Oxford 17 Flog It!


Oxford 17

Antiques series. This episode comes from the place sometimes dubbed 'the last bastion of free speech in the western world' - the historic Oxford Union.


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Transcript


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Today, we're in a place dubbed

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the last bastion of free speech in the world.

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This place is famous as a forum for debating controversial issues.

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And no doubt, we'll have one or two good points to talk about today

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over the items we find. This is "Flog it!"

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For this programme,

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we've come to the most famous debating room

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outside of Westminster,

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the hallowed chamber of Oxford Union.

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The Union's core principle is free speech

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and it was founded at a time when universities banned students

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from talking freely about politics and religion.

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Malcolm X came here to debate civil rights...

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The most cosmopolitan and progressive parts of it...

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And Teddy Kennedy arrived under a hail of protest to discuss Vietnam.

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Well, let's hope our "Flog It!" audience aren't as rowdy today.

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We are literally surrounded by history here today

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at the Oxford Union.

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Malcolm X made his famous speech in 1964

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when he demanded black empowerment by any means necessary.

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Let's hope we find some wonderful political memorabilia.

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Come on, then.

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And our experts on the campaign trail are Christina Trevanion,

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our silver-lounged jewellery expert.

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Ooh!

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All that glitters. I like it.

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And our very own formidable debater Mark Stacey,

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who seems to me in need of a little light refreshment.

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Oh, you've drunk it all.

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Not very much fun, is it? We need a little tipple,

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being outside in this cold, don't we?

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Call to order.

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I believe this house has large queues of people all waiting

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to have their antiques valued by our experts.

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So, without further ado, let's see what Oxford has to offer.

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Coming up in today's show...

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Has Christina uncovered a famous fake?

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You think it's Serves.

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Yes. Is it not?

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While Mark gets a bit of a religious education.

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So, who was Charles Spurgeon?

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And I turn the clock back to the Cold War protests

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at Greenham Common.

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Did they change history?

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NEWS REPORTER: They arrived in their thousands by coach, by car

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and even on foot.

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Well, everybody's now safe and seated inside

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and our expert first out on the blocks is Christina.

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Let's take a closer look at what she spotted.

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So, June, I'm assuming you're a Libran

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because opals are the birthstone for Libras.

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-No, I was born in November.

-Ah! A little bit late, then?

-Mm.

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I've never understood why two separate...

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-These are love tokens from past admirers...

-Oh, my goodness!

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-Ages...ages past.

-Ooh!

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And they both bought me these stones at separate times,

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-which is extraordinary.

-Oh, really?

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And I've never expressed a desire for opals.

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So, have you ever worn them?

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I've just tried them on and thought, "They're really not me."

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"Thanks very much, but you obviously don't know me."

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-Quite.

-That's why they are past admirers.

-Exactly. Exactly.

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Well, a lot of people are very suspicious about opals.

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Like I say, they were...

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Or they are the birthstone of Librans and traditionally,

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it said that Librans are the only ones that can wear them,

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which frankly is buncombe.

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They have been historically linked with bad luck due to a book

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that Walter Scott wrote

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where he had his main character wearing an opal talisman

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-and she promptly, I think, dropped down dead, sadly.

-OK.

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So, they've been associated with quite bad luck

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since the 19th century.

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I think they are beautiful and I've got quite a few opals

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mainly because I went over to Australia and picked up...

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Cos they are the native stone of Australia.

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Oh, are they? I didn't know that.

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So, I had a bit of a tourist moment

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and bought myself an opal in Australia.

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This one here...

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Or this pair here is set in nine carat

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and they're obviously a pear shape

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with this little wire work surround in a...

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If we pick one up, you can see it's quite a drop.

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-And it's just quite a nice effect when you turn your head.

-Yes.

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They sort of almost quiver. They're quite sweet.

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And they are from I think about 1975, I think.

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-So, with that sort of tally with the right date?

-Yes.

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And then we've got this little cluster,

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which is almost quite a Tudor-y looking setting here.

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Garnets in the middle

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and I think these are also stamped nine carats on the back.

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So, very, very sweet.

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Difficult thing to value

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because like I say they've got this reputation and opals are...

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They're not as commercial as say diamonds

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or some of the other harder stones.

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If we were to put them into auction, we would put them in as one lot.

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-Right.

-So, we've put them together and I would probably be looking

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somewhere in the region of £80 to £120, something like that.

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And hoping to get the sort of £100 region.

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-How would you feel about that?

-That sounds fine.

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Would we look at a reserve or not on that?

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If we could, possibly a reserve of sort of 80. How would you feel?

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-That's fine.

-Is that all right?

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If we put 80 firm and then the auctioneer sort of can't go

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-any lower than that.

-Yes.

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Well, let's hope we get some divine inspiration for our earrings,

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-shall we?

-Let's hope we do.

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Our next item is a rather unusual bust of a gentleman who

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preached divine inspiration every Sunday from the pulpit.

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This was a man not afraid to speak his mind -

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the Baptist Charles Spurgeon.

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Mark should like this one.

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You've brought this rather interesting

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Parian ware bust into me.

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Now, what can you tell us about it?

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My mother owned this all of my life.

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And I think she used to go around and, on occasions,

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heard Charles Spurgeon actually preaching.

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-So, she might have met him.

-At some of his meetings, yes.

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-He was known as the Prince of the Preachers.

-Oh, right.

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So he was very popular in his day.

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-And he looks a terribly Victorian gentlemen.

-Oh, absolutely, yeah.

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And being a preacher, of course, he would've felt at home here,

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-in a debating chamber.

-That's right.

-Wouldn't he?

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Similar to the gentleman across there.

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-He looks very Victorian as well, doesn't he?

-Yeah.

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And why have you brought it in to show to us today, David?

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Well, it's not something that we feel we need to keep anymore.

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-And time's are hard...

-Maybe time for somebody who collects Parian ware

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-to have it.

-Absolutely, yes.

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It's known as Parian ware after the Island of Paros.

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Oh, right.

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Because of course, when you first see them, they look like marble.

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-Yes.

-And that's where they mined marble.

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And they are often fully signed.

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We know this one is by a firm called Robinson & Leadbeater,

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and I think it was designed by one of their sculptors called Acton,

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J Acton, around about 1878.

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So it is a nice, proper antique item.

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Now, they used to be popular many years ago.

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The market for Parian ware is much more realistic these days.

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And it does depend on the model.

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You know, if you get one of the very big models of a glamorous

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looking young lady, who is semi-draped,

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showing a little more than she should be showing...

