Greenwich 23 Flog It!


Greenwich 23

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LineFromTo

Today, we're on the banks of the River Thames in the capital city

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and we are treading on regal ground here at the Old Royal Naval College

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in Greenwich, because kings and queens were born on this site,

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including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I.

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The building which stands today was designed by the architect

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Sir Christopher Wren, as a grand sanctuary for wounded

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and retired seamen in the 18th century.

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So, with so much history,

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and a fantastic queue, laden with antiques and collectables,

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what more could we ask for?

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Welcome to "Flog It!".

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The Royal Borough of Greenwich here in London carries a unique legacy.

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A crown charity owns much of the land

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and it has been providing charitable support to Royal Navy veterans

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and their families for more than 300 years.

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There's something so special about Greenwich

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which I can't explain.

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Maybe, possibly, it's because this is where the hemispheres meet.

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Longitude is measured at zero degrees,

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and every place on Earth is measured east or west of this line,

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so we'd better stay on course here today

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at the Old Royal Naval College,

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because this lot only have one thing on their mind.

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They want to know the answer to that all-important question, which is...

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-ALL:

-What's it worth?!

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You'll find out.

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Our expert Mark Stacey is a wealth of knowledge...

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I can tell you straight away, without reference books,

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that's a cup, a teacup.

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-Wow.

-Are you impressed?

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Yeah.

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..while Philip Serrell is stealing a few accessories for himself.

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You put it over your shoulders.

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Yeah, it's really lovely. Thank you.

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-It looks very nice.

-Bye-bye.

-Oh, no! Don't...

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So, let's open the doors and get everyone into the glorious,

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painted hall, so we can get those valuations going.

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But before all that,

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let's take a peek at what's happening in today's show.

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Now, come on, Philip, don't spare the horses.

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-What's the name of the pub?

-Coach & Horses.

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-What are you looking at?

-A coach with no horses.

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-So it's actually the Coach & No Horses.

-True.

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And, of course, there's always the sweet smell of success.

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-Oh, yes.

-It confirms what I think.

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-This is auctions for you.

-I don't believe it.

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And this is the very first letter that Admiral Lord Nelson wrote with

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his left hand after losing his right arm in battle.

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Later on in the programme, I explore how he became the nation's hero.

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The Old Royal Naval College started out life

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as the Royal Hospital for Seamen.

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It was built in the 18th century,

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designed to give refuge and shelter to retired or injured sailors.

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It even had its own bakery and brewery here,

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the latter proving very popular with the naval pensioners.

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They were given a daily beer allowance,

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and quite often some of them got into trouble,

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so the hospital had to come up with clever ways of dealing

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with the drunken behaviour.

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They made an example of them.

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They told them to wear yellow jackets,

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and they were called canaries,

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and they were assigned menial duties,

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so they could be spotted by everybody else.

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Right now, we're catching up with expert Philip Serrell,

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and hopefully, he's keeping himself out of trouble

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at the valuation table.

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June, how are you? All right?

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-Fine, thank you.

-Were you there?

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No.

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In 1966?

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No, I was too young.

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Do you know, I can remember coming back from a Scout camp

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for the day of the World Cup final.

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-Scouts.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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I'm a lot younger than I look.

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So, this isn't actually a programme from the final, is it?

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This is more of a tournament programme.

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But if we open it up,

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it's quite a special tournament programme, isn't it?

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-It is.

-Because look at this here. Fantastic.

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How do we know that all of these are genuine?

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Well, my son-in-law's great uncle was a cameraman.

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-Really?

-Yeah, at that particular game

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and he got them from the players themselves.

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Now, this is going to test my memory now.

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-Gordon Banks was in goal.

-Right.

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-George Cohen, full-back.

-Right.

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Ray Wilson was left-back.

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-Nobby Stiles, he was right-half.

-Yeah.

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Jackie Charlton, centre-half.

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The greatest player of them all, Bobby Moore.

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Geoff Hurst, inside-left,

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and he is the only man to have scored a hat-trick

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in a World Cup final.

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The great Bobby Charlton at centre-forward.

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And then we've got Martin Peters at inside-right

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and Alan Ball at outside-right.

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-And we've got Alf Ramsey, who was the England manager.

-Yeah.

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England won 4-2 in extra time, with the Geoff Hurst hat-trick.

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It was the first time that we'd won the World Cup

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-and, I have to say, we haven't won it since.

-Since.

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So, where were you when this was being played?

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I was at Clacton, on holiday.

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-Really?

-In a caravan, yeah, and we were watching it

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on a small television.

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Were you cheering?

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-Yeah! Of course we do, don't we?

-Yeah.

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So, what's it worth?

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Well, it's up for you to say!

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-Well, it says here two and sixpence.

-Six.

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That's twelve-and-a-half pence, isn't it?

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It's worth more than that, isn't it?

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It is, it is, a lot more than that.

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-All them signatures and...

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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Worth £50?

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-I would think so.

-Would you?

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And more, yeah, I would think so.

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-Worth £100?

-Well, I would think so, but...

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OK, this is what I...

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This is what I think we should auction estimate it at.

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I think we should put an estimate on it of £200 to £300

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and I think we should put a reserve on it of 180.

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-Right.

-Are you happy with that?

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Yeah.

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I've got a line for you now.

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So, on that note, they think it's all over.

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It is now.

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And here comes Hurst, he's got...

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Some people are on the pitch. They think it's all over.

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-It is now. It's four!

-CHEERING

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Yes, if you didn't know,

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that was the legendary commentary line from the match.

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Speaking of legends,

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what's Mark up to?

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-Kevin, Meg, this is a bit of an unusual one for us.

-Yes.

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Let's identify what we've got.

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You got hearts, you've got clubs, I've got diamonds and spades,

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so I think we're talking playing games here, aren't we?

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-Possibly.

-Yes.

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-Bridge.

-Bridge.

-Yes.

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I've never anything like this.

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-I've seen bridge chairs with the various suits on them...

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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..and you get bridge ashtrays,

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and you get bridge pens enamelled with, again, the suit of clubs,

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-but I've never seen a little set of tables.

-No.

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And they're beautifully... I love the turned legs.

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Where have they come from?

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They were left to me by a neighbour I used to look after.

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She was a very keen bridge player.

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-Was she?

-Yes.

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And you followed in her suit, did you?

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No, unfortunately.

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-Do you know what? I don't know how you play bridge, either.

-No.

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You know... Well, I love these. I think they're great fun.

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They're unusual.

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It's quite interesting, you know,

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-cos I've looked at them and I think the top is oak...

-Yes.

