They're with Christina Trevanion.

0:23:180:23:20

-You've brought in today with you these wonderful bears.

-Yes.

0:23:200:23:24

Tell me where they've come from.

0:23:240:23:26

They've been passed down through my wife's side of the family.

0:23:260:23:29

Was she allowed to play with them as a child?

0:23:290:23:32

As a child she was allowed to play with them

0:23:320:23:34

at the bottom of the stairs because Granny didn't like noisy children.

0:23:340:23:38

-She'd be seen and not heard.

-That's right.

0:23:380:23:42

-Were you allowed to play with them?

-I was allowed to hold them,

0:23:420:23:45

but my brother and me were never allowed to play with them.

0:23:450:23:48

I think the fact that you weren't allowed to play with them,

0:23:480:23:51

that your wife was obviously very careful with them,

0:23:510:23:54

has meant that they are in excellent condition.

0:23:540:23:56

The wonderful thing about this one is he's still got his growler,

0:23:560:24:00

-hasn't he?

-Yes.

0:24:000:24:01

Can you make him growl for me?

0:24:010:24:03

THE BEAR GROWLS

0:24:060:24:09

There we go, that was it.

0:24:090:24:10

It's very difficult to hear cos it's quite noisy here.

0:24:100:24:13

-But it's definitely there.

-In a quiet room it is, yeah.

0:24:130:24:16

-Yeah, I imagine he's quite sort-of, "Grr."

-Oh, yeah.

0:24:160:24:19

Run a mile.

0:24:190:24:21

-He's terrifying, wouldn't want to meet him in the woods, would you?

-No!

0:24:210:24:24

I've rather taken to him, I think he's absolutely wonderful.

0:24:240:24:28

And he's got this lovely label on the bottom which tells us

0:24:280:24:31

that he's actually a Farnell bear.

0:24:310:24:33

Now, Farnell's was basically the English equivalent of Steiff,

0:24:330:24:38

which is obviously the German factory.

0:24:380:24:40

Farnell is really sought after as a British made bear.

0:24:400:24:44

And he's quite an early chap,

0:24:440:24:46

we've got these wonderful glass eyes,

0:24:460:24:47

later they were plastic.

0:24:470:24:49

And if we knock them against our teeth, we can tell they're glass.

0:24:490:24:53

Nice felt pad, there. Original stitching.

0:24:530:24:56

So, I would date him to around the 1930s, 1940s.

0:24:560:25:01

He's got the most wonderful expression on his face.

0:25:010:25:04

It must have been so tempting to play with him when you were younger

0:25:040:25:06

and not be allowed.

0:25:060:25:08

-My grandma was always stood guard over Tony and me.

-Oh, was she?

-Yeah.

0:25:080:25:11

And then this little chappie,

0:25:130:25:15

unfortunately, we can't attribute him to any particular factory.

0:25:150:25:18

But he looks like he's the same sort of date.

0:25:180:25:21

-So he was Granny's bear as well, wasn't he?

-Yeah.

0:25:210:25:24

-He's very much a Winnie the Pooh looking bear, isn't he?

-Yeah.

0:25:240:25:27

He's got the nice glass eyes that you would expect of an early bear

0:25:270:25:31

and if we go down to the paws, we can see it looks as if

0:25:310:25:35

it's got the original linen this time, rather than felt.

0:25:350:25:38

We've got the linen pads, there.

0:25:380:25:40

With the stitching which looks to be original.

0:25:400:25:43

And I think as a nice, 1930s, 1940s bear,

0:25:430:25:46

we're looking somewhere, probably in the region of about £100-150.

0:25:460:25:51

-Purely because we can't attribute him to a particular factory.

-Yeah.

0:25:510:25:55

The Farnell's Alpha Bear, I think he is gorgeous.

0:25:550:26:00

-We're probably looking somewhere in the region of maybe £300-500.

-OK.

0:26:000:26:05

And I think with internet exposure and that Farnell name,

0:26:050:26:09

we might do better. But I would like to think that the same buyer would buy both.

