Sheffield 14 Flog It!


Sheffield 14

Antiques series. This episode comes from Cutlers Hall in the heart of Sheffield. Joining Paul Martin are experts James Lewis and Anita Manning.


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Transcript


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This is stainless steel, the material we couldn't do without.

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From the tiniest parts in watches to the tallest buildings,

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stainless steel is everywhere.

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And today, we're in the city that invented it.

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Welcome to "Flog It!" from Sheffield.

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Our valuation day comes from the city of Sheffield,

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an area that has been renowned for producing steel and cutlery

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for nearly 1,000 years.

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This is a city that has steel flowing through its veins,

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and it's helped shape the modern world.

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Our venue today is Cutlers' Hall,

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home to the Cutlers' company since the 1600s.

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Cutlers' Hall is renowned throughout Sheffield

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because it's been at the very heart of the industry

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that put the city on the world map.

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And today it looks like all of Yorkshire has turned out

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laden with bags and boxes full of antiques and collectables.

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And scouring the lines, looking to unearth

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some rare and fascinating treasures

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are our equally fascinating experts, James Lewis...

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-Ah, stainless steel. Perfect.

-It's all gone to...

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We can sort that out when we go in.

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..and Anita Manning.

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We'll have a closer look at that once we get it upstairs.

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We'll be taking the finest antiques off to auction,

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and if you're happy with your valuations,

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what are you going to do?

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ALL: Flog it!

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Yes, that's right. Let's get inside and get valuing.

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The impressive main hall is where our team have set their stalls.

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Our experts will be working flat out to make sure every item

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gets inspected and valued.

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And we've really got our work cut out today

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with such a range of antiques to pour over.

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There's lead horses...

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..and porcelain dogs...

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..silver spoons and gold watches.

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They'll all be taken to auction later on,

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but which one will make a handsome profit for their owners?

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You'll find out later.

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Such a fabulous turnout here today.

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It makes for such an exciting event.

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It looks like chaos down there but everybody knows what they're doing.

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James Lewis is first at the table,

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so let's take a closer look at what he's spotted.

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Janet, what you have brought today

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is one of my favourite styles of jewellery.

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That necklace...

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..could almost be made from pure 24 carat gold

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and worn by some Etruscan princess.

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Yeah, I said it looks like something what Cleopatra could have worn.

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Exactly.

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Egyptian, Etruscan, it's that...it's that look.

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The only thing that shows that it isn't is that

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-big great locket on the front.

-Oh, right.

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-This was made 140 years ago, probably.

-Right.

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But that, in itself, without the locket,

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is a very fashionable piece of jewellery.

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Is this something you wear?

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-Ah, no, no, it was my great grandma's...

-OK.

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..and then it came to my grandma, and now my sister and I have got it,

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and we've never worn it.

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The first thing to say is it's Pinchbeck.

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What's Pinchbeck?

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Pinchbeck was invented by Christopher Pinchbeck.

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He invented it around 1720

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as a replacement for gold.

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And it's made from copper, zinc and brass -

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a mixture of all the metals.

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The reason why it died out in 1890

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is because we reduced our gold content to nine carat.

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And as soon as that happened gold became so cheap

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with the gold plating and the nine carat

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-that Pinchbeck was just outmoded.

-Yeah, I understand.

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Became unfashionable.

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If we look at the style on the front it's almost Japanese,

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and it's engraved with a swallow,

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an emblem that represents homecoming.

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Would this tie into any family history that you can think of?

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-Well, that was from my great grandma.

-Yeah.

-And her...

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I think it was her father, went out to America.

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And in actual fact, all my relatives are in America,

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but the eldest was a girl called Charlotte...

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who didn't settle in America

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cos she'd left her young man in Sheffield,

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and she came back to Sheffield, and I'm down that one single line.

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-So, this could well be the locket...

-Yeah.

-..that he gave to her?

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Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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-Saying, "Please come back?"

-Yeah, yeah.

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-How wonderful.

-So, you know, there is the extra history to it, yeah.

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So, what's it worth? Um...

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..£50-£70.

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-Oh, right.

-Not hugely valuable but I love it.

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So, what would you do? Would you put a reserve on it then?

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-I think we should put £50 on it, firm.

-Yes.

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-And if it doesn't make that...

-Then I do take it back home.

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-Take it home.

-Whatever will be, will be.

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I love it. Thank you so much for bringing it in.

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-Thank you very much for seeing me.

-Pleasure.

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One thing I really like about our valuation days is seeing items

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that connect with our location and its history.

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And Anita has found something that really does just that.

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Kath, it's wonderful being in Sheffield.

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It's wonderful being in the Cutlers' Hall.

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Now I have a piece of Sheffield silver sitting in front of me.

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It's made by Walker And Hall, best you can get.

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Tell me about this piece specifically.

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It was given as a present to my husband's parents,

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and it was given by Sir Stuart and Lady Goodwin

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on their silver wedding anniversary.

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My mother-in-law was actually his housekeeper.

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Ah, right.

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And apart from the fact that I know it's Walker And Hall

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and that it's silver,

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I don't really know an awful lot about the tray itself.

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So, obviously, to give a little silver salver like this,

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-it was quite a prestigious wedding present.

-It was.

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-It was lovely.

-Aha.

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I have to be honest and say that I actually never really saw it

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until after my mother-in-law had died,

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and then everything that was hers came to my husband.

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-So, it was tucked away?

-It was tucked away.

-Yeah.

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-This little tray dates from 1919.

-Mm-hm.

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When did your mother-in-law get married?

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1940, because that is 1965.

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The fact that it's from Sir Stuart Goodwin

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may be an interesting marketing feature

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because we are going to sell in a Sheffield saleroom.

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-Right, yes.

-And I'm sure that local silver made by a local factory...

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I see it in Sheffield, and...

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..with associations with a prominent Sheffield character

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I think all these factors will make it really quite desirable.

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-That'd be lovely.

-Why are you wanting to sell it?

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It used to come out about once a year to be cleaned.

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It was on display in our cabinet but other than that

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-it was just tucked away in the back of the cabinet.

-Yeah.

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You could see it but that was it.

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Better to pass it on and to sell it to someone who will...

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-Absolutely.

-..enjoy it.

-Yeah.

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Um, price-wise, it is Sheffield, it is Walker And Hall,

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it is silver, but it's a fairly

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plain and straightforward item.

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-Yeah.