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-Right.

-..then it is a little bit more popular.

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This is more of an academic figure.

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This is for someone who has got a nice Victorian house who

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wants to create a sort of library or something like that.

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Having said all that, I think he would sell at auction.

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I think years ago,

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something like this would have made £80 to £100.

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Today, we've got to be a little bit more realistic, I think.

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I'd like to put it in with an estimate of around £30 to £50.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Yeah, that's fine.

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Would you want to put a reserve on it or would you

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-just like to see what happens?

-No, I don't, because I... No.

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Let the market decide on the day.

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I mean, hopefully, there will be two or three people.

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Put those hands up and we'll get a good price for it.

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-Find its own level.

-Absolutely.

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Well, I've done enough preaching, now it's off to the auction for us,

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-isn't it?

-OK.

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But before we do,

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let's delve a little bit deeper into the history of the Union.

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And keeping a tight rein on the proceedings,

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is the President of the Union,

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who sits right here, in this chair.

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It currently belongs to student Maria Rioumine,

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who has some ambitious plans for her tenure.

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-Why did you want to be President for the Union?

-I was...

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When I came to Oxford, cos I'm Russian,

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so I'm an international student,

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I was absolutely overwhelmed with the history of the place,

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with the debates that've gone on here, with the speakers that I saw.

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And I think I just thought that, where else could you have such

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an opportunity, age 20, to basically run an entire institution

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and put on any events that you wanted?

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So to me, having always debated all the way through school,

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I thought that this is definitely something I should get involved with.

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What speakers do you want to bring here?

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Ideally, I want to make my debates as controversial as possible.

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-That's the whole idea in a way, isn't it?

-Exactly. So that's why...

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I mean, this time we've had Psy come to give his first

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English-speaking address. We had John McCain.

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We had even the Winklevoss twins, which were extremely popular.

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So, I think...

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Ideally, for... I'd like people like Caitlin Moran, Germaine Greer,

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politicians, anyone from the frontbench, any Americans,

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obviously Barrack Obama, but I think he'll probably be busy.

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-Well, you never know, do you?

-Well, I can... I'll try, I'll try.

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I'll bring up Angela Merkel as well, but we'll see about that.

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I'm sure you will. Thank you so much for talking to me today.

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Thank you very much.

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Clearly a lady who's going somewhere,

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and I'm sure she will get Barack Obama one day.

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Welcoming our next guest is another intelligent lady,

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Christina Trevanion, who has discovered a piece

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by a famous female potter.

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Welcome, Julian and Paris.

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Thank you for coming in today and for bringing this beautiful

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Charlotte Rhead vase. Which belongs to you, Julian.

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Did you inherit the piece?

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-From his nan.

-From your nan, OK.

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And was she a Charlotte Rhead collector?

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-She collected lots of things.

-She did? Oh, brilliant.

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Well, she obviously had a very, very good eye cos this is

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a particularly beautiful piece.

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-Do you like it?

-Nice design, nice shape.

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Brilliant, it is. It is a beautiful design.

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And Charlotte Rhead really came from an entire dynasty of Rhead family

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ceramics specialists.

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And they worked for a lot of different Staffordshire companies.

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But she really is the most famous of her brothers and her sisters,

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who were also in the industry.

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If we look on the bottom - we'll have a look at its bottom here -

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it's actually got TL5 - Tube Line 5.

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And this pattern is quite a prolific pattern.

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It has got oranges and lemons

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and it is a continuous band all the way around.

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So if we keep looking, it is all over decorated.

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And collectors do love that.

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What are your valuation expectations for it?

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Because she did produce quite a lot of them, they are quite prolific.

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Four years ago,

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we saw on the computer, online, one for about £120.

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About £120,

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which would be a fairly accurate open market valuation for it.

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I was thinking, I had in my head,

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cos I've sold quite a lot of these before,

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and they've made in the region of about £80 to £120.

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So, I would be happy to put an £80 reserve on it,

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with an estimate of 80 to 120.

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How do you feel about that?

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-Fine.

-Excellent. Brilliant.

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Well, let's put it to auction at 80 to 120,

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and hopefully, we'll get some more for you.

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Thank you ever so much for bringing it in today.

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-It has been a pleasure to meet you both.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Well, one or two frank discussions over the valuation tables.

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I'm sure you will agree.

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Well, there you are, three wonderful items we have found so far.

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Our auctioneer, Thomas Plant, is under starter's orders.

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He's at the auction room right now,

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so it is time for us to go over there.

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And here is a quick recap of all the items we are taking with us.

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We have Jean's opal love tokens from past admirers,

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which failed to impress.

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"But you obviously don't know me."

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-Right.

-Hence why they are passed admirers.

-Exactly.

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And David's rare Baptist bust, which turned Mark's head.

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And not forgetting, Julian's Charlotte Rhead vase.

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Which one of them will triumph in the arena of the auction?

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Our sale today comes from Newbury, near Reading.

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At £1,100, make no mistake...

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Our very own auctioneer, Thomas Plant,

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has set up home on a former RAF base, Greenham Common.

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It has its own story to tell, but more of that later.

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Right now, our first lot up are Jean's opal earrings,

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a favourite of Christina's. It is just a shame she cannot bid.

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Jean, I've got my fingers crossed for you. Good luck.

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-Thank you very much.

-And I must say, you look fabulous.

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You don't need it. You don't need it. You've got style, lady!

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-Hasn't she?

-She has.

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We are about to sell the two pairs of gold and opal earrings.

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Let's hope they are all in vogue and it's not running hot and cold.

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Because we need some kitchen taps, or is it bathroom taps?

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-Bathroom taps.

-So, you are doing a bit of DIY?

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I am indeed. I'm looking forward to it.

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-I like these, I think they've got style.

-Yeah.

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Opals, not everyone's cup of tea, so let's just hope that doesn't

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put too many people off and we get some Librans in the sale room.

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I'd like them to go to somebody who really loves them.

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-Cos you don't wear them anymore.

-I don't. They are not really me.

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No. Do you know, I can see that. I can see that.

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-Anyway, good luck. This is it.

-Thank you.

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Next up is lot number 90.

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This is two pairs of gold and opal earrings, the drops here.

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Start me off here at £65. At 65.

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At 65, the bid is with me here at 65.

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At 65. 70. Five.

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-80. And I'm out at 80. Lady's bid at £80.

-Well, we've sold them.

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-Yep, £80.

-£80 against you all...

