Greenwich 22 Flog It!


Greenwich 22

The team are at the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, London. Expert Philip Serrell gets very excited about some cards painted by Mary Fedden.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

This view can only mean one thing.

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Yes, we are in London but we're not at Canary Wharf today.

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We're the other side of the River Thames.

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We're here at the old Royal Naval College in Greenwich.

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This magnificent building was designed by Sir Christopher Wren and I'm

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rather pleased to say for one day only it's home to our valuation day.

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Hundreds of people have turned up from London and beyond, laden with

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antiques and collectables.

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They're here to see our experts to find out, what's it worth?

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And if you're happy with the valuation, what are you going to do?

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-ALL:

-Flog it!

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Greenwich is renowned for its maritime history and it's world famous for

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the meridian that's used to set our clocks according to Greenwich Mean Time.

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Prior to the late 19th century,

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timekeeping was a local phenomenon.

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It wasn't until 1847 that the railways introduced a standardised time to

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help produce train schedules.

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Today, I'm standing on one of the most historic sites in London.

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There was once a medieval palace here,

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which was a favourite home to the royals.

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Henry VIII, Mary I and Elizabeth I

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were all born here and would have

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played in the grounds as young children.

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In the 18th century, it opened its doors as the Royal Naval Hospital

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and welcomed thousands of retired Navy pensioners

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who lived here in pleasant retirement.

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We'll be finding out more about that later on in the show but

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right now we need to get the doors open to get this massive queue inside

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because they're eager to find out the answer to that all-important

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question, which is...

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-ALL:

-What's it worth?

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Our expert Mark Stacey makes sure everyone knows what his role is in the show.

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-I would like to flog it.

-Oh, well, you see, that's why we're here.

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-Well, flog it.

-Because that's what the show's called, isn't it?

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Although Philip Serrell seems to be shirking his responsibilities.

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I really love a man that gives you a thing like this because look,

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he's done all the work, look.

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Hello, how are you?

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And there's always a bit of drama when these two get together.

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Sorry to interrupt. I've found you a wonderful drawing you're going to love.

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-What's that?

-I can't tell you that.

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But I'll show you later but I am sure you're going to want to film it.

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-All right, that's lovely.

-It's right up your street.

-Thank you. Life's always a mystery with Mr Stacey.

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All the action will take place in the gorgeous painted hall that has been

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described as the Sistine Chapel of the UK.

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So while we're getting everyone in, here's a quick look at what's coming up.

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Mark meets an extraordinary man with a fan.

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You took up running at 62?

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-Yes.

-And then what did you do?

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I did 16 marathons.

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-16 marathons, London marathons?

-Yes.

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And Philip's valuation comes as a bit of a shock.

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GASPS

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They've been stuck in a tin, that's been stuck in a cardboard,

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-on the wall.

-Do you think you'll get more?

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And later on in the show, I'll be finding out more about some of the

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pensioners who lived here, and it seems even these grand settings didn't

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stop drunkenness and bad behaviour.

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The architecture here is fantastic.

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So while everyone is settling in,

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let me show you this view from Queen's House.

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When the architect Sir Christopher Wren

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designed this refuge for retired naval veterans in 1696,

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all the plans were meticulously thought through.

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Everything was perfectly symmetrical.

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However, there was one command from Queen Mary II not to spoil the view.

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So this line was left right down the middle,

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creating a gap between the two towers,

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so the royal household could continue looking at the River Thames.

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And right now it's time to go inside and catch up with expert Philip Serrell

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and enjoy the view on his table as we take a closer look at his first item.

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-Tim, how are you?

-I'm OK, thanks, how are you?

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-And are you local?

-Yes, not far away, yes.

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I was desperate to do this the minute I saw this.

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Yes, I noticed you spotted it, yes.

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-I'm glad you did.

-Well, not because of value.

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-No.

-That's a bit of my childhood.

-And mine.

-Really?

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-Yes, it's my own.

-And have you had that since a child?

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-Yes, I have.

-Muffin the Mule started on BBC television in 1946.

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-Yes.

-And was very much an icon of children's television.

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And Matchbox made this model of Muffin the Mule.

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Oh, I didn't know that.

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Yes. I look back at my childhood and I can remember the black and white

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children's television. Andy Pandy, never really got Andy,

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got on with Andy Pandy.

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I thought Bill and Ben were a bit dull, really.

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Yeah, bit more lively.

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But Muffin the Mule was a great character.

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Used to come home after school, watch Muffin the Mule, great stuff.

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-A good memory.

-What do you think it's worth now?

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Not a lot, I don't suppose?

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I think we put a £30 to £50 estimate on it,

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put a reserve on it of £30 and see where we go?

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-Yeah.

-There is one thing that we need to do before we go any further.

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Oh, have a little play?

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Have a little play.

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Are you ready? One, two, three, up.

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There we are. Look at that.

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We've got to try and walk a bit. We're not going anywhere.

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As puppeteers, this isn't doing it, really, is it?

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He used to sit down, didn't he, like that.

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Look at that. That's good. We've got that going really well.

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-Teamwork.

-We'll finish there.

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-Teamwork.

-You're happy with that, yeah?

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-Good to see you.

-Thanks a lot.

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# We want Muffin

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# Muffin the Mule

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# Dear old muffin, playing the fool

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# We want Muffin, everybody sing

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# We want muffin the Mule! #

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While Philip is horsing around,

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I've made a tactical move towards this chess set.

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Barbara, an incredible chess set.

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I play chess, I love chess.

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My son plays chess as well. Do you play chess?

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-No.

-But you got one of the best chess sets I've ever seen, and it's boxed,

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original box.

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So, how long have you had this?

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-Seven years.

-How did you come by this?

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-In a boot sale.

-Oh, don't tell me you paid next to nothing for it?

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-How much did you pay?

-Well, we paid £30.

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That was quite a lot, we thought.

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It is next to nothing for what it is, though.

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£30, considering it's boxed, and it's all there.

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You know they are made by Jaques, don't you,

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a great London maker that dates to the end of the 18th century,

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like the 1790s, they started making quality games.

