Compilation 38 Flog It!


Compilation 38

Paul Martin presents previously unseen finds from the show's travels round the country, visiting Muncaster Castle, The Bowes Museum and Norwich Cathedral.


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Transcript


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The medieval red stone castle

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high up on the escarpment behind me is Powis.

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It's situated near Welshpool in mid Wales,

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close to the English border.

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Powis's interiors are crammed full of fine art and antiques.

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The walls are adorned with prestigious paintings.

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But what tops all of that are some of the interesting stories

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belonging to some of the people who have lived there,

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and I can't wait to find out more.

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Welcome to "Flog It!"

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We've got a very special show for you today,

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as we're going on tour around the country

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and taking a look back at some of our fabulous

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valuation days from this series

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where our experts heard your fascinating stories

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and we took your collectibles to auction houses far and wide.

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150.

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We journeyed to the picturesque Lake District in Cumbria,

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where we held our valuation day at the impressive

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13th-century Muncaster Castle.

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We travelled to the magnificent Norwich Cathedral in Norfolk,

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where in the nave, Kate Bateman was shocked at the treatment

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of one poor antique.

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Tricia used to use it to plant bulbs in.

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No, you didn't.

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We also had fun at the seaside in our valuation day

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on the Grand Pier in Weston-super-Mare in Somerset.

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Amongst the bright lights,

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Thomas Plant came across an item that shone.

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These would've been the most modern,

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the most luxurious, the most wonderful things to own.

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And finally we headed north to our valuation day

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at the jaw-droppingly beautiful Bowes Museum in County Durham,

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which was built in the style of a French chateau.

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But before all that, I'm heading back to Wales.

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Powis Castle was built in the mid-13th century by a Welsh ruler,

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and some 300 years later,

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the Herbert family first leased the castle and then went on

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to eventually own it outright.

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Subsequent generations of the family

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have turned the castle from a fortress

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into a rather magnificent stately home,

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complete with lavish interiors.

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And the family continued to live here right up until 1952

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when the Fourth Earl died,

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leaving Powis in the safe hands of the National Trust.

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Many members of the Herbert family led colourful lives.

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One male heir was convicted of treason,

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while another accompanied James II into exile.

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But it wasn't just the men who had interesting stories to tell.

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Many female members of the family also led remarkable lives.

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And I'll be returning to Powis later in the programme

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to find out about the extraordinary adventures

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undertaken by one of the female members of the Herbert family.

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But first it's time to head eastwards

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over the border into England to our valuation day

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at Norwich Cathedral, where Kate Bateman

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came across a "Flog It!" classic with a twist.

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Jim and Trish, what can you tell me about this thing you've brought in?

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Well, it belonged to my grandmother,

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who gave it to my mother, who about 30 years ago gave it to us,

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and it's been in our house just sort of sitting around,

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but Tricia used to use it to plant bulbs in.

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-No, you didn't.

-I did.

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It looks lovely with...

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at this time of year with a bowl of hyacinths in it.

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-I can see where you're coming from.

-It does look nice. Daffodils.

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And I suppose it is a plant...

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Well, planter... I think it's just a decorative bowl.

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Do you know who it's by?

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Yes, well, we've always known it was Moorcroft Pomegranate

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cos it says Moorcroft on the bottom.

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Excellent.

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What I haven't found is a Moorcroft bowl

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on a pewter stand other than...

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I thought it was Liberty, but I don't know.

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So, Liberty Tudric is the one you would expect it to be.

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-Right.

-But it's not.

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It's actually something called Hutton on the bottom,

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and I've never seen one with a stand like this.

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And it's kind of interesting how they fit so well together.

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Considering it's porcelain and metal -

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they're not natural bedfellows - they look so good together.

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It's like it's their sort of natural form.

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And I haven't have taken it off the stand or even thought about it

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because it was made for it, wasn't it?

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Certainly, it's got that bit to fit it.

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It certainly looks like it.

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Let's just have a look and check it is Moorcroft.

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Yep. Here we go.

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We've got the Moorcroft here. Made in Britain.

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171 is the shape,

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so that's like the shape of this particular design.

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And then we've got this lovely matching base.

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And you're right, it's got this funny little ribbed lip

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which means it does fit straight in,

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so I can only assume it was retailed exactly as it is.

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The Pomegranate design

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has really kind of mushy, soft colours.

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Later on, the piping,

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which is the bits that separate the different colours -

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the edges, if you like -

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that gets really more tube-lined harsher,

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a bit more raised.

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And the colours get a bit more garish,

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so as soon as I saw that kind of slightly sloshy

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kind of muddy colours, I knew it was an early one.

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This was very Art Nouveau, which is 1920s.

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Think of people like Alphonse Mucha and people like that.

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It was all sinuous lines and natural forms

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but stretched into kind of wonderful patterns,

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and that's what you've got here in this base.

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I mean, why are you thinking of selling?

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My daughter is getting married in May,

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and it's just a tad of expensive year for us,

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so we thought we would just see.

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-Yeah. As parents of the bride, it's going to be expensive.

-Yes.

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Well, have you ever thought about price?

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Well, I thought, since it's Moorcroft Pomegranate,

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it might be a couple of hundred pounds.

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Couple of hundred. We did see the damage.

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It's not the end of the world. It's not a huge crack.

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It's always been chipped in all the years I've known it.

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OK. I mean, that's going to affect it a little bit.

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How about a reserve of, say, 150

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and an estimate for £200 to £300?

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-OK.

-Yes.

-And we'll see.

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I think with the base, it's a really interesting thing.

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They don't come up that often, so who knows?

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Powis seems to be overrun by fine paintings.

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Every surface area has been adorned.

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These wonderful murals running up the side

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of this grand staircase were completed

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in the early part of the 1700s.

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Now, at a valuation day

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in another impressive stately home, Muncaster Castle,

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James Lewis came across an item

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from a little later on in the same century.

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Ian, there is one thing you cannot beat with antiques,

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-and that is a good bit of patination.

-Right.

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Years of polish and dirt and colour

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-that you can't ever fake, and that is fantastic.

-Good.

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-A car-boot find, I've heard.

-Yes, absolutely. Yes.

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I saw this. It was half in the mud on the floor under the table.

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I thought, "That's nice."

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Opened it up. The inside is missing out of it.

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I said, "Oh, it's a shame the interior is gone."

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I said, "How much is it?"

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And the guy who was behind the stall shouted to his wife,

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"Marge, how much is that old writing slope?"

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And I was like, "That's not a writing slope,"

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but he didn't know.