-But we have this rather nice decoration

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around the edge,

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and the feet are little claw feet.

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So, these are little details that will help the price.

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Coming into auction, I would say price of 80-120.

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-Right.

-Would you be happy with that?

-Yeah.

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Yeah. I mean, obviously, like everybody,

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-you hope it's going to be worth a lot more.

-Mm-hm.

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Um, but I don't know what silver's worth today, so...

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I can be a wee bit conservative.

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THEY LAUGH

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If you estimate it low and wide,

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it makes people think that, "Oh, yes, I'll have a go at that,"

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so, it's a wee bit of the auction psychology.

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Would we be able to put a reserve on it?

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We could put a reserve on it...

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-Yeah.

-..and I would suggest the bottom estimate, £80.

-That's fine.

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-Yes, I'm sure my husband would be very happy with that.

-OK.

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It's lovely. We'll take it along. And let's hope it flies.

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Hundreds of "Flog It!" fans bringing in their valuables.

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It's always a real feast of antiques for our experts.

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And I've managed to sniff out a few tasty morsels myself.

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Rita, we're holding a little bit of Sheffield's history in our hands,

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and it doesn't get much better than this. Well, for you at least.

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-Father-in-law made these.

-That's right.

-Yeah.

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And what a talented man. Tell me about him.

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He was an apprentice silversmith at the Sheffield College of Art.

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And they always had to do an apprenticeship piece.

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Did it in pewter because it was cheaper, because

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if you made a mistake, it would have been a very costly mistake.

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So, he did it in pewter, had it silver plated,

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and because it was such a good piece,

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there was a young man there who he was at the college with

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and he was an apprentice chaser for Mappin & Webb's.

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Oh, good name. Very good maker.

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So, when George had finished making this he...

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-..hand chased it for him.

-It's beautiful, isn't it?

-Yes.

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Absolutely beautiful.

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And my father-in-law, after,

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he actually owned his own business,

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George Herriot And Son of...

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And they were pewter makers,

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and we used to make pewter beer tankards, wine goblets, hip flasks,

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and send them all over the world.

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Well, just looking at them,

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we've got the milk bowl, and the sugar bowl and the teapot.

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Beautifully chased, and sort of

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modelled on something from the George II period.

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It's got that lovely sort of Rococo look to it.

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I think it's lovely. I think it's absolutely lovely.

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Condition's very, very good as well.

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But this really sums up what was going on in Sheffield

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-throughout the sort of early 1900s.

-Yes.

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You know, small firms, small family firms

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making great wears like this

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which are appreciated all over the world.

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This is worth more to you really than putting it on the market.

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You can't put a value on something that belongs to the grandfather.

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-No, you can't.

-Look after them. It's a lovely trio,

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and it really does sum up what Sheffield is all about.

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It does, yes.

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-Thank you so much for coming along today.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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And from something very Sheffield,

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next up, it's James with a collection of toys

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that are very British.

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-Martin, are you a royalist?

-Yes.

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-You are.

-Yes.

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So, tell me, have you been to any of the jubilee celebrations?

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Not at of the jubilee celebrations, Trooping The Colour.

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-You've been there?

-Yes.

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But here we have the 1953 coronation coach

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made by a Great British firm known as Britain's.

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1893, William Britain invented a way of die-casting hollow lead animals.

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Now, that, of course, made them lighter to play with

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but also almost halved the cost of the materials.

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-Right.

-Is this something you played with as a child or...?

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No, it wasn't mine.

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-So, whose was it?

-It was some friends' of mine.

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And they were moving to Turkey and it was about to go on a skip.

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Well, well rescued.

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Now, they're all set out very nicely

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but tossed to one side is the box. Let's have a look at that.

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-Yes, there's the box.

-There we go.

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Whenever we're looking at toys or models

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or anything like that the box is very, very important.

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Now, one thing that strikes me

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when I look at this first is that this arrangement

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of five horses is certainly not what we see at the coronation,

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and here inside...

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-..we have directions of assembling the team of eight horses...

-Oh!

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..and the state coach. So, there we go, we...

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To start with, we're missing three horses.

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Now then, let's stick that back in there.

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Now, this little chap here doesn't belong there.

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Now, that - he belongs here.

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Going to move this one over to there. There we go.

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-So, the riders should be in one line.

-Right.

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So, there should be four of these down here.

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And then next to each rider they will be controlling

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the horse by their side as well.

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-So, we're missing a whole load of riders and horses...

-Ah.

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..which absolutely decimates the value.

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Right.

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But we do have the box,

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and we have the little instruction bit there.

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So, it has a value

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but nowhere near a complete one.

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-I think that we should just get whatever we can for it...

-Yeah.

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-..because if it had been in good condition..

-Yes.

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..with all of its horses and riders it's £50.

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-Right.

-Something around there.

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So, with bits missing, maybe 20.

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And hopefully, somebody else with a couple more riders

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will join forces with this one and make them into a decent set.

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-But let's give it a go and see what happens.

-Yep.

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And to think all those were going to be thrown onto a skip.

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Hats off to Martin for saving them.

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If you'd like to take part in "Flog It!"

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this is where your journey starts,

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evaluation day, very much like this one.

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Details of up-and-coming dates and venues

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you can find on our BBC website.

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But right now, it's off to the auction room for the first time.

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Let's put our first set of valuations to the test.

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And here's a quick recap of all the items

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that are going under the hammer.

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Janet's necklace might be fit for a princess

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but can it fetch a king's ransom at the auction?

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Kath served up a piece of Sheffield history with her silver tray.

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Hopefully, it will catch the eye of a local collector.

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And will these lead horses be worth their weight in gold?

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It's just a hop and a skip two miles south across the city

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to Sheffield Auction Gallery

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where I met up with auctioneer Robert Lee.

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He's given one of our items the chance to shine.

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Rob, you've done us proud

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and I think Janet'll be pleased as well. Look at that.

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Not the front page but the back page of the catalogue.

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That image will sell it,

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especially at £50-£70.

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Ah, very conservatively priced.

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And I like the fact that the actual locket matches the chain as well.

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Period piece, aesthetic, very nice.

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-It's a shame it's not gold.

-Oh, ho!

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We won't be talking big money.

0:14:570:14:59

What do you see this making in the sale later on?

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I would have thought £100-£150 cos it's in such clean order.

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I know a couple of other links have been added,

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the little drop that holds the pendant on has been added now.