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..but the legs may be some sort of fruit wood.

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-Each one of them seems to be carved with a different pattern.

-Yeah.

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And these have been done by hand,

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so somebody's taken, like, a hot poker or something

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and then carved all of this in.

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I mean, it's difficult to date them.

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I love the turned legs, so I'd like to think they were, sort of,

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-late Victorian, Edwardian.

-Mm-hmm.

-Yes.

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So, they go back 100 years or so.

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-Nice.

-Yes.

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And I just think, if you like playing cards,

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or even if you'd just like four different lamp tables

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or coffee tables in your house,

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these would go down a treat, wouldn't they?

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I think they are.

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The condition is generally very good.

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One of you is holding a wobbly leg.

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-Yes.

-You've got the wobbly leg.

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-I've got the wobbly leg.

-And I mean the table, of course.

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-Of course.

-And I've got a bit of a chip here,

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but, other than that, they're in good condition.

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-Yeah.

-Very good, yes.

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I think if we put £100-£150 on the four...

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-Very nice.

-..and we'll put £100 reserve fixed.

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-Lovely.

-Lovely, yes.

-Because if you can't get 100 for them,

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I don't think you should sell them.

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-No.

-No.

-But I wouldn't be surprised if they make a bit more than that.

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-I think they're wonderful.

-That's very nice.

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Thank you very much, indeed. I love it.

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All I can say now is, anybody for cards?

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Well, it's not fun and games for everyone here today.

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-I'm talking to Linda, who is sitting patiently.

-Mm-hmm.

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I thought she was admiring the ceiling and the wonderful artwork,

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-but actually...

-I have.

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-Yeah, but you've been doing some revision, haven't you?

-I have.

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-What's all this about?

-It's all about neuromuscular fitness.

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Right, OK, so what do you do, then?

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-I teach Pilates.

-Oh, do you?

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-Yes.

-Oh, right, OK. Oh, so you're very healthy, then.

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Well, sort of, yeah!

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And how's your antique skills?

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-Not very good, no.

-What have you brought along for us?

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-I've brought...

-Where have you come from?

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-I'm originally from Newcastle, but I live down here in Bexley...

-Yeah.

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..so I've brought that, which was given to me by my grandmother.

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-Good make.

-Yeah, very nice.

-Boxed and ready to go.

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-And...

-Very small, though.

-Very small, and then I've got...

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Oh, that's more like it.

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That's quite old. I've got lots of Georg Jensen.

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Oh, wow, that's really nice.

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-You know, Jensen's really collectable.

-Yeah.

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-It's lovely, I do like it.

-It's up there with the best.

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-Yeah.

-Yeah, it's really nice.

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That could be worth a lot of money, that little box, for you.

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-I hope so!

-Well, look, good luck. SHE LAUGHS

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-Thank you.

-Good luck.

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-Ray, how are you?

-How do you do, Philip? Pleased to meet you.

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Yeah, you too. You, too. This is lovely.

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Have you got a connection with this?

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Yes, I worked on this pub, the Coach & Horses,

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-when it was refurbished.

-Right.

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And when was that?

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Back in the mid-'90s.

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And this was thrown in the skip.

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I was sat having my lunch break when they threw it in the skip.

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And what was your role in the refurbishment?

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Well, I was a painter and decorator on the refurbishment.

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You didn't do the ceiling here, did you?

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Not really, no! A bit before my time.

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OK, well, I think it's really interesting

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and there's a process that you can go through that dates it for you,

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because the brewery is a local one.

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-It was set up in Bethnal round about 1860-ish.

-Oh, really?

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And they merged with a much larger brewery and they became part

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of that large concern at the back end of the 1970s.

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So, you'd, kind of, think from that that this might date

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to somewhere between 1955 and 1965. Would you agree with that?

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Yeah, I would agree with that, because it's on a metal base.

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Yeah, absolutely, because a lot of these originally

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-would have been wooden, wouldn't they?

-Yeah.

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But there's one thing about it that I absolutely love.

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Right.

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Does anything strike you strange in any way?

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You know, it does seem a little bit twisted.

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-So, you think it's slightly twisted?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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-But it's character, isn't it? I like the character.

-Anything else?

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-Not really, no.

-What's the name of the pub?

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Coach & Horses.

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What are you looking at?

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A coach with no horses.

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A coach and no horses, so it's actually the Coach & No Horses.

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-True!

-You know, it's all hand-painted and you can tell.

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If you look all around here,

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you can actually see the brushstrokes,

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and just here, look, you can just see where the paint's run.

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I think... I love it and it's...

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I would have really loved it, if it had been wooden,

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perhaps turn of the last century. That would have been great.

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You'd have been talking hundreds and hundreds of pounds

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and I think if this were just on a piece of canvas,

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-you know, you'd be thinking perhaps £40-£60, £50-£80.

-Yeah.

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That's what we should use as an estimate.

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Put £50-£80 on it and put a reserve on it of £40,

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but I just think it's a great bit of fun

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and what would be lovely is if

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a pub called the Coach & Horses bought it,

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but I suspect this is going to

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just end up as a decorative item in someone's house.

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-Yeah.

-Are you happy with that?

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I'm fine with that, yeah.

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What you should have done, you know, is get another piece of metal

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-and paint in some horses just here!

-Put a horse on it. Yeah!

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Well, I'll tell you what, it's going really well.

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We're having a fabulous time here.

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Enjoying yourselves, everyone?

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-ALL:

-Yes!

-Yes, that's what it's all about.

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Right now, our experts have found their first three items

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to take off to auction.

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This is where it gets exciting.

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Anything could happen.

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Don't disappear, it could be a roller-coaster ride.

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Hang on to those armchairs.

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Here's a quick recap of all the items that are going

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under the hammer.

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We've got team spirit, so let's hope we can score with this World Cup

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football programme from 1966,

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with all of the players' signatures.

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And we need a good deal

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for these card coffee tables.

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The drinks are on Philip if we can get a good price

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for the Coach & Horses pub sign.

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We're heading now to our auction room in Chiswick, west London,

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which is home to London's largest and oldest brewery.

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300 years ago, London was home to thousands of breweries,

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large and small,

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but Fuller's is the only one that has survived since then.

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Unfortunately, there's no time for a pint right now,

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as we need to head ten minutes up the road to Chiswick Auctions.

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Stephen Large and William Rowse are on the rostrum.

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Remember, when you're selling at auction, or buying,

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you need to pay a commission fee,

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which here, today, it's 15% plus VAT.

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First up, the coffee tables.

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Kevin, it's good to see you. Where's Meg?

