Compilation 1 Flog It!


Compilation 1

Paul Martin and his team of experts invite members of the public to bring their antiques to be viewed and valued, with an option to sell at auction.


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Transcript


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We start today's show at the Beaulieu Estate in Hampshire.

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Its attractions include a fine historic house,

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the ruins of an abbey,

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and one of the largest collections of amazing old cars in the country.

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Beaulieu is an excellent example of how a family have made their home,

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their family treasures and 7,000 acres of parkland

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viable in the modern world, with some very clever thinking.

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And later on in the programme,

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we'll be looking at more fascinating cars on display, like this one!

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But first, it's a tour of the country, as we find out if today's

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valuations will make their owners as financially sound, too.

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Welcome to Flog It! CAR HORN SOUNDS

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We've travelled across the country, in search of exceptional stories

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and objects to take to auction.

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And we've been saving some of the best till now.

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In today's show, we travel to Kent, to Chiddingstone Castle,

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a fascinating historic house set in 35 acres of countryside.

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To Dorset, to Lulworth Castle,

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an early 17th-century mock castle only ten minutes from the coast.

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And then inland, to Wrest Park in Bedfordshire,

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an elegant house in the French style...

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..where our experts find some fascinating collectables.

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In our programme today,

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things get a bit out of control for Christina Trevanion at Wrest Park.

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BUZZING SOUND What happens when it gets to the... Oh, we've got more of it, here.

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We've got some more, Oh, we've got to stop him! Quick, stop him!

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THEY LAUGH

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And Adam Partridge has to put the brakes on at Chiddingstone Castle.

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We're ready, loaded with air. Are you with me? We're going to fire?

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Not quite! Oh. You're very impetuous, Diana!

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We're not going to fire just yet. I knew it, you can't wait to.

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I really wanted the excitement.

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But which one of these items will be a runaway success at the auction?

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Bids all out then, selling then, to the blue shirt.

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Can you imagine how much it costs to maintain

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an estate like Beaulieu?

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Well, the owners aren't going to tell me exactly,

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but needless to say, a great deal,

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to keep all of these individual elements running smoothly.

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The Montagu family have owned this site since 1538,

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and they take their responsibility very seriously,

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opening up their home to the public over 60 years ago.

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And later on in the show,

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we will be exploring some of the attractions here,

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but right now, it's straight in to the valuations and let's hope

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our owners have been equally as diligent

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with the care of their treasures.

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Our first stop is Kent, where we find Thomas Plant making the most

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of the sunshine, in the grounds of Chiddingstone Castle.

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So, John, are you a photographer? Only digital these days. Yes? Yes.

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JOHN LAUGHS

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And what were you doing before, was it 35mm film, or...?

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It was 35mm SLR, yes. Yes.

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I've still got that one tucked away in a cupboard somewhere.

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They're quite valuable. As these are now. Yes.

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So we're looking at early photography, aren't we? Yes.

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And traditionally, we would call these, um,

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mahogany and brass, hand-held,

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quarter-plate cameras. Yes.

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Quarter-plate because of the glass plate on the back... Yes.

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..is quarter size of a larger plate. Yes.

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Tell me, how did you come by it?

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I inherited it from my great uncle, Major Ernest Lee.

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That was about 30 years ago. And what did he do?

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He was an inventor and mechanical engineer

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for most of his life.

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He served in both the world wars.

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In the World War I, it was his job to go

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and view crashed German aircraft behind our lines...

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Really? ..and unbolt bits of interest to be sent back

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to Farnborough for further evaluation. So, he was looking for

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inventions that the Germans had built

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onto their machines, like synchronised machine guns.

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In the first war? In the first war.

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So, he would have had something very similar,

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if not this camera, in the first war. Quite possibly, yes.

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It dates from that period, the first war period, and just after.

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The lens is interesting. Yes.

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Bausch Lomb. Yes. They established lenses manufacturing in the mid-19th

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century. Bausch was an optician and Lomb was his financer. Oh, right.

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Do you know how it works? Well, you adjust the focus with the

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knurled knob at the side.

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Um, looking at the glass screen on the back.

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When you've got the image right, you open this little flap here...

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like that, and that folds out of the way.

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And you can slide one of the negative carriers

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which you've previously loaded in the darkroom

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with two glass plates. Yes. And that...

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So, these nitrate plates?

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..drops in there, and then to take the picture,

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assuming you should have closed the shutter...

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you pull that up there, to expose the plate

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and then you cock the shutter

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and...press the trigger.

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And there seems to be a few additions to this camera. Yes.

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Here... My great uncle modified the trigger mechanism

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and he's also added on a...

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structure on the base of the camera

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to allow for a flash to be fitted, which goes in that side there.

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Right. And also it's got a fitting to screw onto a tripod.

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Oh, so he really was an inventor of sorts, wasn't he? Oh, he was, yes.

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When it comes to value, these aren't making hundreds and hundreds,

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but they are certainly making over ?100. Oh, that's good. Yeah.

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And I would think that would be a sensible estimate. ?100-?150.

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Right, that's good, thank you. Are you happy with that?

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Yes, very happy. Because you've got all the accoutrements with it.

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Yes, there's quite a few spare negative carriers.

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Well, thank you very much, John. OK.

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And we look forward to making a snappy sale for you at the auction.

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I look forward to being there.

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You could have a lot of fun with that.

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Our tour continues 145 miles to the west, in Dorset, at Lulworth Castle,

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where Catherine Southon has spotted a great little character.

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Well, this little piggy hasn't come to market, but he's come

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out in the sticks, to Lulworth Castle to see us here today.

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Thank you for bringing him along, Claire. It's quite all right.

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Tell me a bit about this pincushion. Where did you get him from?

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He's a little piggy that has come to me from my mother,

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who died two years ago. And I always played with it as a child.

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He did have a nice bright blue back, where the pins would be put in,

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but unfortunately, I played with it so much, it got rubbed away.

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My mother obviously realised that I liked it

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and she gave it to my sister to give to me, you know, when...

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when she died. My mother was an auctioneer's clerk, which is

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where she got this little pig from.

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So, she bought this at auction? Yes.

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Oh, I see. Yes, when she was about 18. Right.

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And she would have been 94 this year. Right.

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So, this was always at home. You never used it as a pincushion?

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No. It was just in a cabinet or something? On the shelf, yes.

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I think it's beautifully fashioned,

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it's got such an intricate little tail

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and the haunches at the back and the little ears, I just...

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I think it is such a beautiful little item.

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But I know nothing about it. He's got character, hasn't he?

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Let's be honest.

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We see a lot of these on Flog It!, I'm not going to pretend to you

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they are incredibly rare, because they are not.

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I've seen bigger ones and I've seen smaller ones.

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But he seems nicely proportioned, this one,

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and he's got a nice little character.

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Now, he's silver, it's hallmarked for Birmingham and it's dated with

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the letter M, so it's about 1911-1912, so that's the date.

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And we've got the maker's initials there, as well,

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so it is Adie Lovekin. And it's that sort of date, 1911-1912.

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You say that you played with it quite a bit

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and it was a nice bright blue. It's slightly faded.

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To be honest, it's not going to make a huge difference.

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If it had a replaced pincushion or, indeed, if it was missing,

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then that would be questionable.

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But it's just a little rubbed with time.

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There are people, as well, that collect pigs,

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so this sort of thing would be desirable at auction.

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Any ideas on price? I have absolutely no idea, whatsoever.

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I would say at auction, you'd probably expect around ?60 to ?100

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and I would suggest putting a reserve on of 50.

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How does that sound to you? That's fine by me.

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I think the fact that it came from auction

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and it's going back to auction is absolutely perfect.

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Well, say goodbye.

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Bye, little piggy. Bye, little piggy. He's going off to auction.

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It is true, these pigs are not rare, but they are charming.

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So, fingers crossed, Clare's luck in the saleroom is set to continue.

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We travel 150 miles north now, to Wrest Park in Bedfordshire,

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where Christina Trevanion has found her second childhood.

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Ooh, round it goes, round it goes, round it goes, ooh!

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Come on, you can do it!

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There we go! He's speedy on the straight bits, isn't he?