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-Yes.

-So, it is complete.

0:15:120:15:14

I like that, strangely enough.

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I think it's great value for money. You know, it could be anything.

0:15:160:15:19

It could be Egyptian, rock'n'roll, it's a costume piece...

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-Yes.

-..for that sort of money.

-Aha.

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But I have a feeling it'll go for a lot more, don't you?

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Fingers crossed. Let's hope so.

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We'll see tomorrow.

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Janet's necklace is already attracting attention

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but we'll just have to wait until later to see how it fares

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because right now we have other lots going under the hammer first.

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Well, serving up for you right now we've got a silver waiter,

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a silver waiter! Ever heard it called that?

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-ANITA LAUGHS

-That's what it says in the catalogue.

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That wonderful silver tray belonging to Kath.

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Nice thing. Nice thing. Family history here.

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This was given to your mother-in-law, she was in service.

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-She was for a long time.

-So, why do you want to sell this?

0:15:560:16:00

We're just clearing out everything that's in the cabinet.

0:16:000:16:02

We had an original valuation of £80-£120.

0:16:020:16:05

-I know you've upped that, you want a fixed reserve at £100.

-Please.

0:16:050:16:09

That's mid-estimate, and I'm pretty sure we'll get that anyway.

0:16:090:16:12

-I mean, this is good quality silver. You know, it's a nice thing.

-Aha.

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-I know you're nervous right now, aren't you?

-Yeah, I am.

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Well look, just enjoy it, OK? It's going under the hammer.

0:16:180:16:21

Let's find out if we can tempt somebody with this tray.

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Hallmark silver waiter, Sheffield 1919.

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Must start the bidding.

0:16:270:16:29

A few commissions. 140. 150. 160.

0:16:290:16:32

Quality always sells. Look at that.

0:16:320:16:34

£170 it needs to be elsewhere.

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£160 bid so far. Got to be 170.

0:16:380:16:42

170 to move on. 160 with me.

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170, is it?

0:16:440:16:46

All done with me at £160.

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165 I'll do you. OK.

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170 I'm after.

0:16:500:16:51

165, gentleman here.

0:16:510:16:54

Anybody else at 170?

0:16:540:16:55

All done at 165.

0:16:550:16:57

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yes, the hammer's gone down.

0:16:580:17:00

-Excellent.

-That was straight in, wasn't it?

-Thank you.

0:17:000:17:02

No need to worry about the fixed reserve there

0:17:020:17:04

or putting the valuation up.

0:17:040:17:06

-That was lovely.

-That's a good result, isn't it?

0:17:060:17:08

-Thank you, yes.

-Quality. And we say it on the show

0:17:080:17:10

time and time again - quality always sells.

0:17:100:17:14

Next up is Martin's lead toy set,

0:17:190:17:21

and it seems he's found the missing pieces.

0:17:210:17:24

-I know you've added to it, haven't you?

-Yes, yeah.

0:17:250:17:27

Found some bits in the bottom of the bag.

0:17:270:17:30

-Got an evaluation.

-You found them?

0:17:300:17:32

-Yes.

-Brilliant.

0:17:320:17:34

We now have a new valuation of £40-£60...

0:17:340:17:36

-Great.

-..with the reserve at 35 with discretion.

0:17:360:17:39

But I tell you something,

0:17:390:17:41

I think this is a lot of kit for even £40-£60.

0:17:410:17:45

I... You know, Britain's don't normally let us down, do they?

0:17:450:17:47

No, I mean...I mean, a complete set

0:17:470:17:49

-is a totally different thing to...

-Sure.

-..one with four missing.

-Sure.

0:17:490:17:53

-So... We said they had galloped off, didn't we?

-Yes.

0:17:530:17:55

Well, let's hope they're looking at 80-120.

0:17:550:17:57

That's kind of what I'm thinking anyway.

0:17:570:17:59

-They're going under the hammer now, Martin.

-Right.

0:17:590:18:01

Fingers crossed. This is it.

0:18:010:18:02

Britain set number 1470 - state coach

0:18:020:18:06

finished in blue and gold complete with the eight horses.

0:18:060:18:09

Quality piece.

0:18:090:18:10

Other people think so.

0:18:100:18:12

The collectors are willing to start the bidding at £60.

0:18:120:18:15

-Great, in at 60.

-65 I'm after.

0:18:150:18:19

£65 it needs to be elsewhere.

0:18:190:18:22

Anybody want £65 for them?

0:18:220:18:24

65 at the top. 70 and 75 now.

0:18:240:18:26

With me at 70.

0:18:260:18:28

Anybody else want them? With me on commission at £70.

0:18:280:18:31

Are we done at £70?

0:18:310:18:34

Hammer's going to drop.

0:18:340:18:36

-GAVEL BANGS

-That's a good result.

0:18:360:18:37

-Thank goodness you found the horses and came up with them.

-Brilliant.

0:18:370:18:41

Unbeknown to James. That was really good.

0:18:410:18:43

I'm really pleased. I'm a bit stunned. I can't take it in yet.

0:18:430:18:46

-Aw, take a moment, won't you? Take a moment.

-I will.

0:18:460:18:48

Wow.

0:18:490:18:50

I'm really glad Martin managed to make up the full set.

0:18:500:18:53

That really helped to fetch a good price.

0:18:530:18:56

And finally, star of the back page is Janet's dazzling necklace.

0:18:560:19:00

Janet, it's great to see you again. And who's this? Is this Sue?

0:19:010:19:04

-It is, yes.

-My sister.

-Sister. And of course, this was Great Grandma's,

0:19:040:19:07

-so you've got to be here today, haven't you?

-Exactly, yes.

0:19:070:19:10

Did you like this locket and chain?

0:19:100:19:12

We've had it for 30 years and it's been in a drawer.

0:19:120:19:14

Had a chat to the auctioneer yesterday at the preview day.

0:19:140:19:17

Well, we both actually said we really love it.

0:19:170:19:21

There's something about it, there really is.

0:19:210:19:23

-And really, it's a "come and buy me" at around £70.

-Oh, yeah.

0:19:230:19:26

-Hopefully we'll double our money.

-That'd be great.

0:19:260:19:28

-Happy with that?

-Yes, that'd be lovely.

-Wonderful.

0:19:280:19:30

Let's put it to the test. It's going under the hammer now.

0:19:300:19:32

-Good luck, both of you. This is it.

-Thank you.

