Croome 49 Flog It!


Croome 49

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Today, we're at Croome Court in Worcestershire,

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and this magnificent 18th-century Palladian mansion

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situated in woody parkland is the venue for our valuation day,

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and I've got to say, it doesn't get much better than this,

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with the Malvern Hills as a backdrop.

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All of this is the vision of one man, the sixth Earl of Coventry,

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a man of impeccable taste and vision,

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and I'm hoping as all our experts look in these bags and boxes,

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everyone here has good taste as well.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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George William, the sixth Earl of Coventry, inherited Croome in 1751.

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He immediately set about transforming the house and the estate,

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as he wanted them to be at the height of fashion.

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The sixth Earl took a punt on up-and-coming talent.

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He gave Lancelot Capability Brown his first complete commission

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to landscape the grounds in the new naturalistic style,

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and to remodel the house.

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Croome is now looked after by the National Trust

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so it's in safe hands, and I have to say,

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it's looking fabulous today, and so is everybody here.

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It looks like the whole of Worcestershire has turned up

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laden with bags and boxes. They are here to see our experts,

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to listen to them wax lyrical over their treasures,

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and at the end of that you've got one important question

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you want to ask them, which is...

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-ALL:

-What's it worth?

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If you're happy with the valuations, what are you going to do?

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-ALL:

-Flog it!

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Right, let's get on with it!

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Already hard at work scouring the crowd

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to find exciting items to take off to auction, we have two experts,

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Adam Partridge...

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You think it's for cutting an egg.

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Any idea what that's for?

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And David Fletcher...

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What else have you got in there? Let's have a...

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RATTLING

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That's woke your cameraman up!

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Adam and David have also found time for a little fun.

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Is that even my size as well?

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David? What do you think?

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Much smarter than you normally look.

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Thank you very much!

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I think Adam is aspiring to David's dress sense.

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Whilst everybody makes themselves comfortable on Croome's south lawn,

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let's have a look at what's coming up later on in the show.

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Adam realises a childhood fantasy

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when he gets his hands on some firefighting equipment.

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That squirts out there in a quarter of an inch jet.

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And a late bidder comes to the rescue in the auction room.

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No takers at 200?

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Going to have to pass it, I'm afraid.

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Yes, on the net!

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And I'll be admiring some of the treasures

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from the sixth Earl's collection,

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which the National Trust have displayed in a contemporary way

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which they think the Earl would have approved of.

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I love seeing the plates on the ceiling.

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But that's all to come later.

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As you can see, everybody is now safely seated,

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so it's time for our first valuation.

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So let's catch up with Adam Partridge and see what we can find

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to take off to auction.

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Well, Deborah, what a fine saxophone you've brought along today.

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I always like to see musical instruments.

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My speciality is in the stringed instruments,

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but I've sold lots of saxophones,

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and I think we're going to have a go at this one.

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-OK.

-What do you know about it?

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My uncle gave it to me over 40 years ago.

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He used to play saxophone.

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OK, was he in a band?

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Yes, but I can't remember the name of it.

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OK. And did you ever play?

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Many years ago in a band for a theatre, yes.

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Oh, did you? So you're a proper saxophonist?

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Mm...

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-Maybe!

-Well, it's been a while since you played.

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Yes, a long time.

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My parents are former musicians as well,

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and you can't get them to play at all now.

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Once they used to do it for a living, they won't do it.

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-That's right.

-So presumably, is there any point in me asking...?

-No.

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That was pretty firm, wasn't it?

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I don't think we're going to hear it played.

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So, it's a tenor saxophone.

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It is. B-flat tenor.

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And we've got a maker's name under here.

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But it's very, very worn.

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When you blow on it you can see Pan-American Elkhart USA.

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-Oh!

-It's an American Elkhart Pan-American.

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Early 20th century, quite popular these days, some value to it.

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-Any idea?

-No idea at all.

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No? I think, really, it should make £200-300.

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-Something like that.

-Right!

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You look surprised. Now I think I've got it wrong,

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cos you know about saxophones!

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No, no, no, I don't know about the value of them, no.

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Judging by other examples I've sold,

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I think it's worth that and maybe a touch more.

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Condition's not bad at all.

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It's operational?

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No...

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Go on!

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No! Go on.

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Can't get a single note out of it.

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It's very hard!

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It's very hard indeed.

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So, why have you decided to sell it?

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-You don't play any more?

-I don't play any more,

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and it's time for it to move on.

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Yes, OK, so you're happy to put it in the auction?

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-Yes.

-200-300 estimate?

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-Yes.