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Norman, I love this.

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And, Olive, thank you for bringing them in, these wonderful

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collection of toys, I feel like a child in a sweet shop, I really do.

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Where have they come from?

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Well, they're family toys that have been with us,

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we believe, an awful long time. Right.

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Unfortunately, I spent most of my childhood in hospital, from two

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to seven. Oh, really? Five years.

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Yes. Oh, my goodness! So, did you never play with these as a child?

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I don't have a recollection of actually playing with them, no.

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Unfortunately, or fortunately, that may have been their saving grace,

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because so often we see toys these days, especially tin-plate

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toys, which, as you can see, they're quite thin, aren't they?

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They were pressed out. They are so often very, very worn.

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I think also the fact that nearly all of them are still working.

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It shows just how good English toys were made pre-war. Absolutely. Yeah.

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Well, we have... Obviously, the Germans made...

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They were the real, sort of, frontrunners at the turn

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of the century, making really could tin plate toys,

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but the majority of what you've got here is actually British. Yes.

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They really do evoke the era.

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I mean, this is so, sort of, 1950s, 1960s. It's fabulous.

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Really fabulous.

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And have you been playing with them since you found them?

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No, but I have! LAUGHTER

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Well done, Olive!

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I like it. So, which is your favourite, Norman?

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Well, I think the cowboy, actually. This little chap over here? Yes.

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He is quite spectacular. I do love him.

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I can quite see why you're taken with him.

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They are all still in fantastic condition. They really are.

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Olive, which is your favourite? I like my fireman. Our fireman.

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Can we have a demonstration of him?

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Oh, look at him!

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I think he's fantastic. That's wonderful.

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What happens when he gets to the top?

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Oh, we've got more of it here, haven't we? We've got to stop him!

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Stop him! Quick!

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Before he climbs off the end of his ladder!

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It really sort of evokes the innocence of childhood

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and how much fun actually you can get out of the simplest of things.

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And with the simplest of technology, really.

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I mean, they are all key turn.

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There's nothing particularly fancy about them,

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but they're just great fun.

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I really like them and there is definitely a market for them.

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There is an interest in tin-plate toys

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and in toys that obviously are made in Britain.

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What sort of expectations did you have at auction?

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Were you thinking about selling them?

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If they could get a home, somewhere where

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they would not deteriorate, I think it would be good. Yeah.

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I would hope that they would go to a home that is a collector's home,

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rather than to be played with, cos I think

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they are far too precious for that.

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They are wonderfully nostalgic, aren't they?

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I found the box and when I opened it, this was the first one I saw.

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Oh, really? And it... I'd had a rotten day up until then

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and it really brought a smile to my face.

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But you can't help but smile, can you? I mean, they are wonderful.

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They just make you smile. You're absolutely right.

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I think really we would be looking at putting them in as one lot,

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because I think they certainly will all appeal to the same

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collector of tin-plate toys. And I think, at auction,

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we're probably thinking somewhere in the region of ?200 to ?300.

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How would you feel about that?

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Well, I think that's...

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It will at least give an opportunity for somebody that would like to

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do something with them. Quite.

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Would you be happy with a discretionary reserve at 200,

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or would you want a firm reserve? I think a firm reserve.

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Firm reserve.

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So, if they don't sell for 200, then you'll have them back. Yes. Super.

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Shall we have a quick last go before he goes?

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Oh, wow! Crash! LAUGHTER

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Oh, he's derailed.

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Oh, no!

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Those toys are at the top of their game.

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Our tour now continues at Lulworth Castle in Dorset,

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where a colourful item has caught Catherine Southon's eye.

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Stefan, lovely to meet you. Welcome to Flog It!

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Thank you. Very nice to meet you, too.

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A wonderful collection of spoons here.

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Well, two sets of spoons. Now, when you see these,

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and probably when the viewers see these at home,

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they will be thinking, these are incredible.

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And, indeed, they are beautiful. And what lovely colours they are.

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But there is this huge cloud which is hanging over them

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and it begins with the word D. And that's damage. Mm.

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And that is a problem. These are lovely enamelled little

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coffee spoons. I am going to look at one of them individually.

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I am going to look at this set, first of all.

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This was retailed by the Goldsmiths Silversmiths Company

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and these would date from around 1930.

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Let's have a look at this one first of all,

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because this is where the D word starts.

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Can you see that? Mm. A big bit of damage on some lovely blue enamel

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there. It is so sad, because these are so elegant

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and so pretty. And I love the blue colours

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and the red and the white. Very British.

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Mm. Very patriotic. Absolutely.

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I am just going to have a quick look at these, cos it will be nice

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to date them. And they are 1936.

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And they are made by the Adie Brothers for the retailers,

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Goldsmiths Silversmiths Company. These have come down through

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the family, have they? They must have been a wedding present...

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Right. OK. ..for my mother. I think she got married in about 1938.

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1938. Right. So, that works.

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Where she particularly patriotic? Oh, yes. Was she? Ah, well,

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they have chosen the colours well, haven't they?! Very definitely.

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It is just such a shame. The more I look at them,

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the more damage I see. In perfect condition, we would be looking at

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about ?100 for these. But they are not quite going to be up to that.

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But I will come back to that a bit later. Right.

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These little spoons here, these are Danish,

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by the well-known Danish factory, Tostrup. What beautiful colour.

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I think those are lovely.

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Really exquisite, aren't they?

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Again, these are all enamel and they are on gilt silver.

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In perfect condition, again, you would be looking at ?100-?150

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for these, but I can see there is a tiny bit of damage on each

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and every one. Rough washing-up.

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Is that what it is? Did you wash them up? No. Do I tell you off?

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I've never used them. I have never seen them being used.

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So, it all comes down to price. ?100, in perfect condition.

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?100-?150, in perfect condition.

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This goes right down, I'm afraid, and you would be really looking

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for the two at around ?50-?80.

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Ooh!

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Maybe 60-80.

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Mm, because of the damage. Shall we say 60-80?

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It sounds a bit better, doesn't it? Yes. Shall we put a ?60 reserve

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on them? Please.

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OK, let's say ?60-?80, with a 60 reserve. Happy with that? Yes.

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Let's close them and forget about the damage.

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And we are going to make good money at auction.

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Thank you so much, Stefan. It is lovely to meet you. And you, too.

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Before we head off to auction, there is something I'd like to show you.

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In the year 1204, stone and other building materials were brought up

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this river to build an abbey church on land gifted

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to the Cistercian monks by the king. Now, this king was King John,

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who had not led the holiest of lives. Maybe he was worried about

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eternal damnation. But he visited this abbey frequently

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and he named it Bellus Locus Regis,

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which translates to, "the beautiful place of the King".

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Better known to us today as the estate of Royal Beaulieu.

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A deal had been made,

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that in order to repay his generosity, the Cistercian monks,

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known above all other religious orders for their poverty,

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chastity and obedience to God, would pray for the somewhat

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tarnished soul of King John.

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Although prayer was the core activity here,

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plenty of other duties were performed,

0:17:300:17:32

but all of them were seen by the monks as an extension of prayer.

0:17:320:17:36

They generated an enormous amount of income by working the land,

0:17:380:17:41

rearing sheep and selling wool.

0:17:410:17:43

It took 100 years to complete the complex around the Abbey Church

0:17:460:17:49

and it seems quite ironic today that 300 years after work began

0:17:490:17:54

this river was used to transport those very rocks back again

0:17:540:17:59

to be used on other building projects around the country

0:17:590:18:02

by the orders of another king.

0:18:020:18:04

So why did this happen, and he was the other King?

0:18:040:18:08

Well, this was a king who was desperate to have a male heir.

0:18:080:18:12

A king who, despite being married for 20 years, had not produced one.

0:18:120:18:17

This was an extravagant king whose coffers were being bled dry

0:18:170:18:21

because he was paying for costly coastal defences

0:18:210:18:24

and fighting expensive wars with the French and the Spanish.

0:18:240:18:28

This was King Henry VIII.

0:18:290:18:31

A king who was to change the course of English history, firstly,

0:18:310:18:35

by breaking with the Pope in Rome

0:18:350:18:37

and then making himself the supreme head of the Church of England.