0:19:320:19:34

An aesthetic locket with the engraved swallow

0:19:340:19:37

and Oriental-style detail with braided and star border

0:19:370:19:40

on the Etruscan-style collar necklace. It's a beauty.

0:19:400:19:43

It's all original, isn't it?

0:19:430:19:45

100. 110. 120.

0:19:450:19:48

You should help me.

0:19:480:19:49

130 I'm after.

0:19:490:19:50

£120 bid. 130. 140 with me.

0:19:500:19:53

150 I'll take.

0:19:530:19:54

I'm out. Who's on 160?

0:19:540:19:56

-150.

-Flying away, isn't it?

-On commission.

0:19:560:19:59

Got to be 160 to move on.

0:19:590:20:00

160, new bidder.

0:20:000:20:02

170 I'm after. 180, sir?

0:20:020:20:04

190, please. 180 in the room.

0:20:050:20:07

190 I'm after.

0:20:070:20:09

190. 200, sir.

0:20:090:20:11

210 will do.

0:20:110:20:12

200 in the room. It's got to be 210 now.

0:20:120:20:14

Room bid at £200.

0:20:140:20:16

Anybody else at 210?

0:20:160:20:17

I've got it. 220, sir.

0:20:170:20:19

230 I need.

0:20:190:20:20

220 bid. On my left it's got to be 230 to progress.

0:20:220:20:26

All done, are we at £220?

0:20:260:20:28

Hammer's going to drop. Going, going...

0:20:280:20:30

-GAVEL BANGS

-..gone.

0:20:320:20:33

-That's a sold sale.

-That's wonderful.

-Wow, isn't that good?

0:20:330:20:36

-Fantastic.

-We were saying, if it went for 60 or £70 at the lower end

0:20:360:20:39

a student would buy it as costume jewellery.

0:20:390:20:41

-That didn't go to a student.

-Lovely.

0:20:410:20:42

That's going to some lady who will wear it, and love it,

0:20:420:20:45

and appreciate it and look fabulous in it.

0:20:450:20:47

That's right.

0:20:470:20:48

-Thank you very much.

-Was that a good experience?

0:20:480:20:50

-Wonderful, yes.

-Lovely. BOTH:

-Thank you very much.

0:20:500:20:53

£60 new bid in the room.

0:20:530:20:55

65 will do.

0:20:550:20:56

Gentleman in the room holds it at 60. 65.

0:20:560:20:58

70, sir.

0:20:580:20:59

Well, that's the end of our first visit to the auction room today.

0:21:000:21:03

So far, so good. We are coming back here later on in the programme.

0:21:030:21:07

I love being in auction rooms

0:21:070:21:09

surrounded by fine arts and antiques.

0:21:090:21:11

And it's not just about what's it worth,

0:21:110:21:14

it's about the quality and the craftsmanship

0:21:140:21:16

and the beauty of the object.

0:21:160:21:18

Now, there's one man here in Sheffield

0:21:180:21:20

who's keeping those craft traditions alive.

0:21:200:21:22

And I went to find him.

0:21:220:21:24

This is the River Don, the largest of five rivers

0:21:360:21:38

and countless streams that run through the city of Sheffield.

0:21:380:21:43

Now, together with an abundance of coal and iron ore

0:21:430:21:46

in the hills of South Yorkshire, Sheffield's waterways have provided

0:21:460:21:50

the power to turn the water wheels in the factories and the mills,

0:21:500:21:54

perfect for making steel and grinding it.

0:21:540:21:57

Because of this, as far back as the 12th century

0:21:580:22:01

Sheffield became renowned for making tools and knives.

0:22:010:22:05

Over the centuries, as the demand for Sheffield's steel products grew

0:22:050:22:08

the city became the main centre for cutlery manufacture,

0:22:080:22:12

all done by hand.

0:22:120:22:14

By the 18th century,

0:22:140:22:15

hundreds of water mills lined these river banks,

0:22:150:22:19

with thousands of craftsmen and workers turning out steel

0:22:190:22:22

in all shapes and sizes.

0:22:220:22:24

However, the Industrial Revolution of mass production

0:22:240:22:27

was just around the corner.

0:22:270:22:28

Factories with new machines sprung up all over the place,

0:22:280:22:31

and suddenly, one man could do the work of several skilled craftsmen,

0:22:310:22:34

or little mesters, as they were known.

0:22:340:22:37

And little workshops like these which you'd find

0:22:370:22:39

all over Sheffield started to become obsolete.

0:22:390:22:42

The main driving force behind this change was the steam engine.

0:22:430:22:47

These machines meant factories could virtually run night and day

0:22:470:22:50

with one big engine able to power the entire mill.

0:22:500:22:53

To all intents and purposes

0:22:540:22:56

this is the Industrial Revolution moving forward at full tilt.

0:22:560:23:01

The whole country was doing this but particularly Sheffield.

0:23:010:23:05

What you see up here is one massive great big drive belt...

0:23:050:23:07

There it is there, look.

0:23:070:23:09

..which is turning that central axle.

0:23:090:23:12

Now, that in turn is driving several other small drive belts which

0:23:120:23:16

power these lathes which are cutting out dies.

0:23:160:23:19

Once you've got the die, you can then stamp out hundreds

0:23:190:23:22

and millions of spoons, forks, knives, whatever you want to make,

0:23:220:23:27

you cut the die, it will be made.

0:23:270:23:29

And to give you one example, back in the year 1900,

0:23:290:23:32

Joseph Rodgers And Sons, one of the leading manufacturers around here,

0:23:320:23:36

produced 3 million knives in a year with very little craftsmen.

0:23:360:23:40

Since then, machines have become even more sophisticated

0:23:410:23:44

and can churn out huge numbers of anything

0:23:440:23:47

almost on their own.

0:23:470:23:49

Craftsmen have long gone from the factories.

0:23:490:23:52

However, despite the overwhelming force of industrialisation,

0:23:530:23:57

some craftsmen did survive

0:23:570:23:58

by creating high-end or specialised items,

0:23:580:24:02

like Pete Goss who hand makes surgical steel instruments to order.

0:24:020:24:07

-Hey.

-Hiya. Good morning. You all right?

0:24:120:24:15

I didn't want to stop you there. It looks fascinating.

0:24:150:24:17

-You are the last of a dying breed, aren't you?

-I am.

0:24:170:24:20

Making surgical instruments.