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She's poorly at the moment. She's sick.

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-Rather than suffer and give it to anybody else...

-Yeah, in bed.

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-In bed. Exactly, exactly.

-We're grateful for that.

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Anyhow, we've got this wonderful set of little tiny occasional tables.

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-I adore them.

-Oh, they're brilliant.

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-They're bridge tables.

-Bridge tables, yeah.

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Hopefully, they'll find a loving home

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with someone that plays cards and someone that loves furniture.

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Well, I've been very realistic. £100-£150.

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-Not a lot of money.

-They've got to make 100.

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Let's find out what the bidders think.

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They're going under the hammer right now.

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Good luck, both of you. Here we go.

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Bridge occasional tables.

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I haven't seen a little set like this before.

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421, an unusual lot.

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Start me, at £100 to go.

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100 is bid. Next to me at 100.

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110, I'll take elsewhere.

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So far, it's a maiden bid of 100.

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Is that it?

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For £100...

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Are we all done, then?

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Selling for £100.

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In the room at 100...

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Hammer's gone down, £100.

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What a pity, but the money's there.

0:14:300:14:33

-The money's there, isn't it?

-The money's there.

0:14:330:14:35

-£25 a table.

-It's not a lot, really, is it?

0:14:350:14:36

-Yeah, that's right. No.

-No.

-That was good.

0:14:360:14:38

Right, now it's time for last orders.

0:14:420:14:44

Yes, there's a nice link to that pub sign.

0:14:440:14:46

Philip's laughing. Ray, it's great to see you. Who's this?

0:14:460:14:48

I'm Jane. I'm his wife.

0:14:480:14:50

Oh, hello. You weren't at the valuation day, were you?

0:14:500:14:52

-I wasn't, no.

-Well, thank you for joining us today.

0:14:520:14:54

I love this pub sign.

0:14:540:14:55

50 quid?! What a bargain!

0:14:550:14:57

Absolutely. A great decorator's piece.

0:14:570:14:58

Yeah, I hope it goes for twice as much,

0:14:580:15:00

because, you know, the Coach & Horses,

0:15:000:15:02

that's an iconic name in pubs, isn't it?

0:15:020:15:04

Right, let's find out what the bidders think, shall we?

0:15:040:15:06

Here we go. Let's hope for that top end of the estimate.

0:15:060:15:08

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:15:080:15:10

A very good example.

0:15:110:15:12

I've got some interest.

0:15:120:15:13

Let's try and start this off at £40.

0:15:130:15:15

We're not going to go any lower than £40.

0:15:150:15:17

£40 is bid.

0:15:170:15:18

-Great. Come on.

-£40. Any advance on £40?

0:15:180:15:21

Is there a bid? 45, in the room.

0:15:210:15:23

Yeah, I think we're going to sell now.

0:15:230:15:25

-We're going to sell.

-£45, in the room.

0:15:250:15:27

£50, on the internet.

0:15:270:15:29

55, sir? It's 55, in the room.

0:15:290:15:31

£55.

0:15:310:15:32

Someone's going to be happy.

0:15:320:15:34

£60. 65...

0:15:340:15:35

Would you like 65, Tony?

0:15:350:15:37

65, in the room.

0:15:370:15:38

At 65, yes.

0:15:380:15:40

£70, on the internet.

0:15:400:15:41

It's against you. Going for 75?

0:15:410:15:43

75, in the room.

0:15:430:15:44

80, on the internet.

0:15:440:15:46

Brilliant, brilliant.

0:15:460:15:47

-This is more like it.

-85?

0:15:470:15:49

-Come on, come on...

-It's 85, in the room.

0:15:490:15:50

And don't spare the horses!

0:15:500:15:52

£90, on the internet.

0:15:520:15:53

95? 95, in the room.

0:15:530:15:55

We're pushing it up. 95, in the room.

0:15:550:15:57

£100, on the internet.

0:15:570:16:00

£100 - that's the room out.

0:16:000:16:02

£100.

0:16:020:16:03

I think that's going to be it. Any further interest?

0:16:030:16:05

We're selling at £100.

0:16:050:16:06

-Yes, we've done it.

-It's selling.

0:16:060:16:08

-It's now sold at £100.

-Yes!

0:16:080:16:10

We did get twice the bottom end and that's gone online,

0:16:100:16:12

hopefully, to a collector, and that'll be on the wall somewhere,

0:16:120:16:16

where it belongs.

0:16:160:16:17

-A work of art.

-Yes.

-Thank you so much for coming in.

0:16:170:16:20

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:16:200:16:21

-Lovely to meet you, as well.

-Thank you.

0:16:210:16:22

Next up, the 1966 World Cup programme.

0:16:220:16:26

June, you're a footie fan, aren't you?

0:16:270:16:29

This one's going to hit the back of the net, that's for sure.

0:16:290:16:31

-Hope so.

-I hope so.

-Oh, it will do.

0:16:310:16:33

Real legends, weren't they?

0:16:330:16:34

-Yeah, especially with the signed autographs.

-Yeah.

0:16:340:16:36

So, why are you selling this?

0:16:360:16:38

-Well, it's my son-in-law's...

-OK.

0:16:380:16:40

-..and he does nights, so he isn't here.

-OK.

0:16:400:16:42

And he, erm... I think he wants to do his motorbike up.

0:16:420:16:45

Right, OK. Let's see what we can do.

0:16:450:16:47

Let's put the tournament programme to the test

0:16:470:16:50

and it's going under the hammer now.

0:16:500:16:51

The World Championship 1966 football programme.

0:16:520:16:57

And start me at £150 to go.

0:16:570:17:00

150 is bid. 200 is bid, on the internet.

0:17:000:17:03

Straight in at 200.

0:17:030:17:05

-200.

-Yeah.

-That's a good start.

0:17:050:17:07

We're in there straight away at 200.

0:17:070:17:09

Is that it?

0:17:090:17:10

220.

0:17:110:17:13

Come on, come on, come on, a couple more bids.

0:17:130:17:14

A signed programme at £220.

0:17:140:17:18

At 220...

0:17:180:17:20

I'm going to sell it, then, for 220.

0:17:200:17:23

Make no mistake. We're all done, at 220.

0:17:230:17:25

-Yes, yes...

-That's good, isn't it?

0:17:260:17:28

-Yes.

-I'm really pleased with that. £220, that'll help.

0:17:280:17:30

-Well done.

-That will help, won't it?

0:17:300:17:32

-It was only in the drawer, so...

-Yeah!

0:17:320:17:34

Yeah.