0:26:090:26:13

-Yes.

-Because it would be nice for them to go to the same home.

-Yes.

0:26:130:26:16

But you never know.

0:26:160:26:17

-As long as they go to someone who looks after them, that's really what I'd like.

-Yes, exactly.

0:26:170:26:22

I think that's the most important thing

0:26:220:26:24

and I'm sure we'll find a very keen home for them at the auction room. Thank you.

0:26:240:26:27

-OK, thank you.

-Thank you.

0:26:270:26:29

Two bears, ready to be sent off to auction.

0:26:290:26:33

James is with Trish,

0:26:330:26:34

and about to make a confession about his misspent youth.

0:26:340:26:38

Trish, I can just imagine you sitting at home

0:26:380:26:41

in front of the fire, rolling your roll-ups.

0:26:410:26:44

Where's your pipe gone? Do you smoke the pipe?

0:26:440:26:46

They're wonderful aren't they? No, they belong to my father.

0:26:460:26:49

He died ten years ago and he spent his last days with me.

0:26:490:26:53

And I was having a look the other day and found these.

0:26:530:26:56

And I thought, I will take them to "Flog It!"

0:26:560:26:58

Do you know, I've never seen one of those?

0:26:580:27:03

A wonderful little slide for cigarette papers.

0:27:030:27:06

-Yes.

-Little Rizlas.

0:27:060:27:08

I had a cat called Rizla, you know.

0:27:080:27:10

-Did you?

-Yeah, I did. Not very classy, me.

0:27:100:27:14

I was a rough student.

0:27:140:27:15

-And you know, I actually used to use these.

-Did you?

0:27:150:27:19

But whoever had this, could afford a silver case for his papers.

0:27:190:27:23

I'm surprised they ever made anything like that.

0:27:230:27:25

No, I've never seen one. Really unusual.

0:27:250:27:28

And then the piece in the centre is a visiting card case.

0:27:280:27:31

It's curved because it sits in the waistcoat pocket.

0:27:310:27:34

-Oh, lovely.

-Sometimes they have covers, sometimes they're open.

0:27:340:27:38

A very practical, but a very common piece of silver.

0:27:380:27:41

And the one at the end, I mean, really, that is what you have

0:27:410:27:44

if you've got everything else a pipe smoker needs.

0:27:440:27:47

"I've got one of those, one of those

0:27:470:27:49

"but I haven't got a solid silver case for my pipe."

0:27:490:27:52

And really, just look at it.

0:27:520:27:54

Solid silver, wonderful quality, little suspension ring on the end.

0:27:540:27:58

Gilded interior so that the tobacco didn't attack the silver.

0:27:580:28:03

But, you know, I don't think it's been used.

0:28:030:28:06

-It's not the most practical of things.

-No.

0:28:060:28:08

Again, wonderful little hallmark,

0:28:080:28:10

Chester hallmark in there.

0:28:100:28:12

So, all together we've got a successful businessman who has his

0:28:120:28:16

business cards, who likes roll-ups and pipes.

0:28:160:28:19

Probably late Victorian, you can imagine one of those great big

0:28:190:28:22

curly moustached men, with their hair greased down,

0:28:220:28:26

with their waistcoat on for that,

0:28:260:28:29

and rolling up their cigarettes.

0:28:290:28:31

You can imagine who used these.

0:28:310:28:32

Value,

0:28:320:28:34

we've got to have probably 80-120 for the three.

0:28:340:28:37

Is that all right?

0:28:370:28:38

Oh, lovely. Yes, fine.

0:28:380:28:39

Have you got stacks more stuff belonging to your father?

0:28:390:28:42

I've still got Pa's ashes in my wardrobe.

0:28:420:28:45

Oh, no!

0:28:450:28:46

-Bless him, yes.

-You sleep with your father's ashes in the wardrobe? In your bedroom?

0:28:460:28:49

So, I did think that if this made any money, that there'd be

0:28:490:28:55

a family treat and we'd scatter his ashes at sea.