-And what price would you rather have it back if it didn't sell?

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190?

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OK. Let's put 200 with discretion, so 180 would be the very limit.

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-OK.

-Is that all right?

-Yes.

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And would you do anything specific with the proceeds?

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I shall take my mother out to dinner

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-and we shall celebrate my uncle's life.

-Very good.

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-Thank you.

-Are you going to play it now?

-No!

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We'll just have to close our eyes

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and imagine what that sax sounds like.

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Next, David has come across some amusing pictures.

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-Hello, Margaret.

-Hello, David.

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The British are very good

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at taking the mickey out of themselves, I think.

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And seeing the bright side of life.

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There's that Monty Python song, isn't there?

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Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life,

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and I think that relates to these, really.

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I've come across Lawson Wood's stuff quite a lot,

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as you might imagine. He's a book illustrator and a humourist, really.

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He was born towards the end of the 19th century,

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and as it happens he served in the First World War

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and he got a decoration for gallantry at Vimy Ridge.

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So he had a remarkable life,

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but what I really like about these is to see so many in one go.

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-Each one is based on an imaginary postcard sent home.

-Yes.

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You know, we send postcards to our family and friends, saying,

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"having a great time, wish you were here."

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We don't wish they were here at all!

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We're jolly glad, we've gone away to get away from them!

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But we say wish you were here.

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And this is the sort of thing that Lawson Wood is saying in a way.

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They are all called Holiday Echoes, so it's from a series.

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Have they been inherited?

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They were my grandfather's.

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They came down to my mother.

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But probably in the last 20 years they have sat in the garage.

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Do you ever remember them being hung together?

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Yes, yes, in my grandparents' house in South Wales,

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they were in the hall,

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and as a young child I loved going and looking at them.

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It was the first thing I did when we got to the house,

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and that one is definitely my favourite.

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I think that's great, and he is saying here,

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"I'm in a very bracing position, over 500 feet above sea level.

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"Sitting room is small, but gets glorious views."

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-Yes.

-Isn't that great?

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I mean, he's hanging from a rope, painting a skyscraper,

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and he's none of those things at all!

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He's very uncomfortable, he's swinging backwards and forwards,

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but he is seeing the bright side of it.

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And it's all about taking the mickey, isn't it, which I think is great.

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So they speak of their period, they are good fun,

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I think they are uplifting.

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-They are just prints, we know that, of course.

-Yes.

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It would be lovely if they were originals.

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-They are not going to make huge amounts of money.

-No.

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I would expect probably somewhere in the region of £100.

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-Right.

-Does that sound about right to you?

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That's fine. That's fine, yes.

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OK, well, what I would like to do, if we may,

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is estimate them at 60 to 80.

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Just to make sure nothing disastrous happens,

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we'll put a £60 reserve on them, reserve at bottom estimate.

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OK? Well, I'll look forward to seeing you in the sale.

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And I hope everyone who views it has a jolly good laugh at these.

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-I hope so.

-I am sure they will be cheered up if they do.

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MUSIC: Always Look on the Bright Side of Life by Eric Idle

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Right, that's two solid valuations under our belt.

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While our experts look for the third,

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I thought I'd come inside the house to have a look around.

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The Long Gallery was installed between 1761 and 1766

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and it was designed to look outwards to the beautiful Malvern Hills.

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The renowned 18th century architect and designer Robert Adam

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was responsible for everything in this room.

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He really was hands-on, he designed the chimney piece, the mirrors,

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the furniture and even the decoration on the ceiling.

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But sadly a lot of these artefacts have long gone,

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including the neoclassical figures which would be standing

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in these purpose-built niches.

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Now, faced with this problem,

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the National Trust came up with a brilliant idea

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that was still in keeping

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with the fashionable cutting-edge ethos of the sixth Earl.

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They have commissioned up and coming artists to come up with

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installations to fill the niches,

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and the brief was something to do with the history and the characters

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that made Croome great.

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Now, if I climb in here, this one is called The Viewer,

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and basically it's made up of hundreds of those little door viewers.

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You know the spy holes you find in a hotel room or on your front door?

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So, when you're in the room, and someone knocks at the door,

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you look outwards, you can see who it is.

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And this is rather clever, actually,

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because whatever one you look through,

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you get a different vista of the room.

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Wonderful little perspectives.

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This is an artful play on the work of Capability Brown, his landscapes.

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So, when you're walking along a pathway,

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you come between two trees,

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it may just frame up a classical temple into a beautiful perspective,

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and then you move and you look at something else and you see it

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from a different angle. That's what this is all about.

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I think it's really clever.

