Guildford 22 Flog It!


Guildford 22

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I'm here in West Sussex at a site dedicated to the

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conservation of historic buildings and later on in the programme,

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I'll be getting hands-on restoring an 18th century house.

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Now, the bad news is it involves animal dung.

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So I better find some gloves.

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Welcome to "Flog It!"

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We'll be back in Sussex later on in the show.

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Today's valuations are taking place in the county town of Surrey,

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at Guildford Cathedral.

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It's one of only a very few cathedrals

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built in the 20th century.

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Construction started in the 1930s

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and the building eventually opened its doors in 1961.

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Some critics believe that building the cathedral away from the

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town centre, on the top of a hill,

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would be a crazy idea

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but soon they were proved wrong and the cathedral attracted

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large congregations and today it's still very much

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at the heart of the community here.

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And hundreds of people have turned up,

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clutching bags and boxes full of antiques and collectibles.

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And there's one question on your lips, which is?

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CROWD: What's it worth?

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And they're going to find out and so are you.

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And the two people with the answer to that question are the

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"Flog It!" experts and today they are the devilish Mark Stacey

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and the angelic Catherine Southon.

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Competition between them will be high, or should I say low?

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-Oh, that's pathetic.

-There we are.

-You've got to give it a bit of oomph.

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-Well, you have a go.

-All right, go on, then. I don't want to break it.

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Come on. Oh, I'd love to see you fall over, Catherine Southon.

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Oh!

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That was awful, Catherine.

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So as the people of Guildford make their way inside,

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our experts prepare for a busy day of valuations.

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And here's what's coming up on today's programme.

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See if you can guess which of these items will do best

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when they go under the hammer later on in the show.

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Will it be this wooden shoe-shaped snuff holder?

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Or this Moorcroft bowl?

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Or this music box?

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All will be revealed later on in the show.

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Well, everyone is now safely seated inside the cathedral

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and this is what I love to see, hundreds of happy faces.

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Are you all having a good time?

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CROWD: Yes!

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And they're all hoping they're one of the lucky ones who've got

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something that's worth a small fortune.

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They've come from miles away, hundreds of them!

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Which means thousands of antiques to look at

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and this is where all the action's taking place.

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Look, it's lights, camera, action right here.

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Let's now catch up with Catherine Southon who has spotted

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a real classy gem and I love it.

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Anne, this is absolutely super. I love it in every shape or form.

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-It's a piece of WMF.

-Yes.

-Do you know what WMF stands for?

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-Well, I can't pronounce it.

-Oh, go on.

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-It's always a giggle when we try.

-No!

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You'd have to help me.

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Well, it's something along the lines of

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Wuttembergische Metallwarenfabrik, but don't quote me on that.

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Anyway, we've got something here which is rather charming.

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-It's something like a visitor's card tray.

-A butler's tray, maybe.

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And it's stamped right on the back, quite clearly, WMF.

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-It's got the number here, 369, now that would be the shape.

-OK.

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But what I love about it is the little doggie, the little dachshund.

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And I love the way he's looking down at the lizard crawling across.

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It's just divine.

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Where did you get it from, Anne?

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Well, I'm not exactly sure but there is a German connection.

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My brother lived in Germany

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and I assume he bought it in an antiques shop out there.

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-Yeah.

-And gave it to my mother.

-Right.

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And I've...then passed to my sister and she then passed it onto me

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because she wasn't all that keen on it.

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So, you think that your brother probably bought it in Germany?

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In Germany, yes.

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-Well, it's 1900 in date.

-Is it?

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They made pieces in pewter and silver plate.

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This is definitely silver plate.

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The very early pieces had like an ostrich stamp on them

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but this is clearly marked with the initials WMF.

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But I really think it's around 1900...

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-Oh, I thought it would be later...

-..in date.

-..than that.

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I mean, it is quite typical of WMF because of the style of the time.

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The Art Nouveau, the Jugendstil, these kind of lines

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and these curves.

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But it's just the lizard for me.

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The way he's looking down, it's just really, really nice.

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A really special thing.

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And I think today,

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I could see antique dealers fighting for this at an auction.

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Oh, that would be good.

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And perhaps putting that in their shop,

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just to put their business cards on. I mean, I'd love to have that.

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If I was a dealer, I would love to put...

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-That's good.

-Display it in my shop.

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-Do you have any idea of value on this?

-Not really.

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-I'm going to put £100 to £150 on.

-That's good.

-Is that good?

-Yes.

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Reserve of £90?

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£90 to £100?

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-To £100?

-Yes.

-Oh, all right then. You want £100 fixed on it?

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That would be nice.

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OK, as it's a family piece, we'll put £100 fixed, £100 to £150.

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-Lovely.

-Coming along to the auction?

-Of course.

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Let's watch it fly.

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Yes, I've always wanted to go to an auction so...that would be great.

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-It'll be great fun. Thanks very much, Anne.

-OK.

-Thank you.

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So, let's hope Anne's first trip to an auction room is a successful one.

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But not everyone who comes along is laden with antiques.

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-What have you brought in today?

-Ourselves.

-Yourselves!

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OK, are you after a valuation?

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Back to Mark, who's also talking to some glamorous ladies.

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-Hello Shirley, Susan.

-Hello.

-Hello there.

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Thank you so much for coming in.

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Looking very glamorous there in your outfits and the necklace.

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-Thank you very much.

-Now, tell me about these watercolours.

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These watercolours, I bought them about...nearly 40 years ago,

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off of a friend and I've had them ever since.

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And you've liked them all that time?

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-My husband loved them.

-Did he?

-Mm-hm.

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And why have you decided now to bring them along to sell?

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Well, I've got some other pictures and we're changing all the

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decoration and things like that so we thought we'd just bring these along.

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-You've got too many pictures really, haven't you?

-Well, quite a lot!

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-Well, they're by quite a well known artist. F J Aldridge.

-I never knew.

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Yes, he specialised in sort of marine scapes.

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Obviously these are Dutch marine scapes and you can see

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the windmill and the Dutch type houses in the background there.

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-Often painted in pairs.

-Right.

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He died in 1933, born in 1850 and actually

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-he lived just up the road from where I live.

-Oh, really?

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I live in Brighton, he lived in Worthing.

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-That's how you knew right away?

-Well, I've had his work before.

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-Oh, I see.

-Sneakily, I knew that.

-Right.

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And they're in quite nice frames actually.

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They suit the picture very well.

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Yes, they've been in those frames all the time I've had them.

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They probably need rebacking. You see where the backing has faded.

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Yes, I did.

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And there's been a little, slight bit of fading around the pictures.