0:17:340:17:35

Gosh, there you are. Wasn't that exciting?

0:17:400:17:42

Our first lots done and dusted under the hammer,

0:17:420:17:44

and we are coming back here later on.

0:17:440:17:46

Right now, I'm going back to Greenwich, to visit

0:17:460:17:48

the National Maritime Museum, to find out about

0:17:480:17:51

one of our national heroes,

0:17:510:17:52

someone who helped put the Great in Britain, Horatio Nelson.

0:17:520:17:56

The 18th century was a turbulent period for the Royal Navy.

0:18:020:18:06

While the dockyards were bustling with activity,

0:18:060:18:09

ferocious battles with the Dutch, Spanish and French

0:18:090:18:12

were happening at sea.

0:18:120:18:14

This was the backdrop for a confident young sailor

0:18:140:18:17

from humble beginnings to make a name for himself.

0:18:170:18:20

The National Maritime Museum, next door to the Naval College,

0:18:220:18:26

holds a massive collection of several thousand items

0:18:260:18:29

relating to Nelson, including paintings of battles,

0:18:290:18:33

the clothes he wore, and even the personal letters he wrote.

0:18:330:18:37

Right from his early days in the Navy,

0:18:390:18:41

Nelson was always ambitious and he rose through the ranks rapidly.

0:18:410:18:44

When he was stationed as a young lieutenant in Italy,

0:18:440:18:47

he wrote to his new wife, Fanny.

0:18:470:18:49

"I wish to be an Admiral and in command of the English fleet.

0:18:500:18:54

"I should very soon either do much or be ruined."

0:18:540:18:57

Although Nelson was not from a privileged background,

0:19:000:19:03

his mother's brother, Captain Maurice Suckling,

0:19:030:19:06

took control of Nelson's career from when he was 12 years old.

0:19:060:19:10

His uncle made sure Nelson spent a lot of time at sea

0:19:110:19:14

and acted as his sponsor.

0:19:140:19:17

In the Navy, the system allowed sailors to rise up

0:19:170:19:20

through the ranks.

0:19:200:19:21

Nelson was trained up and his clear talent was spotted.

0:19:210:19:25

Most of us have an image of Horatio Nelson - the iconic image,

0:19:270:19:31

as a man wearing an eye patch and the loss of one arm.

0:19:310:19:33

Well, it may surprise you to know that he actually didn't

0:19:330:19:36

lose his eye - he lost the sight in one eye,

0:19:360:19:38

so he never wore an eye patch.

0:19:380:19:40

His eye remained intact, and he lost his right arm three years later

0:19:400:19:44

at the Battle of Santa Cruz in Tenerife.

0:19:440:19:46

Now, what we have here is a letter in front of me that he wrote for

0:19:460:19:50

the very first time with his left hand,

0:19:500:19:52

and he's writing to his superiors,

0:19:520:19:54

telling them that he's just lost the battle, but it begins with,

0:19:540:19:58

"I became a burden to my friends and useless to my country.

0:19:580:20:02

"I became dead to the world."

0:20:020:20:04

And here on the back, it says, "You will excuse my scrawl,

0:20:040:20:08

"considering it is my first attempt."

0:20:080:20:11

Now, is this Nelson emotional and depressed?

0:20:130:20:15

Well, if it is, then it's short-lived,

0:20:150:20:18

because Nelson was a fighter

0:20:180:20:19

and, a few years after losing his arm, he writes,

0:20:190:20:22

"I am envious only of glory.

0:20:220:20:24

"If it is a sin to covet glory,

0:20:240:20:26

"then I am the most offending soul alive."

0:20:260:20:29

It was the victorious Battle of Cape St Vincent in 1797

0:20:330:20:37

that made Nelson famous.

0:20:370:20:41

He attacked a Spanish ship vastly superior to his own

0:20:410:20:45

and boarded it in armed combat.

0:20:450:20:47

From that ship, he then boarded another, even bigger vessel.

0:20:490:20:52

His performance in this and subsequent battles

0:20:540:20:57

ensured Nelson's place in naval history.

0:20:570:21:00

He was mobbed in the streets like a modern footballer or pop star

0:21:010:21:05

and thousands of souvenirs were produced with his face upon them.

0:21:050:21:10

The only thing that tarnished his reputation

0:21:100:21:13

was his love affair with Lady Emma Hamilton.

0:21:130:21:16

She was one of the most glamorous and celebrated women of the day

0:21:170:21:20

and the wife to the Ambassador of Naples.

0:21:200:21:23

It was their scandalous affair at the turn of the 19th century

0:21:230:21:26

which would last for the rest of Nelson's life.

0:21:260:21:29

It was Emma and their daughter, Horatia,

0:21:290:21:31

who were on his mind when he entered the Battle of Trafalgar.

0:21:310:21:35

This painting by JMW Turner depicts the battle against Napoleon

0:21:390:21:43

at Cape Trafalgar in autumn 1805.

0:21:430:21:46

'I'm meeting with James Davey, who is the curator of naval history

0:21:470:21:51

'here at the National Maritime Museum,

0:21:510:21:54

'and can explain what happened on that fateful day.'

0:21:540:21:57

Well, it certainly is Turner on a grand scale.

0:21:580:22:00

Can you talk me through it?

0:22:000:22:02

It was commissioned in 1822 by King George IV

0:22:020:22:06

and finished a couple of years later.

0:22:060:22:08

And is it historically correct?

0:22:080:22:10

It is absolutely not historically accurate,

0:22:100:22:12

and, actually, when the painting first went on display,

0:22:120:22:15

it received quite a lot of criticism.

0:22:150:22:17

A lot of the people that came to see it had actually served in the Battle

0:22:170:22:20

of Trafalgar, but they didn't quite get what Turner was trying to do.

0:22:200:22:23

He's not trying to depict one moment of the battle

0:22:230:22:26

and render an accurate description.

0:22:260:22:27

What he's trying to do is bring together various stages

0:22:270:22:30

-of the battle in one large canvas.

-Sure.

0:22:300:22:33

So, right here in the centre, you have HMS Victory itself,

0:22:330:22:36

this very imposing ship.

0:22:360:22:38

Over here, on the right of the painting,

0:22:380:22:40

you can see the French ship, the Redoutable.

0:22:400:22:43

This was the vessel that the Victory was locked in combat with

0:22:430:22:46

during the majority of the battle.

0:22:460:22:49

Right here, and central to the painting,

0:22:490:22:51

you can see Nelson's famous signal,

0:22:510:22:54

"England expects that every man will do his duty,"

0:22:540:22:57

hanging down from the main mast.