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And there you are, I can see the Long Gallery now

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tunnelling all the way down there.

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And this one will put a smile on your face, it's called The Departed.

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I imagine these feet disappearing into the wall

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belonged to a neoclassical figure that was standing here,

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and they probably had enough and they thought it's about time to go.

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Into the wall they went, and off they go.

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And in fact, that's exactly what I have to do right now,

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but I'm not going through the wall, I'm going straight down those stairs

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and out onto the lawn to join up with our experts.

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We need one more item before we pay our first visit to the auction,

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and it looks like Adam has come across something unusual.

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What have we got here then, Ian?

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We've got a Second World War hand-operated Lee Howl fire pump.

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Lee Howl would be the makers from Tipton?

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Yes, they started in about 1880,

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it's obviously got an insignia for George VI,

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which dates it to the Second World War.

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And how the thing flew, you'd chuck that bit in a duck pond,

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a canal or a river.

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-Or a well.

-Or a well.

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-So that was the inlet valve.

-That goes in.

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That goes in the water, without that in the water, nothing happens.

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Obviously, and it sucks up through here.

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It sucks up through the cage so it doesn't take in all the rubbish.

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-Where does this go?

-That goes on a hose,

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it connects up to the inlet valve.

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-Another hose to connect into that.

-That's the inlet valve.

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And then basically you've got two outlets,

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and those are the nozzles that operate...

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That squirts out there in a quarter of an inch jet.

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-Yeah.

-And to make it work, you had two blokes on two handles.

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So there would be something going...

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The bar in each end of there, and you had one there doing that...

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-And I'd be here...

-..and you're here doing that.

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And then, with a bit of luck,

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two lots of water came out there to the nozzle to fight your fire.

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I see. Do you know what, I'm not very mechanically minded at all,

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but you've explained that to me very well, Ian, thank you very much.

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And it ain't been used for about 70 years, and it still works.

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Well, it will do when we are long gone as well, won't it?

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-I hope so.

-Proper thing.

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We don't see many of these types of things on the programme,

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so I was very pleased that you brought it in.

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Tell me, where did you get it from,

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because clearly you've not been around since World War II, have you?

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No, I'd like to say I have, but I haven't.

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No, I found it in about '83,

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-in a family manor house about ten miles away.

-OK.

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Reputed that a member of the family was a Home Guard sort of boss.

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-Yes.

-I would imagine he had the place to store it,

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and then basically it was used by the platoon.

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It's been sat inside a tea chest, so I thought it was time it was moved.

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And is this the first time it's come out?

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It's the first time anybody's ever seen it.

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Wow. And you've decided to sell it, or try to sell it.

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We've got to try and flog it.

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We're got to try and find it a good home.

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Well, it's one of those things, it's never easy to predict.

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Either love it or hate it.

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I suppose so, yeah.

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I would put an estimate of £200-300 on it.

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It doesn't seem much, I know, but you need to coax them into bidding.

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Yeah, all we want is two real enthusiasts that must have it.

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Yes. We're going to put a reserve of £200 on it?

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-Yes.

-Estimate 200 to 300.

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If it goes off and makes more,

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would you spend it on anything in particular?

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It's going to the Cuba slush fund.

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-A holiday.

-A holiday to Cuba.

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-OK, very good. Well, I hope you have a good time on that holiday.

-Thank you!

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And thank you very much for bringing up and explaining it

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-so eloquently for us.

-Thank you, Adam.

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Well, there you are, our experts have now found

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their first three items to take off to auction.

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This is where it gets exciting.

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You've heard what they've had to say.

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I've got my own opinions on that, you've probably got yours,

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but right now we're going to find out what the bidders think

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as they go off to auction.

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Here's a quick recap of the items we're taking with us.

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Will Deborah's Pan-American Elkhart sax raise the roof at the saleroom?

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David was tickled pink by Margaret's six cartoon pictures

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by artist Lawson Wood.

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Let's hope the bidders are too.

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And finally, will things hot up in the auction,

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when Ian's fire pump from the Second World War goes under the hammer?

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Well, this is the moment I've been waiting for,

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where we put those valuations to the test.

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This is where it gets exciting.

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We're just outside of Evesham, at Littleton Auctions,

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and the car park is filling up.

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The sale is just about to start.

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This bodes well because when I go inside the saleroom,

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hopefully it's going to be jam-packed

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full of bidders all wanting our lots.

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Let's catch up with our owners and get on with the sale.

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Remember, whether you're buying or selling,

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there's always commission to pay and VAT.

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Here, the rate if you're selling is 15% plus VAT.