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-Jean, the hammer has gone down. We just did it, £80.

-Wonderful.

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Those taps will be mine.

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Yay!

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From plumbing to Parian ware, it is that bust next.

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Will the Prince of Preachers fetch a princely price?

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Going under the hammer right now, we've got a Parian ware bust

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of Thomas Haddon Spurgeon, belonging to David.

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And in fact, David has brought along a book which accompanies the bust.

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-That's correct.

-It tells us all about the Prince of Preachers.

-Absolutely.

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-As he was known.

-Indeed, you are right, Paul.

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Why have you decided to sell it now?

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We've got no direct connections with it anymore

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and there is a Spurgeon Society that is current at the moment,

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-so somebody might be interested in moving it onto them.

-Sure.

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And it is beautifully made.

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It is by a good maker, so it is very well modelled.

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-It is beautifully modelled.

-No reserve.

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I know, that's dangerous.

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Was that your idea or Mark's idea?

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We both agreed.

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-I can't be blamed for this, Paul.

-No.

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Well, I'm sure Thomas will not let this go for £5.

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Lot number 210, the Robinson and Leadbeater

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Parian ware bust of Charles Spurgeon,

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and I've got bids here with me starting straight in at £35.

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-Great.

-Wonderful.

-Straight in at the top end, there you go.

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At £35, the Parian bust.

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At £35, is there any advance?

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At £35. That is my top bid at 35.

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40 if you want it.

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At £35 against you all...

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Selling then.

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That is a great result.

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You know, I wouldn't mind owning that for £35.

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I would love it for £35.

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It is a nice little thing. Especially with that book.

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I'm sure Charles Spurgeon's book has a few revelations.

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But now it is time for a real "Flog It!" favourite.

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Well, going under the hammer right now,

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we've got a Charlotte Rhead jug.

0:16:220:16:24

It is a great name in ceramics.

0:16:240:16:25

Charlotte Rhead is up there with the best.

0:16:250:16:27

Belonging to Julian, who is standing right next to me,

0:16:270:16:30

with his interpreter, Jean.

0:16:300:16:31

Julian's hoping to put the money towards a trip

0:16:310:16:34

to New York for his 40th birthday.

0:16:340:16:36

Good luck with that. Great to see you both.

0:16:360:16:39

Good to see you both again.

0:16:390:16:41

-It's very exciting.

-I like this a lot.

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:16:410:16:44

And it belonged to your grandmother, didn't it, Julian?

0:16:440:16:46

-Yes.

-That's right.

0:16:460:16:48

So, do you think we'll have her blessing to sell it today?

0:16:480:16:51

-Oh, yeah, I think she'll be very pleased.

-Brilliant.

0:16:520:16:56

I'm sure she'd be happy that I'm going to use

0:16:560:16:58

the money for a holiday to New York.

0:16:580:17:00

Well, good luck.

0:17:000:17:01

Let's hope we get the top end of the estimate and a little bit more.

0:17:010:17:05

-Fingers crossed.

-Fingers crossed.

0:17:050:17:07

Here we go. Let's hand the proceedings over to Thomas Plant.

0:17:090:17:13

An Art Deco pottery jug by Charlotte Rhead.

0:17:130:17:16

Good-looking lot, this one.

0:17:160:17:17

I start the bidding with me, straight in at £85 with me.

0:17:170:17:20

Oh, brilliant!

0:17:200:17:21

-Wow. That's good.

-Fantastic.

0:17:210:17:23

Is there any advance at £85?

0:17:230:17:25

90. Five. 100. And ten.

0:17:250:17:27

-120. 130.

-It's just such a great name.

0:17:270:17:31

Everybody is out at 130?

0:17:310:17:33

-Wow.

-With me, on the book at 130. I sell, then, £130...

0:17:330:17:38

-Yay!

-Yes, the hammer has gone down.

-Brilliant. Congratulations.

0:17:380:17:41

-Brilliant.

-That's marvellous news.

-Fantastic.

0:17:410:17:43

That'll help towards the trip.

0:17:430:17:44

-Yeah.

-Yeah, definitely.

0:17:440:17:47

I've got hands everywhere. Last chance, then.

0:17:490:17:52

Free speech is a central tenant of Oxford Union,

0:17:540:17:56

everyone has the right to express their opinion.

0:17:560:17:59

In 1981, a group of women expressed their opinion in a rather

0:17:590:18:03

dramatic way.

0:18:030:18:05

This was a debate that the whole world would sit up

0:18:050:18:07

and take notice of, and it happened literally right here,

0:18:070:18:10

because the auction room is built on the site of Greenham Common.

0:18:100:18:14

In 1981, 36 women and four babies in pushchairs set out

0:18:220:18:27

from the city hall in Cardiff to walk to Greenham Common, RAF base.

0:18:270:18:33

They had one aim - to reach the American air base,

0:18:330:18:37

which was situated here, on Greenham Common.

0:18:370:18:40

It was a 120-mile walk, but they were determined.

0:18:400:18:43

They were on a mission to protest.

0:18:430:18:45

The reason being, American nuclear warheads were stored here,

0:18:450:18:49

on this site.

0:18:490:18:50

And behind this door, lies the command centre.

0:18:500:18:53

This is where the protesters were desperate to get access to,

0:19:000:19:04

and they actually did make it on the base,

0:19:040:19:06

when security guards mistook them for cleaners.

0:19:060:19:10

But once their protest began in earnest, relations soured.

0:19:100:19:14

'Despite the rain and the bitter cold, they arrived by coach,

0:19:160:19:20

'by car and even on foot.

0:19:200:19:21

'Their aim was to stress as powerfully as possible that in their

0:19:230:19:26

'view, the cruise missile is not a deterrent, it is a weapon of death.'

0:19:260:19:30

In the volatile political landscape of the 1980s,

0:19:340:19:37

opinions polarised over nuclear issues.

0:19:370:19:40

And Greenham Common became a symbolic battleground.

0:19:400:19:43

Now, many people believed cruise missiles were

0:19:430:19:45

a deterrent against a nuclear attack from Russia, while many other

0:19:450:19:49

people believed they were a force of destruction in their own right.

0:19:490:19:53

Ordinary women felt they had no choice

0:19:540:19:57

but to leave their families and homes behind.

0:19:570:20:00

They came to Greenham to protest,

0:20:000:20:02

as they believed Armageddon was imminent.

0:20:020:20:06

We had been told we're stuck with this reality,

0:20:060:20:08

where war is acceptable, war is a way of solving the world's problems.