0:18:370:18:41

This enabled Henry to have his long-standing marriage

0:18:450:18:48

to Catherine of Aragon declared null and void,

0:18:480:18:51

and marry a young Anne Boleyn,

0:18:510:18:53

the second of his six wives.

0:18:530:18:55

Shortly after this, he proceeded with the dissolution

0:18:550:18:58

of the monasteries, which changed the face of England for ever.

0:18:580:19:01

In 1536, there were over 800 monasteries, nunneries and friaries.

0:19:010:19:06

Combined, they owned a third of the land in the country.

0:19:060:19:10

In 1540, four years later, there were none.

0:19:100:19:14

Henry VIII and the people around him were considerably wealthier.

0:19:140:19:18

During those four years, Henry used Thomas Cromwell, a clever

0:19:200:19:24

legal adviser, to act as his agent, and the opportunist plan took shape.

0:19:240:19:30

The religious houses were becoming increasingly ungodly,

0:19:300:19:33

which made them unpopular with ordinary people.

0:19:330:19:37

So Thomas took advantage of this and,

0:19:370:19:39

with a piecemeal approach began by shutting down the smaller

0:19:390:19:43

establishments who had the worst reputations.

0:19:430:19:47

He then moved on to the richer, more powerful ones like Beaulieu Abbey.

0:19:470:19:50

Where he could, Cromwell negotiated payoffs but,

0:19:510:19:55

if his offers were declined, he resorted to force.

0:19:550:19:58

The abbot here formally surrendered the Abbey to the Crown in 1538,

0:20:010:20:05

and for that, he received an annual pension of ?66.

0:20:050:20:09

In contrast to the brothers, who received between ?4 and ?6.

0:20:090:20:13

This is all that is left of the Abbey Church,

0:20:160:20:19

the spiritual centre of the precinct here at Beaulieu.

0:20:190:20:23

It really is just a ghost of a former building,

0:20:230:20:26

the first to be knocked down upon Henry's orders in 1539.

0:20:260:20:31

What are we left with?

0:20:310:20:32

Well, hardly a stone upon a stone.

0:20:320:20:35

It really is just a field with the imprint of its former huge building.

0:20:350:20:41

The stone went down the river by order

0:20:420:20:44

of the King and was used to build defensive

0:20:440:20:46

castles on the Solent at Hurst, Calshot and Cowes.

0:20:460:20:51

But what did Henry VIII do with the ruined abbey and estate,

0:20:510:20:54

which was one of the richest pickings of the dissolution?

0:20:540:20:57

He refilled his empty coffers by selling it to a powerful friend,

0:20:590:21:02

Sir Thomas Wriothesley,

0:21:020:21:04

whose descendants still live here today.

0:21:040:21:06

And I'm going to meet one of them, Ralph Montagu.

0:21:080:21:11

So what happened to Beaulieu after the dissolution of the monasteries?

0:21:120:21:15

Well, a lot of the Abbey was destroyed

0:21:150:21:18

but some significant bits were left, and this is one such part.

0:21:180:21:21

It was the great gatehouse to the Abbey, where the

0:21:210:21:24

monks receive their guests

0:21:240:21:25

and it made quite a good hunting lodge for the lay owners

0:21:250:21:29

after the dissolution and then, much later,

0:21:290:21:32

my great-grandfather extended it and made it into the family

0:21:320:21:36

home that it is today, and made this room,

0:21:360:21:39

which was a big, open hall originally,

0:21:390:21:41

into this magnificent drawing room.

0:21:410:21:43

It is a stunning run and it's got a good feel about it.

0:21:430:21:46

Tell me a little bit about the stained-glass windows, the armorials.

0:21:460:21:49

Well, this is Victorian.

0:21:490:21:51

This is part of the conversion that was done at that time.

0:21:510:21:53

And these are the shields of benefactors

0:21:530:21:57

and other significant figures connected with the Abbey,

0:21:570:22:00

most notably, perhaps, Thomas Stevens,

0:22:000:22:02

the last abbot of Beaulieu who was required, shall we say,

0:22:020:22:06

to surrender the Abbey to the Crown.

0:22:060:22:09

And he's remembered there.

0:22:090:22:11

He was one of the more cooperative ones, because some

0:22:110:22:13

of the abbot in the North were literally hung, drawn and quartered.

0:22:130:22:16

Not a very nice ending.

0:22:160:22:18

It's perhaps hard for us to imagine what life would have

0:22:210:22:24

been like back in England in the 16th century

0:22:240:22:27

and what impact this huge establishment would have

0:22:270:22:29

had in the medieval world.

0:22:290:22:32

This was a place where the poor could seek alms,

0:22:320:22:35

where the sick could be treated and where fugitives,

0:22:350:22:37

both high and low in status, could seek sanctuary.

0:22:370:22:41

The sound of bells that would ring out during the day

0:22:410:22:43

and night calling the monks to prayer would have been

0:22:430:22:46

a familiar soundtrack to life for the people in the villages and the fields beyond these walls.

0:22:460:22:51

We've got our first four items. Now, we're taking them off to the sale.

0:22:590:23:04

Here's a quick recap of what we're taking with us.

0:23:040:23:07

These two sets of spoons with their coloured enamels are highly decorative.

0:23:070:23:11

It will all depend on the bidders overlooking damage.

0:23:110:23:14

John's camera comes with all the kit,

0:23:190:23:21

so it should get full exposure in the saleroom.

0:23:210:23:24

This little silver piggy was bought at auction

0:23:290:23:31

but will history repeat itself?

0:23:310:23:33

And this toy collection is in mint condition,

0:23:370:23:39

so what more could the bidders ask for?

0:23:390:23:42

Charterhouse Auctioneers in Dorset is where our first sale is

0:23:490:23:53

being held.

0:23:530:23:54

Auctioneer Richard Bromell is on the rostrum,

0:23:540:23:57

selling the attractive silver spoons.

0:23:570:23:59

Well, I've just been joined by Stefan and our expert Catherine.

0:23:590:24:02

They do say, you know,

0:24:020:24:03

some people are born with a silver spoon in their mouth.

0:24:030:24:06

Was Stefan born with six?!

0:24:060:24:08

You have lots of boxes of spoons.

0:24:090:24:10

What are you doing with all these spoons?

0:24:100:24:12

They've just been sitting in the draw for years.

0:24:120:24:14

These coffee sets, is it something you want to collect

0:24:140:24:16

or family inheritance?

0:24:160:24:18

Family inheritance. And you never use them. No.

0:24:180:24:20

The enamel ones are quite nice, obviously in red, white and blue.

0:24:200:24:23

They're not perfect. They're not, no.

0:24:230:24:25

Totally understand if they don't sell.

0:24:250:24:27

Might struggle on these, purely because of the damage.

0:24:270:24:30

To the enamel.

0:24:300:24:32

So, the six silver gilt enamelled teaspoons. Another set, as well.

0:24:320:24:35

A little bit of damage, but very pretty,

0:24:350:24:37

the set and I'm straight in at ?50, I have a bid now at 50.

0:24:370:24:39

60, ?60 on the right. That's good. You sold them.

0:24:390:24:41

?60, I have.

0:24:410:24:43

Two sets of teaspoons, at 60. 70 on the internet.

0:24:430:24:45

At ?70, the internet bid. Selling online at 70. That's good. Good.

0:24:450:24:50

Thank you so much.

0:24:500:24:52

Done it. Job done.

0:24:520:24:53

See? We proved you wrong.

0:24:530:24:54

Mind you, it's not a lot of money for two boxes.

0:24:540:24:57

Let's face it, 35 quid a box.

0:24:570:24:59

That's quite a bargain, I think.

0:24:590:25:01

I know, if you look at it like that, they have.

0:25:010:25:03

They've gone, they've gone. This is what this show's all about.

0:25:030:25:05

It's called "Flog it!" We want to sell your things, so bring

0:25:050:25:08

it in and we'll do the business.

0:25:080:25:10

Well done, Catherine.

0:25:100:25:11

Everyone is pleased with that.