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Auctioneer Martin Homer is already hard at work on the rostrum,

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and first under his hammer,

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it's Margaret's collection of six cartoon pictures.

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These are fun. And architecturally, put together in two rows of three,

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they look fabulous.

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Or if you had a long, narrow corridor, all in a row,

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with little lights above, it will make you laugh all the way down.

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Why are you selling these?

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Well, they belonged to my grandparents

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who had them in a long hall.

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I haven't got a long hall so I can't put them up.

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OK. So I was right with the long hall bit, wasn't I?

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As a child, can you remember looking at them and laughing?

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-Definitely.

-Lots of memories, lots of fun.

0:16:130:16:15

We think of satire as being an invention of the 1960s,

0:16:150:16:18

but these are satirical, in a way.

0:16:180:16:20

Just gentle rib-tickling, self-deprecating humour.

0:16:200:16:23

I love them, I think they're great.

0:16:230:16:25

Rib-tickling, I love that word!

0:16:250:16:26

Rib-tickling! Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:16:260:16:29

-Here we go, good luck.

-Let's see if their ribs are tickled.

0:16:290:16:32

Look at those. I've got a commission bid on the book of £60.

0:16:340:16:37

65 takes me out.

0:16:370:16:39

It's in the room at 65, 70,

0:16:390:16:42

five, 80,

0:16:420:16:44

five, 90, five,

0:16:440:16:47

at 95 with you, madam.

0:16:470:16:49

It's in the room at £95.

0:16:490:16:51

-We're looking for 100 now.

-Come on, there's six of them.

0:16:510:16:55

Great value for money.

0:16:550:16:56

At £95.

0:16:560:16:58

Crack, the hammer's gone down.

0:16:580:17:00

-Wonderful.

-£95, that's brilliant, isn't it?

0:17:000:17:03

Rib-tickling!

0:17:030:17:04

I'll tickle YOUR ribs!

0:17:070:17:09

Next up, let's hope there's a steady stream of bids

0:17:100:17:12

for Ian's World War II fire pump.

0:17:120:17:14

It weighs an absolute tonne, but I tell you what,

0:17:140:17:18

that's proper British engineering, isn't it?

0:17:180:17:21

-It really is. Don't you think so?

-Yeah.

0:17:210:17:23

Over the top, belt and braces.

0:17:230:17:25

I'm quite surprised you actually got it there because it's so heavy.

0:17:250:17:29

I didn't, two of the humpers got it there for me.

0:17:290:17:32

Interesting lot, ladies and gentlemen.

0:17:330:17:35

Let's start that at £200.

0:17:350:17:37

We're looking at £200 to start here.

0:17:370:17:39

Do you know what, I really want this to sell.

0:17:400:17:42

I really want this to sell. Top money.

0:17:420:17:45

£200.

0:17:450:17:47

Room or net, an unusual lot.

0:17:470:17:49

Come on, don't go quiet.

0:17:490:17:51

The nozzles are fabulous on their own.

0:17:510:17:53

No takers at 200?

0:17:530:17:54

Going to have to pass it, I'm afraid.

0:17:540:17:57

Yes, on the net! £200!

0:17:570:18:00

At £200, we're on the internet.

0:18:000:18:04

-Never say never.

-They were waiting for it to go down, weren't they?

0:18:040:18:07

£200, I'm going to sell it.

0:18:070:18:10

-Going once, twice...

-PHONE RINGS

0:18:100:18:12

Telephone bid coming through!

0:18:120:18:14

200, all done?

0:18:140:18:16

Once, twice, sold at £200.

0:18:160:18:18

Yes!

0:18:180:18:20

Well done! Well done, the internet.

0:18:200:18:22

Adam was right, they were waiting to see if it dropped.

0:18:220:18:24

Brilliant, that's a great result.

0:18:240:18:26

You've got to be so happy, thank you for bringing a proper boys' toy in.

0:18:260:18:29

-It was a bit different.

-But do you know what,

0:18:290:18:31

you made the effort to bring in something incredibly heavy.

0:18:310:18:33

Finally, fingers crossed we hit the high note now

0:18:370:18:39

with the saxophone belonging to Deborah.

0:18:390:18:42

Did you buy the saxophone to learn to play on,

0:18:430:18:45

or was it handed down through the family?

0:18:450:18:47

No, it was given to me by my uncle.

0:18:470:18:49

-He used to play it.

-And did you play at all?

0:18:490:18:52

-A little.

-What put you off it?

0:18:520:18:54

Becoming a mother.

0:18:560:18:58

Oh, right, OK!