0:22:570:23:00

He hoisted the signal just as the British fleet

0:23:000:23:02

was approaching the enemy,

0:23:020:23:04

but what makes it really, really remarkable is

0:23:040:23:06

this was the first time in naval history that a commander

0:23:060:23:09

had been able to compose a message in his own words

0:23:090:23:12

and communicate it to his entire fleet.

0:23:120:23:14

It was a comforting message that every crew member on each

0:23:140:23:18

of his 27 ships heard as they went into battle.

0:23:180:23:21

Just before the battle commenced,

0:23:240:23:25

he wrote a last amendment to his will,

0:23:250:23:28

while in sight of the French and Spanish fleets.

0:23:280:23:30

He's trying to make sure that Lady Emma and Horatia

0:23:300:23:34

are looked after, if he is killed.

0:23:340:23:36

Admiral Nelson was shot by a musket ball

0:23:440:23:46

in the final hours of the battle,

0:23:460:23:48

but he stayed alive long enough to know that they were victorious.

0:23:480:23:52

And this is the uniform he wore on that fateful day.

0:23:550:23:58

Nelson's last words were, "Thank God I have done my duty."

0:23:580:24:02

And he did.

0:24:020:24:03

His body, pickled in brandy in a cask,

0:24:060:24:08

was brought back to his homeland

0:24:080:24:10

and carried ashore at Greenwich by his beloved men from the Victory.

0:24:100:24:14

Lord Nelson lay in state in the painted hall

0:24:160:24:19

and crowds stacked up inside to see him for one last time.

0:24:190:24:24

More than 30,000 people came here to pay their respects.

0:24:250:24:29

They eyed the coffin with melancholy,

0:24:290:24:31

but Nelson's last wish, that Lady Emma Hamilton be cared for

0:24:310:24:35

after his death, was not upheld.

0:24:350:24:37

Their scandalous affair was a stain on the reputation of this

0:24:370:24:41

national hero and, without support, she died in 1815, in poverty.

0:24:410:24:46

Nelson's daughter, Horatia, was now on her own.

0:24:490:24:53

Earlier, I met with Horatia's

0:24:550:24:57

great-great-great-great- great-granddaughter,

0:24:570:25:00

to find out what happened to Horatia.

0:25:000:25:03

Becks, thanks for meeting me here.

0:25:030:25:06

So, how does it feel being a descendant to Lord Nelson,

0:25:060:25:09

being here where he was laid to rest before being taken to St Paul's?

0:25:090:25:14

Yeah, it's amazing really.

0:25:140:25:15

It's a really special place, this.

0:25:150:25:18

I've never actually been to this spot before.

0:25:180:25:20

-Haven't you?

-No, I haven't, so it's incredible to actually see it.

0:25:200:25:24

And the name Nelson and Horatia crop up regularly throughout the line?

0:25:240:25:30

Yeah, it's been passed down.

0:25:300:25:32

Me and all of my cousins have either

0:25:320:25:35

Horatia or Emma or Nelson in our name somewhere,

0:25:350:25:39

but it's usually a middle name.

0:25:390:25:42

When you hear and you read about Emma dying in poverty,

0:25:420:25:45

what do you think, what do you feel?

0:25:450:25:48

I think it's really sad, because she was such an important person to him

0:25:480:25:53

and she was quite a remarkable woman, really.

0:25:530:25:56

I think, to make a name for yourself

0:25:560:25:58

at a time when women had no social standing, is quite incredible

0:25:580:26:02

and I think he felt confident that she's be taken care of

0:26:020:26:06

and, then, she wasn't, so it was sad.

0:26:060:26:09

So, what happened to Horatia, after she died?

0:26:090:26:12

She went to live with Nelson's sister

0:26:120:26:14

and she was married at 21 and had eight children.

0:26:140:26:18

So, a happy ending for her?

0:26:180:26:20

Yeah, I think so.

0:26:200:26:21

The Battle of Trafalgar sealed Lord Nelson's place in the history books

0:26:270:26:31

as a national hero - a status which would be

0:26:310:26:34

forever enshrined in popular myth and iconography.

0:26:340:26:38

He got the glory that he craved

0:26:380:26:41

and the victory gave Britain an unrivalled supremacy at sea

0:26:410:26:46

for the next 100 years.

0:26:460:26:48

Welcome back to our valuation day venue here

0:26:550:26:58

at the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich.

0:26:580:27:00

It's now time to join up with our experts, to see what other items

0:27:000:27:04

we can find to take off to auction.

0:27:040:27:06

Thank you for coming to visit us on "Flog It!".

0:27:100:27:12

You've brought two very difficult items in

0:27:120:27:15

and you've got a little bit of history.

0:27:150:27:16

Your father was a great collector, is that right?

0:27:160:27:18

He was a collector, yes.

0:27:180:27:20

He used to love going round second-hand shops

0:27:200:27:23

and, when we'd be on holiday,

0:27:230:27:25

he would spend a lot of his time walking around second-hand shops

0:27:250:27:28

and, as kids, we'd be traipsing behind him.

0:27:280:27:31

Oh, no, not another one!

0:27:310:27:33

My mum was never very pleased with all the things he brought home,

0:27:330:27:36

because she'd just think, "That's something else to dust, really!"

0:27:360:27:40

He sounds like a man after my own heart,

0:27:400:27:43

because I love doing that myself.

0:27:430:27:45

He had an eye for things and he'd just buy something he liked.

0:27:450:27:49

This type of collecting field really has grown up over the last 30 years.

0:27:490:27:54

-Yeah.

-I mean, millions of bronzes have been made,

0:27:540:27:58

particularly representing Buddha.

0:27:580:28:01

These are standard representations of the figure, as well.

0:28:010:28:05

The values, of course, depend on the age of the item.

0:28:050:28:08

-Yes, I see.

-To me,

0:28:080:28:11

the earliest they would be, to my eye, is late-19th century.

0:28:110:28:16

So, that's 1880, 1890.

0:28:160:28:18

-Oh, right, OK.

-This one, I quite like because, to me,

0:28:180:28:21

it's got quite a nice patina. It's a nice, brown colour.

0:28:210:28:24

It's had a lot of people touching her.

0:28:240:28:27

All our greasy, dirty hands that go on there, over time,

0:28:270:28:32

-that creates a nice, waxy bronze patina.

-Yeah.

0:28:320:28:37

This one...

0:28:370:28:39

has not really got much of a warmth or colour to it.

0:28:390:28:43

-OK.

-It doesn't mean that it's not old.

0:28:430:28:45

-No.

-But those are some of the things I look for.