0:20:080:20:13

And that is simply not good enough.

0:20:130:20:15

This is not even war what they're promising now,

0:20:150:20:18

it's extermination.

0:20:180:20:20

Of us, of everybody.

0:20:210:20:24

Every living thing.

0:20:240:20:25

Jean Hutchinson was one of the founding mothers of the camp.

0:20:250:20:29

It was actually her family who persuaded her to take a stand.

0:20:290:20:33

My son said, "It's about time that you got down there and found out,

0:20:350:20:40

"and I'll do the cooking for the family."

0:20:400:20:43

I arrived with a tent and put it up. So we were all in tents.

0:20:460:20:50

'They'd been living in the most primitive conditions outside

0:20:500:20:53

'the main gate for 15 months. Tonight, however,

0:20:530:20:56

'police reinforcements have been called to Greenham.'

0:20:560:20:59

The Council liked to evict us a lot.

0:21:010:21:05

We had to be very close, because we had to come onto this ground

0:21:050:21:10

and coordinate a nonviolent, direct action.

0:21:100:21:14

'Women had gathered to form a human blockade.

0:21:160:21:18

'They stood in the path of a military convoy

0:21:180:21:20

'and refused to move.'

0:21:200:21:22

# Whatever happened to dear old Lenny? #

0:21:220:21:26

Jean soon found that the authorities adopted a zero-tolerance policy.

0:21:260:21:31

Yes, we all went to prison several times, of course.

0:21:310:21:34

# Whatever happened to the heroes? #

0:21:340:21:39

A pattern was set up -

0:21:390:21:40

nonviolent, direct action, court, prison.

0:21:400:21:45

It was thought of as all part of getting rid of the cruise missiles.

0:21:450:21:50

This weapon is massively destructive, 16 times a Russian bomb.

0:21:520:21:58

The Greenham Common women captured the interest of the media

0:22:030:22:06

by chaining themselves to the perimeter fence,

0:22:060:22:09

demanding an open debate with government on nuclear armament.

0:22:090:22:12

They didn't think it was democratically right that

0:22:120:22:15

Margaret Thatcher's government would just let the Americans

0:22:150:22:18

bring their nuclear missiles into the country.

0:22:180:22:20

Greenham became a permanent encampment.

0:22:250:22:27

Jean lived here for 18 years. Conditions were primitive.

0:22:270:22:31

There was no electricity, no running water.

0:22:310:22:33

But by the mid-1980s, more than 1,000 women had joined her.

0:22:330:22:39

'Thousands of women and small children spread

0:22:390:22:41

'out around the base, joining hands to surround it completely.'

0:22:410:22:45

'They believe their protestors made deployment of crews too

0:22:450:22:48

'sensitive politically and too unsafe.'

0:22:480:22:51

But there is another view from inside the base.

0:22:560:22:59

Phil DeMonte used to work for the US government

0:22:590:23:01

and was based behind the wire at Greenham from 1988,

0:23:010:23:06

where things looked very different.

0:23:060:23:08

They used to get on the base quite regular. It was massive base.

0:23:080:23:11

Cut a couple of holes through the fence, climb over the fence.

0:23:110:23:14

They couldn't stop them getting on the base but the secure areas, they never got into.

0:23:140:23:18

I appreciate the fact that they were protesting,

0:23:190:23:21

and that's one of the liberties that we do have is the right to protest.

0:23:210:23:25

But when they actually started cutting down fences

0:23:250:23:27

and damaging property and interfering with convoys,

0:23:270:23:29

by throwing paint balls, etc, that put people's lives in danger

0:23:290:23:32

and that actually cost money to the British taxpayer.

0:23:320:23:34

I mean, realistically, in the event of the missiles

0:23:360:23:41

actually having to be deployed on a real footing,

0:23:410:23:44

I really don't think they would have had anywhere near the systems

0:23:440:23:47

or the convoys or the base.

0:23:470:23:49

This is a unique view inside the decontamination chamber

0:24:000:24:03

which was only accessible in a state of high alert.

0:24:030:24:06

Scarily, survival time in the event of a nuclear attack

0:24:060:24:09

outside of this chamber was just 14 seconds.

0:24:090:24:12

Now, that's just 14 seconds

0:24:120:24:14

to decide what to do with the rest of your life.

0:24:140:24:17

So you can understand why this was an issue

0:24:170:24:19

so many people had to take a stand on.

0:24:190:24:22

The whole world held their breath as Reagan and Gorbachev

0:24:270:24:31

sat down at the table to discuss nuclear disarmament.

0:24:310:24:35

The historic INF Treaty, signed in 1987,

0:24:360:24:40

effectively ended the Cold War

0:24:400:24:43

and the life of the nuclear weapons stored here at Greenham.

0:24:430:24:46

Now that the missiles have gone 30 years since protests began,

0:24:480:24:52

is there any common ground?

0:24:520:24:55

Jean and Phil, I've brought you together here in the Peace Garden.

0:24:550:24:58

Can you see it from each others' point of view now?

0:24:580:25:01

-I applaud what they've done 18 years standing out here.

-Yeah.

0:25:010:25:06

But what I cannot condone and never can condone -

0:25:060:25:09

when fences were ripped down and property destroyed

0:25:090:25:11

as well as interfering with military operations.

0:25:110:25:14

I can't condone that.

0:25:140:25:16

-Well.

-HE CHUCKLES

0:25:160:25:18

-We took...

-What are you going to say to that, Jean?

0:25:180:25:20

We took non-violent direct action.

0:25:200:25:22

The whole place is freed up

0:25:220:25:25

from more than 100 weapons

0:25:250:25:28

that could have - if used - killed a billion people.

0:25:280:25:32

And you really feel that your actions here

0:25:320:25:34

had a direct result in the fall of communism?

0:25:340:25:37

Women on this spot

0:25:370:25:39

knew that it was possible to defeat cruise missiles.

0:25:390:25:44

So the cruise missiles themselves deployed in the field

0:25:440:25:46

had nothing to do with the signing of the INF Treaty, that's what you mean?

0:25:460:25:50

You can't say that your people

0:25:500:25:51

were working for multilateral disarmament and then...

0:25:510:25:54

Yes, they were.

0:25:540:25:55

You think that wasn't Ronald Reagan's stance, speak softly but carry a big stick?

0:25:550:25:58

He had the weapon systems ready. Now do you want to sit down and talk?