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They introduced this Staunton set in around 1846,

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named after the grand chess master Howard Staunton.

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There, look, you see Howard Staunton.

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You can see Jaques on the paper label.

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You can see it's got its original mahogany, Cuban mahogany box,

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original lock, hinges, escutcheon, it's all there.

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There's no damage. The right lining as well.

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That's what the collectors want. That box belongs with that set.

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Have you noticed something when you pick these up?

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Pick one up.

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-They are quite heavy.

-That's boxwood, yes, it shouldn't be that heavy.

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It is weighted with a little bit of lead in there.

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What's the idea with that?

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Well, it stops them from wobbling on the board.

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These have been varnished.

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These have been ebonised, they've been stained to look like ebony.

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I have two Staunton chess sets at home.

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Now, they are not the weighted ones, they are the cheaper version of this.

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Also, they came in a cardboard box, not a wooden box.

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This is the Rolls-Royce of Staunton chess pieces.

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This is circa 1900, 1910.

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There is a bit of age to these.

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I think they are fantastic.

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One of the pawns has been replaced.

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It's not original. That one, there.

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Oh, right.

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Also, on the black bishop, it is missing a little tiny finial, there.

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-Can you see that? It's not the same as that one.

-Oh, I see, yes.

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Also, on the king's crown, the king, can you see that?

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-Yes, the top.

-The crown, half of the crown's missing.

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How much do you think they're worth?

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-I haven't got a clue.

-Well, you paid £30 for them.

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I'd say we put them into auction with a valuation of a minimum of £300.

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Very good.

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Yes. Fixed reserve, 300, with the box.

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I'm going to say an auction guide of £300 to £500, with the box,

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as a complete set.

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Lovely, even better.

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Is it something you're prepared to sell?

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Yes. It's only been in the loft.

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-Shall we put them into auction?

-Yes.

-Can't wait to see who inches it.

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Barbara, you've made my day.

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Now it's time to see how the other tables are shaping up.

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-Thanks for coming to Flog It!

-Thank you.

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You brought in this ridiculous little mannequin.

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-Yes.

-It is wonderful, isn't it?

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-She's beautiful.

-How long have you had it?

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About 20 years.

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Why did you get it?

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Because I wanted something to hang my necklaces on.

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Oh, yes, of course.

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There were too many, they all started falling off.

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-She's got to go.

-You've got too many?

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You'll have to get rid of the necklaces, as well.

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-So, where did you find it? At a market or something?

-Yes.

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Can you remember what you paid?

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-Around about £1.

-No!

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-Yes.

-Gosh, that's a bargain.

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-She's beautiful. For £1.

-I think it's great.

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I can't quite work out exactly what it's for.

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-No.

-It could be,

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the Stockmans are quite well known for making shop mannequins.

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Or mannequins for seamstresses, fashion designers.

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It was a young sculptor, Frederick Stockman, in Paris,

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who made the original mannequins out of papier mache.

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Oh, really?

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I wonder whether it may be a tradesman's sample.

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You know, that a travelling salesman could take along with him and show

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the quality of the stitching.

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It's really nicely made.

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-I think it probably dates from the 1930s.

-Really?

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Cos it's got a nice oak base.

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This is nicely aged.

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They're very proud to put the name on there, they are proud of their...

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-Yes.

-..their items, their stock.

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I think it's great fun. You've had it a long time.

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How much do you think it's worth?

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I have no idea.

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Neither do I, in fairness!

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Maybe more, if I put a necklace on it.

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Maybe, if it was a gold necklace.

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I think, actually, we've got to have a little stab at it, really.

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I think if we put it in at £40 to £60 and see what happens.

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The life-size mannequins can make hundreds of pounds.

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I think somebody would really like this.

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I think if we put £40 to £60 on it, but put a £40 reserve, fixed.

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But I think it will make a bit more than that. I think it's wonderful.

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-Let's give it a go, shall we?

-Yes, please.

-Thank you, Anne.

-Thank you.

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Well, the atmosphere is certainly buzzing.

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We're having a fantastic day here.

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Hundreds of people are enjoying these impressive surroundings and

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our experts have worked flat out so far.

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They've found their first items to take off to the saleroom.

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I've got my favourites, you probably got yours.

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But, right now, it's going to be down to the bidders to decide.

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Here's a quick recap of all the items going under the hammer.

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Let's hope this Muffin the Mule puppet

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will pull someone's strings at the auction.

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I've made a brave move in valuing this lovely chess set that Barbara

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brought in. Let's hope we can win on the day.

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And she's used to being on display,

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so let's hope we find the right fit for Anne's mini mannequin.

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Our auction destination today is along the River Thames,

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to West London, in the district of Chiswick.

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Chiswick is a village turned desirable suburb,

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with attractive period properties and generous green space.

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Just up the road at Chiswick Auctions,

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William Rouse is putting our desirables to the test.

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Remember, you will be paying a seller's commission to the saleroom,

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which here is 15% plus VAT.

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Now, if I said Muffin the Mule,

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I bet that brings back memories to many of you.

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I've just been joined by Tim and Philip, our expert,

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who put the value on this.

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-It's great to see you.

-Good to see you, too.

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I can remember, as a young lad, playing with one of these.

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I can remember seeing it in black and white on TV.

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Did you watch Muffin the Mule?

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I loved Muffin the Mule. It's one of my favourites.

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I can't remember any kind of storyline or anything like that.

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I can just remember the mule dancing up and down and the puppeteer with

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all the strings. It's iconic telly.

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That was early BBC.

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Good luck with that. Here we go, this is your lot.

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321, Muffin the Mule.

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A 1950s cold painted metal puppet.

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What's it worth to start me, £30?

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It's got to be worth that. £30 for it.

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30 is bid.

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32 in the room.

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35, 38.

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40. 42. 45. 48.

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50.

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Are we all done, then? £50 it is then.

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That's good. You were spot on, Philip. Are there many left?

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I think there can't be that many left,

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because that's why the ones that are make £50 a time, really.