0:28:450:28:48

But they are interesting

0:28:490:28:51

and the market likes decorative Asian articles.

0:28:510:28:55

This one, I think we should put in at 200 to £300, with a £200 reserve,

0:28:550:28:59

-so we protect it.

-Yeah.

0:28:590:29:02

This one, I really don't know, to be honest with you.

0:29:020:29:06

What would you like that to sell...

0:29:060:29:08

If you said, "I would like that to make a sum of money,"

0:29:080:29:11

-what would you like it to be?

-I remember him saying that he actually

0:29:110:29:15

preferred that one.

0:29:150:29:16

I think probably

0:29:160:29:19

400, I really do. I do.

0:29:190:29:23

I think we could try it at four to six, with a 400 fixed reserve.

0:29:230:29:27

-Yes.

-I mean, look, I think it might struggle,

0:29:270:29:31

but with the market the way it is, I don't know.

0:29:310:29:34

And when you're valuing things like this,

0:29:340:29:37

when there's great uncertainty,

0:29:370:29:39

it is up for other people to decide.

0:29:390:29:41

If it doesn't make that, I shall blame you.

0:29:410:29:44

-You know that, don't you?

-Obviously, you will, yeah.

0:29:440:29:47

So let's hope we have a good day, Stephen.

0:29:470:29:49

-I hope so, as well.

-Do you know the fun part?

0:29:490:29:51

-Go on.

-We won't know until the auction.

0:29:510:29:54

-No, that's very true.

-But we'll both be smiling after it.

0:29:540:29:56

-All right?

-I hope so, anyway.

0:29:560:29:58

-Great. Thank you, Stephen.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:29:580:30:02

Let's hope Mark's wisdom will fare well at auction.

0:30:020:30:05

Right now, though, we had better stay focused.

0:30:050:30:08

-Greg, how are you?

-I'm fine.

-Good to see you, good to see you.

0:30:080:30:11

-Great.

-Now, what I was hoping that you were going to tell me that your

0:30:110:30:14

-family name is...

-Nelson.

-Nelson.

0:30:140:30:16

And you are actually Gregory Horacio Nelson.

0:30:160:30:19

No, no. Unfortunately not.

0:30:190:30:21

We've failed here, haven't we, miserably.

0:30:210:30:23

-Is this a family thing?

-Yes.

0:30:230:30:25

It was my maternal grandfather's.

0:30:250:30:28

-Your maternal grandfather's? Was he a mariner?

-No.

0:30:280:30:32

He was a farmer... in Nottinghamshire.

0:30:320:30:35

That's fantastic. I'm, sort of, kind of, hoping, we're in Greenwich

0:30:350:30:39

and it might belong to Nelson and you're telling me it's a farmer from

0:30:390:30:42

landlocked Nottingham. And why would he have had it, do you think?

0:30:420:30:45

I'm not even sure whether he might have inherited it.

0:30:450:30:48

-Does it work?

-Yes.

0:30:480:30:50

-It does.

-Let's just have a look at it.

0:30:500:30:52

-Absolutely.

-What we want to do is just open that first drawer there.

0:30:520:30:55

-Yeah, right.

-Just roll that around like that

0:30:550:30:58

and you want to see a maker's name just there.

0:30:580:31:01

-Oh, right, yeah.

-Perhaps someone like Doland.

0:31:010:31:03

-Yeah.

-You'd normally see it just there.

0:31:030:31:06

-We don't know who it's by.

-Nope.

0:31:060:31:08

But we've got all these drawers here which just pull out.

0:31:080:31:12

-Right, yeah.

-And then we've got a cover,

0:31:120:31:15

just on the end,

0:31:150:31:17

and very often you'll find a maker's stamp on there.

0:31:170:31:19

-Oh, right.

-So let's just slide...

0:31:190:31:21

That unscrews as well.

0:31:210:31:22

That just comes open as well, there.

0:31:220:31:24

-Yeah, yeah.

-And then we've got another one here, look.

0:31:240:31:27

-So I just open that.

-Right.

-See what I can see now.

0:31:270:31:32

Absolutely.

0:31:320:31:33

It's a very, very powerful scope, that.

0:31:350:31:39

And I would think that it's possibly a marine one.

0:31:390:31:45

It's got this...

0:31:450:31:47

it looks like a part-mahogany case here, sometimes they're in leather.

0:31:470:31:51

-Right.

-It's brass-mounted here.

0:31:510:31:54

In terms of date,

0:31:540:31:57

I would think it's probably around the last half of the 19th century,

0:31:570:32:02

somewhere between, let's say 1850 and 1880, something like that.

0:32:020:32:07

Right.

0:32:070:32:08

It's missing a case, which it would have had, initially.

0:32:080:32:10

-Yes.

-Possibly leather, possibly wooden.

0:32:100:32:13

-Yeah.

-But I quite like it, actually.

0:32:130:32:15

What's it worth?

0:32:150:32:17

-A good question.

-I think a sensible estimate is £60 to £90.

0:32:170:32:20

-Right.

-And we'll stick a fixed reserve on it at 60 quid for you.

0:32:200:32:23

-Yep.

-And with the internet, this will get caught at auction.

0:32:230:32:27

It'll be picked up and the buyers will be there for it.

0:32:270:32:30

-Right.

-Someone is going to see a profit in it.

0:32:300:32:35

Although Greg's telescope doesn't have a Nelson connection,

0:32:360:32:39

here at the Royal Naval College,

0:32:390:32:41

Nelson became a central part of its maritime history.

0:32:410:32:45

I've just stepped outside for a moment,

0:32:450:32:46

because there is something unusual

0:32:460:32:48

I want you to show you and it's up there with the stone pediment.

0:32:480:32:52

Seven years after Nelson's death in 1805, this pediment,

0:32:530:32:58

entitled The Immortality Of Nelson, was designed by Benjamin West.

0:32:580:33:02

It is over 40 feet long and ten feet high and it depicts Nelson's body

0:33:040:33:09

being handed over to Britannia by a winged female figure,

0:33:090:33:12

representing victory.

0:33:120:33:15

The trident symbolising Britain's domination over the sea.

0:33:150:33:19

Interestingly enough,

0:33:220:33:23

the frieze within the pediment isn't made of stone,

0:33:230:33:27

it's made of coade stone.

0:33:270:33:29

And it's a lot simpler to use because it's made from a mould,

0:33:290:33:32

it's a special sand and a special glass mixed together,

0:33:320:33:34

so you don't have to carve it, so it's cheaper and easier to produce.

0:33:340:33:38

But, boy, does it looks fantastic.