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I think they're charming, I think

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-they're very pleasant looking pictures.

-Yes.

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The only downside, I suppose,

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-is the market is a bit more realistic for these.

-Right, OK.

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Some people might consider them a little bit old-fashioned these days.

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Right, OK.

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I mean, although they're beautifully painted, and also I think the

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younger market, they're looking for things with a bit more cutting edge,

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-a little bit cleaner line.

-Yes, yes.

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Susan, what do you think about them?

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I mean, I do think they're lovely and my dad always used to say,

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"Oh, I think these will be worth something".

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But, I haven't got the room for them.

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I mean, houses are getting smaller and...

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-Have you thought about the value?

-No, that's why I came here.

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And do you remember what you paid for them, then? All those years ago?

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-About £50.

-£50 for the pair? Well, that's not bad, is it, really?

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I suspect actually that ten years or

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so ago they would been worth a little bit more than they are now.

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Right.

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I mean, as a pair of pictures now,

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we would estimate them at something like £200 to £300.

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-Right.

-Something in that order.

-Yes.

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-We'd have to think of a reserve, of course.

-OK.

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Because we wouldn't want to put them into auction without a reserve.

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-No, no. OK.

-I would suggest you to be a bit on the realistic side.

-OK.

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And maybe put a fixed reserve of £150.

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-So we don't sell them below that figure.

-OK.

-Yes.

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-How would you feel about?

-I'd feel fine, yes, that's OK.

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-Is that all right?

-Yes, fine.

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And you're not going to put the money to more paintings, are you?

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-No more paintings!

-No!

-No more paintings.

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-You don't want any more paintings at home, do you?

-Definitely not.

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Well, that's lovely.

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We'll sail along to the auction together

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and let's hope we get a good result.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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Away from the valuation tables, I've found a very different piece of art.

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Now although this cathedral is relatively young,

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it's still full of historic and interesting items.

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Take this carpet, for instance,

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which lies between the oak altar rails and the altar itself.

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It depicts two angels supporting the diocese of Guildford.

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And there above here, a stag, which represents Stag Hill,

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the site which this cathedral is built on.

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Not only is this carpet famous for its symbolism

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but also for its historic content.

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It was made by the world famous Wilton factory in 1957

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and it's believed to be the last handmade carpet they ever made.

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From carpet level, let's go back to Catherine Southon who is

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up on high for her next valuation.

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Elizabeth, we come to the cathedral to hear the sounds of the organ

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and the sounds of the choir,

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but also to hear the sounds of this beautiful musical box.

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As soon as I just see the lid of it,

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I know that's actually a special musical box there.

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The detail of that marquetry is something very special.

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It's not just a bog standard boxwood stringing or a transfer on the top.

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The marquetry is superb.

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Where did you get this little gem from?

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I had another musical box and it needed some work doing to it

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and I couldn't afford to get it done and somebody said

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"Well, I'll swap you for the old musical box for this musical box."

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So I have this one but it doesn't have the sentimental value for me.

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-So that's why I'm...

-Right.

-..going to let it go.

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But it's very expensive to have something like that restored.

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-Well, can we take a little peek inside?

-Please do.

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Well, it is a cylinder musical box and what we see straightaway

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when we open the lid is the

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magical name of Nicole Freres,

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who was like the Rolls-Royce of musical boxes and it tells us

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Nicole Freres, Geneva.

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This was made in Switzerland.

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Now, there's two different types of cylinder boxes which is

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essentially what this is, a cylinder musical box.

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There's the ones that are made with a lever wind

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and they are late 19th century.

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They're about 1880s,

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1890s and then there's the earlier ones which are worked with a key.

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Now this one is worked with a key.

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So that means we can date it to about 1860, 1865.

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You would put this key in the side here.

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And turn that round and that is how it would work.

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Now this one is in fantastic condition, it really is

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because quite often these teeth get damaged

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and they need to be replaced and as you say,

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they're expensive to do, but it's just absolutely pristine.

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Yes, I mean, when you say the pins got damaged,

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I think the other one was a bit squeaky in places

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so that would indicate that the pins had been broken.

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-Do you have any idea on value?

-No, not really, no.

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The market was stronger a while ago but now

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I would say a very conservative price would be £700 to £1,000.

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You might get a bit more, which would be nice.

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I think we should fix the reserve of £600, how does that sound to you?

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Yes, that's fine, thank you.

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But really, we have to have a listen, don't we?

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-Oh, it's beautiful.

-We have to see what this really sounds like.

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So, I'm going to give it a wind up.

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MUSIC BOX PLAYS

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What a fabulous time we're having here at Guildford Cathedral.

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Hundreds of people have come through the doors

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to have their antiques and collectibles valued.

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But right now we are going to up the tempo.

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This is where it gets exciting, we're putting our first

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batch of antiques to the test in the saleroom.

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Don't go away, anything can happen

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and here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

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There's Anne's German silver plate.

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A pair of watercolours.

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And let's hope the music box hits the right note at auction.

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We're in the neighbouring county of West Sussex for today's auction.

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And in charge of proceedings is auctioneer Rupert Toovey.

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At £350...

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Well, our next item has certainly been passed around the family

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-a few times, am I right, Anne?

-Yes, that's right.

-It was your brother's,

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-then your sister's and now yours.

-That's right.

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We're talking about that little tray, the WMF tray with the dog

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on it looking at a lizard, and I'm so pleased you had

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a go at pronouncing it because I cannot pronounce it.

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-I just say WMF.

-Oh, WMF, yes.

-It's really difficult, isn't it?

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-It is, you say it very quickly.

-I won't put you through it.

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You did it once, didn't you? You're very brave.

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But it is quality, it's absolute quality.

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It's beautiful. I just think the way that that little dog is

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looking down at the lizard... love it.

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Fingers crossed. It's going under the hammer right now.

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We're opening the bidding on this lot at £70. £70 here.

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£75, can I see?

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At £70 here. £75, can I see? £75.

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And 80. And 5, sir, centre?

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And 90, and 5, sir?

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95, and 100, sir. 110.

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110 now with you, sir, in the room.

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£110 centre now. £110.

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Is there any advance on £110?

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It's fair warning. 110.

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-110.

-Just over.

-Just over!

-Well...

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-They were sitting on their hands, weren't they, for that one?

-Yes.

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-Thanks for bringing that in, anyway.

-Thank you.

-It's quality,

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-again you see that...

-It's been a great day.

-..quality always sells.

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So, despite a slow start,

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that silver plate now has a new home and Anne was happy with the result.

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Let's see if those watercolours float the bidders' boat.