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And she said, "Tenner."

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So, I said, "Would you take a fiver?" being cheeky,

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and he put his hand out and shook my hand.

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Gave him a £5 note, walked away with it.

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Was that recent?

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-Within the last year.

-No!

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Well, that teaches them for not watching "Flog It!"

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-Yeah, absolutely. Yeah.

-Tell me, how much do you know about it?

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It's Georgian, I think, unless it's an Edwardian copy,

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but I presume it's Georgian.

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It's George III. It's 1780 to 1800.

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-Wow.

-And as you say, it's a knife box,

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-not a writing slope.

-No.

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The interior, you can see the colours in that lid.

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See the greens and the pale colours and the contrast with the mahogany?

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Well, those colours would be the same on the front

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and on the outside as they are now today in the cover,

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and that is what we talk about

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when we're talking about patination

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and something you can't fake.

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It's that ageing. It's the dirt.

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It's the polish. But look at that. That's super.

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The slope base to it would have had a series of little slots

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for knives, spoons, possibly even forks to go in.

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Down the front here we've got stop-fluted columns,

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and they are typical of what you would've found

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on the grand tour.

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So, somebody's gone to Greece, gone to Rome

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and they've seen those neoclassical columns

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and they've come back to their furniture maker

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and they've said, "Look.

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"How wonderful to have those on the front of a knife box."

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The panel in the centre is satinwood.

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Wonderful colour.

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And it's cross-banded in rosewood,

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and it's got herringbone cross-banding at the side as well

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and outlined with boxwood stringing, so there's a lot of work in there.

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Before we decide on an auction estimate,

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we must mention the fact that it's slightly tired.

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-That's a very polite way of saying...

-It's had a hard life.

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It's had a very hard life.

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Hinges are broken and there's lots of beading and things wrong with it.

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But what do you think in terms of value?

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I do have to admit, I saw one sell this week in an auction.

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I was watching it and it sold for £70,

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but it's looked like it was in better condition than this,

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so £40, £50, I'd be happy with that.

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I think we should put an auction estimate of 40 to 60 on it.

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-Brilliant.

-And I'd like to see it...

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-It'd be horrible to see it sell at £15 or £20, wouldn't it?

-Yeah.

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-So, let's put a reserve of 40 on it.

-Yeah.

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-A great eye. Well spotted.

-Brilliant.

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-And, no, brilliant. Well done, you.

-Thank you.

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Next we headed to the coast to our valuation day

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on the Grand Pier at Weston-super-Mare in Somerset,

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where Jonathan Pratt came across an item

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from a far more exotic location.

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So, Dick, you brought this lovely little fob watch.

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This is from an Indian or Pakistani port,

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but how come it's with you?

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How is it in your hands?

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My mother left it to me, but it belonged to her great aunt.

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She died in 1945 and my mother died 20 years ago,

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so it came down to my mother and then to me.

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I mean, immediately, this sort of style of pocket watch,

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-it's what we call a hunter because it's got a solid front.

-Yes.

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You know, if you're riding on your horse on your hunt

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-and you fell off...

-Yes.

-..you don't want to break the glass.

-Yeah.

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So, it's got that solid front on it.

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Engine turning, and a little cartouche in the middle there.

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Immediately I'd say, just from looking at that,

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-it's going to be late 19th century.

-Yes.

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It would date from the latter part of the 19th century.

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The key with this is to give it a squeeze and pop the front open,

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and you've got a name on there for Max Minck.

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-Yeah, Karachi.

-Max Minck of Karachi.

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Spelt K-U-R-A.

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-Yes.

-It's now spelt K-A-R.

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And a double E on the end.

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Lends itself to sort of the Raj, you know,

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when we were living out in India, and presumably at the time...

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I mean, it's Pakistan now, but at the time

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it might have been India at the end of the 19th century.

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He will have been someone who was retailing watches and clocks...

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-Yes.

-..to the rich gentry who were living out there, you know,

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-taking their summers in India.

-Yes.

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We need to see in the back. There we are.

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And so on the back, it tells us it's got a ten-jewel movement,

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and that's what I need to see.

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And you see you've got an 18k case.

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So, it's 18 karat gold, or stamped 18k.

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Lady's watch, obviously, for the size. It's a nice thing.

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So, why do you want to sell it?

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Well, I've never used it, and quite frankly, I've kept it -

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what everybody says -

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-I've kept it in a drawer cos I don't use a pocket watch.

-Yes.

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-Well, you've kept it, by doing so, in nice condition.

-Oh, yes. Yes.

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I mean, it hasn't been wound.

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But, you know, gold doesn't oxidise, so it just sits there.

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-Looks like it was the day it was made.

-Yes.

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-I rather like it.

-Yes.

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I think if you should want to sell it,

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I think happily between £200 and £300.

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-Yes.

-How does that sound?

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-Yes, I hope to get 200.

-Yes.

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But, yeah, I would be content with that.

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OK, well, you know,

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let's do a reserve of £200, protect you,

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and if it doesn't make that, then you can put it back in the drawer.

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-Yes.

-How does that sound?

-Very good.

-Fantastic.

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-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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Well, there's our first three items,

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and we'll see how they fare at auction

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a little later on in the programme.

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But first, I want to show you a painting with a secret,

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and it's here, hanging on the walls in the dining room of Powis.

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As you can see, there are many family portraits,

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but it's this one taking centre stage

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that's caught my eye.

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It's a three-quarter length portrait of Lady Henrietta Herbert.

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This was painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds,

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Britain's greatest portrait painter in the 18th century.

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He did this in 1777, so it's noteworthy for that reason.

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But there's something odd about it.

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When Sir Joshua Reynolds finished this,

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a black and white engraving was done of this,

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an exact copy, and it's on the wall just there,

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and it shows Lady Henrietta not wearing the hat.

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So, shortly after this was finished, some artist,

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an unknown artist, added a big blue hat.

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Why? Well, nobody seems to know.

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Maybe fashions changed

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and she wanted to be seen portrayed wearing the latest fashion.

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I wonder if Sir Joshua Reynolds found out.

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Well, it's not just the portrait that's extraordinary.

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The sitter is too, and later on in the programme,

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we'll be returning here to Powis to find out more about the life

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of Lady Henrietta and how it was filled with adventure.

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But right now let's see how our owners' items fared

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when they went under the hammer.

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At our valuation day at Norwich Cathedral,

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Jim and Tricia brought along their Moorcroft bowl,

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which unusually came with its own custom-made pewter stand.