0:25:580:26:01

I can see...I can see now that opinions are still divided

0:26:010:26:04

and they haven't really changed

0:26:040:26:06

and I don't think they will, will they, Phil?

0:26:060:26:08

-We had a job to do.

-You had a job to do.

-And we had a job to do.

0:26:080:26:11

The publicity was on this side of the fence

0:26:110:26:12

but the history was made on that side of the fence.

0:26:120:26:15

We can all safely say history was definitely made here.

0:26:150:26:18

Yes, we had the missiles destroyed.

0:26:180:26:20

Well, that got quite heated.

0:26:230:26:25

It just goes to show you that 30 years on,

0:26:250:26:27

issues such as this can still prompt debate.

0:26:270:26:31

But at the end of the day, that's what it's all about -

0:26:310:26:33

freedom of speech.

0:26:330:26:34

This was the reason that Oxford Union was created.

0:26:340:26:38

Welcome back to our valuation day venue, the Oxford Union.

0:26:510:26:54

There's still a great buzz in the room

0:26:540:26:56

and plenty more antiques to find to take off to auction.

0:26:560:26:59

So, from the best seat in the house, the president's chair,

0:26:590:27:02

it's over to the hot seat in the house, Christina's chair.

0:27:020:27:05

Let's go and take a closer look at what she's spotted.

0:27:050:27:07

So, Joy, you've brought this beautiful box in to me today.

0:27:100:27:14

Tell me where it came from.

0:27:140:27:16

-It came from Lord and Lady Baldwin's estate.

-Right.

0:27:160:27:21

He'd died and his wife lived there for a little while afterwards

0:27:210:27:25

and she found the place was too big,

0:27:250:27:27

so they had a massive auction which I attended.

0:27:270:27:31

My parents worked for Lord and Lady Baldwin.

0:27:310:27:34

-When did you buy it?

-1975.

0:27:340:27:36

-And what did you pay for it then?

-£50.

0:27:360:27:39

-And you think it's Sevres?

-Yes.

0:27:390:27:42

Is it not?

0:27:420:27:43

-I'm afraid it's not.

-Oh.

0:27:440:27:46

We've done a little bit of research and although the top is lovely,

0:27:460:27:49

we're going to have a look at its bottom

0:27:490:27:51

-because that's the bit that tells us everything, isn't it?

-Of course.

0:27:510:27:54

So if we turn it over here,

0:27:540:27:56

we've got this lovely sort of entwined Ls mark

0:27:560:27:59

-which, you're absolutely right, is a Sevres mark.

-Hmm.

0:27:590:28:03

But there was a factory based in Paris called Samson.

0:28:030:28:06

Oh, I see.

0:28:060:28:07

Now, Samson started in the 1830s

0:28:070:28:10

and he started by producing imitation Sevres works basically.

0:28:100:28:16

And he was a great imitator and a great copier.

0:28:160:28:20

And he never set out to deceive anybody,

0:28:200:28:22

he just made replacements for things that were broken

0:28:220:28:24

-and things like that.

-Mm-hm.

0:28:240:28:25

But he actually became very well-known in his own right.

0:28:250:28:28

-And this is a Samson box.

-Well, how strange.

0:28:280:28:32

I'm wondering if Lady Baldwin knew that.

0:28:320:28:35

-You never know. It is a difficult one to spot.

-Hmm.

0:28:350:28:39

Especially because this is such a typical Sevres view.

0:28:390:28:42

Yes, I knew that.

0:28:420:28:43

This sort of 'what oh'-esque lovers frolicking in a French garden

0:28:430:28:46

in very much the 18th-century style is typical Sevres, isn't it,

0:28:460:28:50

with this wonderful blue Mazarin ground.

0:28:500:28:54

And we open it up. We've got this lovely ormolu setting

0:28:540:28:57

-and inside, lovely gilt interior.

-It's beautiful, isn't it?

0:28:570:29:00

Very beautiful.

0:29:000:29:01

And I think this is quite a late one.

0:29:010:29:03

This is a late 19th-century example.

0:29:030:29:05

I don't think it is the 1830 that we'd like it to be.

0:29:050:29:10

And as such, really that is going to be reflected

0:29:100:29:12

in the auction estimate.

0:29:120:29:14

Yes, I do understand that.

0:29:140:29:15

But I think at auction we might be looking

0:29:150:29:17

-somewhere in the region of sort of £60-£80.

-Mm-hm.

0:29:170:29:21

How would you feel about selling it at that sort of level?

0:29:210:29:23

-Um, that's difficult.

-It is difficult, isn't it?

0:29:230:29:27

I don't have any daughters but I do have two lovely daughters-in-law

0:29:270:29:30

and I was wondering about giving it to one and thinking,

0:29:300:29:35

-I've got nothing to give to the other one that's similar.

-Hmm.

0:29:350:29:38

Um, now...I'll sell it.

0:29:380:29:42

-You'll sell it.

-Yes.

-Are you sure?

0:29:420:29:44

-Yes.

-OK.

0:29:440:29:45

-And they'll get the money.

-Good. That's a very good idea.

0:29:450:29:48

-So if we put an estimate of £60-£80...

-Yes.

0:29:480:29:51

-..and a reserve of 60...

-Yes.

-..and see how we get on.

0:29:510:29:54

-Yes, that's fine.

-Yeah?

-Mm-hm.

-Brilliant.

0:29:540:29:57

Well, we look forward to it.

0:29:570:29:58

Let's hope we can make slightly more than that for you.

0:29:580:30:00

Oh, never mind.

0:30:000:30:01

-Thank you for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

0:30:010:30:04

£50 back in the early '70s was quite a lot of money.

0:30:040:30:07

It just proves that you have to look closely

0:30:070:30:09

when buying at local auctions.

0:30:090:30:11

Now it's time to leave the lively excitement of our "Flog It!" crowds

0:30:140:30:18

for a bit of quiet.

0:30:180:30:19

We are in the cathedral of learning after all.

0:30:190:30:22

This was the original debating chamber until 1878.

0:30:230:30:26

It's hard to imagine but, back then,

0:30:260:30:28

Oxford University was very restrictive.

0:30:280:30:30

The culture was the graduates were there to be taught,

0:30:300:30:33

not to think for themselves.

0:30:330:30:35

And there was very little in the way of books

0:30:350:30:37

other than the textbooks the college provided.

0:30:370:30:40

So the students were very keen to start up their own library,

0:30:400:30:44

and I think they've jolly well succeeded, don't you?

0:30:440:30:47

I mean, this is just marvellous.