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That was yours as a young lad, wasn't it?

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Do you feel a little bit sad?

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-I would be.

-I think perhaps I've grown up since then.

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I haven't, nor has he.

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We definitely haven't, have we?

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Let's hope Muffin the Mule will live on for few more years to come.

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Now, I wonder how our next lot will shape up?

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Hopefully we can turn £1 into around £40 or £50.

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That's what Anne would dearly love, wouldn't you?

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Our little mini mannequin cost £1 about 20 years ago.

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You've been hanging your necklaces on it for the last 20-odd years.

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£40 - £60, I agree with that.

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Good quality, good condition, good make.

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I think it might make a bit of a profit.

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People like those quirky things.

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-They do.

-They're very good to buy.

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Anyway, let's find out what this little one makes.

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It's going under the hammer right now.

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381, a miniature mannequin.

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I have not seen one of these before.

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I'm straight in at 40

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and I'm bid £40, 45... I'm bid £50.

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-£50.

-15?

-55 in the room against me.

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55, 60, 65,

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70, 75, 80.

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80 is very good.

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At £80 to my far left.

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Are you all finished? £80 for you, madam.

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-£80.

-And it's going home.

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Thank you very much.

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-Thank you, we enjoyed that. We thoroughly enjoyed that.

-I loved it.

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-Thank you so much.

-It's a good decorator's item.

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And if you've got anything like that, we would love to flog it for you.

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Bring it along to one of our valuation days and fingers crossed we'll be

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coming to a venue near you soon, so dust them down and bring them in.

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Details of the venues are on our BBC website or the BBC Facebook.

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Check it out and join in.

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Anyone for a game of chess?

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Barbara, the big day is now upon us.

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We are here in the saleroom in Chiswick.

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We're talking about the Staunton chess set.

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It's fabulous, I love it and I'd love to buy it,

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but I tell you what, I bet 3-5 on this.

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Remind us, how much did you pay for this?

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£30.

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You're going to be in the money.

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She's going to be in the money. I'd like 550.

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I'd like the top end of my estimate, that's what I'd like.

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-Just that little bit more.

-I'd like that as well!

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I bet you would. Well, let's keep our fingers crossed, OK,

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because it's an auction and anything can happen and that's why they are such great fun.

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And this chess set is going under the hammer right now.

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401 is a Staunton chess set and,

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goodness me, lots of interest in this.

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Lots of interest and a phone bid.

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Straight in at the reserve of 300 and 320.

0:16:400:16:43

I'll take elsewhere, with me at 300.

0:16:430:16:45

340, 360, 380,

0:16:450:16:49

380. 400 on the telephone, 420 with me.

0:16:490:16:53

440, 460, 480, 500.

0:16:530:16:56

550, 600, 620.

0:16:580:17:02

No, I've got £600 and the next bid is 20 if you want it.

0:17:020:17:06

At £600 it's a commission bid.

0:17:060:17:09

With me, then, 600, all done and finished.

0:17:090:17:12

Yes, 600!

0:17:130:17:15

You see, that's quality, a great name, beautiful weight,

0:17:150:17:19

beautifully modelled pieces. What are you going to do with that £600?

0:17:190:17:22

There is commission to pay, everyone has to pay that.

0:17:220:17:24

We'll probably go on a holiday.

0:17:240:17:27

OK? And thank you so much for coming in.

0:17:270:17:29

-It's been a real pleasure because that item was dear to my heart.

-Thanks so much. Yes.

0:17:290:17:32

300...340 in the room.

0:17:360:17:37

Well, that's it, that's our first lots under the hammer.

0:17:380:17:41

We are coming back here later in the show, so don't go away.

0:17:410:17:43

We could have that big surprise. Meanwhile,

0:17:430:17:46

back in Greenwich at the old Royal Naval College, I had the opportunity

0:17:460:17:50

to visit the painted hall and find out more about the pensioners who once lived there.

0:17:500:17:54

So, just before the valuation day I took a guided tour,

0:17:540:17:57

but this was no ordinary tour.

0:17:570:17:59

This was an 18th-century tour with the artist as my guide.

0:17:590:18:03

King William III granted this site as a refuge for old and wounded naval veterans.

0:18:130:18:19

He wanted a Royal Hospital for seamen to be built in memory of

0:18:190:18:22

his late wife Queen Mary II who strongly believed that the country

0:18:220:18:27

owed a debt of gratitude to the sailors who had served.

0:18:270:18:31

Sir Christopher Wren's grand design would show the nation's true appreciation.

0:18:310:18:37

Oh, hi, thank you very much.

0:18:370:18:38

There's your money. Thank you.

0:18:380:18:40

This is just spectacular.

0:18:410:18:44

Look at this!

0:18:440:18:45

Wow! It's breathtaking.

0:18:470:18:49

Imagine a life at sea.

0:18:500:18:52

It's dangerous, it's rough and ready,

0:18:520:18:54

and then you spend your retirement here.

0:18:540:18:57

Originally, this was intended as the dining hall for naval pensioners but

0:18:570:19:01

it was rarely used as one.

0:19:010:19:04

When Sir James Thornhill created his masterpiece on the ceiling there and

0:19:040:19:08

on the walls, everybody just wanted to come in here and look at it.

0:19:080:19:12

I don't blame them because it's jaw-dropping.

0:19:120:19:15

So this quickly became Greenwich's first tourist attraction and many of

0:19:150:19:20

the pensioners that lived here became tour guides.

0:19:200:19:23

The first naval pensioners arrived in 1705

0:19:250:19:28

before building work had even been completed.

0:19:280:19:31

Many of the residents who lived here would have literally seen this room

0:19:320:19:36

take shape and watched Thornhill while he worked.

0:19:360:19:39

The lower hall was finally completed in 1712 and opened to the public

0:19:390:19:44

a couple of years later.

0:19:440:19:46

Now, upon entry, you would pay sixpence for the tour and be given

0:19:470:19:51

a printed booklet.

0:19:510:19:52

I have a copy of one.