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Dick's 18 karat gold pocket watch with empty cartouche

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had crossed the seas to make it to our valuation day

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at Weston-super-Mare, as it originally hailed from India.

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And finally, at our valuation day at Muncaster Castle in Cumbria,

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Ian turned up with his Georgian knife box

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which he bought for a fiver at a car-boot sale.

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But did it make him a profit when it went under the hammer?

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It's time to find out.

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We sold Ian's knife box

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at Thomson Roddick & Medcalf saleroom in Carlisle.

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Auctioneer Steven Parkinson was on the rostrum.

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Remember, whether you're buying or selling at every auction room,

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there's always commission to pay and VAT on top.

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380.

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Going under the hammer right now, my favourite lot in the show.

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It's not a lot of money.

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We're asking for £40 to £60,

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but it's a cracking Georgian knife box.

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It's beautiful. It belongs to Ian. You got this in a car-boot for £5.

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I did, yes. That's right.

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I know it's had the interior removed,

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but nevertheless, as a stand-alone box with the inlay

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and all that detail and that serpentine front for £5.

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You just look at it and it feels fabulous.

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-It's got a wonderful colour.

-It's history.

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It's going under the hammer right now. Let's put it to the test, Ian.

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This is it.

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45. 45 is in the room. At 45. At 45.

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48. 48. At 48. You want 50?

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Good. That man wants it.

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At £50. It's in the room at £50.

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It's a little money, but we'll sell it.

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At 50. Anybody else? At 50. At 50. At 50.

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-Good price.

-Very good, yeah.

0:16:060:16:07

Still cheap for what it is, you know.

0:16:070:16:09

It should be £100, but look,

0:16:090:16:11

50 quid, you're very, very happy with that.

0:16:110:16:13

-Yeah, absolutely.

-And for £5, you know, that's nice, isn't it?

0:16:130:16:16

-Who says antiques are expensive, eh?

-They're not.

0:16:160:16:18

That box will come in very useful for somebody,

0:16:180:16:21

even if you stick the post in it or give it to your kids

0:16:210:16:24

to put all their felt-tip pens in it as a tidy keep.

0:16:240:16:27

-It's a great thing.

-Oh, we all need boxes, and that was a cracker.

0:16:270:16:30

Next we travel to Norfolk to TW Gaze in Diss

0:16:330:16:36

to sell Tricia and Jim's Moorcroft bowl with stand.

0:16:360:16:40

The auctioneer we had our hopes pinned on was Ed Smith.

0:16:400:16:43

Going under the hammer right now, a great name in ceramics - Moorcroft.

0:16:450:16:48

It doesn't get any better than this, and it's Pomegranate as well.

0:16:480:16:51

It belongs to Patricia and Jim, and not for much longer.

0:16:510:16:54

You're not going to be taking this home.

0:16:540:16:57

This is definitely here to go, and I think it's priced just right

0:16:570:17:00

-and it's going to tempt everybody in to bid on it.

-I think it'll go.

0:17:000:17:02

-I love this thing.

-Let's find out what happens.

0:17:020:17:05

Here we go.

0:17:050:17:06

And again, straight in here. £200. 200.

0:17:060:17:10

-150 and start.

-Come on.

0:17:100:17:12

Lovely piece of Moorcroft there for £150. 100 bid.

0:17:120:17:15

100 I have. 110. 120.

0:17:150:17:17

130. 140. 150. 150 it is. Is there 60?

0:17:170:17:20

Oh, come on.

0:17:200:17:22

It's 150 now bid. Where is the 60?

0:17:220:17:24

It's at £150 there. Is there 60? We will be selling for 150.

0:17:240:17:29

Are we all done?

0:17:290:17:30

The hammer's gone down on £150, right on its reserve.

0:17:320:17:36

-On its reserve.

-They were sitting on their hands.

0:17:360:17:39

-There was only one person here that really wanted it.

-Yeah.

0:17:390:17:41

-I would live with the damage.

-Turn it around.

0:17:410:17:43

Well, we have for about 30 years.

0:17:430:17:45

Look, I'm really sorry it didn't make any more.

0:17:450:17:47

-I'm so sorry, OK?

-That's alright.

-That's auctions for you.

0:17:470:17:50

£30.

0:17:500:17:51

Finally, we travel west back to the Somerset seaside

0:17:530:17:56

to sell Dick's gold pocket watch at Clevedon Salerooms.

0:17:560:18:00

Marc Burridge was wielding the gavel.

0:18:000:18:02

Selling at 85.

0:18:020:18:05

Well, time is definitely up. No, it's not the end of the show.

0:18:050:18:07

It's time to sell Dick's pocket watch.

0:18:070:18:09

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:18:090:18:11

-This is a good item, a really nice item.

-Oh, good. Thank you.

0:18:110:18:15

-Bit of quality. Why are you selling it?

-Yes. Yes.

0:18:150:18:17

You just don't use it any more? Don't need it?

0:18:170:18:19

I haven't used it at all.

0:18:190:18:21

-I haven't worn a waistcoat for years, you see.

-No.

0:18:210:18:23

-It's going under the hammer right now. Good luck, Dick.

-Yeah.

0:18:230:18:26

On the book we have bids here at 180, 190, 200,

0:18:270:18:31

210, 220, 230,

0:18:310:18:34

240, 250.

0:18:340:18:35

-It's on its way.

-250.

-And it's still going.

0:18:350:18:38

£250 here. 260, anyone?

0:18:380:18:41

260 now. Thanks to all in the room.

0:18:410:18:44

It's all on the book then and selling at 250.

0:18:440:18:48

Well done. Spot-on.

0:18:480:18:49

£250 mid estimate. That was a short fight for that.

0:18:490:18:53

You see, quality - and quality always sells.

0:18:530:18:55

-Yeah.

-Well done, you.

-Thank you.

-A man of quality.

-Yeah.

0:18:550:18:59

What a good, solid price for Dick's gold pocket watch,

0:18:590:19:02

and his watch also had something in common with Powis Castle -

0:19:020:19:06

a connection to India -

0:19:060:19:07

and I'm heading back to Wales to find out more.

0:19:070:19:10

For centuries, the Herberts acquired riches

0:19:210:19:24

to fill their castle,

0:19:240:19:25

but they also had treasures coming in from another source -

0:19:250:19:28

prestigious families marrying into the Herberts.

0:19:280:19:31

And there's a lovely example of this

0:19:310:19:33

when Sir Edward Clive married Lady Henrietta Herbert in 1784.