0:30:470:30:49

From the wonders of books to the beauty of bronze,

0:30:520:30:55

Mark Stacey has unearthed something Bergman.

0:30:550:30:58

What an extraordinary group of figures you've brought in.

0:31:010:31:03

Have you had them a long time?

0:31:030:31:05

My wife's mother said that they were bought by her father,

0:31:050:31:08

so, my wife's grandfather.

0:31:080:31:10

So a wee while ago?

0:31:100:31:12

-Probably a long time ago.

-Yes.

0:31:120:31:14

I mean, the minute I saw them, I thought only of one thing.

0:31:140:31:19

-Yes.

-That they were of course Austrian.

0:31:190:31:22

Ah.

0:31:220:31:23

Cold painted bronze, which means that the painting

0:31:230:31:26

and the decoration is painted on after they were actually...

0:31:260:31:30

-come out of the mould.

-Course.

0:31:300:31:31

And I hoped they would be by one maker...

0:31:310:31:36

a chap called Franz Bergman.

0:31:360:31:38

And the answer to my question is on here.

0:31:380:31:40

And we've got a little number here.

0:31:400:31:43

Then we've got a word that says "geschutzt"

0:31:430:31:45

which is Austrian or German for "register".

0:31:450:31:48

Can you see that little vase there?

0:31:480:31:50

-Oh, yes.

-With the B in the middle?

-Yes.

-That stands for Bergman.

0:31:500:31:54

Franz Bergman. That's his mark.

0:31:540:31:56

-Right.

-And it's really nice to see.

0:31:560:31:58

-So it's confirmed what I thought they would be.

-Yes.

0:31:580:32:01

-And they would date to around about 1900.

-Yes.

0:32:010:32:06

So they're going to... They're well over 100 years old.

0:32:060:32:09

He specialised in this type of work

0:32:090:32:11

and produced a wide range of animal figures and bird figures.

0:32:110:32:15

Produced a lot of Arabian-type scenes

0:32:150:32:19

with Arabs drinking coffee,

0:32:190:32:21

-carpet sellers, this sort of thing.

-Hmm.

0:32:210:32:24

But these are Africans, aren't they?

0:32:240:32:27

Well, we always assumed they were sort of Zulus.

0:32:270:32:30

-Yeah, Zulus with their shields.

-Yeah.

0:32:300:32:32

There's a huge collector's market for Franz Bergman's works

0:32:320:32:36

but I've not seen a little group like this

0:32:360:32:38

and I think they're absolutely charming.

0:32:380:32:40

I would say, as they're damaged, put them in as a little group.

0:32:400:32:44

-Yes.

-And I would like to put an auction estimate on them

0:32:440:32:47

of £400-£600.

0:32:470:32:49

Right.

0:32:490:32:50

But I think they might make a bit more on the day.

0:32:500:32:53

Would you be happy to put them in at that?

0:32:530:32:55

-Um, yes, I have my wife's permission.

-You do?

-Yes.

0:32:550:32:59

You're not going to get into trouble with 'er indoors?

0:32:590:33:01

-I don't think so, no.

-Oh, good. I'm sure you won't.

0:33:010:33:03

-We'll put a reserve of course.

-Yes.

-We'll put a reserve of £400 on them.

0:33:030:33:08

There's two types of reserve, you can have it fixed,

0:33:080:33:11

-which means that we won't sell them below 400.

-Yes.

0:33:110:33:14

Or you can have it discretionary,

0:33:140:33:16

which gives the auctioneer 10% on the day.

0:33:160:33:19

What do you think your wife would be comfortable with?

0:33:190:33:23

Um, let's say fixed.

0:33:230:33:26

-Shall we say fixed?

-I would say fixed anyway.

0:33:260:33:28

Let's say fixed because actually, I think we're going to be OK.

0:33:280:33:32

And they'll go to a collector who loves these type of things.

0:33:320:33:34

They've been in a box, I must confess.

0:33:340:33:36

Oh, no. Oh, no, they can't live in a box.

0:33:360:33:38

-They're much too nice for that.

-That's right.

0:33:380:33:40

I think someone who appreciates them should...

0:33:400:33:42

I'm glad we've got them out of the box

0:33:420:33:44

and we're going to give them a chance

0:33:440:33:45

of finding a home where they're going to be loved and cherished.

0:33:450:33:48

-Good.

-Thanks for bringing them in, Michael.

0:33:480:33:50

Here's hoping those beautiful Bergman bronzes

0:33:500:33:53

never have to be boxed up again.

0:33:530:33:55

And now, our final item of the day could be the most lucrative.

0:33:560:34:00

And who better to evaluate it than our very own jewellery expert

0:34:000:34:04

Christina Trevanion.

0:34:040:34:06

Zena, what a sparkler.

0:34:060:34:08

I love it. You've brought this beautiful ring in to us today.

0:34:080:34:11

It's absolutely stunning.

0:34:110:34:13

Can you tell me a little bit about it?

0:34:130:34:15

The original ring was given to me by an ex-boss when she retired.

0:34:150:34:20

She gave me the option of a few items which I'd like to have

0:34:200:34:23

as a thank you and I chose the ring.

0:34:230:34:25

-But it was set in white gold at the time.

-Right.

0:34:250:34:28

It was a very small ring but a square setting

0:34:280:34:33

and it looked more like a ring out of a cracker.

0:34:330:34:35

-Oh, right.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:34:350:34:37

So I had it reset in 18 carat gold.

0:34:370:34:39

So you must have worked incredibly hard

0:34:390:34:41

-because it's a beautiful ring and a very, very generous present.

-Yes.

0:34:410:34:45

Very generous present.

0:34:450:34:46

-So you've had it put into quite a traditional setting really.

-Yes.

0:34:460:34:49

And it's very, very similar to my engagement ring.

0:34:490:34:52

-I'm thinking about swapping.

-No. No, no, no, no.

0:34:520:34:54

Slightly bigger than my engagement ring!

0:34:540:34:56

But this is a very, very traditional setting.

0:34:580:34:59

-And did you wear it when it was...?

-I did, yes. I used to wear it

0:34:590:35:02

-but the insurance value was rather high.

-Right.

-Um,

0:35:020:35:07

and I put it in the safe and now I don't wear it, so...

0:35:070:35:11

It's a bit ridiculous paying the insurance for it.

0:35:110:35:13

It does seem that way, doesn't it?

0:35:130:35:15

So let's see if we can find a mutually agreeable value

0:35:150:35:18

and then perhaps you can use the money

0:35:180:35:19

towards something that you will wear.