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Susan, Shirley, great to see you again. Fingers crossed.

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This is your moment. Let's hope we get the top end of that estimate.

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We're talking about those two framed watercolours,

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the sailing barges by Aldridge.

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-Wonderful, with little windmills in the background as well.

-Yes.

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Gilt frames. You paid quite a lot of money for these, didn't you?

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-£50, quite a long time ago.

-Yes.

-Long time ago.

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That was a lot of money long time ago.

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-It was, but the market was better for them.

-Yes.

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The market for these types of watercolours is very...

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Never the less, never the less, it's a pair.

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-It's always nice to have something original on the wall.

-It is.

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-And these aren't a lot of money really.

-They're not.

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And the interior decorators like pairs a lot because they match up.

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-Yes.

-And they make the room symmetrical which is nice.

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Well, let's hope they sail away and they're going under the hammer

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right now. This is it!

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The Frederick James Aldridge,

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a pair of watercolours, both signed.

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Lovely, lovely things those and bids to match.

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We're opening the bidding on this lot at £250.

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-250 is the lowest we've got.

-That's good.

-On commission at 250.

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250 here. 280, can I see?

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At £250. At £250, on commission at £250.

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250.

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-That's strange.

-Blink and you'll miss it. £250, gone.

-Fantastic.

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You've enjoyed them on the wall, haven't you? For quite a few years.

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-Somebody else can enjoy them.

-Thank you very much.

-I call that

0:16:040:16:07

money well invested and that's the great thing about antiques.

0:16:070:16:10

Buy something, enjoy it, keep it for 20 or 30 years, sell it,

0:16:100:16:12

make a bit of profit.

0:16:120:16:14

Another spot-on estimate for Mark. Next we've got that music box.

0:16:140:16:18

Right, we're going to hit the high notes right now with this

0:16:180:16:21

Swiss music box belonging to Elizabeth.

0:16:210:16:23

It's got six airs, it's absolute quality

0:16:230:16:25

-and I had a chat to Rupert before the sale started.

-Oh, did you?

0:16:250:16:28

We both went quality, quality, quality. Great maker. Nicole Freres.

0:16:280:16:31

I mean, it doesn't get any better than that. Key wound,

0:16:310:16:34

the inlay on the box, everything was divine about it.

0:16:340:16:37

So, we're confident.

0:16:370:16:38

There are plenty of collectors out there and we've seen them

0:16:380:16:41

time and time again on "Flog It!" And I've interviewed quite

0:16:410:16:43

a lot of them and they really are passionate about things like this.

0:16:430:16:47

Anyway, let's put it to the test. Here we go.

0:16:470:16:50

Late 19th century Swiss music box

0:16:500:16:52

by Nicole Freres playing six airs.

0:16:520:16:54

Beautifully inlaid case with honeysuckle sprays

0:16:540:16:57

and opening the bidding here at £550.

0:16:570:17:01

-550 here, can I see the 600?

-Oh, come on, we need 600.

0:17:010:17:03

We need a bit more than that.

0:17:030:17:04

550 here. Can I see the 600?

0:17:040:17:07

£550 here. 600, can I see?

0:17:070:17:09

At £550. Is there any advance on 550?

0:17:090:17:12

And 600 now. £600.

0:17:120:17:14

Can I see the 650? At £600 and selling!

0:17:140:17:17

At £600.

0:17:170:17:20

600.

0:17:200:17:22

-It's gone! You didn't want to take it home, did you?

-I didn't, no.

0:17:220:17:25

-Thank goodness, it's too heavy.

-Yeah, it's very heavy. Oh, well done.

0:17:250:17:28

-Thank you very much.

-That's OK.

-Thank you.

0:17:280:17:30

Auction rooms are great places to pick up items that you can admire

0:17:340:17:37

and preserve to look after for future generations to enjoy.

0:17:370:17:41

Now while we were in the area filming,

0:17:410:17:43

I visited a museum where preservation is a key part of their

0:17:430:17:46

work, but we're not talking about looking after paintings or

0:17:460:17:49

furniture or porcelain.

0:17:490:17:51

We're talking about looking after buildings.

0:17:510:17:53

Take a look at this.

0:17:530:17:54

The Weald & Downland Open Air Museum is located in the idyllic

0:18:080:18:11

South Downs National Park.

0:18:110:18:13

The museum originally opened in 1970

0:18:130:18:15

and now it's home to around 50 traditional buildings which

0:18:150:18:18

have been saved from destruction, carefully restored and rebuilt

0:18:180:18:23

to bring back to life the story of the people who lived in them.

0:18:230:18:29

The museum owes its existence to the devotion of one man.

0:18:290:18:32

It's founder Roy Armstrong.

0:18:320:18:34

And as a local historian, Roy had an increasing

0:18:340:18:36

passion in the conservation of buildings from the past.

0:18:360:18:40

The eruption of modern housing estates threatened many

0:18:400:18:43

traditional homes and buildings with demolition.

0:18:430:18:46

Roy Armstrong feared that many historic buildings in the area

0:18:470:18:51

were being destroyed as a consequence, even listed buildings.

0:18:510:18:54

And he feared that without such structures, people's links

0:18:540:18:57

to the past would be lost forever, so something had to be done

0:18:570:19:01

and this place was born.

0:19:010:19:04

The rescued buildings had been carefully dismantled

0:19:040:19:07

and conserved but now the process of reassembling them could begin.

0:19:070:19:11

And in 1969 the first building was erected on the site.

0:19:110:19:15

In the first month of opening, thousands of visitors

0:19:150:19:17

came through the door. The museum was officially a success.

0:19:170:19:20

And some 40 years later it's still a thriving visitor attraction.

0:19:200:19:24

Now I'm here today to meet the museum's director,

0:19:240:19:26

Richard Pailthorpe, to find out more about the work that's being

0:19:260:19:29

done to continue Roy's vision for the museum.

0:19:290:19:32

Richard, why is it so important to have a museum like this?

0:19:350:19:39

Well, I think we have to put the clock back, sort of 40, 50 years.

0:19:390:19:42

Back to the sort of 1950s, '60s,

0:19:420:19:44

post-war Britain, where overnight, literally,

0:19:440:19:47

these traditional buildings, barns, farm houses, etc were disappearing.

0:19:470:19:53

-And being replaced by, you know, sorts of glass and steel...

-Yes.

0:19:530:19:58

..and everything else, you know.

0:19:580:20:00

So, conservation is key to what you do here.

0:20:000:20:02

How much work is involved in actually maintaining

0:20:020:20:04

-the buildings once they're here on site?

-Right.