0:28:550:28:58

-Wonderful!

-That's what we're going to do.

0:28:580:29:00

It's funny, my grandfather always wanted that to happen and it didn't for some reason.

0:29:000:29:05

They buried his ashes with my grandmother.

0:29:050:29:08

-But that would've been nice.

-My father had asked me to do that.

0:29:080:29:11

It's my fault, I never got round to doing it,

0:29:110:29:14

-so that's why he's still with me.

-It doesn't matter when, does it?

-No.

0:29:140:29:18

Well, really great story and I hope we raise a bit of money for you.

0:29:180:29:22

-Thank you very much, James.

-I'll see you at the auction.

0:29:220:29:24

I shall look forward to it.

0:29:240:29:26

-Reg, is that from the Isle of Wight?

-Yes.

0:29:310:29:33

I had the pleasure of filming on the Isle of Wight.

0:29:330:29:36

I got to play on the sand in Alum Bay and

0:29:360:29:40

I made one of these,

0:29:400:29:44

but nowhere as good as that.

0:29:440:29:46

That is beautiful!

0:29:460:29:47

-There you go, there's the needles.

-Needles.

-Aww.

0:29:470:29:50

I thoroughly enjoyed that day, the sun was shining, it was a beautiful day.

0:29:500:29:54

Is this a Victorian piece, do you think?

0:29:540:29:57

-Or yes, my father bought it before the Second World War.

-Did he?

0:29:570:30:01

On a trip to the Isle of Wight? He brought it back as a souvenir.

0:30:010:30:05

Let's get it into auction,

0:30:050:30:07

we'll put an estimate of £90-120 on this.

0:30:070:30:10

Hopefully, it might fly away.

0:30:100:30:12

-Can you trust us with that?

-Yes, course I can.

0:30:120:30:14

Do you know what you should do with the money? Take a trip back

0:30:140:30:17

-to the Isle of Wight. Get over there on the ferry.

-Yes.

0:30:170:30:19

Good luck to Reg,

0:30:220:30:23

that one really will depend on the right people turning up on the day.

0:30:230:30:27

We've got time for one more item and Christina is with Bert.

0:30:270:30:31

-So, Bert, you've bought this in to me today.

-Yes.

0:30:310:30:33

-Did you carry it in?

-Yes.

-It's jolly heavy.

0:30:330:30:35

In a plastic bag.

0:30:350:30:37

In a plastic bag?

0:30:370:30:39

The handle broke off, so I had to carry it under my arm.

0:30:390:30:41

Thank you for struggling in with it,

0:30:430:30:44

because it really is the most wonderful, wonderful jardiniere.

0:30:440:30:48

What did you use it for?

0:30:480:30:50

We kept kindling and coal in it.

0:30:500:30:53

-So this has been your coal bin.

-Yes.

-Was it covered in dust?

0:30:530:30:57

Because it looks pretty clean to me.

0:30:570:30:59

Well I did it myself, I cleaned it all up

0:30:590:31:01

and each panel took me four hours to clean.

0:31:010:31:03

Four hours to clean!

0:31:030:31:05

-So it's been a labour of love for you, hasn't it?

-Oh, yes.

0:31:050:31:08

It's come up beautifully

0:31:080:31:09

and I'm glad that you went to the effort of giving it a good clean

0:31:090:31:12

cos we can really see in detail exactly what we've got on here.

0:31:120:31:16

We've got some rather typical cranes here,

0:31:160:31:19

which is a very Japanese emblem to use, a water crane.

0:31:190:31:23

And some more birds, and also some bamboo.

0:31:230:31:26

-We've got...

-What would the flower, what would the blossom be?

0:31:270:31:30

Well, this particular flower here is a chrysanthemum, which was

0:31:300:31:34

considered to be one of the national flowers.

0:31:340:31:36

So it really is all quite symbolic.

0:31:360:31:39

-Will you be a gentleman and see if you can pick it up for me?

-Yes.

0:31:390:31:43

See if we can find a mark there.