0:19:330:19:38

Because of that union,

0:19:380:19:39

the castle acquired a collection of over 300 artefacts from India

0:19:390:19:43

and the Far East.

0:19:430:19:44

The collection was started by Edward's father, Robert.

0:19:440:19:48

Edward and Henrietta carried on the collection, so today it houses

0:19:480:19:52

the largest private collection of its kind in the UK.

0:19:520:19:57

The Clive collection has been brought together

0:19:580:20:00

and placed in the Clive Museum,

0:20:000:20:02

which is situated in what used to be part of Powis's ballroom.

0:20:020:20:06

The collection is varied and include items such as weaponry,

0:20:060:20:10

games, textiles, jewels and even a sultan's tent.

0:20:100:20:15

The display cases and the design of the museum

0:20:150:20:18

are in a style known as Hindu Gothic,

0:20:180:20:20

which evokes a feeling of the British Raj.

0:20:200:20:23

However, many of the items here in the collection

0:20:260:20:28

predate the period of the actual British Raj

0:20:280:20:31

when the British Crown assumed total control of India

0:20:310:20:35

between 1858 and 1947.

0:20:350:20:38

Robert Clive was in India earlier in the 1700s.

0:20:380:20:42

He worked for the British-owned East India Company

0:20:420:20:45

promoting trade between India and other countries..

0:20:450:20:48

He also played a major part in forging the way

0:20:480:20:52

for eventual British rule.

0:20:520:20:55

During his time working on the subcontinent,

0:20:550:20:57

Robert Clive became known as Clive of India

0:20:570:21:00

and he amassed a personal fortune and brought back many of the pieces

0:21:000:21:04

that are on display in the Clive Museum today.

0:21:040:21:07

Edward Clive followed

0:21:070:21:09

in his father Robert Clive's footsteps

0:21:090:21:11

and became governor of Madras in 1798.

0:21:110:21:14

He spent time in India with his wife, Henrietta Herbert,

0:21:140:21:18

and he carried on collecting Indian artefacts.

0:21:180:21:20

And I want to show you two or three of my favourites.

0:21:200:21:23

Let's start with this magnificent ivory chess set,

0:21:230:21:26

thought to belong to Robert Clive.

0:21:260:21:28

The soldiers with swords and shields are pawns.

0:21:280:21:32

An Indian elephant is usually the equivalent of a bishop,

0:21:320:21:35

but sometimes this could be a camel,

0:21:350:21:37

in which case the elephant becomes a rook.

0:21:370:21:40

Alternatively, the camel may act as a knight.

0:21:400:21:43

It all gets very complicated, but how about this?

0:21:430:21:46

It's small but it's very precious.

0:21:460:21:49

It's a gold tiger head finial from the throne of Tipu Sultan.

0:21:490:21:53

He was the sultan of Mysore, the richest city in Southern India,

0:21:530:21:57

which fell into the hands of the British.

0:21:570:21:59

In fact, the treasures and the spoils

0:21:590:22:01

were divided up amongst the soldiers of that victory.

0:22:010:22:04

They pulled the throne apart, sadly.

0:22:040:22:06

This is incredibly rare. It's only one of two surviving finials.

0:22:060:22:11

It's not solid gold.

0:22:110:22:13

It's gold on a core of wood,

0:22:130:22:15

but it's been inlaid with emeralds, diamonds and rubies.

0:22:150:22:20

I particularly love the collar of the tiger,

0:22:200:22:23

and the ruby as a tongue.

0:22:230:22:25

This was added to the collection by Henrietta Herbert.

0:22:250:22:28

It was given to her by Lord Wellesley,

0:22:280:22:31

the Duke of Wellington's brother.

0:22:310:22:33

Lady Henrietta Herbert was fascinated by all things Eastern,

0:22:330:22:37

and whilst in India, she undertook an incredible journey

0:22:370:22:41

without her husband in the year 1800 across the subcontinent,

0:22:410:22:45

which was a very brave and daring thing to do at the time.

0:22:450:22:48

However, the story of Henrietta's colourful life

0:22:500:22:53

and Indian adventures weren't well-known until recently

0:22:530:22:56

when a writer and fellow woman traveller,

0:22:560:22:59

Nancy K Shields from Texas, stumbled across her story

0:22:590:23:03

and was inspired to write a book about it called Birds Of Passage.

0:23:030:23:06

So, how unusual was it for a lady like Henrietta

0:23:080:23:11

to be travelling India in the late 1700s

0:23:110:23:13

unaccompanied by her husband?

0:23:130:23:15

Henrietta was the first one to travel,

0:23:150:23:18

make such a travel in India, to my knowledge, and the only one.

0:23:180:23:23

I don't know of anyone else who duplicated that trip.

0:23:230:23:26

And it wasn't just one lady travelling.

0:23:260:23:28

I mean, here's a mother with her two daughters and their governess,

0:23:280:23:32

who was an Italian artist.

0:23:320:23:35

And the four women set off into the wilderness,

0:23:350:23:38

what was really wilderness then, we have to remember, of South India,

0:23:380:23:43

full of tigers and wild elephants and snakes

0:23:430:23:47

and rivers that they had to ford.

0:23:470:23:49

There were no bridges.

0:23:490:23:51

And how long did she go for?

0:23:510:23:52

-It was... She went for seven months.

-That's a long time.

0:23:520:23:54

Yes, that's a long time to be camping.

0:23:540:23:56

The only maps were those of the military,

0:23:560:23:59

which were pretty inadequate.

0:23:590:24:00

They knew the territory best there

0:24:000:24:03

because the war with Tipu Sultan had just finished,

0:24:030:24:06

so the military situation in India was really heavy at that time.

0:24:060:24:10

And a big entourage like that, it simply hadn't been done.

0:24:100:24:14

I mean, with three camels to carry messages,

0:24:140:24:17

14 elephants to ride on and to carry some of their goods

0:24:170:24:22

-and, you know, belongings and tents.

-Yeah.

0:24:220:24:25

-They camped all the time.

-It's a big set-up, though.

0:24:250:24:27

-Yes.

-It's colossal.

-Yes, right. 750 people...

-Wow.

0:24:270:24:31

..and all their hangers-on.

0:24:310:24:33

So, what drove her?

0:24:330:24:34

Well, Henrietta, you might say,

0:24:340:24:36

was a really rebellious person.

0:24:360:24:39

-She...

-Spirited.

0:24:390:24:41

-Spirited, right.

-THEY LAUGH

0:24:410:24:43

She didn't want just to go to balls

0:24:430:24:46

and have the usual kind of women's social society there,

0:24:460:24:50

and they considered her quite standoffish.