0:24:200:24:21

I can say I'm probably the last in...definitely in Britain.

0:24:210:24:25

-Really?

-Yes.

0:24:250:24:26

-How long have you been doing this?

-58 years.

0:24:260:24:28

58 years?

0:24:280:24:29

-Yes.

-So, when you left school you went straight into this industry

0:24:290:24:32

-like most young kids in Sheffield?

-Yeah.

0:24:320:24:34

-I had to run the errands and things like that, you know?

-Sure.

0:24:340:24:37

-When you're kids...

-Make the tea.

0:24:370:24:38

And what are you making right now? A pair of scissors?

0:24:380:24:41

I'm making a pair of nurse's scissors.

0:24:410:24:42

Just for sort of cutting bandages open and general use?

0:24:420:24:45

That's correct, yes.

0:24:450:24:46

You've got rows and rows of dies over there.

0:24:460:24:48

-Each one has a specific job to do.

-That's right, yeah.

0:24:480:24:51

And for every different order I get, I've got sets of dies.

0:24:510:24:54

I just knock them out.

0:24:540:24:55

..put the new ones in for the new job.

0:24:560:24:58

-So, you've got these set up on this special anvil...

-Yes.

0:24:580:25:01

-..you can literally work along.

-That's right.

0:25:010:25:03

So, in a way this is your own little conveyor belt.

0:25:030:25:05

That's correct, yeah. It is really, yeah.

0:25:050:25:08

The techniques used by Pete are very simple and timeless.

0:25:080:25:11

Very little has changed over the centuries.

0:25:110:25:14

Even so, their future looks uncertain.

0:25:140:25:17

These are skills which, sadly, aren't being passed on.

0:25:190:25:23

I know, but...

0:25:230:25:24

Be no good nowadays, would it? It's not quick enough.

0:25:260:25:28

And all this is by eye.

0:25:300:25:31

I can see you're just bending it in these forms here just by eye...

0:25:310:25:35

-Yeah.

-..getting the right shape on the handle.

0:25:350:25:37

Just one more heat and that's that done.

0:25:390:25:41

-Do you want to have a go at making one of these?

-Yes, please.

0:25:440:25:46

Yeah, I'll give it a go.

0:25:470:25:49

-Get that.

-Right, on there?

0:25:490:25:50

Hold it on the edge.

0:25:500:25:52

-Yeah.

-And then...?

-And on the side as well.

0:25:570:25:59

Yeah, it's getting there.

0:26:030:26:04

That's it. Oh, you'd be good breaking toffee at Thorntons.

0:26:040:26:08

PAUL LAUGHS

0:26:080:26:09

-Ah, yeah.

-What do you think?

-PETE LAUGHS

0:26:100:26:12

I wouldn't want to use those as a pair of scissors.

0:26:120:26:15

THEY LAUGH

0:26:150:26:16

I can tell you, that is a lot harder than Pete makes it look.

0:26:160:26:20

You've got some examples of your work there.

0:26:200:26:22

-That's right.

-Can we look at them?

-Yes.

0:26:220:26:24

Pete makes each piece to order

0:26:270:26:28

and over the years has made all sorts of surgical instruments

0:26:280:26:31

for a variety of medical procedures.

0:26:310:26:34

Well, this is for open heart surgery.

0:26:350:26:37

Uff!

0:26:370:26:38

It's for opening chests. That goes between the ribs.

0:26:380:26:41

And it opens the chest up.

0:26:420:26:43

Where does it go from here for you?

0:26:440:26:46

-Is there still a future making these instruments?

-No.

0:26:460:26:50

No, there's not enough work today...

0:26:500:26:52

-Really?

-..to keep anybody going full-time.

0:26:520:26:55

You've got all these skills, you've dedicated your life to this,

0:26:550:26:58

and you're clearly passionate about it,

0:26:580:27:00

don't you want to train up an apprentice to pass it on?

0:27:000:27:03

But it'd be no good

0:27:030:27:04

because it wouldn't keep a lad going for his entire career.

0:27:040:27:07

There just isn't the amount of work. It's all being phased out now.

0:27:070:27:11

-Hand forges.

-How do you feel about that? Does it make you feel upset?

0:27:110:27:15

Not really. I mean, it's understandable

0:27:150:27:17

because you wouldn't be able to keep a firm going nowadays

0:27:170:27:20

just by hand forging.

0:27:200:27:21

There's such a big demand and quick turnover...

0:27:210:27:24

..wouldn't be worthwhile.

0:27:250:27:27

-Well, it's been a pleasure meeting you and seeing your work.

-Thank you.

0:27:270:27:30

You know, it's handcrafted in the traditional way

0:27:300:27:32

with traditional methods and skills, and that's what it's all about.

0:27:320:27:36

-And you can't put a price on that really, can you?

-No, no.

0:27:360:27:38

You really can't.

0:27:380:27:40

You know, it's a real honour to meet someone like Pete,

0:27:480:27:50

a craftsman clearly at the top of his genre,

0:27:500:27:52

passionate about what he does and also very modest as well.

0:27:520:27:56

But it's also tinged with a bit of sadness

0:27:560:27:58

because once he stops doing that, that's where it ends.

0:27:580:28:02

There is no apprentice, there is no future for it.

0:28:020:28:05

A lot of you might say, "Well, you've got to move with the times,"

0:28:050:28:08

but that's a bitter pill to swallow.

0:28:080:28:10

Welcome back to the magnificent Cutler's Hall.

0:28:220:28:24

Hundreds of people have already had their unwanted antiques valued

0:28:240:28:28

and there are plenty more to go.

0:28:280:28:30

First up, with time on her hands, is Anita Manning.

0:28:310:28:35

John, welcome to "Flog It!".

0:28:350:28:37

And what a wonderful item you've brought along.

0:28:370:28:41

This marvellous pocket watch and albert chain.

0:28:410:28:45

Can you tell me, where did you get it?

0:28:450:28:48

Well, it's been in the family donkey's years

0:28:480:28:50

but I believe it came via an uncle

0:28:500:28:53

who went to America in the '20s

0:28:530:28:57

hoping to get work.

0:28:570:29:00

And I don't think he stayed that long. He was more or less...

0:29:000:29:03

He went across, and he was back and never really settled,

0:29:030:29:06

and brought the watch back with him.

0:29:060:29:08

So, he went over there with no money and he came back...

0:29:080:29:13

With a nice watch.