0:18:580:18:59

Gets a bit busy then, doesn't it?

0:18:590:19:01

Yes, it does a bit, yeah.

0:19:010:19:03

And once the kids are asleep,

0:19:030:19:05

you don't want to wake them up practising!

0:19:050:19:08

The saxophone in case, Pan-American, 1915.

0:19:080:19:13

I've got interest on this one.

0:19:130:19:15

I can come straight in at £200.

0:19:150:19:18

With me on the book at 200.

0:19:180:19:20

220 takes me out.

0:19:200:19:21

260, 280, 290, 320, 340, at 340.

0:19:210:19:26

-Wow.

-At 340, the net has it.

0:19:260:19:29

At 340. Looking for 350 now.

0:19:290:19:32

At 340.

0:19:320:19:34

At £340, are we done?

0:19:340:19:37

That's what you said.

0:19:370:19:38

-He's so right.

-Twice, sold at £340.

0:19:380:19:41

-There we go.

-Thank you very much.

-It's a pleasure.

0:19:410:19:43

-That was hotly contested for a little while, wasn't it?

-Yeah!

0:19:430:19:46

Well, that concludes our first visit to the auction room today.

0:19:460:19:51

We are coming back here later on in the programme, so don't go away,

0:19:510:19:53

it could get very exciting.

0:19:530:19:56

Earlier on in the show, I told you how the National Trust

0:19:560:19:59

are continuing the sixth Earl's legacy.

0:19:590:20:02

They have installed contemporary sculpture

0:20:020:20:04

designed by young up-and-coming talent at the house,

0:20:040:20:07

but they haven't just stopped there.

0:20:070:20:09

Croome was the brainchild of the sixth Earl of Coventry,

0:20:190:20:22

who brought together the greatest talent to overhaul his parkland,

0:20:220:20:26

house and its interiors in the 1750s.

0:20:260:20:29

The finished result was in the best of taste,

0:20:310:20:33

and it was at the height of fashion.

0:20:330:20:35

Altogether, the sixth Earl employed more than 40 leading craftspeople

0:20:370:20:42

to design furniture, ceramics, textiles

0:20:420:20:44

and the interiors for his new home.

0:20:440:20:46

The finished collection was hugely important and influential,

0:20:460:20:50

containing some of the finest pieces in the country.

0:20:500:20:53

I can only imagine then that the sixth Earl

0:20:560:20:58

would have been devastated if he'd known that

0:20:580:21:01

a couple of centuries later, in 1948,

0:21:010:21:03

his beloved Croome and its contents would be sold,

0:21:030:21:06

following the death of his descendant, the tenth Earl,

0:21:060:21:10

who was killed on the retreat to Dunkirk in 1940.

0:21:100:21:13

Despite the losses from the 1940s' auction,

0:21:180:21:21

enough of the original Coventry collection survives

0:21:210:21:24

to show the refined taste that the sixth Earl had,

0:21:240:21:27

and today the National Trust have chosen to display the key pieces

0:21:270:21:31

in a contemporary fashion,

0:21:310:21:33

which they feel sure the Earl would have approved of.

0:21:330:21:36

Amy Forster-Smith, Croome's house and visitor experience manager,

0:21:420:21:46

is sharing with me a couple of the pieces from the Coventry collection.

0:21:460:21:49

We're starting with the chairs in the main hall.

0:21:510:21:53

-I like that.

-Do you?

0:21:550:21:57

I love it. I've not seen hall chairs displayed like that before.

0:21:570:22:02

I'm glad you think so. That's exactly what we're trying to do.

0:22:020:22:05

-Isn't that great?

-So, the three chairs in the middle

0:22:050:22:08

are 18th-century Hall chairs made by one of the finest

0:22:080:22:11

18th-century carpenters that the sixth Earl could afford,

0:22:110:22:14

-John Hobcraft.

-Wonderful.

0:22:140:22:16

And they are modelled on a 17th-century Italian design.

0:22:160:22:18

-They are, yes.

-And there would have been rows of them here

0:22:180:22:21

-against the wall.

-Yes. We think they were a set of ten, originally.

0:22:210:22:24

-Yes, possibly that.

-And we have got all ten,

0:22:240:22:26

but we are just showing three here,

0:22:260:22:28

because we didn't want to display all the hall chairs set out.

0:22:280:22:31

-Against the wall.

-Yeah.

-Of course, they were designed to be

0:22:310:22:34

as uncomfortable as possible,

0:22:340:22:36

-to make people sit at attention...

-Absolutely.

0:22:360:22:38

..anticipating meeting the Earl,

0:22:380:22:40

not getting any further than this space.