0:19:540:19:56

It was produced by Thornhill and it gave a wonderful explanation

0:19:560:19:59

of his work and I'll read you a little bit.

0:19:590:20:02

"Out of all that is given for showing these halls,

0:20:040:20:06

"only three pence in the shilling is allowed to the person that shows it.

0:20:060:20:11

"The rest makes an excellent fund for the yearly maintenance of 140 poor boys

0:20:110:20:17

"who are the sons of mariners that have either been slain or disabled

0:20:170:20:21

"in their service to the country."

0:20:210:20:24

And it goes on to say how this fund keeps "the boys", as he calls them,

0:20:240:20:27

clothed and fed.

0:20:270:20:30

Now, I like that.

0:20:300:20:31

Well, I've paid my sixpence and now I'm meeting with curator Will Palin

0:20:330:20:37

who will explain a bit more about the 18th-century tour.

0:20:370:20:40

So, Will, if I came here as a visitor, let's say, back in 1714,

0:20:410:20:45

is this exactly what I would see?

0:20:450:20:48

Well, you would have had a lot of scaffolding here

0:20:480:20:50

because James Thornhill had just finished the first phase.

0:20:500:20:54

I mean, it is quite impressive, isn't it?

0:20:540:20:56

It really is. There's a lot of detail up there.

0:20:560:20:59

A huge amount of detail and if you stand here and look and spend time

0:20:590:21:05

unravelling the imagery here, you can be here for hours.

0:21:050:21:09

The fact that he produced this little printed booklet - that meant a lot to him.

0:21:090:21:13

He needed to explain what was going on?

0:21:130:21:15

Absolutely. I think people imagine that at the time all this imagery

0:21:150:21:19

would have been easy for the average visitor to understand,

0:21:190:21:23

but of course it wasn't.

0:21:230:21:24

So he thought it was very important to make sure

0:21:240:21:27

that the visitor was armed with a guide so he could decipher and penetrate

0:21:270:21:31

some of the complex allegories and mythology in the painting itself.

0:21:310:21:35

In the booklet, he talks about peace and liberty.

0:21:350:21:38

That's right, the centrepiece shows William III and Mary II,

0:21:380:21:42

who were the founders of the Royal Hospital, under a canopy of state,

0:21:420:21:46

surrounded by the virtues

0:21:460:21:49

and he is trampling on a figure of arbitrary power and tyranny

0:21:490:21:55

and that is Louis XIV,

0:21:550:21:56

so we have William and Mary bringing peace and liberty to Europe and

0:21:560:22:01

triumphing over the Catholic monarchs

0:22:010:22:04

and the tyranny they represent.

0:22:040:22:05

So it's more of a political statement going on up there?

0:22:050:22:09

Absolutely. And of course it's interesting reading between the lines.

0:22:090:22:13

It's a show of confidence and also there's an element of insecurity

0:22:130:22:17

because we were in the ascendancy in Europe,

0:22:170:22:21

certainly in terms of our naval power,

0:22:210:22:23

-but there were still big threats...

-Sure.

-..from Spain, from France.

0:22:230:22:27

So this is asserting a certain world view that we hoped would come to fruition.

0:22:270:22:33

At a staggering 5,683 square feet, the painted hall ceiling was,

0:22:370:22:44

and still is, the largest figurative painting in the country.

0:22:440:22:48

This was Thornhill's greatest achievement

0:22:480:22:51

and he was given a knighthood for his work.

0:22:510:22:53

We know that when he wrote the booklet

0:22:580:23:00

there were around 140 live-in naval pensioners.

0:23:000:23:03

By 1820, there were more than 3,000 residents.

0:23:030:23:08

Let's talk about some of the pensioners who lived here

0:23:110:23:14

and who possibly became tour guides.

0:23:140:23:16

Sure. It must have been a funny thing if you arrived here

0:23:160:23:19

as a sort of naval veteran, a decades-old seaman...

0:23:190:23:22

-Rough and ready.

-..and see this palace.

0:23:220:23:24

It must have been completely overwhelming and slightly absurd.

0:23:240:23:27

But they inhabited these buildings and they lived here,

0:23:270:23:31

quite a boring existence at the time, there was very little to do.

0:23:310:23:34

They were kept going with a very large beer ration.

0:23:340:23:37

There was one particular individual called John Worley who lived until

0:23:370:23:40

-he was 90-plus.

-That's a ripe old age, isn't it?

0:23:400:23:43

Absolutely. He was a real troublemaker

0:23:430:23:45

and he caught Thornhill's eye

0:23:450:23:47

and Thornhill thought this mischievous man was rather amusing

0:23:470:23:50

-and he painted him into the ceiling.

-Did he?

0:23:500:23:53

So, you see the figure with the white beard representing winter.

0:23:530:23:58

That is John Worley himself.

0:23:580:24:00

So it's a nice reference to the pensioners themselves.

0:24:000:24:03

-I think it was the booze that kept him going.

-I'm sure it was.

0:24:030:24:06

In 1824, the painted hall became the National Gallery for Naval Art.

0:24:090:24:13

Paintings covered Thornhill's painted walls, and pensioners

0:24:140:24:18

could earn extra pocket money by giving tours.

0:24:180:24:20

All of these naval paintings are now held at the National Maritime Museum.

0:24:220:24:26

This is a print of an oil painting by Andrew Morton,

0:24:270:24:31

titled United Services 1845.

0:24:310:24:33

It shows us the Chelsea army pensioners in their familiar red coats

0:24:330:24:37

with the Greenwich naval pensioners with their blue coats on.

0:24:370:24:41

But it also shows us a veteran black sailor here, look, Deman,

0:24:410:24:46

who served with Nelson in the West Indies.

0:24:460:24:49

As a boy aged around 13, he came to England and joined the Navy

0:24:490:24:53

and he served in Admiral Lord Nelson's fleet on various ships

0:24:530:24:57

and it's believed he was injured at the Battle of the Nile.

0:24:570:25:00

Being unfit for active duty, he entered Greenwich Hospital

0:25:030:25:07

around the turn of the century, where he gave tours.