0:24:500:24:53

Henrietta was, I think, really a scholar.

0:24:530:24:56

The first thing she did when she got to Madras

0:24:560:24:59

was to build a little house, a room, a big room in her garden

0:24:590:25:04

where she was planning to put the collections she wanted to make

0:25:040:25:08

while she was in India of rocks and plants

0:25:080:25:11

and butterflies and shells.

0:25:110:25:14

-She was a naturalist.

-Wow.

-She was never known as this.

0:25:140:25:18

Women who tried to become scientists during this period of time

0:25:180:25:23

-really weren't acknowledged.

-No.

0:25:230:25:25

It sounds like she preferred her rock collection to dancing.

0:25:250:25:27

She preferred gathering the rocks. Yes, she did.

0:25:270:25:29

And educating the daughters and seeing to that,

0:25:290:25:32

and that turned out to be a really full-time job.

0:25:320:25:35

Lady Charlotte was 12 and Lady Henrietta was 13

0:25:360:25:40

when they accompanied their mother, Henrietta,

0:25:400:25:42

on her trek across Southern India.

0:25:420:25:44

Nicknamed Charlie, Lady Charlotte kept a journal

0:25:440:25:47

from 1800 about her adventures.

0:25:470:25:50

"Accidents continually happen in this nullah.

0:25:510:25:54

"Captain Brown heard a tiger growl.

0:25:540:25:57

"The village people told us that a few days ago

0:25:570:26:00

"a man was carried off by a tiger

0:26:000:26:02

"and they found his body almost entirely eaten up."

0:26:020:26:04

Oh!

0:26:040:26:05

"We passed many piles of stones where a man had been killed,

0:26:050:26:09

"and each person who passes in safety adds one to the heap."

0:26:090:26:13

-Gosh.

-Yes.

0:26:130:26:15

Charlie's account really brings the incredible trip to life,

0:26:150:26:19

and as well as this written account,

0:26:190:26:20

there also survives watercolours depicting the journey

0:26:200:26:24

painted by an Anna Tonelli,

0:26:240:26:25

the governess who accompanied Lady Henrietta

0:26:250:26:28

and her two daughters across India.

0:26:280:26:30

She was the first woman, certainly,

0:26:320:26:36

to have paintings out of the wilderness area of India.

0:26:360:26:41

Yes, she must've been, I guess, yeah.

0:26:410:26:43

So, this is really a scene,

0:26:430:26:46

an everyday scene for them,

0:26:460:26:47

when they're getting ready to go on the road.

0:26:470:26:49

These bearers with their turbans and the palanquin and the camel.

0:26:490:26:54

-She's a very good artist. Quite accomplished.

-Yes.

0:26:540:26:57

-It's kind of sums up the time and the moment.

-It does. It does.

0:26:570:26:59

Exactly.

0:26:590:27:00

So, do you feel a connection with Lady Henrietta?

0:27:000:27:04

Yes, I do like Henrietta very much.

0:27:040:27:06

I like her for wanting to roam about.

0:27:060:27:08

I mean, she had really a dream of going to the east.

0:27:080:27:13

-Henrietta loved to learn.

-Yeah.

0:27:130:27:16

She really did.

0:27:160:27:18

Well, look, it sounds like you've had your adventures too,

0:27:180:27:21

and thank you so much, Nancy, for coming all the way over

0:27:210:27:24

from Texas and talking to me today.

0:27:240:27:25

Oh, it's been a pleasure. It really has.

0:27:250:27:28

Now we continue our tour of the country

0:27:340:27:36

as we revisit our valuation day

0:27:360:27:38

on the Grand Pier in Weston-super-Mare

0:27:380:27:40

where Thomas Plant found a pair of vases that got his pulse racing.

0:27:400:27:44

Sue, thank you very much for coming in and bringing possibly

0:27:460:27:51

the most exciting thing I've seen in a long time.

0:27:510:27:54

How did you come by these Lalique vases?

0:27:540:27:57

They were inherited from my grandmother,

0:27:570:27:59

and I've got a feeling that these were a gift from her husband.

0:27:590:28:04

-Where was her husband from?

-He was from London.

0:28:040:28:07

-And is that where your grandmother lived?

-Yes. Yes.

-Right.

0:28:070:28:11

So, they were Londonites. They must have been wealthy.

0:28:110:28:14

-Yes, I think they were.

-THEY LAUGH

0:28:140:28:17

-The reason why I ask is cos you've got to get context.

-Right.

0:28:170:28:21

You know, you don't just turn up

0:28:210:28:24

a pair of Art Deco opalescent Lalique Beliers vases.

0:28:240:28:29

-That's the title of them.

-Yes.

0:28:290:28:31

These are Beliers, vases like that.

0:28:310:28:36

In 1925, when these were new...

0:28:360:28:38

Yes.

0:28:380:28:40

..these would have been the most modern, the most luxurious,

0:28:400:28:44

the most wonderful things to own.

0:28:440:28:46

-Lalique was a fabulous jeweller.

-Yes.

0:28:460:28:50

He was known for his jewellery.

0:28:500:28:52

But in the 1920s,

0:28:520:28:55

he moved to a larger factory in Alsace-Lorraine

0:28:550:28:58

and really started to produce glass, but moulded glass.

0:28:580:29:01

And this is moulded.

0:29:010:29:03

You can see the mould line on these goats here.

0:29:030:29:06

-Possibly why you couldn't see it sort of on the bowls so much.

-No.

0:29:060:29:11

No, probably the bowls were made separately,

0:29:110:29:13

cos you can get them with different...

0:29:130:29:15

You get birds on them coming down, so they were applied on.

0:29:150:29:20

It's sort of like a mountain chamois.

0:29:200:29:22

-I thought they were onyx.

-Yeah, I thought they were onyx,

0:29:220:29:24

but onyx don't have these beards, do they?

0:29:240:29:26

When you look at onyx, they're quite clean here.

0:29:260:29:29

And the use of opalescents and colours and frosting

0:29:290:29:33

was something he was really well known for doing.

0:29:330:29:36

It's signed here - Rene Lalique - and it's an etched signature.

0:29:360:29:41

It's done by hand.

0:29:410:29:42

-Later on, they were acid-etched.

-Oh, you're right.

0:29:420:29:46

-Or moulded.

-Oh.

0:29:460:29:49

These are actually etched. It dates them to 1925.

0:29:490:29:53

What have you brought them here today?

0:29:530:29:55

There was no-one to inherit them.