0:25:110:25:13

Tim Duggan is wielding the gavel for us at Ewbank's Auctions in Surrey,

0:25:150:25:20

near the town of Guildford.

0:25:200:25:21

Five pounds.

0:25:210:25:23

John, good luck. Your camera is just about to go under the hammer.

0:25:230:25:25

I should say this was your... Was it your uncle's? Great uncle.

0:25:250:25:28

Great uncle. Why are you selling it now?

0:25:280:25:30

Well, when I originally inherited it in 1984, I had ideas of,

0:25:300:25:34

"Oh, I'll get this working", and that sort of thing

0:25:340:25:37

and it's remained in a box ever since.

0:25:370:25:39

I have those ideas with things! They stockpile.

0:25:390:25:42

Never going to get round to it. We're going to put this to the test, this camera.

0:25:420:25:46

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:25:460:25:48

The mahogany and glass-plated camera there by Bausch Lomb there.

0:25:480:25:51

And we go straight in at ?60 online. 65, now 70, have we got now?

0:25:510:25:55

I want 75 now, please.

0:25:550:25:56

Online. 80, we've got now. 85, now, please.

0:25:560:25:59

Looking for ?80 now. We're looking for 85 now.

0:25:590:26:01

All online, collectors buying online. 95 now.

0:26:010:26:05

Looking for 95 now.

0:26:050:26:06

95 bid now. Looking for 100. 100 in the room now.

0:26:060:26:08

These cameras look lovely on the tripod base, don't they?

0:26:080:26:11

They look fabulous. And it's the bases that haven't survived.

0:26:110:26:14

Look at this. It's brilliant.

0:26:140:26:16

It's your bid online now. 110. Selling then, online, at 110.

0:26:160:26:21

110, the hammer's gone down. Good for you. That's good.

0:26:210:26:24

Happy with that result? Yes, thank you. Well done.

0:26:240:26:28

Yes, I hope it will give someone an interesting attempt to use it.

0:26:280:26:32

Someone should have a go. If they've got all the kit and they just need the chemicals,

0:26:320:26:35

it's worth trying to have a go, isn't it?

0:26:350:26:38

And so much more satisfying than clicking a button

0:26:380:26:41

and seeing them on screen.

0:26:410:26:43

We're now heading just north of London to Tring Market Auctions,

0:26:470:26:51

where auctioneer Stephen Hearn is selling the toys for us.

0:26:510:26:54

I shall sell. Make no mistake, they're going for ?180.

0:26:540:26:58

Thank you.

0:26:580:26:59

Fingers crossed, Norman. Good luck. Is this your first auction?

0:26:590:27:03

First auction. The first auction you've ever been to.

0:27:030:27:06

Fingers crossed. That's all I can say. Condition, very, very good.

0:27:060:27:09

I know there's a bit of damage to one of the wheels,

0:27:090:27:12

wasn't there, in transit?

0:27:120:27:14

Had a chat to Stephen earlier and he said there's enough in the lot,

0:27:140:27:17

hopefully, to carry it through without devaluing it.

0:27:170:27:20

Condition is key with these collectors. They are a fussy lot.

0:27:200:27:24

You know who you are.

0:27:240:27:25

But you've got to be right here, right now to buy them!

0:27:250:27:28

Very interesting collection of '50s and '60s tin plate toys.

0:27:280:27:32

Where shall we start? 150 for them? 100 for them? Yes? 100, we have.

0:27:320:27:37

10 for you, sir? Are you 20, sir? Yes?

0:27:370:27:39

130. 140. And 50.

0:27:390:27:42

160. Two of you want them. 70. 80.

0:27:420:27:45

80, I have. At ?180. And 90, is it?

0:27:450:27:50

I'm going to sell at 180, then. They're going down. I shall sell.

0:27:500:27:54

Make no mistake, they're going for ?180.

0:27:540:27:57

Well, the hammer's gone down and they've sold at ?180.

0:27:570:28:01

I know we had a fixed reserve at ?200, but I think Stephen's used

0:28:010:28:04

his discretion there and the auction room will make up the balance.

0:28:040:28:08

Often, you use that 10% discretion. It was one bid away.

0:28:080:28:11

Why lose the sale for one bid? Are you happy with that? Yes.

0:28:110:28:14

Good. Sold. Job done!

0:28:140:28:16

And they're off to a new home.

0:28:170:28:20

Now back to Dorset and to beautiful Sherborne, where my favourite item

0:28:200:28:24

is being sold by auctioneer Richard Bromell, Charterhouse Auctioneers.

0:28:240:28:29

Going under the hammer right now, we have a silver pincushion in the form of a little pig.

0:28:300:28:35

It belongs to Clare. I go gooey when little pigs come on the show.

0:28:350:28:38

Every time we sell a pincushion, it's a

0:28:380:28:40

pig or it's some kind of pig, I love pigs.

0:28:400:28:43

Why are you selling it? Just for the "Flog It!" experience actually.

0:28:430:28:47

The "Flog It!" experience!

0:28:470:28:49

Why not? Oh, good girl! Brilliant! OK.

0:28:490:28:52

We should get top end cos everyone loves pigs. People do.

0:28:520:28:54

Let's put it to the test. Ready? This is it.

0:28:540:28:57

The Edwardian novelty pincushion and this little piggy's going off

0:28:570:29:00

to market now. ?50 is bid. At 50. 60. 70.

0:29:000:29:03

At ?70 and away now. We're away.

0:29:030:29:05

At ?70, it goes, selling... 80, new bidder.

0:29:050:29:07

Third row and seated on the aisle. At ?80 and away now.

0:29:070:29:10

It's selling in the room at ?80. Good. The internet all quiet.

0:29:100:29:12

It's in the room and I sell at 80. At 80.

0:29:120:29:15

Well, that trotted up quickly, didn't it? Fantastic. ?80.

0:29:150:29:17

Nice and quick.

0:29:170:29:19

Well outweighed its scrap value and that's what it's all about,

0:29:190:29:22

isn't it? Yeah, very nice.

0:29:220:29:24

Cos the cushion was a little bit worn, wasn't it? It was, yes.

0:29:240:29:27

Nice looking thing though. Good face on it. Thank you for bringing it in.

0:29:270:29:30

Back at Beaulieu, I'm admiring one of the largest

0:29:400:29:44

collections of vintage and veteran cars in the country.

0:29:440:29:47

Memories and the passion for motoring are on show

0:29:470:29:50

here at the National Motor Museum,

0:29:500:29:52

which has over 250 spectacular historic vehicles on display.

0:29:520:29:57

When it comes to motoring,

0:29:580:30:00

Britain gave the world the iconic design of the Mini, the style

0:30:000:30:05

of the Jaguar and the everlasting elegance of the Rolls-Royce.

0:30:050:30:09

The museum was set up over 60 years ago by the current

0:30:090:30:13

Lord Montague in honour of his late father, John Montague,

0:30:130:30:17

who was an early British motoring enthusiast.

0:30:170:30:20

He became a leading advocate for motoring in this country,

0:30:200:30:23

even introducing the royal family to the car by taking

0:30:230:30:27

the Prince Of Wales out for a spin.

0:30:270:30:29

He enthusiastically took part in rallies

0:30:290:30:32

and owned a little gem like this.

0:30:320:30:35

The 1903 De Dion Bouton was made in France and was one of the most

0:30:350:30:39

popular cars on British roads in the early 20th century.

0:30:390:30:43

In fact, over half of all the cars in Britain were being

0:30:440:30:47

manufactured by De Dion Bouton.

0:30:470:30:49

The French and the Germans were the early pioneers, setting the standard

0:30:530:30:57

for motor manufacturing, with names like the Benz Velo and Renault.

0:30:570:31:02

In contrast, the British were producing cars like this -

0:31:030:31:06

John Henry Knight's 1895 creation, the Knight.

0:31:060:31:10

Now, I know what you're thinking.

0:31:100:31:12

It looks like something you will find in a farmyard!

0:31:120:31:15

You're probably right!

0:31:150:31:17

But in 1895, this was the first British petrol engine to be

0:31:170:31:22

driven on a public road.