0:22:400:22:41

And most people didn't wash back then,

0:22:410:22:43

so you had to have chairs like that that you could wipe clean.

0:22:430:22:46

-Yes, absolutely.

-But I love this.

0:22:460:22:49

So, who did this?

0:22:490:22:50

This is by Will Datson, who's an artist based in Bristol.

0:22:500:22:52

But he's not just an artist,

0:22:520:22:54

he's a craftsperson as well and a bit of an engineer.

0:22:540:22:57

And he really wanted to create something to not draw attention

0:22:570:23:00

to the objects just in themselves,

0:23:000:23:02

but also so you can see all of the structure,

0:23:020:23:05

and how they were made, and I think he's done a really good job.

0:23:050:23:07

Yes, you can tell he's an engineer, it's all counterbalanced.

0:23:070:23:10

Yes, it's got a steel core,

0:23:100:23:12

and then the plaster has been applied to the surface.

0:23:120:23:14

It's very, very clever.

0:23:140:23:16

-Thank you.

-I approve.

0:23:160:23:18

Next, it's off to the dining room to admire the impressive collection

0:23:200:23:24

of porcelain, which is displayed in a way I've never seen before.

0:23:240:23:28

Wow! Ta-da!

0:23:310:23:34

-Wow!

-It's incredible, isn't it?

0:23:340:23:36

I love seeing the plates on the ceiling, I love it.

0:23:360:23:39

We are absolutely surrounded, aren't we?

0:23:390:23:41

Yeah, it's been created so you get this sort of enveloping experience

0:23:410:23:45

of the porcelain, which is...

0:23:450:23:46

all of the items are from the collection,

0:23:460:23:48

the finest items from the collection,

0:23:480:23:50

so it's just a really funky display case, really,

0:23:500:23:53

something a bit different.

0:23:530:23:55

So, the artist wanted for us to see ourselves in all of this.

0:23:550:24:00

-Yeah, with the porcelain.

-With the porcelain.

-Absolutely,

0:24:000:24:04

and be able to take selfies and photos of each other,

0:24:040:24:06

and the outside of the box is incredible as well,

0:24:060:24:09

so the artist, Bouke de Vries,

0:24:090:24:10

we gave him a brief to do something playful

0:24:100:24:12

and to do something interesting

0:24:120:24:14

which would really draw attention to the porcelain,

0:24:140:24:16

but we had no idea what he would create, and this was it.

0:24:160:24:19

We absolutely love it.

0:24:190:24:20

I like the clear little vistas, are they the real key pieces?

0:24:200:24:24

There are lovely, yes, these are the very best pieces of the collection,

0:24:240:24:27

so this is Sevres porcelain,

0:24:270:24:29

and there's a little chocolate pot and a tea set that was meant for

0:24:290:24:32

Madame de Pompadour before she unfortunately died

0:24:320:24:34

and the sixth Earl snapped it up for himself.

0:24:340:24:37

The modern golden box is artfully juxtaposed

0:24:400:24:43

with Robert Adam's intricate 18th-century plasterwork,

0:24:430:24:46

which it reflects back on all its sides.

0:24:460:24:48

The plasterwork would have been white originally,

0:24:500:24:52

but during another interesting phase of Croome's life,

0:24:520:24:56

the religious order of the Hare Krishnas used the house

0:24:560:24:59

as their headquarters,

0:24:590:25:00

and they painted Adam's plasterwork in bright colours.

0:25:000:25:04

Everywhere you go in this house, your expectations are confounded.

0:25:040:25:09

This is pure theatre.

0:25:110:25:12

I love it. Absolutely love it.

0:25:140:25:16

These commodes should be

0:25:160:25:18

either side of a rather large imposing fireplace,

0:25:180:25:22

you know, as an architectural statement, perfect symmetry.

0:25:220:25:25

But here, displayed like this, back-to-back,

0:25:250:25:29

these commodes make the perfect centrepiece.

0:25:290:25:32

So naturally you have to stop, you have to go,

0:25:320:25:35

"Wow, look at the way they're lit, look at this."

0:25:350:25:38

This is by Mayhew and Ince, possibly the most important partnership

0:25:380:25:42

in the mid 18th century in cabinet work.

0:25:420:25:45

And the word "commode," that comes from the French chest of drawers.

0:25:450:25:48

They are not really a chest of drawers,

0:25:480:25:50

they are just cabinets to show off great craftsmanship,

0:25:500:25:54

and to show off wealth.

0:25:540:25:55

Another unusual thing the National Trust is doing here

0:25:580:26:01

is offering tours of the house's red wing to visitors.