0:29:550:29:57

My children like them to look at, but they don't want to inherit them.

0:29:570:30:02

Value. We've established that they're Art Deco.

0:30:020:30:04

We've established they're Lalique.

0:30:040:30:06

They're signed, they're etched, they're engraved signatures.

0:30:060:30:09

-So, they've got a lot going for them.

-Yes.

0:30:090:30:12

-Individually, we normally see them.

-Right.

0:30:120:30:16

And they're normally estimated £500, £700 on their own.

0:30:160:30:21

You hardly ever see a pair.

0:30:210:30:23

So, I will go strong and say

0:30:230:30:25

that they're worth between £1,500 and £2,500.

0:30:250:30:29

Oh, my word.

0:30:290:30:31

-Hmm.

-Happy?

0:30:310:30:33

Yes.

0:30:330:30:35

-Taken by surprise a bit, I think.

-Good.

0:30:350:30:37

They are immensely collectible.

0:30:370:30:40

Now, a reserve, I would suggest we fix them.

0:30:400:30:44

-Yes, please.

-Yes? Fix them at £1,500.

0:30:440:30:48

-Yes, that would be...

-If you don't mind.

0:30:480:30:51

No, I don't mind. I'm quite happy to take them home again.

0:30:510:30:53

-Don't want you to give them away.

-No.

-It's a conservative estimate.

0:30:530:30:57

-Oh.

-I would've thought that they could go a little bit higher.

0:30:570:31:03

Wow.

0:31:030:31:04

I'm ever so glad I brought them.

0:31:050:31:07

Well, I'm ever so grateful you brought them in. You've made my day.

0:31:070:31:10

Thank you very much indeed.

0:31:100:31:12

Next, we travel north to our valuation day

0:31:150:31:18

at the beautiful Bowes Museum in County Durham,

0:31:180:31:21

where Paul Laidlaw came across an item

0:31:210:31:23

that held childhood memories for its owner.

0:31:230:31:25

Bob, I love your little projector.

0:31:280:31:31

-Is it yours?

-Yes, it is.

0:31:310:31:33

Yours from your youth or something you picked up?

0:31:330:31:36

From youth. No, from my youth.

0:31:360:31:38

My parents bought me it when I was ten years old in 1950.

0:31:380:31:42

I've used it four or five times and it's been stuck in that box,

0:31:420:31:48

original box, upstairs in the attic.

0:31:480:31:51

-Very, very rare it comes out.

-HE LAUGHS

0:31:510:31:54

Very rare it comes out.

0:31:540:31:55

The few times that you did use it,

0:31:550:31:57

did you get your friends around, switch all the lights off,

0:31:570:31:59

pull the curtains and blow their minds or what?

0:31:590:32:02

-Yeah, because you could run it on a wall.

-Yeah.

0:32:020:32:04

You can actually show it on a wall or on a tablecloth.

0:32:040:32:08

My mam used to put a white tablecloth up.

0:32:080:32:10

Stick it on the wall and we used to play the films on it.

0:32:100:32:14

-Very good. So, it's hand-cranked.

-It's hand-cranked.

0:32:140:32:17

Mains powered,

0:32:170:32:19

although I wouldn't advise anyone try that in this day and age.

0:32:190:32:22

-But the condition is... And a lamp socket.

-That's it, yeah.

0:32:220:32:26

-My word.

-It's all original. Everything is original in it.

0:32:260:32:30

-A little Bakelite socket.

-Yeah.

0:32:300:32:33

-But it's only a 9.5mm.

-It is, yeah.

0:32:330:32:36

-You know, and the films are bit flimsy.

-Indeed.

0:32:360:32:41

-Yeah.

-But I am taken aback by

0:32:410:32:43

the fact that you preserved it so well.

0:32:430:32:45

It tells us who made it.

0:32:450:32:47

It's a little Astor, and they were a Nottingham-based manufacturer

0:32:470:32:51

of these little projectors for domestic use.

0:32:510:32:54

Made them between the '30s and the '50s,

0:32:540:32:56

so I daresay when you got yours

0:32:560:32:57

it was towards the end of the lifespan of these things.

0:32:570:33:01

I think it offers a great prospect for a collector

0:33:010:33:04

because you're going to buy this, it's not a usually valuable object.

0:33:040:33:07

You pick this up, but for me the fun would be

0:33:070:33:10

-hunting down as many little reels as I could...

-Yeah.

0:33:100:33:13

..in flea markets and online auctions and the likes

0:33:130:33:16

to see what we could find.

0:33:160:33:18

That's right.

0:33:180:33:19

Vintage toys sell, vintage technology sells,

0:33:190:33:22

but they're relatively modest in value.

0:33:220:33:24

I would suggest an auction presale estimate

0:33:240:33:27

of 20 to 40 would turn out to be spot-on on the day.

0:33:270:33:31

Would that be enough to tempt you

0:33:310:33:32

to part with it after all these years?

0:33:320:33:34

-Certainly, yes.

-Would you like a reserve on it.

0:33:340:33:36

-Yes, you can put a reserve on it.

-Put £20 on it.

0:33:360:33:38

If you don't get your money, then you can let the kids

0:33:380:33:41

-and the grandkids decide what they're going to do with it.

-Yeah.

0:33:410:33:44

That sounds perfectly reasonable to me.

0:33:440:33:46

Yeah, they can do what they want with it.

0:33:460:33:48

We'll see how Bob's projector fared at auction shortly,

0:33:480:33:51

but before that, we revisited Norwich Cathedral in Norfolk

0:33:510:33:55

where another item had caught Kate Bateman's attention.

0:33:550:33:58

-Well, hello, Val. Welcome to "Flog It!"

-Hello.

0:34:000:34:02

What have you brought me today?

0:34:020:34:04

I've brought you a sovereign. I believe it's got Victoria on it.

0:34:040:34:08

So, is this something you've inherited or worn or bought?

0:34:080:34:11

My husband inherited it.

0:34:110:34:13

I didn't even know it existed until yesterday.

0:34:130:34:16

-Until yesterday?

-Yes, yesterday.

-Oh, my goodness.

0:34:160:34:19

I was coming along with a friend just to keep her company,

0:34:190:34:22

and said, "Have we got anything?"

0:34:220:34:24

And he said, "Well, I have got a sovereign upstairs in the drawer

0:34:240:34:28

"that I've had for many years," and here we are.

0:34:280:34:30

What else has he been keeping from you all these years?

0:34:300:34:33

The suspicions mount.

0:34:330:34:34

-It's a lovely thing to have a surprise with. Great, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:34:340:34:37

It is a full sovereign instead of a half sovereign.