0:31:220:31:24

It had a single cylinder engine

0:31:240:31:26

and it was capable of doing a whopping 8mph!

0:31:260:31:30

Driving laws were not easy on early motorists.

0:31:300:31:33

Parliament passed a law that insisted a red flag had to be

0:31:330:31:37

waved to warn the public of an approaching vehicle.

0:31:370:31:41

British roads at the time were not yet ready for the new

0:31:410:31:45

motorised vehicle.

0:31:450:31:46

Early motorists had to prepare themselves for long,

0:31:460:31:49

hard journeys and the cars were not equipped for the British weather.

0:31:490:31:53

Conditions, however, for the motorist were about to improve.

0:31:540:31:57

The turn of the century, the Edwardian period,

0:31:570:32:00

brought style and elegance to the motoring classes in Britain.

0:32:000:32:03

And luxury design in cars,

0:32:030:32:05

such as this Rolls-Royce Alpine Eagle, had a long production run.

0:32:050:32:09

Proving exquisite style was a winning formula.

0:32:090:32:12

Well, let's take it for a spin.

0:32:120:32:14

In 1913, during the Austrian Alpine Trials,

0:32:170:32:21

it outperformed all other cars in the competition.

0:32:210:32:24

It was said at the time that it flew through the Alps like an eagle,

0:32:240:32:28

so becoming known as the Alpine Eagle.

0:32:280:32:31

As the 20th century raced on, the appetite for speed grew,

0:32:350:32:39

and cars became more and more powerful.

0:32:390:32:41

And so, the supercar was born.

0:32:410:32:44

This is the Bentley supercharged Blower.

0:32:490:32:52

It was built in 1930 and it was the supercar in its day.

0:32:520:32:56

And, incredibly, this could achieve speeds of 120mph.

0:32:560:33:00

Cars like this had their engines adapted. Air compressors were

0:33:000:33:04

fitted to the engine, blowing more air into the engine,

0:33:040:33:07

making the engine burn more fuel, making it work harder,

0:33:070:33:11

making the car go faster.

0:33:110:33:13

And everybody was obsessed with speed.

0:33:140:33:17

The British wanted the title of being the fastest in the world.

0:33:170:33:21

One of these men was Sir Malcolm Campbell,

0:33:250:33:27

who led the charge in the 1920s by attempting to break

0:33:270:33:31

the land speed record in order to showcase British engineering.

0:33:310:33:37

I've come back to the museum to meet Don Wales, the grandson

0:33:370:33:39

of Sir Malcolm Campbell, to hear more about the land speed record.

0:33:390:33:43

Why was your grandfather obsessed

0:33:460:33:48

with being the fastest person on the planet?

0:33:480:33:50

It was a number of reasons.

0:33:500:33:52

He was obsessed by speed. He was a very, very driven man.

0:33:520:33:56

And he knew that if he could show that Britain was making fast cars

0:33:560:33:59

it would help their exports.

0:33:590:34:01

But for him, he was quite selfish, I think.

0:34:010:34:03

Being obsessed by this ecstasy of fear, wanting to go fast,

0:34:030:34:06

wanting to be the best.

0:34:060:34:08

He wouldn't let up off a record attempt

0:34:080:34:10

until he'd got to the other end, and lifted his foot off the accelerator.

0:34:100:34:14

How many records did he break?

0:34:140:34:15

My grandfather broke nine land speed records.

0:34:150:34:18

He was the first to do 150mph in the Sunbeam,

0:34:180:34:21

and the first to achieve 300mph on land.

0:34:210:34:24

So he was the Lewis Hamilton of the day?

0:34:240:34:27

Young kids would look up to him as the figurehead of motoring?

0:34:270:34:29

In my grandfather's day, he was the king of all motorsport.

0:34:290:34:34

Two million people watched him at Daytona,

0:34:340:34:36

which is still the highest recorded figure for any spectator sport.

0:34:360:34:40

The king of speed. Absolutely, yes.

0:34:400:34:42

The Campbells carried on breaking records.

0:34:420:34:45

In 1964, Don's uncle, Donald Campbell,

0:34:450:34:47

became the first man to break both the land and water

0:34:470:34:51

speed record in the same year.

0:34:510:34:53

A feat that has never been repeated.

0:34:530:34:57

Donald Campbell's record-breaking achievements continue to

0:34:570:35:00

showcase British engineering as being amongst the best in the world.

0:35:000:35:04

Most important of all,

0:35:080:35:09

it still proves British leadership in engineering terms.

0:35:090:35:13

And it does, I think, also show that the British, when they make their

0:35:130:35:16

minds up, can jolly well overcome all obstacles and achieve anything.

0:35:160:35:20

As a young boy,

0:35:200:35:21

this iconic car must have left a huge impression on you.

0:35:210:35:26

I had no idea what my uncle was doing...

0:35:260:35:29

You couldn't understand it. Didn't understand it at all!

0:35:290:35:31

But on one occasion, the car was at his garage in Leatherhead,

0:35:310:35:34

and he pulled me out, dragging me by the hand, to come look at his car.

0:35:340:35:39

And these massive wheels in front of me, not knowing what it was.

0:35:390:35:42

And he picked me up and dropped me into the cockpit,

0:35:420:35:45

and that's been a lasting memory ever since.

0:35:450:35:47

Although the British motoring industry may not be as strong

0:35:470:35:51

as it was, the cars that I've seen today at the museum really

0:35:510:35:55

showcase British engineering, style and design.

0:35:550:35:59

It's a real celebration of our place in motoring history.

0:35:590:36:02

We are picking some of the highlights from all

0:36:120:36:14

the valuation days we've held across the country recently.

0:36:140:36:17

And Anita has come across an interesting object

0:36:170:36:20

at Wrest Park in Bedfordshire.

0:36:200:36:22

David, I like a man with a couple of bob in the bank,

0:36:230:36:26

and I see there's a couple of bob in this little bank.

0:36:260:36:29

In that little bank, yes. Tell me, where did you get it?

0:36:290:36:32

It was left to me by my second cousin,

0:36:320:36:35

and it's been at home in the bedroom ever since.

0:36:350:36:39

How long have you had it?

0:36:390:36:40

About 30 years.

0:36:400:36:41

Were you ever tempted to save money in it? No!

0:36:410:36:45

I'd like to have had some money to save.

0:36:450:36:48

I can see a few two pences there... Oh, yeah.

0:36:480:36:52

It's a little American bank.

0:36:520:36:55

And it comes from the 1900s.

0:36:550:36:59

So it's a good age.

0:36:590:37:02

Did you have family at one point that had gone to America?

0:37:020:37:07

No, as far as I know, no family connection with America whatsoever.

0:37:070:37:12

This little bank was made

0:37:120:37:14

by a company called Stevens in Connecticut.

0:37:140:37:18

Yeah.

0:37:180:37:20

It was a time where the Wild West was still wild,

0:37:200:37:23

but people were... Towns were growing,

0:37:230:37:26

and people were building towns,

0:37:260:37:29

shops were happening.

0:37:290:37:31

Banks were happening, and so on.

0:37:310:37:33

This would have been a child's bank.

0:37:330:37:35

This was to teach the child the benefit

0:37:350:37:38

of putting a little something away.

0:37:380:37:40

If we pull this little handle here...

0:37:400:37:44

..the little lid comes up,

0:37:460:37:48

and we've got a little guy here who is the cashier.

0:37:480:37:53

Now, I have a two pence here,

0:37:530:37:55

and you would put your two pence on it...

0:37:550:37:59

Or your cent, as it would have been in those days.

0:37:590:38:03

And it goes down, and you've saved yourself two pence or a cent.

0:38:030:38:08

It's made out of cast-iron, and one of the things I like

0:38:080:38:12

so much about this little bank is that the colours are original.

0:38:120:38:17

So, have you any reservations about selling it?

0:38:170:38:21

No, no. I'm downsizing.

0:38:210:38:24

I lost my wife, and... Yes.

0:38:240:38:26

And a thing to do is, I suppose, all the things that you don't

0:38:260:38:30

immediately need, or use, or love can go. That's right.

0:38:300:38:34

And the thing is, these little things are very, very collectable.