0:29:130:29:14

So, this is not a rolled gold or a plated watch or a silver watch,

0:29:140:29:19

this is a 14 carat watch, and a nice one that.

0:29:190:29:24

And we have this lovely, big, chunky, curb link albert.

0:29:240:29:30

If we look, we can see this wonderful engraved decoration

0:29:300:29:35

around here.

0:29:350:29:37

A little bit of engine-turned work here,

0:29:370:29:40

and we have initials within this cartouche.

0:29:400:29:43

Are these his initials? Have you checked it out?

0:29:430:29:46

I don't know for sure.

0:29:460:29:48

So, this watch is a Rockford watch.

0:29:480:29:51

The workshop was in Rockford, Illinois.

0:29:510:29:54

They made precision watches.

0:29:540:29:56

They were good watchmakers.

0:29:560:29:58

This factory closed in 1915,

0:29:580:30:00

and it made watches between about

0:30:000:30:03

1874-75 and 1915.

0:30:030:30:07

It has a white porcelain face.

0:30:070:30:10

We have the Roman numerals here, and when I look at it

0:30:100:30:14

I can see that it's still in working order.

0:30:140:30:17

And we have this marvellous albert.

0:30:170:30:21

If we look at the watch chain we will find that

0:30:210:30:25

all of the links are hallmarked

0:30:250:30:27

and our T-bar here is hallmarked with .375

0:30:270:30:32

which is nine carat gold,

0:30:320:30:34

so it's a nice one.

0:30:340:30:35

This type of item is doing remarkably well in today's market

0:30:350:30:41

because the price of precious metals has soared.

0:30:410:30:45

Yep, yep.

0:30:450:30:46

This will never go to the melting. This will be bought as an item,

0:30:460:30:50

but the fact that it's gold will have pushed that price up

0:30:500:30:54

to a good level.

0:30:540:30:57

Auction estimate, I would put an estimate of 800-1,200.

0:30:570:31:01

In that region.

0:31:010:31:03

-Yeah.

-Would you be happy to put it forward at that estimate?

0:31:030:31:07

-Yes.

-Shall we go for it?

-Yep, yep.

0:31:070:31:11

But what would the minimum be?

0:31:110:31:14

We would put a reserve price on it of £800.

0:31:140:31:18

Yeah. And I don't want to see it go for scrap.

0:31:180:31:21

So many beautiful and finely crafted items

0:31:210:31:25

are being melted down.

0:31:250:31:28

To put them into the auction at least we're giving them

0:31:280:31:30

the chance to go on further as an item...

0:31:300:31:33

-That's right, yeah.

-..and for people to enjoy them.

0:31:330:31:36

So, let's put it into auction 800-1,200.

0:31:360:31:40

-£800 reserve.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:31:410:31:44

Thank you for bringing it along.

0:31:440:31:46

-We'll put it to auction and give it a chance.

-Very good. Smashing.

0:31:460:31:50

I'm so glad John is selling that watch.

0:31:500:31:52

It would be a terrible loss

0:31:520:31:53

if it was melted for its scrap value.

0:31:530:31:55

Next, going from gold to silver,

0:31:570:31:58

James has some more items that really say, "Sheffield."

0:31:580:32:02

John, when you come to Sheffield

0:32:030:32:06

you expect to find some Sheffield silver,

0:32:060:32:09

-and you haven't disappointed. Well done.

-Cheers.

0:32:090:32:12

You've got a complete cross span here from the late 18th century

0:32:120:32:17

through to the mid-20th century.

0:32:170:32:19

What's the idea?

0:32:190:32:21

Are these things that you've been collecting

0:32:210:32:23

or are they family pieces?

0:32:230:32:24

They're just things I found on the internet for the last few months.

0:32:240:32:27

The first one is the classic old English pattern dessert spoon.

0:32:270:32:32

We've got a London hallmark on this occasion

0:32:320:32:35

with the duty mark for King George III.

0:32:350:32:38

It's about 1790 to 1800 in date.

0:32:380:32:41

And in here, a lot of 20th-century ones.

0:32:410:32:43

So, tell me about these.

0:32:430:32:44

As I said, they're just ones I took an interest in as I saw them going.

0:32:440:32:47

The one with the little bullet on

0:32:470:32:49

is just so unusual.

0:32:490:32:51

I only picked them up for...I think that one was about £10 or something.

0:32:510:32:54

That one, I'm not sure about selling actually. It's Clarks.

0:32:540:32:57

It's the anniversary of Clarks Shoes...

0:32:570:32:59

-OK.

-..which is a rather strange one.

0:32:590:33:01

It was made by a goldsmith and silversmiths I think.

0:33:010:33:04

-And the date's dead easy. 1950.

-1950, yeah.

0:33:040:33:08

So, why do you not want to sell that one?

0:33:080:33:10

-I just think Clarks might be interesting for the museum.

-Ah, OK.

0:33:100:33:13

Well, let start by saying that is worth far more to a museum

0:33:130:33:18

than it ever will be in a general auction

0:33:180:33:20

cos you don't want it melting down as well.

0:33:200:33:22

Um, that's KSIA Keswick School of Industrial Arts.

0:33:220:33:26

This is a Birmingham hallmark on this occasion. 1899.

0:33:260:33:31

Keswick School of Industrial Arts,

0:33:310:33:33

one of the leading arts and crafts style metalwork producers

0:33:330:33:39

of the late 19th, early 20th century.

0:33:390:33:42

Values.

0:33:420:33:43

What have you paid each for them?

0:33:440:33:45

-Um...15, 20.

-Have you?

0:33:450:33:47

20 for the most.

0:33:470:33:49

20 for the most, OK.

0:33:490:33:50

I'll tell you what I think they're worth at auction.

0:33:500:33:53

-Some of them maybe about £5.

-Exactly.

0:33:530:33:55

10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100.

0:33:550:33:59

About £10 each on those.

0:34:000:34:02

I'm not sure I saw a look when I pointed to that one.

0:34:030:34:05

-Yes, I like that one, I must admit...

-Take that out.

0:34:050:34:08

-Put that one with that one.

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:34:080:34:10

10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and then we've got that one.

0:34:100:34:15

-The Keswick is going to be the one that leads the rest.

-Hmm.

0:34:150:34:19

So, I would put them as one big lot.

0:34:190:34:22

You've got about £50-£70 there.

0:34:220:34:25

So, you've got about 150.

0:34:250:34:28

How does that strike you?