0:34:370:34:39

There's only a couple of millimetres difference, so worth checking.

0:34:390:34:42

And so what we've got here

0:34:420:34:44

is a fabulous scene of George and the dragon here.

0:34:440:34:46

George slaying the dragon. And then the date, 1901.

0:34:460:34:48

So, the last year of Victoria's reign.

0:34:480:34:51

And the centre is 22 karat gold and then a nine karat gold

0:34:510:34:54

quite a delicate filigree mount

0:34:540:34:56

-to make it into a pendant for a chain.

-Yes.

0:34:560:34:58

And that's very Victorian.

0:34:580:34:59

It looks contemporary with the actual coin.

0:34:590:35:01

On the back we've got the old head,

0:35:010:35:03

so there's two types of heads for Victoria.

0:35:030:35:05

She's got the young head and then they kind of did another one

0:35:050:35:08

a few years later with an older head.

0:35:080:35:10

She looks slightly grumpier, slightly fatter.

0:35:100:35:12

-Tempted to wear it at all?

-No, I don't think so.

-Bit bling?

0:35:120:35:15

Yes, I don't think so.

0:35:150:35:17

-Now, do you have any idea of price.

-No. I've no idea at all.

-No idea?

0:35:170:35:21

No idea at all.

0:35:210:35:22

Well, gold has been on an upward hill for some years now,

0:35:220:35:25

and it's a pretty good time to be selling.

0:35:250:35:27

I think your price-wise is probably, with the mount, maybe £200 to £250.

0:35:270:35:31

-Right.

-Something like that.

-Right.

-Pleasantly surprised?

0:35:310:35:34

Very surprised, yes.

0:35:340:35:35

-Is that the kind of thing you'd be happy to sell it for?

-Yes.

0:35:350:35:38

-Would your husband be happy for you to sell it?

-Yes.

0:35:380:35:40

-Yeah, you think.

-Yes, yes.

0:35:400:35:41

Well, I would put a reserve on that,

0:35:410:35:43

-maybe a 180 reserve just to protect it.

-Yes.

0:35:430:35:45

And then 200 to 250 estimate,

0:35:450:35:46

and that'll take into account the weight of the nine carat gold

0:35:460:35:49

and the sovereign itself.

0:35:490:35:50

So, well, thank you for bringing it in. It was a fortuitous find.

0:35:500:35:53

-You're very welcome. It certainly was.

-Great.

0:35:530:35:56

Before we see our last items head off to auction,

0:36:050:36:08

there's something I want to show you,

0:36:080:36:10

and it's painted whimsically on the ceiling here

0:36:100:36:12

in the library at Powis.

0:36:120:36:14

William Herbert, the Second Marquess,

0:36:140:36:16

had four daughters.

0:36:160:36:17

Now, they're all featured in this painting on the ceiling.

0:36:170:36:20

The two youngest daughters are leaning over the balustrade.

0:36:200:36:23

The two eldest daughters, Lady Mary and Lady Teresa,

0:36:230:36:26

are seated on clouds.

0:36:260:36:29

Lady Mary has been depicted as Minerva,

0:36:290:36:31

the Roman goddess of wisdom.

0:36:310:36:33

Now, that's woeful miscasting really,

0:36:330:36:35

because later on, she lost a great deal of the family's fortunes

0:36:350:36:39

on gambling on the French stock exchange,

0:36:390:36:42

and it nearly ruined the family.

0:36:420:36:44

Let's hope our owners have much better luck

0:36:440:36:47

as we go over to the auction rooms to see how their items sold.

0:36:470:36:50

Thomas Plant was over the moon

0:36:520:36:54

when he spotted Sue's matching pair of Art Deco Lalique vases

0:36:540:36:58

at our valuation day on the Grand Pier at Weston-super-Mare.

0:36:580:37:01

Bob's projector had been languishing in the loft

0:37:050:37:08

until he rescued it and brought it to our valuation day

0:37:080:37:11

at the Bowes Museum.

0:37:110:37:12

And finally, at Norwich Cathedral

0:37:160:37:19

Val brought along her mounted gold sovereign

0:37:190:37:21

from the last year of Queen Victoria's reign.

0:37:210:37:24

It delighted Kate Bateman, but were the bidders as impressed?

0:37:240:37:27

It's time to find out...

0:37:270:37:29

as we returned to TW Gaze in Diss to sell Val's sovereign.

0:37:290:37:34

Auctioneer Robert Kinsella was on the stand.

0:37:340:37:37

Our next lot is a full sovereign, it's a whole sovereign.

0:37:390:37:41

It's beautiful, actually.

0:37:410:37:43

-It belongs to Valerie and it was a lucky find, wasn't it?

-Yes.

0:37:430:37:46

It was tucked away in a drawer and...

0:37:460:37:48

For years, and you open up the drawer...

0:37:480:37:49

Yeah, so, there we are.

0:37:490:37:51

It's like finding a fiver in your old coat pocket, isn't it?

0:37:510:37:53

-It's brilliant.

-Mind you, it's worth a lot more than a fiver, isn't it?

0:37:530:37:56

-Hope so.

-It really is.

0:37:560:37:57

It's a little bit more than a sovereign

0:37:570:37:59

-cos there's a bit of decoration, it's mounted.

-Yeah.

0:37:590:38:01

-It's got a little filigree bit on the outside.

-Yes.

0:38:010:38:04

-And a bit for a chain...

-Yeah.

-..so that's good.

0:38:040:38:06

-So, fingers crossed we get the top end of Kate's estimate.

-Yes.

0:38:060:38:08

-That would be nice.

-It would be nice, yes.

-Yeah.

0:38:080:38:10

We're going to find out, OK?

0:38:100:38:12

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:38:120:38:14

Bids are in here. We start 110.

0:38:140:38:17

Take 120 on the sovereign. At 110 is bid.

0:38:170:38:20

Is there 120 now?

0:38:200:38:21

At a 110 bid.

0:38:210:38:23

130 bid then on the net. 130 bid. 140.

0:38:230:38:27

150. 60.

0:38:280:38:30

170. 180.

0:38:300:38:32

180. Back of the room has it at 180 bid. Is there 190 now?

0:38:330:38:37

That's the reserve, so it'll sell at 180.

0:38:370:38:39

Is the 190 now? We're all done? It's 180 bid. Any advance?

0:38:390:38:43

Oh, that was short and sweet, wasn't it?

0:38:430:38:46

-Yeah.

-We just got it away.

-We did, yes.