0:20:040:20:06

Well, like all buildings, they need to be, you know, conserved...

0:20:060:20:10

-Bit of TLC.

-..and TLC, etc.

0:20:100:20:12

And that's what we're having to do increasingly much more of.

0:20:120:20:17

Thatched roofs, for example, are a major issue.

0:20:170:20:20

Got a barn down there desperately in need now of having new thatch.

0:20:200:20:25

And so we'll be doing that this year.

0:20:250:20:27

Now I hear you've got a cottage which is being

0:20:270:20:30

-constructed at the moment or reconstructed I should say.

-Yes.

0:20:300:20:32

-Is it something I can get involved in and help?

-Oh, very much so.

0:20:320:20:35

-You've come at a, you know, just at the right time!

-Wonderful!

0:20:350:20:38

-Is that is over there?

-Just over there.

0:20:380:20:40

We're at the stage where we're about to do some wattle and daubing.

0:20:400:20:43

-Here is...that's an opportunity for you to...

-To get mucky!

0:20:430:20:46

-Absolutely, that's right.

-Thank you very for talking to me, Richard.

0:20:460:20:50

Shall I make my way down that path to the cottage?

0:20:500:20:52

-That's right, there you are. Just down there.

-OK.

-Cheerio!

0:20:520:20:55

Tindalls cottage was originally built in the early 18th century,

0:20:580:21:02

probably as the home of a labourer.

0:21:020:21:04

It remained in its original position in East Sussex until 1974

0:21:040:21:09

when the construction of a reservoir threatened its survival.

0:21:090:21:13

Rescued by the museum,

0:21:130:21:14

the timber frame has been in storage ever since.

0:21:140:21:17

But now it's in the process of being restored back to its former glory.

0:21:170:21:22

And the man responsible for this precious restoration is

0:21:220:21:25

carpenter in residence, Joe Thompson.

0:21:250:21:28

Joe, you've got your work cut out.

0:21:280:21:30

Yeah, we've got a bit to do but it's good you're here.

0:21:300:21:33

It's essentially a timber frame building, isn't it?

0:21:330:21:36

Apart from the brick fireplace and obviously the chimney breast.

0:21:360:21:39

Once you get that working, you're going to keep warm.

0:21:390:21:41

That's right, it'll be wonderful. You've got all mod cons here,

0:21:410:21:44

there's a bread oven out the back,

0:21:440:21:46

there's a copper and a furnace to brew beer through there

0:21:460:21:48

so you can bake your bread, drink your beer, you've got your

0:21:480:21:51

warm kitchen, hall in here and your storeroom's out the back.

0:21:510:21:55

Today on a timber frame building with these oak uprights it'll all

0:21:550:21:58

be dry lined with plasterboard,

0:21:580:22:00

but obviously we're not going to do that, are we?

0:22:000:22:02

No, this is wattle and daub.

0:22:020:22:05

We're going back to the old ways, tried and tested.

0:22:050:22:07

Yeah, talk me through the ingredients. You've got some buckets here.

0:22:070:22:10

This is loam from the vicinity where the cottage came from.

0:22:100:22:14

Then we've got the straw, a little bit of dung and we've got the water.

0:22:140:22:17

So, we're going to basically mix them all together.

0:22:170:22:20

Just looking at the little pot of poo, there.

0:22:200:22:22

-What's that? Cow or horse?

-That's cow.

-Or pig?

0:22:220:22:25

Traditionally it all would've been trodden by the cows.

0:22:250:22:27

Well, I guess I need some gloves really, don't I?

0:22:270:22:29

-Who's got the gloves?

-Here we go, Paul.

-Look at that, thank you.

0:22:290:22:32

Here's our bucket of loam.

0:22:340:22:36

We've got a bit of the cow dung, mixed in.

0:22:380:22:41

Well, that's quite dry.

0:22:410:22:43

-Yeah, this is some stuff I put aside the other week.

-Right, OK.

0:22:430:22:46

-Then mixing in the water.

-But you could literally pick fresh stuff up,

0:22:460:22:49

-couldn't you?

-Yes, you could.

0:22:490:22:51

-So, we've got to get this well mixed.

-Well, it's certainly

0:22:530:22:55

-doing the trick, look, it's sticking to your wellies.

-Oh, yes.

0:22:550:22:59

So if it sticks to those, it's definitely going to stick to this.

0:22:590:23:02

That's right.

0:23:020:23:03

If you wouldn't mind chucking bits of pieces of that in as we go.

0:23:040:23:07

Lovely.

0:23:070:23:08

Keeps you fit.

0:23:090:23:11

I'm going to ask you to help me.

0:23:110:23:14

We're going to unload this and we're going to put it into the bucket.

0:23:140:23:18

-Look at that. What a sausage.

-Yeah.

0:23:190:23:22

Right, we've got a bucket full of it, Joe.

0:23:250:23:28

-Let's put it on the wall.

-Yeah, come on, then. Let's throw it on.

0:23:280:23:31

Let's start at face height. Where would you normally start then?

0:23:310:23:34

At the bottom and work up or...

0:23:340:23:36

I think we'll start at the top and work our way down.

0:23:360:23:38

I'd like to do this without gloves on.

0:23:380:23:40

I think I'd like to feel it going in. I can't feel anything.

0:23:400:23:43

-Do you mind if I take these off?

-Please do.

-They're quite tight.

0:23:430:23:45

-I feel like I need to feel the material.

-Excellent.

0:23:450:23:48

Yeah, exactly. It's that sort of thing.

0:23:480:23:50

I'm going to get myself what we call a cat.

0:23:500:23:53

-So it's a piece about the size of an apple.

-OK.

0:23:530:23:54

-I'm going to squeeze it once or twice in my hands.

-Yeah.

0:23:540:23:58

-And then, we're going to slap it on the wall.

-OK.

0:23:580:24:00

So I've got about the right amount.

0:24:000:24:02

-That's it, you've got yourself a cat there.

-Gosh, that's sticky.

0:24:020:24:05

Yeah. So, push it on there and with your fingers,

0:24:050:24:10

push it into there.

0:24:100:24:13

-It wants to go through the gaps.

-Yeah.

0:24:130:24:16

That's perfect. Yeah, that's coming along nicely.

0:24:160:24:20

Ah, do you know what? It makes you feel like a kid again,

0:24:240:24:26

it makes you feel like playing with mud.

0:24:260:24:29

It's so satisfying because at the end of the day,

0:24:290:24:31

it's just clay really, isn't it?

0:24:310:24:32

-Look at that. Look how sticky that is.

-It's good fun.