0:31:430:31:44

Yes, we've got a nice clear mark on the bottom.

0:31:440:31:46

Unfortunately, we haven't been able to decipher it

0:31:460:31:49

but I would imagine it would be a metal worker.

0:31:490:31:52

It is fairly crude, so I think possibly not an expert metalworker,

0:31:520:31:57

but I still think a very talented person in his own right.

0:31:570:32:00

I don't know about you but I can see daylight down there.

0:32:000:32:03

Yes, I know. I think it must be a fault in the casting.

0:32:030:32:06

-Nothing to do with you keeping it as a coal bin?

-No.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:32:060:32:10

Because of the damage, and because it's quite large and heavy,

0:32:100:32:14

we might be looking at, putting a conservative estimate,

0:32:140:32:17

-£100 to £200, perhaps with a discretionary reserve of £100.

-Yes.

0:32:170:32:22

I would hope, though, that the oriental market at the moment is quite buoyant,

0:32:220:32:26

and it really is a beautiful piece.

0:32:260:32:29

Fingers crossed, we'll find it a good new home.

0:32:290:32:32

-And it could make more.

-And it could make more. Exactly, you never know.

0:32:320:32:36

-Thanks so much for bringing it in.

-That's all right. Thank you very much.

0:32:360:32:40

That's it, our experts have now made their final choices,

0:32:410:32:44

so it's over to the auction room.

0:32:440:32:47

Before we go, here's a quick recap of what we're taking

0:32:470:32:49

and why we've chosen it.

0:32:490:32:51

I think these are two of the nicest examples of bears I've seen,

0:32:510:32:55

especially this one. I've got a feeling they could fly at auction.

0:32:550:32:58

You can just imagine the sort of man that would have worn these

0:32:580:33:01

way back over hundred years ago.

0:33:010:33:04

Just need to wait and see which sort of man is going to buy them.

0:33:040:33:07

How incredible is that? Look at that.

0:33:070:33:12

I never really did master the technique.

0:33:120:33:14

I had a go but I've got to say I don't think there's anybody alive

0:33:140:33:19

that could do something like this now.

0:33:190:33:21

I love the work that's gone into this jardiniere,

0:33:210:33:23

not only the maker, in making all these wonderful birds and animals,

0:33:230:33:26

but also Bert, who's spent hours cleaning it.

0:33:260:33:29

I think it has the potential to be a sleeper at auction

0:33:290:33:31

and I hope it makes him lots of money.

0:33:310:33:33

£40, thank you. And five. We can do it in twos if you want.

0:33:330:33:38

This is our auction house today -

0:33:380:33:39

Andrew Smith and Sons in Itchen Stoke.

0:33:390:33:43

Yesterday was auction preview day.

0:33:430:33:45

I had a chat with one of the auctioneers, Andrew Smith,

0:33:450:33:47

about one of our items, and this is what he said.

0:33:470:33:50

And it's Kenneth and Gail's teddy bears up for discussion.

0:33:500:33:53

# If you go down to Itchen Stoke,

0:33:530:33:55

# You're sure to have a big surprise! #

0:33:550:33:57

-Because there's teddy bears everywhere here, Andrew.

-Yeah.

0:33:570:34:01

-What you think of these fellas?

-I think they're great.

0:34:010:34:03

They're both in good condition, and the Farnell

0:34:030:34:07

on the far side is a particularly good one.

0:34:070:34:09

Totally agree with you, that's the big money earner.

0:34:090:34:12

But do you know which one I prefer?

0:34:120:34:13

Probably the well loved one here.

0:34:130:34:15

I do, because he's got the character.

0:34:150:34:17

He's worn, slightly tatty and he's the one that you feel sorry for,

0:34:170:34:20

you fall in love with and say, "I want to give him a home."

0:34:200:34:23

He's got the look, hasn't he?

0:34:230:34:25

I'd still put the safe money on the Farnell.

0:34:250:34:28

Has there been much interest?

0:34:280:34:29

Yes, both during the viewing and on the internet.