-£180.

-Yeah.

0:38:460:38:49

It's a lot better than the old fiver in the pocket.

0:38:490:38:51

-It is.

-Isn't it?

-Yes, it is.

-Well, good luck to you.

-Thank you.

0:38:510:38:54

Next we headed north to Eighteen Eighteen Auctioneers

0:38:580:39:01

in South Lakeland, in Cumbria,

0:39:010:39:03

where auctioneer David Brookes wielded the gavel

0:39:030:39:06

over Bob's projector.

0:39:060:39:07

Sadly, Robert can't be with us today,

0:39:100:39:12

but we do have his 9.5mm projector and our expert, Paul.

0:39:120:39:16

-It's got condition on its side...

-Yeah.

0:39:160:39:18

..but they're not the most - as you know - sellable of things.

0:39:180:39:22

From Magic Lantern down to toy cine projectors,

0:39:220:39:25

-it's not the most aggressive of markets.

-No. No, it's not.

0:39:250:39:28

Anyway, we're going to find out right now. Good luck. Here we go.

0:39:280:39:31

£30, please. 30.

0:39:320:39:35

Start me as 20 then. It's a bit of fun.

0:39:350:39:37

Put it on your desk at home.

0:39:370:39:38

20? There's no point starting any lower. Come on.

0:39:400:39:43

Surely somebody must want this delightful thing for £20.

0:39:430:39:47

No interest.

0:39:470:39:48

No. You're right.

0:39:480:39:51

No interest at £20.

0:39:510:39:52

A tough thing to get away,

0:39:520:39:54

even for £20.

0:39:540:39:55

-Yeah, no money.

-No money at all.

-I think he had a premonition.

0:39:550:39:58

That's why he stayed at home.

0:39:580:40:00

Could well be. Could well be.

0:40:000:40:02

Finally, we headed back to Clevedon Salerooms in Somerset

0:40:040:40:07

to test the market for Sue's fabulous pair

0:40:070:40:10

of Lalique vases.

0:40:100:40:11

Marc Burridge was still on the rostrum.

0:40:110:40:14

2,700 in the room. Thank you.

0:40:140:40:16

Going under the hammer right now, we have a great name -

0:40:160:40:19

one of the most desirable in glass - Lalique.

0:40:190:40:21

You've heard it before.

0:40:210:40:22

It's quality and it's going under the hammer,

0:40:220:40:24

a pair of vases belonging to Sue.

0:40:240:40:26

Why are you selling such a treasured possession?

0:40:260:40:29

-Well, my children aren't interested.

-They don't like it.

0:40:290:40:31

They like it, but they don't want it.

0:40:310:40:34

It's just, like, wow -

0:40:340:40:36

-Lalique, opalescent and Art Deco and period.

-Yeah.

0:40:360:40:39

And that's his thing, you see. He loves anything Art Deco.

0:40:390:40:42

But it's that opalescent.

0:40:420:40:43

For me, that's the best in Lalique, that sort of iridescence,

0:40:430:40:46

and you look up and you go, "Oh, you see the blues."

0:40:460:40:49

-Yeah.

-Yeah, it's quality.

0:40:490:40:51

Right now we're going to do our very best right here

0:40:510:40:53

in the Clevedon Salerooms.

0:40:530:40:54

-This is it. Ready, Sue?

-Yeah.

-Go to business.

0:40:540:40:57

I'll start the bidding here on the book at £1,200.

0:40:590:41:03

Right. We're straight in.

0:41:030:41:05

1,400. 1,500 in the room.

0:41:050:41:08

1,600 now.

0:41:080:41:10

1,600 here.

0:41:100:41:12

1,700. 1,700.

0:41:120:41:15

1,800. 1,800. 1,900. 2,000.

0:41:150:41:20

I'll go easy stages. 2,100.

0:41:210:41:25

2,200.

0:41:250:41:28

2,300.

0:41:280:41:30

2,400.

0:41:300:41:34

2,500.

0:41:340:41:35

2,500 bid. 2,600.

0:41:370:41:40

2,600 on Craig's phone.

0:41:410:41:44

At £2,600.

0:41:440:41:46

2,700?

0:41:460:41:47

2,700? Anyone in the room?

0:41:480:41:51

Selling then on the phone at 2...

0:41:510:41:53

-2,700, thank you.

-Yes. Late legs. Look.

0:41:530:41:55

Chap just put his hand up. Did you see that?

0:41:550:41:58

-I did.

-2,900.

-2,900.

0:41:580:42:00

2,900.

0:42:000:42:02

2,900 bid. 3,000.

0:42:020:42:05

-Go on.

-3,000 on the phone.

0:42:050:42:08

3,100?

0:42:080:42:09

3,200?

0:42:100:42:12

No. £3,100.

0:42:120:42:14

And selling at 3,100.

0:42:140:42:16

All done at 3,100.

0:42:160:42:18

Clocked up £3,100.

0:42:190:42:21

-Sue, that's a lot of money.

-It is.

0:42:210:42:23

And spot-on. Spot-on, Thomas. Well done.

0:42:230:42:25

-Thank you ever so much to both of you.

-Oh, no.

0:42:250:42:27

Thank you for bringing them in. It's all about you and your items.

0:42:270:42:30

Enjoy that money, won't you?

0:42:300:42:32

Thomas, you were spot-on. Well done.

0:42:320:42:35

What a fantastic result. I was so happy for Sue.

0:42:350:42:38

A top "Flog It!" moment.

0:42:380:42:40

Well, that's it for today's show.

0:42:430:42:45

I've had a great time exploring the magnificent Powis Castle

0:42:450:42:48

looking at some of the fine art and treasures

0:42:480:42:51

in the castle's lavish interior.

0:42:510:42:53

You've shown us your treasures from around the country

0:42:530:42:56

and we've had some fun times in the auction rooms,

0:42:560:42:58

so join us again soon.

0:42:580:43:00

But until then, it's goodbye.

0:43:000:43:01

Paul Martin presents a collection of interesting and previously unseen finds from the show's travels round the country, visiting Muncaster Castle in Cumbria, The Bowes Museum in County Durham, the Grand Pier in Weston-super-Mare in Somerset and Norwich Cathedral in Norfolk.

Antiques experts include Kate Bateman, Paul Laidlaw, Jonathan Pratt, James Lewis and Thomas Plant, with items ranging from a pair of Lalique vases to a 9.5mm projector.

Plus Paul takes a tour around Powis Castle in Wales, finding out about their collection of Indian artefacts housed on site in the Clive Museum.


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