0:26:010:26:05

There may seem nothing strange about this,

0:26:050:26:07

but you have to don a hard hat as the red wing is nearly derelict.

0:26:070:26:10

It's like being allowed a peek behind the scenes.

0:26:100:26:13

This was the entertainment area.

0:26:150:26:18

This was where the senior servants would have had their dinner.

0:26:180:26:22

And they would have been waited on by the junior servants.

0:26:220:26:26

When the trust acquired Croome, the red wing had been nearly derelict,

0:26:270:26:31

but they had managed to halt its decline.

0:26:310:26:34

In that room above, it would have been looking very dark,

0:26:340:26:38

nice mahogany.

0:26:380:26:40

The fireplace has chunks of shelves in it

0:26:400:26:42

that would have glinted at night.

0:26:420:26:45

Do you think things should be displayed more traditionally,

0:26:500:26:52

like other National Trust houses?

0:26:520:26:54

It's nice to see it...

0:26:540:26:55

Both ways of displaying it.

0:26:570:26:58

Sometimes it's nice to see the traditional

0:26:580:27:01

and it's nice to see it move on

0:27:010:27:03

and see something a little more modern.

0:27:030:27:05

We like the display of the chairs up there,

0:27:050:27:08

that piece of artwork was really interesting.

0:27:080:27:11

This is exhibition like we've not seen before, and it is cutting-edge.

0:27:200:27:25

It makes people stop and think.

0:27:250:27:27

I love the fact that you can go behind the scenes

0:27:270:27:30

and see conservation work, you know, ongoing here.

0:27:300:27:33

It's the nuts and bolts of the house, basically,

0:27:330:27:36

and getting below stairs.

0:27:360:27:38

But upstairs, you know,

0:27:380:27:39

incorporating the artist working with things from the 18th century

0:27:390:27:45

is just brilliant, it really is. It's put a smile on my face.

0:27:450:27:47

Back out in the sunshine on the south lawn,

0:27:530:27:56

everybody is still having a good time,

0:27:560:27:58

and our experts are looking for their next items

0:27:580:28:01

to put under the hammer.

0:28:010:28:03

And it looks as if David has come across something of interest.

0:28:030:28:06

-Hello, Norman.

-Hello, David.

0:28:070:28:09

Are you a child of the '60s?

0:28:090:28:11

Well, I'm not a child of the '60s,

0:28:110:28:13

but my very dear friend was a child of the '60s.

0:28:130:28:15

-Right.

-Well, a teenager of the '60s.

0:28:150:28:17

She was brought up, lived in Liverpool.

0:28:170:28:20

-Right.

-Near Liverpool.

0:28:200:28:22

As a 16-, 17-year-old,

0:28:220:28:24

would have frequented the various clubs and outlets in Liverpool.

0:28:240:28:29

Yeah. In Liverpool, yeah.

0:28:290:28:30

And you have got some autographs in this book,

0:28:300:28:33

collected by the lady you refer to, that are very interesting.

0:28:330:28:37

I'm sure people will remember Gerry And The Pacemakers.

0:28:380:28:42

Not the biggest name, but nevertheless...

0:28:420:28:44

-No, no.

-..an important name in the pop scene in the 1960s,

0:28:440:28:47

and still going, I think, aren't they?

0:28:470:28:49

And various other autographs as well,

0:28:490:28:51

but let's not beat about the bush, because the most important

0:28:510:28:53

-autographs you have in here are the Beatles.

-Correct, yeah.

0:28:530:28:56

Everybody knows about the Beatles,

0:28:560:28:58

so I don't have to do any explaining there.

0:28:580:29:00

We've got Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and John Lennon.

0:29:000:29:03

I mean, everyone who collects pop and rock memorabilia

0:29:030:29:07

-wants to own the Beatles' autographs.

-Yes.

0:29:070:29:09

I mean, do you have any ideas as to their value?

0:29:090:29:12

At least 1,000.

0:29:120:29:14

-Yeah, yeah.

-At least.

0:29:140:29:16

Erm, just those four alone.

0:29:160:29:18

If you put it as an album...

0:29:180:29:20

-Yeah.

-..as an autograph book together, you know, 1,500,

0:29:200:29:24

-I would have imagined.

-Yeah.

0:29:240:29:25

There are other autographs in here, as we say -

0:29:250:29:27

I don't think any of those significantly increase the value, really.

0:29:270:29:30

-No, OK.

-What whoever buys this will be buying, will be doing...

0:29:300:29:33

-Primarily.

-..will be buying Beatles. Four Beatles autographs.