0:38:340:38:38

And if it goes for sale in auction,

0:38:380:38:41

it will be bought by somebody who will enjoy it. Good.

0:38:410:38:46

Value?

0:38:460:38:47

Well, there's at least 20p in there.

0:38:470:38:50

I would like to put it in with an estimate of, say, 60-100. Yes.

0:38:520:38:58

Would you be happy to put it forward at that price?

0:38:580:39:00

Yes, yes, I think so.

0:39:000:39:02

Shall we put a reserve on it? Yes. We'll put a reserve of ?60.

0:39:020:39:05

That sounds fine. OK.

0:39:050:39:08

I'm sure it will go at least mid-estimate,

0:39:080:39:11

and it may give us a wee surprise.

0:39:110:39:13

I hope so. Thank you for bringing it along. Thank you.

0:39:130:39:16

Who knows? It might make a mint!

0:39:180:39:20

The next stop is Chiddingstone Castle in Kent

0:39:220:39:26

where Adam Partridge is trying to get to know one of the locals.

0:39:260:39:29

Hi, Diana. I'm very pleased to meet you.

0:39:310:39:34

And you are? I'm Adam.

0:39:340:39:36

Pleased to meet you. I'm glad to be shaking your hand,

0:39:360:39:38

because that looks like quite a fearsome weapon in your hands.

0:39:380:39:41

In my darker days, maybe it was, but not now!

0:39:410:39:44

How did you come to own this thing?

0:39:440:39:46

What happened was

0:39:460:39:47

my husband used to work for a lady many years ago. Yeah.

0:39:470:39:50

And when she passed on, they cleared the house

0:39:500:39:52

and they said to my husband, if there's anything you want to take

0:39:520:39:55

that's left before it goes off to the skip, you can take what you want.

0:39:550:39:59

OK. Did he take a lot? He took a good few things.

0:39:590:40:02

We've sold a few things over the years, yes,

0:40:020:40:04

but we've kept this back. It's just been behind the cupboard, really.

0:40:040:40:08

Can I have a look at it? Yes, certainly.

0:40:080:40:10

It just looks a normal cane. Bit of a tall cane, bit tatty, bit flaky.

0:40:100:40:14

But it really is quite an interesting boys' toy.

0:40:140:40:18

It's a concealed weapon, known as an air cane, or a poacher's gun.

0:40:180:40:22

Firstly, let's go to this end, and this unscrews.

0:40:220:40:26

Here we go.

0:40:260:40:28

And there we have your ramrod.

0:40:280:40:29

And that is for pushing your lead shot in.

0:40:290:40:32

You pop your lead shot in there,

0:40:320:40:34

and then you push it down to make sure it gets to the bottom.

0:40:340:40:36

Like they used to do in the Musketeers. Exactly! Exactly right.

0:40:360:40:40

So, we're in the woods, waiting for a pheasant. OK.

0:40:400:40:43

Hoping not to get caught poaching. Sounds exciting. It does.

0:40:430:40:46

So we unscrew this bit...

0:40:460:40:49

OK. Now, we're missing a pump, because what we would've done now,

0:40:490:40:52

is we'd have pumped this into here, this valve.

0:40:520:40:55

We'd have pumped it full of air.

0:40:550:40:57

And this is a canister in here that would've held the air,

0:40:570:40:59

compressed air, to get that power. OK? Right.

0:40:590:41:02

And then you put that back on, full of air. Screw it back up.

0:41:020:41:06

Screw it back up. Can you manage, or do you want a hand?

0:41:060:41:08

I think I can manage to screw it up... Oh, no... Yes, I can.

0:41:080:41:11

All right. All this, still under the cover of darkness in the forest.

0:41:110:41:15

Right. So we put our ball in there, we push it down with the ramrod.

0:41:150:41:20

We're already loaded with air. Now we're going to fire. Not quite.

0:41:200:41:23

You're very impetuous, Diana - we're not going to fire just yet.

0:41:230:41:26

I really wanted the excitement.

0:41:260:41:27

You can't wait to see those feathers going everywhere, can you?

0:41:270:41:30

Of course not. The other thing we'd have had

0:41:300:41:32

is a little key. So you put the little key in there, turn that,

0:41:320:41:36

and then this little button pops up there. That's the trigger.

0:41:360:41:39

We're ready to fire.

0:41:390:41:40

See the sights there and there? That's right.

0:41:400:41:44

So, there we go, where's that Paul Martin gone?

0:41:440:41:46

And...press the button, bang!

0:41:490:41:50

Now, now - he's over there.

0:41:500:41:52

Any disturbance, and you'd be walking back through the forest...

0:41:520:41:55

So innocently. So innocently. Exactly.

0:41:550:41:57

It's ingenious, isn't it? Yeah, it is.

0:41:570:41:59

It's got this top which looks like it's made from bone.

0:41:590:42:02

And it would've been made at the end of the 19th century, 1880?

0:42:020:42:05

Gosh, as old as that? Yeah.

0:42:050:42:07

What do you think it's going to sell for then?

0:42:070:42:09

I've no idea, that's why I've come to you. Want to have a guess?

0:42:090:42:12

Estimate of 150-250. OK.

0:42:120:42:14

Either side of the 200, and maybe a reserve of 150?

0:42:140:42:17

And I'll be back at the auction, and if it doesn't sell...

0:42:170:42:19

Well, we won't be there. What?! We're on holiday in Cornwall, I'm sorry.

0:42:190:42:22

Well, I'll represent you. Will you? That'll be lovely.

0:42:220:42:25

Have you got a mobile number? I have.

0:42:250:42:27

Leave us your mobile number,

0:42:270:42:28

and I'll call you from the auction, let you know how it got on.

0:42:280:42:31

OK. Right, thanks very much. Lovely to have met you. Lovely to meet you.

0:42:310:42:34

And thank you for explaining all of that. Pleasure.

0:42:340:42:36

MUSIC: Run Rabbit Run by Flanagan and Allen.

0:42:360:42:38

I wish Adam would put that gun down!

0:42:380:42:41

Now, we travel north of London to Wrest Park in Bedfordshire

0:42:410:42:45

where Anita Manning has found a cat. But I don't think it's a local.

0:42:450:42:50

Sue, welcome to "Flog It!" Thank you.

0:42:500:42:54

Now, it's absolutely wonderful to have you here

0:42:540:42:56

and you've brought along two interesting items.

0:42:560:42:59

Do you have any question that you would like to ask me?

0:42:590:43:03

It was because of a show that you were involved in, "Flog It! Trade Secrets",

0:43:030:43:07

you were talking about amber

0:43:070:43:08

and it was from that programme that made me wonder if this was amber.

0:43:080:43:12

So I thought that I would come along today to see. I was curious.

0:43:120:43:16

This is a wonderful decorative object.

0:43:160:43:19

Tell me, when did you buy it and why?

0:43:190:43:21

I bought it about 25, 30 years ago when I was over in Egypt, in Luxor.

0:43:210:43:26

And they were selling gifts to tourists.

0:43:260:43:29

And I saw this cat sitting in the corner on the floor

0:43:290:43:31

and I thought, there's something rather beautiful about this cat,

0:43:310:43:35

and I did have eight cats of my own at the time and I quite like cats.

0:43:350:43:39

So this was your ninth cat?

0:43:390:43:41

It was, indeed, yes. Right. So the question is, is this real amber?

0:43:410:43:47

Now, you bought it 30 years ago and you bought it in a tourist area.

0:43:470:43:52

Yes. So the likelihood of it being amber are very, very low.

0:43:520:43:56

And true amber comes from the resin of old pine trees

0:43:560:44:00

over 350 million years old, so it's very, very rare.

0:44:000:44:07

But we do have different types or lookalikes of amber.

0:44:070:44:11

OK, let's look at it. We have these bangles.

0:44:110:44:14

Now, in amber there were different shades of light which would

0:44:140:44:19

come through the amber. So, that's copying that.

0:44:190:44:25

Also, in amber, there is often the inclusion of

0:44:250:44:29

pieces of insects which have been trapped in the resin of the tree

0:44:290:44:35

and, to have an insect or a piece of an insect in a piece of amber makes it more valuable.