0:35:190:35:21

Obviously it's a diamond ring set in, what looks to be,

0:35:210:35:25

a platinum, little coronet setting and then 18 carat yellow gold hoop.

0:35:250:35:30

We've got a diamond solitaire, a brilliant-cut diamond here

0:35:300:35:34

and we grade diamonds on what we call the four Cs,

0:35:340:35:38

so cut, clarity, colour and obviously carat weight,

0:35:380:35:42

what every girl wants to know really is, how big is it?

0:35:420:35:45

And in all four of those aspects it really does score quite highly.

0:35:450:35:49

It's a great colour. It's a nice white colour.

0:35:490:35:53

Clarity, there are a few little inclusions there.

0:35:530:35:56

A lot of people quite sweetly call them birthmarks

0:35:560:35:58

-because that's how the diamond would have formed.

-Right.

0:35:580:36:01

But this is quite clear.

0:36:010:36:02

And carat weight, we've worked it out at about a carat.

0:36:020:36:06

-Have you...?

-Should be 1.1.

0:36:060:36:08

-1.1 carat.

-Is that what they graded it at?

-Yes. BOTH: On the insurance.

0:36:080:36:11

-Yes.

-Which is great cos that means it's over a carat

0:36:110:36:14

which really does make quite a difference

0:36:140:36:16

-when you get over that one carat mark.

-Yes.

0:36:160:36:19

So, value-wise, at auction

0:36:190:36:23

I would be quite cautious

0:36:230:36:25

because of the current economic market we're in

0:36:250:36:28

and maybe go somewhere in the region of sort of 1,000-1,500,

0:36:280:36:31

-something like that.

-Mm-hm.

0:36:310:36:32

-How would you feel about that?

-Yes, fine.

-Is that all right?

-Yes, yes.

0:36:320:36:35

So if we put an auction estimate of 1,000-1,500

0:36:350:36:39

and perhaps a reserve of 1,000,

0:36:390:36:41

-cos I don't think it needs to go for any less than that.

-No.

0:36:410:36:44

-No, I wouldn't want it to.

-No.

0:36:440:36:45

Cos it really is rather beautiful.

0:36:450:36:46

And what would you use the money for?

0:36:460:36:48

-For a holiday I think.

-Cos you're quite an intrepid traveller, aren't you?

0:36:480:36:51

-Yes.

-Globe trotted by the sounds of it.

0:36:510:36:54

THEY LAUGH

0:36:540:36:55

Well, we haven't seen the Northern Lights yet,

0:36:550:36:57

-so I'd like to do a cruise to the Northern Lights.

-Fantastic.

0:36:570:37:00

So next year is supposed to be a good year.

0:37:000:37:01

It would be quite appropriate really from a sparkler

0:37:010:37:04

-to sparklers in the sky.

-It would, wouldn't it?

-Yes!

-True.

0:37:040:37:06

Well, here's hoping that in Zena's case,

0:37:080:37:10

diamonds really are a girl's best friend.

0:37:100:37:12

They definitely appear to be a long-time favourite of Christina's.

0:37:120:37:16

Well, our experts have been working flat out here at the Oxford Union.

0:37:160:37:19

You've just seen the items, you've heard what they've had to say,

0:37:190:37:22

you've probably got your own opinions, but right now

0:37:220:37:24

we're going across to the auction room to put them to the test.

0:37:240:37:27

And here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

0:37:270:37:30

Will Michael's Bergman bronze captivate the crowds?

0:37:310:37:35

Or will it be Zena's diamond solitaire ring

0:37:380:37:40

which sparkles in the eyes of the bidders?

0:37:400:37:43

But first, it's that Sevres box.

0:37:470:37:49

Joy got a shock on the valuation day

0:37:490:37:51

when Christina revealed

0:37:510:37:52

her antique box was actually a later reproduction.

0:37:520:37:56

But can we still turn her a little profit?

0:37:560:37:58

£85. 90. 95.

0:38:030:38:05

100 and I'm out.

0:38:050:38:07

Thomas is back in action on the rostrum.

0:38:070:38:10

-Against you all.

-Here's hoping he can weave his magic.

0:38:100:38:13

And now, for our next item just about to go under the hammer.

0:38:140:38:16

It belongs to Joy, and unfortunately, she cannot be with us

0:38:160:38:19

but her little porcelain box can.

0:38:190:38:21

-And it's going under the hammer.

-It is, yes.

0:38:210:38:23

-Big grin on your face.

-Yeah. It's Samson. She thought it was Sevres.

0:38:230:38:26

-So, Samson box.

-Which is a copy really of...

0:38:260:38:29

-They were the best in...

-Of the best.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:38:290:38:32

And they did a lot of Meissen, Sevres reproduction wares.

0:38:320:38:34

-So hopefully... Hopefully, hopefully.

-Hopefully.

0:38:340:38:37

-Fingers crossed.

-Yeah, bless her.

0:38:370:38:38

-She bought it for £50 over 30 years ago.

-Thinking it was the real thing.

0:38:380:38:42

-Thinking it was the real McCoy, so let's hope.

-Let's hope

0:38:420:38:45

we can get her money back. It's going under the hammer. Good luck.

0:38:450:38:48

Here we go.

0:38:480:38:49

19th-century Samson porcelain box and cover.

0:38:490:38:51

There we are. With gilt metal rims.

0:38:510:38:53

I can start the bidding with me here at £45 with me.

0:38:530:38:57

-At £45 for the box.

-45.

0:38:570:39:00

-Well. Come on, Thomas.

-And 50. And 55 with me.

0:39:000:39:02

At 55 against you all.

0:39:020:39:04

Is there any advance at 55?

0:39:040:39:05

And 60 and I'm out.

0:39:050:39:07

-At 60.

-Ooh, that's better.

-It's in the room at 60.

0:39:070:39:09

Last chance then, at £60.

0:39:090:39:11

-At £60. Oh, joy! Joy for Joy.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:39:110:39:16

Hammer's gone down and we've sold it.

0:39:160:39:17

-I hope you're "en-joying" this moment.

-Brilliant.

0:39:170:39:20

-Phew, that was a relief.

-Yeah, it was.

0:39:200:39:22

No more Joy jokes, I promise.

0:39:220:39:24

Up next, there's a bit of a dispute in the saleroom.

0:39:240:39:28

Going under the hammer right now, one of my favourite lots

0:39:280:39:31

of the sale that belong to Michael who's right next to me.