0:34:290:34:31

I can't wait to see them go under the hammer.

0:34:310:34:34

Also there's something sitting right above my head.

0:34:340:34:36

You haven't seen it yet, but if you look up there

0:34:360:34:39

you'll have a big, big surprise.

0:34:390:34:41

Look at that!

0:34:410:34:42

Before we take off with the bears,

0:34:450:34:47

we're selling a down-to-earth item spotted by Christina.

0:34:470:34:51

Andrew's colleague, Nick Jarrett, is on the rostrum.

0:34:510:34:54

Our next lot is a Japanese jardiniere, just about to go under the hammer.

0:34:540:34:57

It belongs to Bert and, I would think, not for much longer,

0:34:570:35:01

-because we talk about the oriental market being so strong, don't we?

-Very buoyant.

0:35:010:35:05

I know that you have spent a lot of time polishing this as well.

0:35:050:35:08

-It was really in a filthy state.

-I bet it was.

0:35:080:35:11

Good luck with this, good luck both of you.

0:35:110:35:13

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:35:130:35:15

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:35:150:35:17

The Japanese bronze jardiniere, their we are.

0:35:170:35:20

-It looks great, doesn't it?

-Doesn't it, in the photograph?

0:35:200:35:23

Nice quality.

0:35:230:35:24

I've to start you, to clear all bids, at 110.

0:35:240:35:27

-Oh!

-120, can I say?

-It's gone, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

-120, is it?

0:35:270:35:32

At £110, anybody in?

0:35:320:35:34

No? At £110, I'm selling. All finished at 110.

0:35:340:35:39

-That was quick - straight in and straight out.

-That was quick.

0:35:410:35:44

-Nobody bidding against each other. A commission bid, you're right.

-Yeah.

0:35:440:35:48

-Bert, thank you very much. I hope you're happy with that.

-Yes, thank you.

0:35:480:35:52

Bert, thanks so much for bringing it in.

0:35:520:35:53

Always glad to see a happy customer.

0:35:530:35:57

Next, James is in position,

0:35:570:35:59

selling the trio of silver items brought in by Tricia.

0:35:590:36:03

Fingers crossed we get the top end of this next lot

0:36:030:36:06

and a little bit more, cos it's a great time to sell silver, Tricia. Why are you selling all these items?

0:36:060:36:11

Well, I found them in the wardrobe when I was clearing out

0:36:110:36:15

and they belonged to my father - and, I assume, his father.

0:36:150:36:19

-Been in the family a bit of time but you're not really interested in them?

-No.

0:36:190:36:23

That little silver case for the papers. I like that.

0:36:230:36:26

Never seen one, so hopefully it'll do well.

0:36:260:36:29

-That's the novelty item amongst the three things, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:36:290:36:32

Let's hope we get the top end.

0:36:320:36:35

They're going under the hammer now.

0:36:350:36:36

The unusual pipe case here. Silver. It is unusual.

0:36:360:36:40

And the other bits there - the cigarette paper holder

0:36:400:36:43

and the visiting card slip.

0:36:430:36:45

There we are, interesting little lot. To clear bids, I'm starting you

0:36:450:36:48

at £70. I'll take five on it.

0:36:480:36:51

75, 80, five.

0:36:510:36:53

New bidder, 90, five, 100, 10, 120, 130, 140. 140.

0:36:530:36:59

Gentleman bid at 140. Still not expensive at 140.

0:36:590:37:03

Anybody else in at 140? All done at 140.

0:37:030:37:06

You're wincing slightly like you think it is expensive.

0:37:060:37:08

150, 160?

0:37:080:37:10

150, lady's bid at £150. Any more?

0:37:100:37:14

At £150, you're done. All done.

0:37:140:37:17

Such a good time to sell silver, isn't it?

0:37:170:37:19

The scrap value, the melt value is so high, it's nearly £20 an ounce.

0:37:190:37:24

-Goodness!

-Yeah. But those won't be melted, though.

-No, they made more.

0:37:240:37:28

-How exciting.

-Isn't that good?