0:24:330:24:36

And what I'd do, after a couple of days,

0:24:360:24:38

I'd come back and I'd give that another rub up just to

0:24:380:24:41

sort of smooth out any little lumps and bumps.

0:24:410:24:43

It's all pretty wet and sticky now. Let it go off for a bit.

0:24:430:24:45

Come back again.

0:24:450:24:46

And I guess with the air blowing through this building

0:24:460:24:49

-because there are no windows or doors...

-It'll dry nice and quickly.

0:24:490:24:53

It's great. That's very satisfying. Joe, I'll shake your hand.

0:24:530:24:57

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-You're doing a great job.

0:24:570:25:00

-I'm going to leave you to do the rest, I think.

-That's great.

0:25:000:25:03

Only one problem, have you got the sink fitted yet?

0:25:030:25:05

No.

0:25:050:25:07

Well, I've got great admiration for the work they're doing here today.

0:25:110:25:15

Not only are they taking the responsibility of the preservation

0:25:150:25:18

of these buildings through sheer hard work and determination but

0:25:180:25:21

also they're using them to educate and inform us about our past.

0:25:210:25:25

And that's what's so important. And who knows?

0:25:250:25:27

Maybe some of the buildings we live in today will become

0:25:270:25:29

exhibits of the future.

0:25:290:25:31

Welcome back to Guildford Cathedral.

0:25:410:25:43

Let's now catch up with our experts and see what other antiques

0:25:430:25:45

and collectibles we can find to take off to auction.

0:25:450:25:48

As you can see, there's still a lot of people here which means

0:25:480:25:51

hundreds of antiques to sift through.

0:25:510:25:53

Let's now catch up with Mark Stacey. He's found a real gem.

0:25:530:25:57

Jane, Michael. I don't have to look underneath to tell you what this is.

0:26:010:26:06

Because it screams Moorcroft, Moorcroft, Moorcroft, doesn't it?

0:26:060:26:09

-Yes.

-But I tell you what. They don't come much more impressive than this,

0:26:090:26:13

-do they?

-It's stunning, isn't it? I love it.

-It's absolutely amazing.

0:26:130:26:17

It's fabulous. I can't say any more than that. It's absolutely fabulous.

0:26:170:26:21

One of these ones with so much pink in the actual glazing.

0:26:210:26:25

-It really glows, doesn't it?

-It really does.

0:26:250:26:27

It really is a sort of very shepherd... What is it they say?

0:26:270:26:31

Red sky at night, shepherd's delight.

0:26:310:26:33

It's certainly Mark's delight today, I can tell you

0:26:330:26:36

because it's wonderful.

0:26:360:26:38

-How have you come to own it?

-I've inherited it.

0:26:380:26:41

And my husband, with courtesy of my husband,

0:26:430:26:45

I'm allowed to keep all these things, or I have been.

0:26:450:26:48

You've been very patient, have you, Michael?

0:26:480:26:51

Yes.

0:26:510:26:52

Very discreet and gentlemanly about it.

0:26:520:26:54

-And Michael, what do you think of it?

-I think it's terrific, yeah.

0:26:540:26:58

-It's an impressive piece, isn't it?

-Oh, yes.

0:26:580:27:01

Now, what pattern do you think it is?

0:27:010:27:03

Erm...

0:27:030:27:05

Well, I thought it was landscape.

0:27:050:27:07

Well, it certainly is a landscape with those trees

0:27:070:27:10

but the official pattern name is Hazeldene.

0:27:100:27:13

-You see this pattern on vases, on other things.

-Right.

0:27:130:27:16

-And it's known as Hazeldene.

-Hazeldene.

0:27:160:27:18

-There's another one...

-Now we know.

0:27:180:27:20

-..called Eventide which is very similar.

-Right.

0:27:200:27:22

And another one called Claremont which looks like big mushrooms.

0:27:220:27:25

-And I love this jazzy pattern...

-That's lovely.

-..on the outside

0:27:250:27:30

-which, of course, helps to date it immediately.

-Yes, does it?

0:27:300:27:33

-Yes, because it's very Art Deco.

-Oh, right.

0:27:330:27:36

-So, we're looking at about 1925.

-Oh.

0:27:360:27:39

That would fit in with my mother's...could've been

0:27:390:27:42

-a wedding present.

-Oh, were they married around then?

0:27:420:27:45

My mother and father were married in about 1927, I think.

0:27:450:27:48

-Yes, so it could've been, couldn't it?

-Yes.

0:27:480:27:50

It's got a few flaws. There are a couple of chips on there.

0:27:500:27:53

-Oh, yes.

-There's a little bit of restoration.

0:27:530:27:56

But it is a cracking item which I think the collectors would love.

0:27:560:28:00

-Good.

-The damage holds it back a little bit.

0:28:000:28:03

I would want to put an estimate of £800 to £1,200 on it.

0:28:030:28:07

-Really?

-As much as that?

-That's quite a sum.

-It's more than you thought?

0:28:070:28:11

-Yes, it is.

-Oh, good. What did you think?

0:28:110:28:13

Well, I sort of thought £500 to £800, maybe.

0:28:130:28:16

No, I think it's a bit more impressive even with the damage.

0:28:160:28:19

You know, it wouldn't surprise me if it made a bit more than that

0:28:190:28:22

-on the day...

-Really?

-..but we'll protect it with an £800 reserve.

0:28:220:28:26

-Right. Yes, I think...

-If that's all right with you.

-Yes.

-Very good.

0:28:260:28:29

-Perfect.

-It's fine.

-If we do get you, say...

0:28:290:28:32

..the top end of the estimate, £1,200,

0:28:340:28:36

would you put it towards anything in particular?

0:28:360:28:39

Erm...

0:28:390:28:40

-Not sure.

-Ooh.

0:28:400:28:42

-You've got ideas, Jane.

-I've got ideas.

-Go on, tell them.

0:28:420:28:45

Well, I think we'd go and have a nice holiday in France.

0:28:450:28:48

-Oh, wonderful!

-Don't you think?

-What a wonderful idea.

0:28:480:28:50

-Well, I can't think of a better idea.

-Well, there you are then.

0:28:500:28:53

I think that would be wonderful

0:28:530:28:54

-because then while you're sipping a nice bottle of red.

-Right.

0:28:540:28:57

You could be thinking "This is all on my chipped Moorcroft bowl."

0:28:570:29:02

Fingers crossed that bowl will deliver

0:29:020:29:04

when it goes under the hammer later on.

0:29:040:29:06

Let's catch up with Catherine who's found one of her favourite things.

0:29:060:29:10

Well, Juliet, it's wonderful to be up here at Guildford Cathedral

0:29:100:29:15

and equally exciting to see something as delicious as this.