0:44:350:44:44

Now, when you look underneath here, we can see a beastie, there.

0:44:440:44:49

It's a fly. And we see the whole fly.

0:44:490:44:53

Now, if a creature had been caught in this sticky resin,

0:44:530:44:58

it wouldn't just lie there and say, "OK, I'm going to die",

0:44:580:45:02

it would struggle, so when we see a full insect,

0:45:020:45:06

we start to think, no, there's something wrong, there.

0:45:060:45:09

So, these little indications are telling me that it's not amber.

0:45:090:45:14

This cat here is made of a celluloid a plastic. OK.

0:45:140:45:19

So not real amber.

0:45:190:45:22

Now, interestingly enough,

0:45:220:45:25

you brought along another item which is allied in some way to the cat.

0:45:250:45:32

But this isn't earlier item, probably from the Art Deco period.

0:45:320:45:38

Can you tell me where this came from?

0:45:380:45:41

It belonged to my uncle. He was in the Army, positioned in Hong Kong.

0:45:410:45:46

And my aunt was also staying with him.

0:45:460:45:49

And then, just before the fall of Hong Kong on 25 December, 1941,

0:45:490:45:54

my aunt was put onto the last boat being evacuated to Australia,

0:45:540:45:59

and my uncle gave this to my aunt for safekeepings.

0:45:590:46:04

Now, if we look at this, a Mahjong set, an oriental game,

0:46:040:46:07

and if we look at these little counters, this side here is

0:46:070:46:12

decorated with the little symbols which are used in the game.

0:46:120:46:16

But this yellow here is meant to look like amber,

0:46:160:46:21

but it is a celluloid or a plastic copy of that

0:46:210:46:26

and, on the other side we have a celluloid copy of jade.

0:46:260:46:31

So, in some way, the two items are allied.

0:46:310:46:35

They are made to look like something which is a very precious

0:46:350:46:38

substance but, in actual fact is a copy.

0:46:380:46:42

But still interesting. If you were going to auction,

0:46:420:46:46

I would like to put these two items together.

0:46:460:46:49

Put together in one lot, we would put an estimate of perhaps 70-100.

0:46:490:46:54

Would you be happy with that estimate?

0:46:540:46:56

Yes. I'm happy.

0:46:560:46:58

We'll put a fixed reserve on it because I know that,

0:46:580:47:00

if that goes back home with you, you won't be too upset.

0:47:000:47:03

I'd be just as happy, yes.

0:47:030:47:06

Thank you very much.

0:47:060:47:07

Both those items have travelled from far-flung places.

0:47:070:47:10

And now it's time for us to travel to

0:47:100:47:12

the Dorset coast, and to Lulworth Castle,

0:47:120:47:15

where Mark Stacey is at the table.

0:47:150:47:19

Hello, Jacquie, hello, Val. BOTH: Hello, Mark.

0:47:190:47:22

In unison, you must be sisters.

0:47:220:47:25

You are, of course, sisters, aren't you? We are.

0:47:250:47:27

You've brought a lovely little box.

0:47:270:47:30

But before we find out the intriguing contents,

0:47:300:47:33

what's the family history?

0:47:330:47:35

Well, we don't really know anything about it at all.

0:47:350:47:37

They just appeared when my mother died.

0:47:370:47:39

We found them in all her bits and pieces.

0:47:390:47:42

She was 101 when she died.

0:47:420:47:44

Wow, that's a good innings, isn't it? Wow. That's amazing!

0:47:440:47:47

She was amazing. She was amazing, yes.

0:47:470:47:50

Let's open it, shall we? Put us out of our misery.

0:47:500:47:53

Because when we open it,

0:47:530:47:54

we see two lovely, charming, ladies' fob watches.

0:47:540:48:00

And two little... What, if it was in gold,

0:48:000:48:02

would be called an Albert chain.

0:48:020:48:05

But these are the chains that the watches would hang off.

0:48:050:48:07

We've got some little gold elements on the actual chains.

0:48:070:48:12

But I think that the main body of the chains are made

0:48:120:48:15

out of woven human hair. Oh, really?.

0:48:150:48:18

This often happened in the 19th century when people died,

0:48:180:48:21

as a memento mori of the passing of the person.

0:48:210:48:26

Rather macabre in some people's eyes.

0:48:260:48:29

But you can imagine the fragility of it,

0:48:290:48:31

so to find them in good condition is quite unusual, actually.

0:48:310:48:35

And would they go together? I think they probably did.

0:48:350:48:38

As they're all together, in the little package,

0:48:380:48:41

there's every chance they might have been.

0:48:410:48:43

Let's just look at one of the watches.

0:48:430:48:46

This is my favourite. Mine as well, yes.

0:48:460:48:48

This is silver and rose gold.

0:48:480:48:52

With lovely, delicate enamel flowers there.

0:48:520:48:56

And actually set into the arms of the watch

0:48:560:48:59

are two little diamonds. Oh, are there?

0:48:590:49:01

They're tiny diamonds, but they are actually in there.

0:49:010:49:04

If I move it slightly, you can see them glinting. Yes.

0:49:040:49:08

The date is going to be anywhere really from about 1890-1910,

0:49:080:49:13

that sort of period.

0:49:130:49:15

But I think they're lovely,

0:49:150:49:16

and they've obviously been in this box for a long time.

0:49:160:49:19

The box itself is rosewood.

0:49:190:49:21

I think it would be a shame to split them.

0:49:210:49:23

I think a collector would like this.

0:49:230:49:25

I think we should put them in with an estimate of ?150-250.

0:49:250:49:30

Oh, wow! But we shall put the reserve at 150, fixed. OK.

0:49:300:49:34

So if you can't get 150, I think you should keep them.

0:49:340:49:37

I would hope that two collectors will really go for them.

0:49:370:49:42

And we might even get above the 250.

0:49:420:49:45

There's every chance, actually.

0:49:450:49:47

But if they do do very well, are you going to split the money?

0:49:470:49:51

Yes, and we've got two brothers as well. Oh, so it's going four...

0:49:510:49:54

So we need you to do very well.

0:49:540:49:55

We need you to do 400. Probably go for a night out...

0:49:550:49:58

And now it's time to put our expert's valuations to the test

0:50:020:50:05

as we head off to auction.

0:50:050:50:07

But before that,

0:50:070:50:08

here's a quick recap of all the items we're taking with us.

0:50:080:50:11

This little money box has travelled all the way from the USA.

0:50:130:50:17

One internet bid, and it could be going home.

0:50:170:50:19

The gun cane was a revelation to me,

0:50:230:50:25

but I expect there'll be those in the know in the saleroom.

0:50:250:50:29

The cat and the Mahjong set may not be made of amber

0:50:330:50:36

but they are still collectible.

0:50:360:50:38

And I think Mark Stacey has come across a sure bet with the watches and the fob chain.

0:50:420:50:47

Time to travel back to the little town of Tring,

0:50:560:50:59

and to Market Auctions, where Stephen Hearn is on the rostrum.

0:50:590:51:04

Going under the hammer right now,

0:51:040:51:05

that wonderful little money box made in Connecticut, USA.

0:51:050:51:08

I think this is the first time on the show that we've had

0:51:080:51:11

a little American money box.

0:51:110:51:12

Why have you decided to sell it now, David?

0:51:120:51:15

Well, I'm just downsizing a little bit.

0:51:150:51:19

One or two things have to go.

0:51:190:51:22

And starting with the money box.

0:51:220:51:23

Good luck, it's going under the hammer right now. This is it.

0:51:230:51:26

Interesting little object, that one.

0:51:260:51:28

We ought to be looking at ?80 for it. ?50 for it.

0:51:280:51:31

40. 5, 50.

0:51:310:51:33

5, 60. Going...

0:51:330:51:34

65. Two of you.

0:51:340:51:35

65, 70, 5.

0:51:350:51:37

80?

0:51:370:51:38

No more?

0:51:380:51:39

At ?75... ?80 is in.

0:51:390:51:41

There's another telephone bidder.

0:51:410:51:42

85? 80, I am bid. 85...

0:51:420:51:44

90. 90, and 5?