0:34:290:34:31

-Yeah, we'll take it, see how it goes.

-All right?

-Yeah.

0:34:310:34:33

150-200 as an estimate. 150 reserve.

0:34:330:34:37

Let's see how we go.

0:34:370:34:38

-Got a deal.

-Well done.

-Cheers.

-OK.

0:34:380:34:41

I can't blame John for wanting to keep those spoons.

0:34:420:34:45

It's easy to get attached to beautiful antiques.

0:34:450:34:49

Hopefully, the next items won't be going back home

0:34:490:34:51

with Dorothy and Meg.

0:34:510:34:53

Girls, welcome, both of you, to "Flog It!".

0:34:530:34:55

-I know that you're friends and you're neighbours.

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:34:550:34:59

-Who do these belong to?

-Me.

-Tell me where you got them.

0:34:590:35:02

From my late husband,

0:35:020:35:04

and he got them from his uncle,

0:35:040:35:06

-and he got them from his mother.

-Do you like them?

0:35:060:35:09

Yes, I like them but...

0:35:090:35:10

..I've no room for them now.

0:35:120:35:14

I had my flat refurbished four years ago

0:35:140:35:17

and they got wrapped up and put away, and they've never been got out since.

0:35:170:35:21

-Do you know what's unusual about these?

-No.

-They're black.

0:35:210:35:25

I do know that when Grandma had them, the chain was gold...

0:35:250:35:31

..and Uncle thought it made them look cheap

0:35:320:35:36

So, after she died he sat and picked all the gold off.

0:35:360:35:41

So, whether they should be gold or not, I don't know.

0:35:440:35:47

-SHE LAUGHS

-He was a very naughty boy.

0:35:470:35:50

-These are what you call Staffordshire dogs.

-Staffordshire.

0:35:500:35:54

And these were made literally in their hundreds of thousands

0:35:540:35:59

but they were usually white.

0:35:590:36:01

These ones are black, and they're unusual because of that.

0:36:010:36:05

-Yes.

-And the collectors like anything which is a wee bit unusual.

0:36:050:36:10

The other unusual thing about this pair of dogs is that the legs are...

0:36:100:36:16

-It's what we call an open leg...

-Yeah.

0:36:160:36:18

..where the leg is on its own.

0:36:180:36:21

-It's separated from the other leg.

-Yes.

0:36:210:36:24

-So, a wee bit more difficult in the mould.

-Hmm.

0:36:240:36:27

They have gone out of fashion a wee bit. I would say probably...

0:36:270:36:32

..£60-£80.

0:36:330:36:35

-OK.

-It's not a lot of money.

-No.

0:36:350:36:38

It's not a lot of money but it's up to yourself.

0:36:380:36:41

-Yeah.

-Hmm.

0:36:410:36:43

Shall they stay in the box all wrapped up in newspaper?

0:36:430:36:46

-No.

-Or do you put them forward to the auction?

0:36:460:36:49

-I'll put them forward.

-Shall we put them forward?

-Yes.

0:36:490:36:52

I've only one daughter left now and she's not bothered about them.

0:36:520:36:57

You know, she's more modern.

0:36:570:36:59

-That's right.

-And I thought whatever I get

0:36:590:37:02

will go to her 50th birthday next month.

0:37:020:37:05

OK, ladies, we'll go put them into auction.

0:37:050:37:07

50-80, will we put a reserve on them?

0:37:070:37:11

-I'll leave it up to you, that.

-Aha.

0:37:110:37:13

-I'll put £50.

-OK.

0:37:130:37:15

I'm sure that they'll do well.

0:37:150:37:17

They'll be on the internet, and their unusual features

0:37:170:37:21

will make them more appealing to the buyers.

0:37:210:37:23

-Thank you for bringing them in.

-BOTH: Thank you.

0:37:230:37:26

It's been lovely to meet both of you.

0:37:260:37:28

BOTH: Thank you very much.

0:37:280:37:29

Well, that's it. Our experts have now find their final items

0:37:350:37:37

to take off to auction, which means it's time to say goodbye

0:37:370:37:40

to our magnificent grand host location, Cutlers' Hall.

0:37:400:37:44

As we make our way over to the saleroom, here's a quick recap

0:37:440:37:47

just to jog your memories of all the items

0:37:470:37:49

that are going under the hammer.

0:37:490:37:50

We've come along just in the nick of time

0:37:520:37:54

to save this gold watch from being turned into scrap.

0:37:540:37:57

Can these unusual Staffordshire dogs make the buyers sit up

0:37:590:38:03

and buy them at auction?

0:38:030:38:04

And John's spoon collection may have shrunk since he arrived

0:38:060:38:09

but, hopefully, it will fetch a big price in the saleroom.

0:38:090:38:12

So, we're heading back to the auction room one last time

0:38:200:38:22

to see if our favourite finds can sell for a favourable price.

0:38:220:38:27

Stirring things up with a collection of silver spoons

0:38:290:38:32

of assorted hallmarks.

0:38:320:38:33

Hopefully, we can double your money.

0:38:330:38:35

Yeah. The pressure's on me too cos the money's going to Portland Works.

0:38:350:38:38

It's where stainless steel was first made in Sheffield.

0:38:380:38:41

And they're painting the building

0:38:410:38:42

and the money is going to preserve the building.

0:38:420:38:45

-That's fantastic.

-For our little mesters' works.

0:38:450:38:47

And every penny helps.

0:38:470:38:48

And hopefully, we can make a few bob right now.

0:38:480:38:50

Let's put that valuation to the test.

0:38:500:38:52

Collection of assorted hallmark silver souvenir and other spoons.

0:38:520:38:56

Ten in total.

0:38:560:38:57

Forced to start the bidding at £100.

0:38:570:39:00

110 I need to move on.

0:39:000:39:03

110. It must be elsewhere for all this silverware.

0:39:030:39:06

110. 120. 130.

0:39:060:39:08

125. But I've got to go 135. 140.

0:39:090:39:12

145. 150.

0:39:130:39:15

I'm out.

0:39:150:39:17

Who's on 160?

0:39:170:39:18

£150 bid.

0:39:180:39:20

160 new bid. 170, sir.

0:39:200:39:23

180. 190.

0:39:230:39:25

Do you bid 200, sir?

0:39:250:39:26

190 on my left. Anybody else at £200?

0:39:260:39:30

On my left at £190,

0:39:300:39:32

Hammer's going to drop.