0:25:070:25:10

Deman's death was recorded in 1847,

0:25:100:25:13

two years after this painting was displayed at the Royal Academy.

0:25:130:25:16

It really is quite surprising that during the 1850s more than 350 of

0:25:200:25:26

the seamen that lived here came from overseas, including Europe, Africa,

0:25:260:25:30

Asia and the Caribbean, all of whom served Britain in battles at sea.

0:25:300:25:35

Applications to the hospital fell rapidly during the 19th century,

0:25:390:25:43

thanks to a long period of peace

0:25:430:25:45

after the victory in the Napoleonic Wars.

0:25:450:25:48

The hospital closed in 1869.

0:25:510:25:54

The buildings were then taken over by the Royal Naval College for

0:25:540:25:58

officers' training until 1998.

0:25:580:26:01

Although the pensioners are long gone,

0:26:050:26:07

the doors have been opened to the public

0:26:070:26:10

and it is free for all, for everyone

0:26:100:26:11

to come and look around and gaze in wonder at this incredible hall.

0:26:110:26:17

That was yesterday. Today, the hall is packed with people enjoying

0:26:250:26:28

the lovely backdrop and waiting for valuations,

0:26:280:26:32

so we had better get on with it.

0:26:320:26:33

Let's see if Philip is on the right track.

0:26:350:26:39

-Rob, how are you doing? All right?

-Yes.

0:26:390:26:41

So you've come by train today, have you?

0:26:410:26:44

-Not exactly, no.

-So, was this yours originally?

0:26:440:26:47

Yeah, it was mine.

0:26:470:26:49

This box was the first present and every Christmas I'd get another box

0:26:490:26:52

-with bits and pieces added.

-If we pick it up,

0:26:520:26:55

it's got the name that you want to see, hasn't it? Hornby.

0:26:550:26:59

What's interesting for me is that this was bought for you in the '50s.

0:26:590:27:02

You can kind of work out

0:27:020:27:04

that you must be somewhere between 63 and 67.

0:27:040:27:06

-Yes, spot on.

-Good detective work, eh?

0:27:060:27:10

And is this something that you've always treasured?

0:27:100:27:12

Yes, I enjoyed it for years and years and years. I played the living

0:27:120:27:15

daylights out of it and that's why it's in such a rough state.

0:27:150:27:18

Played with it and played with it.

0:27:180:27:19

-Yeah.

-We've got to say that this isn't all of it.

0:27:190:27:21

We've got a box over here with a lot more in it.

0:27:210:27:24

-Tonnes of track.

-Tonnes and tonnes of track.

0:27:240:27:26

So, what's your background?

0:27:260:27:27

Have you always been around here?

0:27:270:27:30

-Where have you been?

-No, I come from here,

0:27:300:27:32

but I've travelled the world a few times.

0:27:320:27:34

-Really? A few times?

-Yes.

0:27:340:27:35

-How many?

-I just got the travel bug.

0:27:350:27:37

I've been around two or three times.

0:27:370:27:39

-And how long were you away for at a time?

-Years, decades sometimes.

0:27:390:27:43

I spent years in America, India, Australia.

0:27:430:27:45

You've been bought this, you've played with it

0:27:450:27:48

and then you've been away for ten years at a time

0:27:480:27:50

but you still kept this.

0:27:500:27:51

It must have had a real thing for you.

0:27:510:27:53

When my parents sold their house

0:27:530:27:55

when I was out of the country my brother rescued it.

0:27:550:27:59

-Really?

-And kept it for me.

-Really?

0:27:590:28:01

-Yes.

-He must have known it was something special to you.

-Yeah.

0:28:010:28:04

What makes toys valuable is when people don't play with them.

0:28:040:28:07

-I know.

-And when they're in the original box.

0:28:070:28:10

-I know.

-You have got reams of tape holding this lot together.

0:28:100:28:14

I should never have opened it.

0:28:140:28:16

Absolutely right, but then it would have been dull, wouldn't it,

0:28:160:28:19

and boring? But this is all tin plate

0:28:190:28:23

and here's the track.

0:28:230:28:25

I'm guessing most of these are sort of O-gauge,

0:28:250:28:27

but it's just a bit of fun, isn't it?

0:28:270:28:29

It's not going to make a huge amount of money because of its condition.

0:28:290:28:32

Have you ever given a thought as to what it might be worth?

0:28:320:28:36

No, I'd like it to be worth something

0:28:360:28:38

but, you know, what can you do?

0:28:380:28:40

I think you need to put this in with an estimate of £60-£90,

0:28:400:28:44

put a fixed reserve on it of £50.

0:28:440:28:47

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah.

0:28:470:28:49

Could you make it 60 minimum?

0:28:490:28:51

If you want me to, I could happily do that for you.

0:28:510:28:53

So that's a first-class ticket for £60.

0:28:530:28:55

-Thank you, sir.

-Thank you very much.

0:28:550:28:57

With that sorted,

0:28:590:29:01

let's exercise our minds and bodies over on Mark's table.

0:29:010:29:04

Charles, it's lovely to see you.

0:29:060:29:07

-Nice to be here.

-Before we talk about your item I want to learn a bit about you.

0:29:070:29:11

You said you weren't terribly energetic as a youngster.

0:29:110:29:14

-No.

-But you took up running at 62.

0:29:140:29:18

-Yes.

-And then what did you do?

0:29:180:29:20

I did 16 marathons.

0:29:210:29:23

-16 marathons? London Marathons?

-Yes.

0:29:230:29:25

From the age of 62?

0:29:260:29:28

-Yes.

-Good Lord.

0:29:280:29:29

That's why you look so young and healthy!

0:29:290:29:32

Because how old are you now, John?

0:29:320:29:33

-90.

-90?

-Yeah.

0:29:330:29:35

Do you know that's very nearly an antique?

0:29:350:29:38

HE LAUGHS

0:29:380:29:39

I am, yeah. I've been told that.

0:29:390:29:41

-But you have brought a genuine antique in.

-Yes.

0:29:430:29:45

A charming fan.

0:29:450:29:47

How long have you had the fan?