0:33:380:33:40

A lot of coade statues still exist today, but sadly, come the 1840s,

0:33:400:33:45

everybody fell out of favour with coade,

0:33:450:33:47

so the industry really just fizzled out.

0:33:470:33:49

But it does stand the test of time and once it's weathered and it's got

0:33:490:33:53

a bit of detail, a bit of dirt and grubbiness to it,

0:33:530:33:56

the whole thing comes alive.

0:33:560:33:58

Right, back inside now, to catch up with our experts, to see what else

0:34:000:34:03

we can find to take off to auction.

0:34:030:34:05

Naomi, you've brought in a right pair here, haven't you?

0:34:090:34:12

Now, where did they come from?

0:34:120:34:14

Well, it belonged to my grandmother and then they went to my mother

0:34:140:34:19

and 25 years ago, when she died, I took them.

0:34:190:34:23

My grandmother lived in the Argentine.

0:34:230:34:25

-Oh, did she?

-She was Anglo-Argentine.

0:34:250:34:27

-Yes.

-Gosh.

-And I think what must've happened was

0:34:270:34:30

her husband worked for a shipping company

0:34:300:34:33

and I imagine he would have brought them out as a gift for her.

0:34:330:34:36

Gosh, he must really loved her.

0:34:360:34:39

He had a whole array of scent bottles he could have bought.

0:34:390:34:42

I suppose so.

0:34:420:34:43

But he's chosen a wonderful pair of exotic, to match the Argentine.

0:34:430:34:51

As an antiques dealer,

0:34:510:34:53

one of the things I regularly see are scent bottles.

0:34:530:34:57

-Yes.

-Because every Victorian lady had an arrangement.

0:34:570:35:02

They come in all shapes and sizes,

0:35:020:35:04

some silver topped, some gold topped,

0:35:040:35:07

some silver-plated.

0:35:070:35:09

And every time we do a "Flog It!",

0:35:090:35:11

we find something just a little bit different.

0:35:110:35:14

And these are very different.

0:35:140:35:16

We've looked the hallmarks up for you.

0:35:160:35:19

-Yes.

-And they are hallmarked in 1888.

0:35:190:35:21

Now, when you first look at glass like this, which is overlaid,

0:35:230:35:26

so you've got a clear glass and then a green glass and a brown glass

0:35:260:35:30

overlaid and cut away,

0:35:300:35:33

you think of Bohemian.

0:35:330:35:35

They were absolutely skilled at doing this.

0:35:350:35:37

I don't think these are Bohemia. I think these are British.

0:35:370:35:40

And they might have been made in Stourbridge.

0:35:400:35:43

The quality is wonderful.

0:35:430:35:44

I've never seen this colour before.

0:35:440:35:47

I just adore them.

0:35:470:35:49

If I had my way, I'd pack them up and take them home with me,

0:35:500:35:53

but I can't, sadly.

0:35:530:35:55

The difficulty is that one of them has had a bit of damage,

0:35:550:35:58

the hinge has come apart,

0:35:580:36:00

but I think any scent bottle collector would adore these

0:36:000:36:03

for their collection.

0:36:030:36:06

You've had them for a long time, would you be sad to get rid of them?

0:36:060:36:09

I'll be sad, I'll be sad, but I can't take them with me.

0:36:090:36:12

-No.

-And if my family are going to sell them,

0:36:120:36:16

I might as well do that myself.

0:36:160:36:18

-Absolutely.

-And do it here.

0:36:180:36:19

I quite agree with you.

0:36:190:36:21

I've got to put a sensible estimate on them because of the damage.

0:36:210:36:25

So, I think we should put them in, maybe, at...

0:36:250:36:27

..£200 to £300, with a fixed reserve of 200.

0:36:290:36:32

But I think they will make more than that,

0:36:330:36:35

because I think they're absolutely wonderful.

0:36:350:36:38

How do you feel about that?

0:36:380:36:40

-Absolutely fine.

-Are you sure?

0:36:400:36:42

-Yes.

-You've made my day.

0:36:420:36:44

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you so much.

0:36:440:36:46

Well, sadly it's time to say goodbye to all of this.

0:36:500:36:53

We've had a marvellous day

0:36:530:36:54

at the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich.

0:36:540:36:57

Everybody has thoroughly enjoyed themselves.

0:36:570:36:59

But right now, we are making our way up the River Thames,

0:36:590:37:02

to the auction rooms in Chiswick. Here is a quick recap

0:37:020:37:05

of the final items that are going under the hammer.

0:37:050:37:07

Let's hope these bronze Buddhas

0:37:070:37:09

can lead to a path of enlightenment at the auction.

0:37:090:37:13

And wouldn't it be great if we could magnify the value

0:37:150:37:18

of Greg's telescope?

0:37:180:37:20

And I'm sure the collectors will sniff out

0:37:200:37:23

this lovely pair of scent bottles.

0:37:230:37:25

Back at the saleroom,

0:37:280:37:30

Stephen Large and William Rouse are the auctioneers.

0:37:300:37:33

First up, Stephen's Buddhas.

0:37:370:37:39

Stephen, we have two Buddhas going under the hammer, two separate lots.

0:37:390:37:43

We're starting with the smaller lot. This is my favourite, actually.

0:37:430:37:45

-I like this one more.

-You see, I'm with you there.

0:37:450:37:48

Yeah, I know.

0:37:480:37:49

I think the colour... It's got a great patina.

0:37:490:37:52

It's good, it's good. Look, these were your father's, weren't they?

0:37:520:37:55

-They were. He was a collector.

-He collected them. He was in and out of

0:37:550:37:58

-all these little second-hand shops and antique shops.

-That's right.

0:37:580:38:01

Fingers crossed. I just hope we have an exciting moment on this,

0:38:010:38:03

because you never know, we've seen it on the show before.

0:38:030:38:06

-It could happen.

-We do like exciting moments.

0:38:060:38:08

It's an auction, it could be a roller-coaster ride.

0:38:080:38:10

Anyway, this lot is going under the hammer.

0:38:100:38:12

Here's the first of the two.

0:38:120:38:14

There we go. Nice little lot there.

0:38:140:38:17

And a little bit of interest to start me. I'm in at 150.

0:38:170:38:21

Not enough. 160, I'll take.

0:38:210:38:22

With me at £150, for the Buddha.

0:38:220:38:25

150. 160, I'll take.

0:38:250:38:27

Is that it? We've stopped at 150.

0:38:290:38:32

-What are you thinking?

-It's not flying, is it?

0:38:320:38:34

There's nothing coming in...