0:39:320:39:34

-GAVEL BANGS

-We're happy with that, 190.

0:39:350:39:36

-That's pleased.

-And all that money, it's going to a...

0:39:360:39:39

-It's going to a good cause.

-..fabulous cause.

0:39:390:39:41

£70. 75. £80.

0:39:420:39:44

And next to go under the hammer are those Staffordshire pooches.

0:39:440:39:47

Dorothy and Vera, it's great to see you again. You look fabulous.

0:39:490:39:52

-Thank you.

-Fingers crossed. The Staffs dogs,

0:39:520:39:55

the pair of Victorian dogs are going under the hammer.

0:39:550:39:57

We think they're Staffs. They're made in the potteries anyway,

0:39:570:40:00

-let's face it.

-Yes, yes.

0:40:000:40:01

There's always a market for our pooches, isn't there, Anita?

0:40:010:40:04

They're a wee bit unusual, and that's what the market likes.

0:40:040:40:07

Pare of these Victorian black glazed

0:40:070:40:09

and gilt-highlighted pottery hearth ornaments.

0:40:090:40:12

Staffordshire style by the looks of them.

0:40:120:40:15

The bidding has commenced at £28.

0:40:150:40:18

30 I'm after.

0:40:180:40:20

30 it needs to be.

0:40:200:40:21

With me at £28 bid.

0:40:210:40:23

30 bid. 35.

0:40:230:40:25

40.

0:40:250:40:26

45 with me.

0:40:260:40:27

It's got to the £50. I've got it now. Gentleman standing at 50.

0:40:270:40:30

Anybody else at 55?

0:40:300:40:32

Gentleman in the room at 50. They are going to go.

0:40:320:40:34

Any advance? Selling them at £50.

0:40:340:40:37

-GAVEL BANGS

-They've gone.

0:40:370:40:39

-Just on that reserve.

-Just made it, ladies.

0:40:390:40:42

Wow. Well done, Anita.

0:40:420:40:43

Well done, Anita. The auction room thought they were worth a bit more.

0:40:430:40:46

-Yes.

-They obviously had some presale interest to gauge that,

0:40:460:40:49

to put the value up but it just goes to show,

0:40:490:40:51

on the day no-one committed themselves,

0:40:510:40:53

-so they went ON the reserve.

-Yeah, yes.

0:40:530:40:56

A few years ago these would have been worth a lot more...

0:40:560:40:58

-About £80-£90.

-..because they were slightly different,

0:40:580:41:00

-but today's market, there isn't the interest...

-No.

0:41:000:41:05

-..that there was 10 years ago.

-You're happy, aren't you?

0:41:050:41:07

-Yes, course I am.

-You didn't like them. You didn't want them.

-No.

0:41:070:41:10

-What did you think of them?

-I thought they were lovely.

0:41:100:41:12

-Why didn't you buy them?

-Because I've got two cats.

0:41:120:41:15

THEY LAUGH

0:41:150:41:16

And finally, it's time for John's engraved gold watch.

0:41:200:41:23

John, Old Father Time's moving along swiftly.

0:41:250:41:28

-It's brought us to your lot.

-Yes.

0:41:280:41:30

The American half-hunter pocket watch with albert chain

0:41:300:41:33

is going under the hammer.

0:41:330:41:35

Beautiful, isn't it? This is real quality actually.

0:41:350:41:37

Real quality.

0:41:370:41:38

Why are you selling this now?

0:41:380:41:41

It's been there all these years...

0:41:410:41:42

-Sure.

-..and there's no-one to pass it on to that would appreciate it,

0:41:420:41:46

so it's... I want it to go to a good home.

0:41:460:41:49

I don't want it in the melting pot.

0:41:490:41:51

Well, it certainly won't get melted down.

0:41:510:41:53

That is a work of art and a scientific instrument all in one.

0:41:530:41:57

That will appeal to the academics. Let's put the value to the test.

0:41:570:41:59

Here we go. This is it, John.

0:41:590:42:01

American hunter pocket watch.

0:42:010:42:03

Decorative engraved case.

0:42:030:42:05

Lots of interest in this.

0:42:050:42:07

£850.

0:42:070:42:09

-We're straight in, £850.

-(Yes!)

0:42:090:42:11

880. 900. 920.

0:42:110:42:14

950. 980. 1,000.

0:42:140:42:17

1,050. 1,100. 1,150.

0:42:170:42:20

1,100 on commission.

0:42:200:42:22

Fair enough. 1,150. 1,175.

0:42:230:42:25

1,150 with me.

0:42:250:42:26

1,175 new bid.

0:42:260:42:28

1,200. 1,250.

0:42:280:42:31

I'm out.

0:42:310:42:32

Who is on 1,300?

0:42:320:42:33

£1,250 bid so far.

0:42:330:42:36

I'll take 1,300 elsewhere.

0:42:360:42:38

It's going to sell. Shout at me if I miss you.

0:42:380:42:40

-This is great.

-All done at £1,250.

0:42:400:42:43

Are we done?

0:42:430:42:44

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yes!

-£1,250.

0:42:450:42:49

-Spot on valuation, Anita. Spot on.

-Yeah, spot on.

0:42:490:42:52

-Yep.

-You're happy with that, aren't you?

0:42:520:42:53

-We got the top end.

-Very happy, yes.

0:42:530:42:56

-And that's your first auction as well.

-Very first, yes.

0:42:560:42:58

Well, hopefully you'll be back for many more.

0:42:580:43:01

Well, as you can see, the auction is still going on

0:43:060:43:09

but it's all over for our owners. And what a fabulous day they've had.

0:43:090:43:12

They've all gone home happy and that's what it's all about.

0:43:120:43:14

All credit to our experts and today's auctioneer.

0:43:140:43:17

I've thoroughly enjoyed being here in Sheffield, a city full

0:43:170:43:20

of history and heritage, and I hope you've enjoyed watching too.

0:43:200:43:24

So, until the next time, it's goodbye.

0:43:240:43:26

This episode comes from Cutlers Hall in the heart of Sheffield. Joining Paul Martin to unearth interesting antiques and collectables are experts James Lewis and Anita Manning.

Among the items brought in, James gets his hands on a rare set of lead toys and Anita finds an unusual set of Staffordshire ceramic dogs. Paul gets to meet Pete Goss, the only person in Britain still forging surgical steel instruments by hand.


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