0:39:310:39:33

It's a group of three Bergman cold painted bronzes.

0:39:330:39:36

Masai warriors.

0:39:360:39:37

And these really are flavour of the month.

0:39:370:39:39

They are really nice. I don't know why you're selling them.

0:39:390:39:42

I'd like to find out.

0:39:420:39:43

Well, they're a bit fussy for us

0:39:430:39:46

-and a bit British Empire too.

-Right, OK.

0:39:460:39:49

It's all the rage right now though.

0:39:490:39:51

-Well, Bergman is a very big name, Paul, isn't it?

-Hmm.

-Very big name.

0:39:510:39:54

Let's find out what auctioneer Thomas thinks.

0:39:540:39:56

We've got a big crowd here and hopefully

0:39:560:39:58

we're going to get them away at the top end. This is it.

0:39:580:40:00

345, a group of three 19th-century Viennese cold painted

0:40:000:40:03

tribal figures - Bergman style.

0:40:030:40:05

There we are.

0:40:050:40:06

But they're not Bergman style, they are Bergman.

0:40:060:40:09

Start the bidding with me at £200.

0:40:090:40:10

Start the bidding with me at £200 for the Masai figures.

0:40:100:40:13

At 210.

0:40:130:40:14

220. 230. 240. 250.

0:40:140:40:18

250. 250 I have.

0:40:180:40:20

With me here at 250.

0:40:200:40:21

Against you all 250. 260.

0:40:210:40:23

-270. 280. 290.

-This is a surprise, Paul.

0:40:230:40:26

-300.

-It's a slow climb though. We're getting there.

0:40:260:40:29

340. 360. 380 with me.

0:40:290:40:31

If you want it, it's 400.

0:40:310:40:33

At 400 and I'm out. At 400 I have.

0:40:330:40:36

At £400. It's in the room at 400.

0:40:360:40:39

Make no mistake.

0:40:390:40:40

And I'm selling at £400.

0:40:400:40:42

-GAVEL BANGS

-400.

-Well, they've gone.

0:40:420:40:45

They've gone at £400, right on the lower end of the estimate.

0:40:450:40:48

-Are you happy with that?

-Um, not totally

0:40:480:40:50

because of the "Bergman style" description.

0:40:500:40:53

-Announcement.

-Yes. Yes.

0:40:530:40:55

Do you feel that slightly killed it off a little bit?

0:40:550:40:58

Uh, well, I don't really know.

0:40:580:41:00

I think it's because some of them need a little bit of restoration

0:41:000:41:04

and that does add to the cost when you're buying something, you know?

0:41:040:41:07

Because you need to take it to a skilled person.

0:41:070:41:10

I'm glad we fixed a firm reserve of 400 on them

0:41:100:41:12

because it meant we protected them.

0:41:120:41:15

It's a shame that those bronzes didn't go for more

0:41:150:41:18

but, Mark is right,

0:41:180:41:19

they did have some damage which maybe put the collectors of.

0:41:190:41:23

There's always an element of risk at auction,

0:41:230:41:25

that's why we fix a reserve.

0:41:250:41:27

But here we are at the last lot of the day

0:41:270:41:30

and I'm keen to show Christina that I have been paying attention.

0:41:300:41:33

Colour, cut, clarity, carat.

0:41:340:41:36

Yes, you know what I'm talking about - Zena's sparkler.

0:41:360:41:39

THEY LAUGH

0:41:390:41:41

Hi, Zena, it's great to see you again.

0:41:410:41:43

-Who have you brought along with you?

-This is David, my husband.

0:41:430:41:45

-David.

-How do you do?

-Pleased to meet you.

0:41:450:41:47

Of course, with those four Cs there is one more C to go with them, isn't there?

0:41:470:41:51

Costly...Christina!

0:41:510:41:53

THEY LAUGH

0:41:540:41:56

-You beat me to it.

-The fifth C!

0:41:560:41:58

-Well, you both sparkle. The six Cs though.

-I'm seriously impressed.

0:41:580:42:01

I've taught you something.

0:42:010:42:02

-You have, haven't you?

-Yeah. Wow.

0:42:020:42:04

We're putting this to the test. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:42:040:42:07

-Good luck, everyone.

-Good luck.

-Here we go.

0:42:070:42:09

Next lot is the diamond solitaire ring. The diamond solitaire.

0:42:090:42:12

1.1 carat.

0:42:120:42:14

Lovely ring this one here.

0:42:140:42:15

Start me here at £800.

0:42:150:42:16

At 800. At 800.

0:42:160:42:18

At £800, solitaire diamond. 800.

0:42:180:42:20

820. 850. 880.

0:42:200:42:24

900. 920.

0:42:240:42:26

950. 980.

0:42:260:42:28

1,000 and I'm out.

0:42:280:42:29

It's reached its reserve. Brilliant.

0:42:290:42:31

Is there any advance at £1,000?

0:42:310:42:33

At £1,000 it's in the room.

0:42:330:42:35

And 1,050.

0:42:350:42:37

1,050. Late legs but it's there.

0:42:370:42:40

And £1,100. At £1,100 are we all done?

0:42:400:42:43

At £1,100, make no mistake.

0:42:430:42:46

-Yes, the hammer's gone down.

-Brilliant.

-In estimate.

0:42:460:42:49

Well done, everyone.

0:42:490:42:50

-Well done.

-Congratulations. That's fantastic.

0:42:500:42:52

A few successes and a few debates at auction, hardly a surprise

0:42:520:42:55

given our choice of venue - Oxford Union.

0:42:550:42:58

We've had a fascinating day here.

0:42:580:43:00

If you'd like to take part in the show

0:43:020:43:04

and you've got unwanted antiques and collectables

0:43:040:43:06

you'd like to sell, bring them along to one of our valuation days.

0:43:060:43:09

Details you can pick up on our BBC website.

0:43:090:43:11

If you don't have a computer,

0:43:110:43:13

check the details in your local press

0:43:130:43:14

and maybe we can help you to flog it.

0:43:140:43:17

This episode comes from the place sometimes dubbed 'the last bastion of free speech in the western world' - the historic Oxford Union. Paul Martin is joined by experts Christina Trevanion and Wil Axon. Together the team pick out a selection of interesting antiques and collectables to be sold at the local auction house.

Christina uncovers a famous fake while Mark gets a religious education after discovering a rare Baptist bust.

Paul delves into the history of the auction site which is built on top of infamous Greenham Common.


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