0:38:340:38:36

which you would expect, obviously.

0:38:360:38:38

Not selling, I'm afraid.

0:38:380:38:39

-That was my favourite.

-Me, too.

0:38:410:38:43

Right, OK.

0:38:430:38:44

Fingers crossed for the next, OK?

0:38:440:38:48

This is... Everyone else rated this one.

0:38:480:38:50

So, hopefully, WE got this one wrong.

0:38:500:38:52

-Which we can do, Paul.

-Which we can do.

0:38:520:38:54

-We often do.

-Here we go. Here's the next lot, Stephen.

0:38:540:38:57

Under the hammer now.

0:38:570:38:58

There we go. I'm bid 350,

0:38:580:39:02

I'm bid 380, I'm bid 400.

0:39:020:39:05

-Here we go.

-£400. 450.

-450.

0:39:050:39:08

480.

0:39:080:39:10

500.

0:39:100:39:11

On the internet, for 500.

0:39:110:39:13

For £500. 550.

0:39:130:39:16

600. Internet bidder of 600.

0:39:160:39:21

At £600, selling it, then.

0:39:210:39:24

It goes for £600, all done.

0:39:240:39:25

£600, there you go, Stephen.

0:39:250:39:28

-Yes.

-600.

-£600.

0:39:280:39:30

-You happy? He's smiling.

-That's the one I thought

0:39:300:39:33

-was the nicer one, personally.

-OK.

0:39:330:39:35

Next up, we have a three-drawer telescope, belonging to Greg.

0:39:390:39:42

This has been in the family a little while, hasn't it?

0:39:420:39:44

-Yes, yes.

-Your grandfather's?

-Yes, but where he got it,

0:39:440:39:48

nobody knows.

0:39:480:39:50

I think it's going to go for that top end.

0:39:500:39:52

-I hope so.

-Happy with this?

-Yes.

0:39:520:39:55

Let's get it in focus. Here we go, this is it.

0:39:550:39:58

The Victorian mahogany and brass three-drawer telescope.

0:39:580:40:01

Very nice, this. I used this earlier.

0:40:010:40:03

Let's start this off at £60.

0:40:030:40:05

Rather attractive.

0:40:050:40:07

-Come on, bidders, come on.

-£60.

0:40:070:40:10

£60, do we have a £60 bid?

0:40:100:40:13

Surely?

0:40:130:40:15

-I don't think so.

-Nope.

-Sadly.

0:40:150:40:18

Nope, no bid.

0:40:180:40:20

No sale, sorry.

0:40:200:40:21

I'm very sorry.

0:40:210:40:23

Look, I think it's meant to be in the family.

0:40:230:40:26

I think it's meant to be in the family.

0:40:260:40:28

Pass it down to the next generation.

0:40:280:40:30

It's such a lovely thing, I'm sure Greg won't mind holding on to it.

0:40:310:40:36

Next, the pair of silver-mounted scent bottles.

0:40:360:40:40

Naomi, thank you very much for coming along to our valuation day

0:40:400:40:43

and bringing, for me, I think one of the best things, the scent bottles.

0:40:430:40:48

-£200 to £300.

-Yes.

-They are fantastic.

0:40:480:40:51

I wouldn't be selling these. I think they look stunning.

0:40:510:40:54

I think they are wonderful.

0:40:540:40:56

They were one of the nicer things I saw.

0:40:560:40:58

-Yes.

-The colour is so unusual.

0:40:580:41:00

Beautiful. It's beautiful.

0:41:000:41:01

We see hundreds of scent bottles.

0:41:010:41:03

Yes. Be prepared to say goodbye.

0:41:030:41:05

I think these will fly away.

0:41:050:41:07

They're going under the hammer right now. This is it.

0:41:070:41:09

A pair of silver-mounted scent bottles.

0:41:100:41:15

Where shall we start this? Start me £150, to go.

0:41:150:41:18

150. 160 with you.

0:41:180:41:20

170, 180, 190, £200, in the room.

0:41:200:41:23

210, 220, 230,

0:41:230:41:26

240, 250, 260, 270,

0:41:260:41:30

280, 290. 290, in the doorway.

0:41:300:41:34

300, on the internet.

0:41:340:41:36

320, on the internet.

0:41:360:41:38

340, in the room.

0:41:380:41:40

360, 380, 400.

0:41:400:41:44

420, 440.

0:41:440:41:47

-Yes!

-Will we get to the 500?

0:41:480:41:50

Yes, we will. We'll get £500, we will get 500, come on.

0:41:500:41:53

-500.

-Yes!

0:41:530:41:55

-Wow.

-550.

0:41:550:41:57

-600. 650.

-Good Lord.

-This is auctions for you.

0:41:570:42:00

I can't believe it.

0:42:000:42:01

700, 750.

0:42:010:42:03

800, 850. £800.

0:42:030:42:05

-They are quality. They're just beautiful.

-900.

0:42:050:42:08

They're definitely English. I thought they were Stourbridge.

0:42:080:42:10

£1,000.

0:42:100:42:11

A thousand?

0:42:110:42:13

1,200, 1,300.

0:42:130:42:15

The internet seems to have stopped.

0:42:170:42:19

We are in the room now, at £1,300, in the far corner.

0:42:190:42:22

At 1,300. Lovely pair of bottles.

0:42:220:42:25

At £1,300.

0:42:250:42:26

All done?

0:42:260:42:28

-Yes!

-Wow.

0:42:280:42:30

-How about that?

-Fantastic.

0:42:300:42:31

How about that? What a lovely surprise.

0:42:310:42:34

-A lovely, lovely surprise.

-You're lost for words.

0:42:340:42:36

-Not quite.

-Come on, then, what do you think?

0:42:360:42:38

Have you got any more like that at home?

0:42:380:42:40

-I think it's terrific.

-Do you know what I think?

0:42:400:42:42

-Thank you so much.

-That was the sweet smell of success.

-It was.

0:42:420:42:45

Do you know, I said to you,

0:42:450:42:46

"Thank you for coming along and bringing those in",

0:42:460:42:49

because that made my day.

0:42:490:42:50

Best thing in the sale for me and what a surprise.

0:42:500:42:52

That's the one we wanted. I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:42:520:42:55

See you for many more surprises to come in another sale room.

0:42:550:42:58

For now, from Chiswick, it's goodbye.

0:42:580:43:01

The Flog It! team visit the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich. Antiques expert Mark Stacey gets very excited about a pair of scent bottles. Paul Martin visits the National Maritime Museum to find out about Admiral Lord Nelson and how he became the nation's hero.


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