0:29:150:29:20

Tell me a bit about it.

0:29:200:29:22

I don't know anything about it, Catherine, I'm afraid.

0:29:220:29:25

It came from my mother, who in turn would've got it from

0:29:250:29:29

her father's antique shop.

0:29:290:29:31

Not a family heirloom or anything like that.

0:29:310:29:33

So, do you think this is something that perhaps somebody

0:29:330:29:36

came in to sell to him one day in the antiques shop

0:29:360:29:39

-and perhaps he saw that and thought...

-I would say so.

0:29:390:29:41

-..I like that. I'm taking that home.

-Yes, a bit like you, then, Catherine.

0:29:410:29:44

Well, I'll tell you what.

0:29:440:29:46

If I saw that, if I had an antiques shop and someone brought

0:29:460:29:48

that in to me to sell, I would pick it up and take that straight home.

0:29:480:29:51

-It is, it's a nice item.

-Which is probably what he's done.

0:29:510:29:53

-It's very tactile.

-Absolutely,

0:29:530:29:55

I mean, it's a great piece essentially of treen.

0:29:550:29:58

-But...

-Right.

0:29:580:30:00

..it is a snuff box.

0:30:000:30:02

-They're normally the smaller ones, the pocket sized ones.

-Yes.

0:30:020:30:05

But this is the sort of thing that you would have had on the table

0:30:050:30:09

so, perhaps it would've been passed around the table

0:30:090:30:12

but what makes this different from others is all this inlay.

0:30:120:30:18

The mother of pearl and the ebony.

0:30:180:30:20

There's an awful lot of work that's gone into this.

0:30:200:30:24

It's absolutely super.

0:30:240:30:26

It's head and shoulders above anything else I've seen.

0:30:260:30:29

Well, let's have a look at this inscription and try

0:30:290:30:31

and clarify what it says.

0:30:310:30:33

A...

0:30:330:30:35

Present...

0:30:350:30:37

And then I love the way it's got the hand in mother of pearl with

0:30:370:30:41

the word to, so "A present to", arrow up,

0:30:410:30:45

"Miss C M Brae"

0:30:450:30:47

and we know nothing about Brae. We don't know who she is.

0:30:490:30:51

Nothing at all. No.

0:30:510:30:53

The...

0:30:530:30:55

sinner...sinners

0:30:550:30:58

because what they've done here is they've forgotten the S.

0:30:580:31:00

-So they've quickly studded it up the top.

-I know. Very sort of...

0:31:000:31:05

It's wonderful.

0:31:050:31:06

-That's their mistake.

-Yeah, wonderful.

0:31:060:31:08

The sinners...earthly...friend.

0:31:080:31:11

Sinners earthly friend, lovely.

0:31:110:31:13

Then underneath, of course, you've got the important bit to me.

0:31:130:31:17

-He died for me. And there's a little picture of her there.

-Yeah.

0:31:170:31:22

And they've got a name stamped in here of...H Lodge.

0:31:220:31:27

That's possibly the maker.

0:31:270:31:29

-Maker, would you think? I don't know.

-Maybe the owner.

0:31:290:31:31

What I love about it is there are all these questions over it.

0:31:330:31:36

Who owned it? Who was Miss Brae?

0:31:360:31:38

And I think that's what makes it interesting.

0:31:380:31:41

I know. We've always wondered.

0:31:410:31:42

-It's a shame we've got this split in front.

-I know.

0:31:420:31:45

-Have you always known it...

-Yes, it's always been like that.

0:31:450:31:48

-Ever since I can remember.

-Right.

0:31:480:31:49

But only one piece, I think, after all those years!

0:31:490:31:52

I don't know, but how old is it?

0:31:520:31:53

-I would date it to 1860s.

-Right.

0:31:530:31:56

That sort of period. It's just pure class, isn't it?

0:31:560:32:01

-It's absolutely super.

-Thank you.

0:32:010:32:03

Now, the question of flogging it,

0:32:030:32:06

-that's what it all comes down to.

-Yeah.

0:32:060:32:08

I can see a lot of people getting excited about this in the same

0:32:100:32:14

-way that I have.

-OK.

0:32:140:32:16

I would like to put

0:32:160:32:18

a saleroom estimate on

0:32:180:32:20

-of £150 to £250.

-That is very nice.

0:32:200:32:23

-Is that good?

-Yes, that's great.

0:32:230:32:25

-But I wouldn't be surprised if it went very high.

-OK.

0:32:250:32:29

Pure...

0:32:300:32:31

-..class. Thank you.

-You really do like it, don't you?

-I really do like it.

0:32:330:32:37

-Really, really do.

-Oh, I'm really pleased. I'm glad you like it.

0:32:370:32:40

I've found a quiet corner away from the valuation table to take

0:32:460:32:49

a closer look at one of the many interesting items in the cathedral.

0:32:490:32:54

Earlier on, I discovered a fascinating carpet

0:32:540:32:56

here in the cathedral but the whole place is full of wonderful

0:32:560:33:00

treasures and behind me there's another one.

0:33:000:33:02

A crosier.

0:33:020:33:03

Which resembles, as you can see here, a shepherd's staff.

0:33:030:33:07

Normally carried by the abbot or the bishop as a symbol of office.

0:33:070:33:11

Now this particular crosier was designed by one of the greatest

0:33:110:33:14

craftsman and designers of the Art Nouveau period,

0:33:140:33:17

Omar Ramsden.

0:33:170:33:18

Born in Sheffield, he worked designing throughout his life

0:33:180:33:22

on many church commissions, right up until his death in 1939.

0:33:220:33:26

This was made for the first bishop of Guildford, sterling silver,

0:33:260:33:30

it's all hallmarked with the London Assay office

0:33:300:33:33

with the leopard's head and the date letter telling us 1927.

0:33:330:33:38

I love this carved ivory ram here within the hook

0:33:380:33:41

but look at this wonderful, wonderful enamel work.

0:33:410:33:45

Something that you associate Omar Ramsden with.

0:33:450:33:48

Glass, coloured glass fused at high temperatures.

0:33:480:33:51

I particularly like this little image of the tree of life.

0:33:510:33:53

It works perfectly well here in this cathedral.

0:33:530:33:57

Sitting on a wonderful rosewood shaft.

0:33:570:34:01

Now, isn't that a real treasure?

0:34:010:34:03

And we come across Omar Ramsden's work a lot on the show

0:34:030:34:06

and it's a big name to look out for.

0:34:060:34:09

Well, right now, let's hook up with our experts

0:34:090:34:11

and see what else we can find to take off to auction.