-I didn't think it would make that, but that's good.

0:37:280:37:32

-I'm really pleased, thank you very much.

-Enjoy the money.

-Thank you.

0:37:320:37:36

This next item's not about the money, it's about nostalgia

0:37:360:37:39

and childhood memories. It's the sand picture belonging to Reg.

0:37:390:37:43

I tell you what, I've had a few sleepless nights over this next lot.

0:37:430:37:47

The last time I saw it was at the valuation day a few weeks ago,

0:37:470:37:50

and I was thinking, "If this gets bubble-wrapped and then put in a bag

0:37:500:37:54

"it's going to get tipped upside down."

0:37:540:37:56

The first thing I did when I got here was ran straight to it

0:37:560:37:58

to see if the picture was intact.

0:37:580:38:01

I bet you'll be sad to see this go, won't you?

0:38:010:38:03

Yeah, I will, in a way, cos it's a family heirloom, really.

0:38:030:38:06

Let's find out what the bidders think, shall we? Here we go.

0:38:060:38:10

Victorian, sand-filled glass bell. Alum Bay, Isle of Wight.

0:38:100:38:16

Start me at £100. £100. 80, then. £80, surely.

0:38:160:38:20

60, then, if you like. £60. £60, thank you, and five.

0:38:200:38:23

£60, 65, 70, and five, 80.

0:38:230:38:27

At £75, any more?

0:38:270:38:29

At £75, no?

0:38:290:38:32

At £75 I'm afraid we're not quite there.

0:38:320:38:36

Tantalising, in quotes, but we can't sell at that level.

0:38:360:38:38

I'm surprised that didn't sell.

0:38:380:38:40

-You know, it was there, a come-and-buy-me.

-Yeah.

0:38:400:38:42

I guess nobody's into sand pictures, really.

0:38:420:38:45

-You know where you should go, don't you?

-Yeah.

0:38:450:38:48

Get your granddaughter to drive you to the Isle of Wight and put it in an auction there.

0:38:480:38:51

I can almost swim over there cos I'm only nine miles away from The Needles.

0:38:510:38:56

-Yeah, but you can't swim with the sand picture.

-I know.

0:38:560:38:59

Reg seems to have taken that one on the chin.

0:38:590:39:01

So will our last sale of the day sink or swim?

0:39:010:39:04

It's those two teddy bears. Let's find out. Kenneth and Gail,

0:39:040:39:08

we've got two, haven't we? We split the lot,

0:39:080:39:10

-so we've got the Farnell's one going first.

-Yep.

-300-500. And my favourite, the little 1940s one.

0:39:100:39:15

I think he's been duffed up a bit and he needs a lot of love.

0:39:150:39:18

-Aw!

-He's the cheaper of the two but I think...

0:39:180:39:21

I think he looks more expensive, put it that way. That's just my opinion.

0:39:210:39:25

They're both in such immaculate condition so, hopefully,

0:39:250:39:28

having not played with them for all your lifetimes, it will pay off.

0:39:280:39:34

And we've seen on the show before there's plenty of collectors for teddy bears out there.

0:39:340:39:38

Hopefully they've spotted these two.

0:39:380:39:40

-Fingers crossed.

-I know, yeah.

0:39:400:39:42

Let's see who's going to put their paws up. Here we go.

0:39:420:39:44

The Alpha Toys teddy bear there, the Farnell's.

0:39:440:39:48

One, two, three, four telephone bids. One, two, three, four.

0:39:480:39:52

This one's going to fly.

0:39:520:39:54

Where will you start me, then? I've got 320 on the net.

0:39:540:39:59

390, 410, 430, 450, 470, 530,

0:39:590:40:06

-550 now.

-Already it's eclipsed the top end.

-550 on the net.

0:40:070:40:10

-I'll take 580 in the room.

-Brilliant.

0:40:100:40:13

I've got 570 now on the net.

0:40:130:40:15

600 now.

0:40:150:40:17

So it's gone to a telephone bid.