0:51:440:51:47

And 100. And 10.

0:51:470:51:49

If there's no... I'm going to sell it then, it's going down at ?100.

0:51:490:51:53

GAVEL STRIKES Thank you, sir.

0:51:530:51:54

Hammer's gone down, ?100.

0:51:540:51:56

Yeah, good, good, good. That's excellent.

0:51:560:51:58

I'm happy with that. Yes, very good.

0:51:580:52:00

Well done, thank you for bringing that in.

0:52:000:52:02

Won't break the bank though, will it? No, it won't break the bank!

0:52:020:52:06

But it was top end of the estimate, so well done, Anita.

0:52:060:52:11

Moving on to Charterhouse Auction Rooms in Sherborne, Dorset,

0:52:110:52:16

where Jacquie's watches are up for sale,

0:52:160:52:18

and her niece is standing in for her.

0:52:180:52:20

Time up for Jacquie's fob watches.

0:52:220:52:24

There's two going under the hammer right now.

0:52:240:52:26

Sadly she cannot be with us right now, but we do have Rachel.

0:52:260:52:28

Why is she selling these?

0:52:280:52:30

I think it's the age-old thing, they're in the cupboard,

0:52:300:52:33

Not doing anything...

0:52:330:52:34

Yes, so it would be better for someone else to make use of them. OK.

0:52:340:52:37

This is a cracking lot, actually, Paul.

0:52:370:52:39

In a nice little rosewood box with pewter inlay.

0:52:390:52:42

Two pocket watches, a bit of an Albert...

0:52:420:52:44

and some mourning Albert as well, with plaited hair.

0:52:440:52:47

It's just the sort of lot auctioneers like.

0:52:470:52:51

You can sniff it straightaway.

0:52:510:52:53

Right, I'm excited, you're excited, and so are you.

0:52:530:52:55

Fingers crossed, it's going to get the top end plus.

0:52:550:52:57

It's going under the hammer now.

0:52:570:52:59

Sweet little 18 carat and enamel gold fob watch here,

0:52:590:53:02

and I'm straight in at ?100, I have bid.

0:53:020:53:04

At 100, 110, 120,

0:53:040:53:06

130, 140, 150.

0:53:060:53:08

At 150, 160, 170.

0:53:080:53:10

180, 190, 200.

0:53:100:53:12

And 20, 240, 260, 280.

0:53:120:53:15

This is a bit more like it, isn't it? Yes.

0:53:150:53:17

Battle of the front row, at 320,

0:53:170:53:19

it's dead-ahead there at 320, I have.

0:53:190:53:21

At ?320 I have, fair warning,

0:53:210:53:22

selling at 320, last chance at 320...

0:53:220:53:26

Well done, Mark. Well done, well spotted. Well done! ?320!

0:53:260:53:30

Thank you so much, that's brilliant. I'm happy, you've got to be...

0:53:300:53:33

I can see a big smile on Rachel's face.

0:53:330:53:35

And I think Jacquie will be happy, too.

0:53:350:53:37

Thank you for standing in for her. No problem. Thank you.

0:53:370:53:40

It's good to see everyone happy.

0:53:420:53:44

And now over to Tring Market Auctions

0:53:440:53:47

where Stephen is selling the rather fine cat and Mahjong set

0:53:470:53:50

belonging to Susan.

0:53:500:53:52

Now, I know we had a fixed reserve at the valuation of ?70,

0:53:520:53:56

but I know you've had a chat to the auctioneer and you've upped it to ?90. I have.

0:53:560:54:00

I felt more comfortable with 90 than 70. OK.

0:54:000:54:02

In the end, we want you to be happy.

0:54:020:54:04

And I feel very comfortable with that.

0:54:040:54:06

Yes. Well, let's keep our fingers crossed.

0:54:060:54:08

Well, look, if it doesn't sell, I know you'll be happy to take this home with you. I am.

0:54:080:54:12

Very happy to take it home, so, as you say, win-win. We've got a win-win situation!

0:54:120:54:16

But we'd like to get top money.

0:54:160:54:18

I mean, that's what it's all about.

0:54:180:54:19

It is.

0:54:190:54:21

And this is going under the hammer right now.

0:54:210:54:22

The Mahjong Bakelite playing pieces, together with the cat.

0:54:220:54:25

There it is.

0:54:260:54:28

How do we go on this cat? 50?

0:54:280:54:30

60? 70? 80?

0:54:300:54:31

Going, 90? Two of you!

0:54:310:54:33

100 bid.

0:54:330:54:34

110, and 20.

0:54:340:54:36

That lady's keen in the red jacket, look!

0:54:360:54:38

She's not putting her bidding paddle down!

0:54:380:54:40

120. Yes or no?

0:54:400:54:42

120, and 30, and 40.

0:54:420:54:45

And 50.

0:54:450:54:46

She's still there, she's still there in the red jacket!

0:54:460:54:50

?140, then. You get the Mahjong pieces and the cat.

0:54:500:54:54

140, then, madam, yours at ?140.

0:54:540:54:58

Thank you so much!

0:54:580:55:00

I am surprised but delighted. So am I!

0:55:000:55:05

Style won once again. I think it did, yes.

0:55:050:55:08

So that's so special. Yes.

0:55:080:55:10

Excellent result.

0:55:100:55:12

That's what it's all about.

0:55:120:55:14

Last stop, Surrey, and that bizarre poacher's gun, which I'm glad to say

0:55:140:55:18

is in the safe hands of auctioneer Tim Duggan at Ewbank's Auctions.

0:55:180:55:23

Our next lot is so unusual, in fact, I've never seen one before,

0:55:260:55:29

and I've never seen one for sale before.

0:55:290:55:31

It's a poacher's gun, hidden in a walking cane.

0:55:310:55:33

We have that going under the hammer.

0:55:330:55:35

Sadly, we do not have Diana, the owner.

0:55:350:55:38

But we do have Adam, our expert. Have you seen any of these before?

0:55:380:55:41

I have, not many. Sold a lot of them? I have sold them before.

0:55:410:55:43

That's why I came up with that estimate.

0:55:430:55:45

Usually make a bit more than that.

0:55:450:55:47

You don't see many, and they're very cool things.

0:55:470:55:49

Poaching gun in a walking cane, who'd have thought of that?

0:55:490:55:53

Anyway, it's going under the hammer right now.

0:55:530:55:55

Fingers crossed it gets the top end of Adam's estimate. Here we are.

0:55:550:55:58

In 20 years of this business, I've never seen one of these before -

0:55:580:56:01

this is an interesting airgun cane of tapered form.

0:56:010:56:04

I've got interest and I'm in at ?100 now.

0:56:040:56:06

?100, 110. 120,

0:56:060:56:08

130, 140, 150, 160...

0:56:080:56:11

Looking for 170 anywhere.

0:56:110:56:12

170 with you, sir. At 170, looking for 180 now.

0:56:120:56:15

180...

0:56:150:56:17

180, 190.

0:56:170:56:18

200.

0:56:180:56:20

220, 240.

0:56:200:56:22

Rare thing, see?

0:56:220:56:23

260, 280.

0:56:230:56:25

300, 320.

0:56:250:56:27

Wow! They're battling it out in the saleroom!

0:56:270:56:30

..at ?300. The bids are all out then,

0:56:300:56:32

Selling to the blue shirt at ?300.

0:56:320:56:35

Great result! ?300, well done, Adam. Someone's poached that.

0:56:350:56:38

That was a rare thing, wasn't it? I know Diana will be really pleased,

0:56:380:56:41

and fingers crossed, you're watching this right now, enjoying the moment.

0:56:410:56:45

Today we have visited some stunning locations

0:56:470:56:50

and met some wonderful people.

0:56:500:56:52

I'm very pleased to meet you.

0:56:520:56:53

And you are? I'm Adam.

0:56:530:56:56

Everyone has gone home happy...

0:56:570:56:59

1,880...

0:56:590:57:01

Well, that trotted up quickly, didn't it?

0:57:010:57:03

So join us again soon on Flog It!

0:57:030:57:05

for more thrills and spills in the auction rooms.

0:57:050:57:08