0:34:110:34:15

Anne, where did this pocket watch come from?

0:34:230:34:26

Well, I inherited it through my parents

0:34:260:34:28

and it belonged to my great grandfather.

0:34:280:34:30

And I really can't tell you that much more about it.

0:34:300:34:33

It's for long service, it's inscribed in the back.

0:34:330:34:36

-I think we should really see the inscription, don't you?

-Yes.

0:34:360:34:39

So, it says...

0:34:390:34:41

For 46 years' service in 1938.

0:34:480:34:51

Do you know what he did for ICI?

0:34:510:34:53

-Well, I believe he worked in the salt mines.

-Oh, wow.

0:34:530:34:56

Because he always used to put loads of salt on everything.

0:34:560:34:59

-I can just remember him.

-So, he smothered his food with salt?

0:34:590:35:03

-Absolutely.

-It's that old adage, isn't it?

0:35:030:35:05

When you did 25 years' service as a retirement gift you got

0:35:050:35:08

a gold pocket watch.

0:35:080:35:10

I don't think they do it quite so much today.

0:35:100:35:12

No, well, because we don't use pocket watches like we used to.

0:35:120:35:15

No, nobody does.

0:35:150:35:17

The nice thing about it, in this case, it is actually a gold one.

0:35:170:35:21

A lot of gold pocket watches we see are actually only gold plated.

0:35:210:35:24

-But this one is hallmarked.

-Yes.

0:35:240:35:26

Nine carat gold and hallmarked in 1938,

0:35:260:35:29

so it was brand-new at the time.

0:35:290:35:31

But it's got a fairly straightforward movement on it.

0:35:310:35:34

-Right.

-And a fairly straightforward maker.

0:35:340:35:36

It's nice that it's got its box.

0:35:370:35:38

But sadly, the value lies in the fact that it is nine carat gold.

0:35:380:35:43

-Yeah.

-And it will probably end up being melted down

0:35:430:35:46

-to be made into something else.

-Yes, I expected that.

0:35:460:35:49

-So, you're not worried about that?

-Not at all, no.

0:35:490:35:51

So, it just lives in a drawer at home?

0:35:510:35:53

It lives in the loft with lots of other bits and bobs.

0:35:530:35:57

Who do I give it to? Two sons, three grandsons.

0:35:570:36:00

-Can't split it in three, can you?

-They don't want it,

0:36:000:36:02

-they'd rather have a phone.

-Of course they would.

0:36:020:36:04

That's absolutely right.

0:36:040:36:05

Now, have you got an idea of how much it's worth?

0:36:050:36:08

-A couple of hundred, I thought.

-I think that's probably about right.

0:36:100:36:14

I mean, we've weighed it as much as we can because obviously...

0:36:140:36:18

Without the workings.

0:36:180:36:19

And a sensible auction estimate is probably in the region

0:36:190:36:23

-of £150 to £250.

-Yeah.

0:36:230:36:25

And it will fluctuate, of course, because when the auction comes up,

0:36:250:36:29

it will be affected by the price of gold on that particular day.

0:36:290:36:32

But I think we should put a fixed reserve of £150 on it.

0:36:320:36:35

Yes, that's absolutely fine.

0:36:350:36:36

-And then it protects it a little bit.

-Yes.

0:36:360:36:39

-And it's...really not a lot more one can say about it.

-I know.

0:36:390:36:42

Other than it's time for it to go and be turned into something else,

0:36:420:36:46

-isn't it?

-Yes, I think you're absolutely right.

0:36:460:36:48

-Thank you, Anne.

-Time to go.

-Time to go.

0:36:480:36:50

What a fabulous turn out we've had here today at Guildford Cathedral.

0:36:550:36:59

Such a memorable day. We've found some wonderful treasures as well.

0:36:590:37:02

We're heading off to the auction room for the very last time

0:37:020:37:05

so it's time for us to say goodbye to this magnificent venue

0:37:050:37:09

and all of these wonderful people who have turned up today.

0:37:090:37:12

Let's put those last valuations to the test

0:37:120:37:14

and here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

0:37:140:37:17

Mark was enthusiastic about the Moorcroft bowl

0:37:180:37:21

but will the bidders feel the same?

0:37:210:37:23

Time's definitely up for the gold pocket watch.

0:37:240:37:26

And there's that fascinating snuff shoe.

0:37:280:37:31

Welcome back to the auction room here in Washington.

0:37:350:37:37

Auctioneer Rupert Toovey is on the rostrum

0:37:370:37:40

and ready to sell our next item and the bidders are raring to go.

0:37:400:37:43

Let's hope we see lots of action.

0:37:430:37:46

I had a quick chat with Rupert before the auction started

0:37:460:37:48

and he had some reservations about one of our items.

0:37:480:37:51

Right, the Moorcroft bowl, the dawn landscape.

0:37:520:37:55

It's got some damage. It's a lovely bowl, a generous size as well.

0:37:550:37:59

Beautiful, that English interpretation of the Art Nouveau

0:37:590:38:02

is wonderful and especially in these

0:38:020:38:03

landscape patterns with Moorcroft,

0:38:030:38:05

-don't you think?

-And I love that colourway as well.

0:38:050:38:08

-Without the damage, £2,000.

-I think you're right.

0:38:080:38:11

But with this restoration on the rim, I'm afraid, you know,

0:38:110:38:14

we might struggle to get £800, you know.

0:38:140:38:17

Is that because there hasn't been a lot of presale interest

0:38:170:38:20

or is it your gut feeling?

0:38:200:38:21

Huge amount of interest but real concerns about this nick on the rim.

0:38:210:38:25

-As soon as they see it, they go...

-Yeah.

-.."that's put me off."

0:38:250:38:28

Collectors are a fussy breed and I totally agree with them.

0:38:280:38:30

If you want to invest in something, you invest in the best.

0:38:300:38:34

And now it's the moment of truth for the bowl.

0:38:350:38:38

Jane and Mike, it's good to see you again.

0:38:390:38:41

-We've been talking about your large Moorcroft bowl.

-Thank you.

0:38:410:38:45

Oh, it's created all sorts of topic of conversation because

0:38:450:38:47

-of that little bit of damage around the rim...

-I know, it's a shame.

0:38:470:38:50

-..which has been restored.

-Yes.

-I think at the valuation day

0:38:500:38:53

Mark probably said to you without the damage,

0:38:530:38:55

you'd be looking at around £2,000.

0:38:550:38:57

-That's why we have a value of around £800 on this.

-That's right.

0:38:570:39:00

It's really knocked it down a size or two.