0:29:470:29:49

Oh, just over 11 years.

0:29:490:29:50

And was it in your family?

0:29:500:29:52

No, I inherited it from a friend.

0:29:520:29:55

So it's been in their family, maybe, for a long time?

0:29:550:29:58

I don't know how long, no.

0:29:580:30:00

It actually comes from China.

0:30:000:30:02

They are generally referred to as Cantonese carved ivory fans.

0:30:020:30:05

Because they were largely exported from the port of Canton.

0:30:050:30:09

You've got this beautiful carving here.

0:30:100:30:13

These are known as brise, because each of the spokes is individual.

0:30:130:30:17

So when you open it, it's individual spokes, all so delicately carved.

0:30:170:30:23

It's absolutely wonderful. Very elegant.

0:30:230:30:25

And you can imagine a very elegant Victorian or Edwardian lady,

0:30:260:30:31

in the summer, using this to keep herself cool, can't you?

0:30:310:30:35

-I can, yes.

-Somewhere like here, at a ball.

0:30:350:30:39

-Yes.

-Well, we're having a ball, aren't we?

0:30:390:30:41

We are indeed, yes.

0:30:410:30:43

In terms of the date, we're probably looking at the late 19th,

0:30:430:30:47

early 20th century.

0:30:470:30:48

So, around 1900.

0:30:480:30:50

It's well over 100 years old.

0:30:500:30:52

-Even older than you, Charles.

-HE CHUCKLES

0:30:520:30:56

-Thank you!

-But it is wonderful quality.

0:30:560:30:59

The condition is very good.

0:30:590:31:00

There are a few little breaks that you can spot along there.

0:31:000:31:04

Considering the delicacy of it, I think it's in very good condition.

0:31:040:31:09

Now, we are safe to sell this,

0:31:090:31:10

because it's before 1947 and it's all beautifully carved.

0:31:100:31:14

-Charles, have you thought about the value?

-No, I've no idea.

0:31:140:31:17

I think we've got to keep it realistic in this market.

0:31:170:31:20

So I would suggest £150 to £200.

0:31:200:31:23

-Great.

-Something like that.

0:31:230:31:26

We'll put a reserve - we can have a fixed reserve of 150,

0:31:260:31:30

or a discretionary reserve.

0:31:300:31:31

-Which one would you prefer?

-I think a fixed reserve.

0:31:310:31:33

We'll put a fixed reserve of 150.

0:31:330:31:35

I think a lot of collectors would want this.

0:31:350:31:39

What would you do with the money if you did make a lot of money?

0:31:390:31:42

I'm going to give it to one of my charities.

0:31:430:31:46

-You're going to support one of your charities?

-Yes.

-That's wonderful.

0:31:460:31:48

-Let's hope it really makes a lot of money.

-I hope so.

0:31:480:31:51

-Thank you so much, Charles.

-Thank you very much.

0:31:510:31:53

It's been a pleasure.

0:31:530:31:54

Before we go back to the valuations,

0:31:560:31:58

I want to share with you a recent discovery

0:31:580:32:01

about the painting on the back wall.

0:32:010:32:03

A few years ago, the ceilings and the walls in the upper hall here

0:32:050:32:09

underwent conservation and cleaning.

0:32:090:32:12

It was a test, really, to see if it could be done

0:32:120:32:14

throughout the whole of the lower hall, and it did work.

0:32:140:32:18

They wanted to make the image brighter, more vibrant and crisper.

0:32:180:32:21

You can see, with a lot of due care and attention

0:32:210:32:24

it was cleaned off gradually.

0:32:240:32:26

The colours are more vivid and there is clarity there.

0:32:260:32:29

In the next few years, they're going to carry on

0:32:290:32:31

doing the rest of the hall.

0:32:310:32:32

But what the conservators didn't bank on was finding one or two new discoveries.

0:32:320:32:37

I'll just quickly tell you about them.

0:32:370:32:39

Now you can see the dome up there, it looks slightly squashed down.

0:32:390:32:43

But you can also see, now it has been cleaned,

0:32:430:32:45

an outline of an earlier dome that was drawn in

0:32:450:32:47

which is slightly higher.

0:32:470:32:50

Why that one was lowered nobody knows.

0:32:500:32:53

The one I like is just here.

0:32:530:32:55

There's a very faint image of a hand.

0:32:560:33:00

It's just there, you can see the fingers and the thumb.

0:33:000:33:04

It is possible this whole image has been raised up

0:33:040:33:07

so everybody in the lower hall can see it.

0:33:070:33:10

But the conservators also have another theory.

0:33:100:33:13

Thornhill asked George I if he would like his wife painted in the image.

0:33:130:33:19

Now, George I had his wife in prison for adultery.

0:33:190:33:22

So when Thornhill said, "Can I represent her in the picture?"

0:33:220:33:26

he said, "I don't care what you do.

0:33:260:33:27

"You can paint her under the carpet for all I care."

0:33:270:33:31

So, this could be George I's ex-wife's hand.

0:33:310:33:35

How funny!

0:33:370:33:38

Now, Philip's bagged a special treat with some cards by one of Britain's

0:33:380:33:42

best-known and most sought-after painters.

0:33:420:33:45

Christine, these are lovely. You've made my day with these.

0:33:450:33:48

-Have I?

-Well, Mary Fedden,

0:33:480:33:50

she's one of the iconic 20th-century artists.

0:33:500:33:54

-Yes.

-So, your mum and Mary were great mates?

0:33:540:33:58

Yes. Mum used to go and visit Mary

0:33:580:34:00

and sometimes take me as a child over to see her.

0:34:000:34:05

-So you knew Mary Fedden?

-Oh, yes.

0:34:050:34:07

Did you realise what a sort of iconic person she was?

0:34:070:34:11

Not really, because...

0:34:110:34:12

She was just your mum's mate?

0:34:120:34:14

-Yes.

-Mary was a Bristolian, wasn't she?

0:34:140:34:16

And she taught at the Slade.

0:34:160:34:18

She taught at the Royal College of Art.