0:40:170:40:20

620, 650. 650 on Catherine's phone.

0:40:200:40:23

650, 670. 700? 700 I have on Adam's phone. 720 now on this phone.

0:40:230:40:31

At 720, 750. 780.

0:40:310:40:35

800.

0:40:360:40:39

And 20.

0:40:390:40:40

850, 880.

0:40:400:40:43

I can see you both willing this on, nodding your heads,

0:40:430:40:47

nodding with the bidders, going, "Yes, one more, one more."

0:40:470:40:50

-980.

-I wonder if it'll make 1,000.

0:40:500:40:54

£1,000? 1,050. 1,100?

0:40:540:40:57

-Kenneth, this is very good, isn't it?

-It is, yes.

-1,150.

0:40:570:41:01

-1,200.

-What's going through your mind, Gail?

-Money.

0:41:010:41:04

-"Don't stop, don't stop."

-The cheque.

-The cheque, yeah.

0:41:040:41:07

-1,300.

-Fantastic. Wow!

0:41:070:41:10

-1,350.

-Gosh!

0:41:100:41:12

It's a bit special.

0:41:120:41:15

1,350, back in. 1,400?

0:41:150:41:16

1,400. 1,450.

0:41:190:41:23

One more, 1,450. No? At 1,400, then. On the steps at 1,400.

0:41:230:41:27

Selling, then, at 1,400.

0:41:270:41:29

-Fantastic!

-Well that's one down, one to go. My favourite next.

0:41:310:41:34

THEY LAUGH

0:41:340:41:36

Let's see if we can beat that.

0:41:360:41:38

-The mohair teddy bear.

-Here we go.

-Someone's got good taste out there.

0:41:390:41:44

At £65. 70, can I say now? 65 with me, 70 is it?

0:41:440:41:48

At £65.

0:41:480:41:49

70, can I say now? £70. 75. 80, and five, 90, and five.

0:41:490:41:56

£100? Got 100 on the net, 110, can I say? £100. And 10 anywhere?

0:41:560:42:01

£100, finished?

0:42:010:42:04

Well, I still prefer that one.

0:42:050:42:07

That was the right money - £100.

0:42:070:42:09

That's a grand total of £1,500.

0:42:090:42:10

I think that's just marvellous, more than we expected.

0:42:100:42:14

What a lovely surprise. Happy? Got to be happy with that.

0:42:140:42:17

-Very happy, yes.

-What are you going to do with the money?

0:42:170:42:20

Take Mum on holiday, I think. And the wife on holiday - it's her mum.

0:42:200:42:23

-Abroad somewhere?

-Yes, definitely. Yeah.

0:42:230:42:25

-Get the sunshine, put your feet up. That's what it's all about.

-Yeah.

0:42:250:42:28

-Thank you so much.

-OK.

-Thank you.

-Thank you for everything.

0:42:280:42:33

# For every bear that ever there was

0:42:330:42:36

# Will gather there for certain because

0:42:360:42:38

# Today's the day the teddy bears have their picnic. #

0:42:380:42:43

Well, that is it - another day in another sale room.

0:42:430:42:46

Our owners have gone home happy, I've had a marvellous time

0:42:460:42:49

here in Itchen Stoke, I have to say. But the highlight for me

0:42:490:42:52

had to be selling those two teddy bears for a whopping £1,500, well above estimate.

0:42:520:42:58

I hope Kenneth and Gail are very, very happy.

0:42:580:43:00

And I hope you've enjoyed the show, too. Join me again for many more surprises.

0:43:000:43:04

Until the next time, from Itchen Stoke, it's goodbye.

0:43:040:43:07

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:180:43:20

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:200:43:22

Paul Martin is joined by experts James Lewis and Christina Trevanion in Winchester. Paul gets excited about some Rolling Stones autographs, and Christina falls in love with a very old teddy bear. James finds himself herding some slightly disturbing ceramic sheep. So which will fetch the highest price at auction?

While he is in the area Paul visits Chawton House to explore the link between the author Jane Austen and an American millionairess.


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