0:39:000:39:03

-Not in my time.

-Not in your time it didn't happen, no.

0:39:030:39:05

-It's still a lovely piece.

-Oh, it's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:39:050:39:08

We're going to find out right now exactly what damage matters

0:39:080:39:11

-to a piece of Moorcroft.

-Lovely.

-Let's see.

0:39:110:39:13

Large Moorcroft pottery lustre,

0:39:130:39:16

glazed dawn landscape patterns, circular bowl. Circa 1928.

0:39:160:39:20

It's beautifully decorated with a little restored chip.

0:39:200:39:23

But I'm opening the bidding here at £700. At £700, can I see the 720?

0:39:230:39:27

At £700. 720, can I see?

0:39:270:39:29

At £700. Can I see the 720?

0:39:290:39:31

Come on, we need one more hundred.

0:39:310:39:34

At £700. Anything online?

0:39:340:39:37

No, sir.

0:39:370:39:38

No? At £700 then, all done.

0:39:380:39:41

At £700 and we're passing it at 700.

0:39:410:39:45

-It didn't sell, Jane.

-Never mind.

-That's such a shame.

0:39:470:39:50

-I'm pleased you protected it with a reserve.

-Yes, I shan't mind.

0:39:500:39:54

Because I shall be able to...I actually took a photograph of it

0:39:540:39:57

-so I had it if it did sell. Oh, well.

-Sorry about that.

-Sorry.

0:39:570:40:01

We tried our hardest but, you know, the collectors are fussy,

0:40:010:40:04

-aren't they?

-Yes.

-So, it seems that the damage to the bowl did put

0:40:040:40:07

the bidders off after all.

0:40:070:40:09

But who knows? It may do better on another day.

0:40:090:40:11

Let's see if Mark has more luck with his next lot.

0:40:110:40:15

Fingers crossed for our next item, it belongs to Anne.

0:40:150:40:17

We're selling a gold keyless wind open face pocket watch

0:40:170:40:20

and this is quality.

0:40:200:40:22

-We've got how much? £150 to £250?

-Yes.

0:40:220:40:24

Why are you selling this?

0:40:240:40:26

I have three grandsons, two sons, who do you give it to?

0:40:260:40:30

-Yeah.

-And they don't want it.

-No. Do you know something?

0:40:300:40:32

-No-one uses them, do they?

-Never.

-No.

0:40:320:40:34

The older they get, the more they'll want it, that's the problem.

0:40:340:40:37

-Too late now.

-It's too late.

-Grandma's spending the money.

0:40:370:40:39

-Going to spend it on yourself?

-I'm going to buy something, yes, I am.

0:40:400:40:44

Well, right, let's put this to the test,

0:40:440:40:46

let's see if we can get the top end.

0:40:460:40:48

A nine carat gold keyless wind, open face gentlemen's pocket watch.

0:40:480:40:51

Opening the bidding here with conflicting bids.

0:40:510:40:53

All the way up to £280.

0:40:550:40:57

-£280!

-£280.

0:40:570:41:00

£280.

0:41:000:41:01

All the bidding on the book at £280.

0:41:010:41:03

Is there any more, anywhere?

0:41:030:41:05

At £280.

0:41:050:41:07

Selling then at 280. 280.

0:41:080:41:11

-Good result.

-Well done.

-Top end of the estimate.

-That's marvellous.

0:41:110:41:14

-Fantastic.

-That's great.

0:41:140:41:15

Easy, wasn't it?

0:41:150:41:16

So, Anne's going home happy with a bit more than she expected.

0:41:180:41:21

Let's see if our final item can do just as well.

0:41:210:41:24

We've seen them on the show before but not as good as this

0:41:240:41:26

-and as big as this.

-No, never.

-Wow, wow, wow!

0:41:260:41:29

-I know, it's pretty, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Lovely.

0:41:290:41:31

This is a piece of social history and I think, you know,

0:41:310:41:33

we should easily double, if not triple what you've put on it.

0:41:330:41:37

-That's what I hope.

-That's what I'd like to think.

-Yes.

0:41:370:41:39

-I knew you would like this.

-Oh, I love it. Absolutely love it.

0:41:390:41:42

-It's fab.

-Yes, yes, yes. Great item of treen.

-I know.

0:41:420:41:45

And thank you for bringing it in, put a smile on all our faces.

0:41:450:41:47

-Yes.

-And I shall smile watching this as well.

-I know.

-Anyway, good luck!

0:41:470:41:50

-I'm excited. Thank you.

-Let's get that top end plus. Here we go.

0:41:500:41:54

19th century mahogany snuff box in the form of a shoe.

0:41:540:41:57

It's inlaid with mother of pearl and has the most wonderful

0:41:570:42:00

presentation inscription inside it, lovely thing.

0:42:000:42:03

And we're opening this lovely thing with conflicting bids at £320.

0:42:030:42:07

-320, commission bid.

-Straight in!

-Wow!

0:42:070:42:11

£320. Can I see the 350?

0:42:110:42:14

£320. Is there any advance?

0:42:140:42:16

350, 380, 400.

0:42:160:42:18

420. 450.

0:42:180:42:20

-£420 here.

-Well, I'm not surprised.

0:42:200:42:23

£420. Can I see the 450?

0:42:230:42:26

At £420 and fair warning then.

0:42:260:42:29

At £420.

0:42:290:42:32

-Wow!

-£420.

-You said so.

-I did, I told you £400 to £500, didn't I?

0:42:330:42:37

-Yes, you did.

-Yeah, I told Catherine that as well back at the cathedral.

0:42:370:42:41

Well, that's it. It's all over for our owners and what a day it's been.

0:42:450:42:48

I hope you've enjoyed the show and do remember

0:42:480:42:51

if you've got any antiques you think would do well in auction,

0:42:510:42:54

we would love to see you at one of our valuation days.

0:42:540:42:57

Details of up and coming dates and venues you can find on our

0:42:570:43:00

BBC website, or check the details in your local press.

0:43:000:43:03

We would love to see you but until then,

0:43:030:43:06

from West Sussex, it's goodbye.

0:43:060:43:07

This edition of Flog It! comes from Guildford Cathedral, where Paul Martin is joined by experts Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon.

Together the team pick out a selection of antiques and collectables to be sold at a local auction. Mark discovers a large Moorcroft bowl, but will a small bit of damage put the bidders off? And Catherine finds a wooden snuff holder in the shape of a shoe - will the buyers sniff it out? But the real star of the show is a music box.

Paul also visits Weald and Downland Museum, where they preserve entire buildings from the local area for generations to come. And he goes hands-on with part of the restoration process.


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