0:34:180:34:21

Wasn't she the first lady to teach at the Royal College of Art?

0:34:210:34:24

-I believe so.

-I think that, in time to come,

0:34:240:34:28

people will look at Mary Fedden as being sort of a mover and a shaker

0:34:280:34:33

of the 20th-century art world, really.

0:34:330:34:35

Well, let's just establish what we have got here.

0:34:350:34:38

-We've got a watercolour here, typical Mary Fedden.

-Yeah.

0:34:380:34:42

It's a birthday card.

0:34:420:34:43

-We've almost got this still life of fruit and flowers.

-Yeah.

0:34:430:34:47

What I love about this, because I had a peep earlier,

0:34:470:34:50

-"Happy birthday dear Ina," - that's your mum?

-Yeah.

0:34:500:34:53

"Lots of love, Mary."

0:34:540:34:56

That's just brilliant. Here we've got another little card,

0:34:570:35:01

-typical Mary Fedden cat.

-Cats, yeah.

0:35:010:35:04

And here we've got a little engraving.

0:35:040:35:06

-Mary's just added that blob of colour there.

-Yeah.

0:35:060:35:10

What makes it so personal is all these things you've got here.

0:35:100:35:14

-Yes.

-I think what I would do is I would put that as one lot,

0:35:140:35:19

and I would put this here as another lot.

0:35:190:35:21

Let's just say what we're not going to do is sell these bits, are we?

0:35:210:35:25

-No.

-So we've got one lot of the cat and the engraving.

0:35:250:35:29

Another lot of the watercolour. What do you think they might make?

0:35:290:35:32

-You must have some idea?

-I haven't got a clue.

0:35:320:35:35

The two together, you should get

0:35:350:35:38

-about £1,000.

-SHE GASPS

0:35:380:35:40

They've been stuck in a tin.

0:35:420:35:44

That's been stuck in cardboard on the wall.

0:35:440:35:47

In fact, I think you'll get more. We're going to put this one at £800-£1200.

0:35:470:35:50

-Oh, my God.

-With a reserve of £700.

0:35:500:35:53

And these two here, we're going to put at £600 to £900,

0:35:530:35:56

with a reserve of £500.

0:35:560:35:59

Or you can take my £100 now.

0:35:590:36:01

-I can't believe that.

-I think that's a no, then, isn't it?

0:36:030:36:06

We'll have an estimate on this of £800 to £1,200,

0:36:060:36:08

-fixed reserve at 700, right?

-God...

0:36:080:36:10

And on these two, we will have an estimate of £600 to £900,

0:36:100:36:14

fixed reserve of £500.

0:36:140:36:16

I nearly didn't bring these.

0:36:160:36:18

Well, let's keep our fingers crossed

0:36:180:36:20

and let's hope we've got every Mary Fedden fan in the world at the auction.

0:36:200:36:24

-You know what? I think we might have.

-Yeah.

0:36:240:36:27

Thank you for bringing these. You made my day.

0:36:270:36:29

I can't believe that.

0:36:290:36:31

Well, that's it. What a day and what an honour to be filming here

0:36:380:36:42

in such an historic setting.

0:36:420:36:44

I know hundreds of Londoners have thoroughly enjoyed themselves today

0:36:440:36:48

and so have the entire team.

0:36:480:36:50

Sadly, it's time to say goodbye to the old Royal Naval College in Greenwich,

0:36:500:36:54

as we go over to the auction for the very last time for some unfinished business.

0:36:540:36:58

Here are the three final items that are going under the hammer.

0:36:580:37:02

Let's hope there'll be light at the end of the tunnel

0:37:030:37:06

for this Hornby train set.

0:37:060:37:08

And if it gets too hot,

0:37:110:37:12

we can use Charles's Cantonese fan to cool us down.

0:37:120:37:15

And these Mary Fedden cards

0:37:190:37:21

will definitely draw in the art collectors.

0:37:210:37:24

We're back at Chiswick Auctions and William Rouse is on the rostrum.

0:37:290:37:33

Now, we're just about to sell Robert's Hornby train set.

0:37:330:37:36

I like this. I had a Hornby train set, I bet you did.

0:37:360:37:39

Why are you selling this, Robert?

0:37:390:37:40

Well, I gave it to my son, he played with it and...

0:37:400:37:43

He's finished with it now? So pass it on?

0:37:430:37:46

-While it's still there in one piece?

-That's right.

0:37:460:37:48

-OK.

-There's a lot of it.

-There is.

-It takes up a lot of room.

0:37:480:37:51

You had a chat to the auctioneer, didn't you?

0:37:510:37:53

-You've dropped the reserve?

-I took away the reserve.

0:37:530:37:55

-I didn't want to carry it home!

-The pressure's off, OK?

0:37:550:37:58

But I think we'll still do that within estimate.

0:37:580:38:00

I think it's a cracking lot. Hopefully we're going to find

0:38:000:38:02

someone that's going to be chuffed to bits with it today.

0:38:020:38:04

-This train is going to be on time.

-It is.

0:38:040:38:06

Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks and what the bidders think.

0:38:060:38:09

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:38:090:38:10

Lot 331.

0:38:100:38:12

A Hornby Meccano clockwork train set, with all the accessories,

0:38:120:38:17

lots of bits and pieces here.

0:38:170:38:18

There we go, what's it worth? Start me...£50 for this lot.

0:38:180:38:21

It's got to be worth that. 40, then?

0:38:210:38:23

40 is bid in front of me.

0:38:250:38:26

45.

0:38:260:38:27

£50?

0:38:270:38:29

£50 here.

0:38:290:38:31

At £50. Are you all done?

0:38:310:38:33

At £50, it's going.

0:38:340:38:35

-Sold.

-It's gone within estimate.

0:38:370:38:39

-You said 50.

-You did. Spot on, Philip.

-It's something.

0:38:390:38:42

-Someone to enjoy it.

-I hope so, yes.

0:38:420:38:44

I did.

0:38:450:38:46

It's the ivory fan next, and I want to reiterate

0:38:470:38:51

that because it was crafted well before 1947,

0:38:510:38:55

it is legal to be sold.

0:38:550:38:56

I have to say, I'm also a fan of the owner.

0:38:580:39:01

Charles, your fan is just about to go under the hammer,

0:39:020:39:05

the Cantonese ivory fan.

0:39:050:39:07

I've got to say, you look very dapper.

0:39:070:39:09

You look absolutely fabulous.

0:39:090:39:12

Thank you very much.

0:39:120:39:13

And you're 92, are you?

0:39:130:39:15

-90.

-90 - don't stretch it.

0:39:150:39:16

I was bigging you up, then.

0:39:160:39:19

Only 90.

0:39:200:39:22

Well, you look absolutely fantastic.

0:39:220:39:24

-And that's because you used to run, didn't you? You've done a lot of marathons.

-Yep.

0:39:240:39:28

-It's never too late.

-Oh, thank you!

0:39:280:39:30

It's never too late! Come on, get fit.

0:39:300:39:32

He's pulling his tummy in.

0:39:320:39:33

Trying to, it's not working.

0:39:330:39:35

I know the feeling. Anyway,

0:39:350:39:37

you were given this fan by a friend about 12 years ago, 11 years ago.

0:39:370:39:41

The condition is good.

0:39:410:39:42

Yes, a tiny bit of damage on some of the fronds.

0:39:420:39:45

But basically it's in jolly good condition.

0:39:450:39:48

Let's put this fan to the test.

0:39:480:39:50

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:39:500:39:52

Lot 291 is a Cantonese fan.

0:39:520:39:55

With me I'm bid £100.

0:39:550:39:57

100, 110, 120.

0:39:570:39:59

300 on the internet.

0:39:590:40:00

300?

0:40:000:40:01

320 on the telephone.

0:40:010:40:03

320 on the telephone, is that it?

0:40:030:40:05

We all done? Got there very quickly at...

0:40:050:40:08

340 in the room.

0:40:080:40:09

360.

0:40:090:40:11

Thank you, sir. 360, still on the telephone.

0:40:110:40:13

All done at 360?

0:40:130:40:16

£360!

0:40:160:40:18

Oh, thanks!

0:40:180:40:20

-Thank Mark, he picked it up.

-Thank you.

0:40:200:40:22

-Lovely thing.

-It's been wonderful meeting you.

0:40:220:40:24

-It really has.

-That's very kind of you, thank you so much.

0:40:240:40:27

A good result, wasn't it?

0:40:270:40:28

Well done. Well done, boys.

0:40:280:40:30

Now it's the Mary Fedden cards.

0:40:330:40:35

I'm so excited, so excited these came in.

0:40:370:40:40

-It's just brilliant.

-Every now and then you see something on "Flog It!"

0:40:400:40:43

that makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end.

0:40:430:40:45

Here we go. Mary Fedden, under the hammer, on "Flog It!".

0:40:450:40:49

And start me... £500 to start me.

0:40:490:40:51

500 is bid. I've got one more, 550.

0:40:520:40:55

Yours for 600?

0:40:550:40:57

650.

0:40:580:41:00

700.

0:41:000:41:01

On the telephone at 700.

0:41:010:41:03

Selling for 700.

0:41:030:41:05

700?

0:41:050:41:06

Gone.

0:41:060:41:08

That's the cat and the boat done.

0:41:080:41:10

Now I wonder how this watercolour will do.

0:41:100:41:12

It's valued at £800 to £1,200.

0:41:120:41:15

I think this is the best of the lot.

0:41:170:41:19

I want a big surprise on this one.

0:41:190:41:21

OK, Lot 505.

0:41:210:41:23

Mary Fedden.

0:41:230:41:24

Goodness me, there's been lots and lots of interest in this picture

0:41:240:41:28

over the last couple of days, on the viewing.

0:41:280:41:30

I'm straight in at £1,000.

0:41:300:41:33

-1,100, 1,200, 1,300.

-£1,000, straight in!

0:41:330:41:36

-With me at 1,300.

-1,300.

0:41:360:41:38

-SHE GASPS

-Oh, my God!

0:41:380:41:39

1,400 is the next bid.

0:41:390:41:41

1,400 on the telephone.

0:41:410:41:43

-1,400.

-1,500.

-1,500.

0:41:430:41:44

1,600.

0:41:450:41:47

Now I've got 1,650.

0:41:470:41:48

-Oh, yes!

-1,700?

-1,650.

0:41:480:41:51

At £1,700, beats me.

0:41:510:41:53

That beats the commission bid.

0:41:530:41:55

£1,700.

0:41:550:41:57

-This is great.

-1,800 seated.

0:41:580:42:01

1,900.

0:42:010:42:03

1,900...

0:42:030:42:04

It is, then, standing at 1,900. You all done?

0:42:050:42:08

-Selling... 2,000 seated.

-Oh!

0:42:080:42:11

2,100.

0:42:110:42:13

2,200.

0:42:130:42:15

Christine!

0:42:150:42:17

2,200 seated it is. At 2,200.

0:42:170:42:21

Anybody else?

0:42:210:42:23

2,200, then, it goes.

0:42:230:42:26

£2,200! And you're crying.

0:42:260:42:29

That's a lot of money. Was that exciting?

0:42:300:42:33

-I'm just gobsmacked, gobsmacked.

-What an end.

0:42:330:42:36

That was in a tin, I kept it in a tin.

0:42:360:42:38

Good for you, it was in immaculate condition, wasn't it?

0:42:380:42:41

-I think you can have another look in the tin.

-Yeah!

0:42:410:42:43

What a name to end with.

0:42:430:42:44

Christine and Mary Fedden, under the hammer.

0:42:440:42:47

Join us again soon for many more surprises.

0:42:470:42:49

Until then, from Chiswick in west London, it's goodbye.

0:42:490:42:53

The team are at the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, London. Expert Philip Serrell gets very excited about some cards painted by one of Britain's best-known artists Mary Fedden. Paul Martin explores the spectacular painted hall in the college and the navy pensioners who once lived there.


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