-Yes.

0:29:330:29:36

Now, I think you're bang on, really.

0:29:360:29:39

I think 1,000-1,500 is about right.

0:29:390:29:42

Now, I've got to say that there are issues

0:29:420:29:44

-that relate to the Beatles autographs.

-Yes.

0:29:440:29:47

As you might imagine, they get faked.

0:29:470:29:49

So, I think it's absolutely essential

0:29:490:29:51

-that the auctioneers get these authenticated.

-Yeah.

0:29:510:29:54

Erm... Let's go for £1,000-1,500

0:29:540:29:57

with a reserve of £1,000.

0:29:570:30:00

-OK.

-And we'll hope for the best.

0:30:000:30:02

-OK?

-OK.

0:30:020:30:04

That 20th-century autograph book is a very contemporary collectable.

0:30:050:30:10

Whereas over on Adam's table, it's an antique with a far greater age.

0:30:100:30:14

Murray, good afternoon, sir, how are you today?

0:30:140:30:16

-I'm fine, thank you.

-Thanks for coming along,

0:30:160:30:18

and you've brought this, erm, weapon along with you?

0:30:180:30:21

Yes, it's been around for quite a long time, this one.

0:30:210:30:24

It certainly has, I'd say it's been around best part of 200 years.

0:30:240:30:28

That's quite good, then, quite good.

0:30:280:30:30

-Where did you get it from?

-It came through my mum.

0:30:300:30:33

-Right.

-And when she died, it came down to me.

0:30:330:30:35

-It's been in the family quite a long time?

-Yes.

0:30:350:30:38

Erm, it's a percussion cap pistol from the early 19th century.

0:30:380:30:42

You see the GR there...?

0:30:420:30:43

-Uh-huh.

-..is George IV, so it's going to be 1820-1830.

0:30:430:30:47

-Uh-huh.

-Now, we're stamped "Tower" here.

0:30:470:30:50

-That's right, I saw that.

-Do you know why that is?

0:30:500:30:53

I thought it was from the Tower of London.

0:30:530:30:55

-Yes.

-But somebody said today it may be a manufacturer.

0:30:550:30:59

Well, the Royal Ordnance Company was headquarter at the Tower of London.

0:30:590:31:03

So, that's why it's stamped Tower, it's by the Royal Ordnance Company.

0:31:030:31:07

So you're kind of right.

0:31:070:31:09

And they made a lot of weapons like this.

0:31:090:31:12

This isn't in great condition any more,

0:31:120:31:14

but neither would we be if we'd been around for 200 years as well!

0:31:140:31:18

-Yes.

-You've got a walnut stock and shaft going along here,

0:31:180:31:22

and I think the ramrod's also present underneath,

0:31:220:31:24

which is, you know, a lot of the time

0:31:240:31:27

these get lost as well.

0:31:270:31:28

But that's all there.

0:31:280:31:29

So, this is not a firearm that's going to be holding up

0:31:290:31:33

your local post office any time soon.

0:31:330:31:35

It's a decorative piece, a wall piece, for the collector.

0:31:350:31:38

Do you have it on display, on that note?

0:31:380:31:40

I used to have it on display.

0:31:400:31:43

But for years, it's now been in a cupboard.

0:31:430:31:45

Oh, well, not much use in there, is there?

0:31:450:31:47

No. That's why I brought it along.

0:31:470:31:49

These come up at auction fairly often,

0:31:490:31:51

so they're not too hard to value,

0:31:510:31:53

really, by comparison with other ones sold.

0:31:530:31:55

And it's going to be in the £80-100 region,

0:31:550:31:58

is the likely outcome.

0:31:580:32:00

Does that sound satisfactory to you?

0:32:000:32:01

-That sounds about right.

-Yeah. Well, I'm glad you agree!

0:32:010:32:05

Reserve price?

0:32:050:32:07

Oh, I suppose about...

0:32:070:32:09

-£70 or something?

-I think so.

0:32:090:32:10

Very sensible, Murray.

0:32:100:32:12

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-And I detect an accent there,

0:32:120:32:14

it's not a local one, is it?

0:32:140:32:15

No, no, I've been away from Scotland a lot of years.

0:32:150:32:18

-Have you?

-Yes.

-Have you been accepted around here yet?

0:32:180:32:20

Well, I actually work here as well.

0:32:200:32:22

Oh, do you? Oh, wonderful, what a great place to work.

0:32:220:32:24

Fantastic.

0:32:240:32:25

Whilst our experts search for our final object to take off to auction,

0:32:260:32:30

I'm nipping back into the house to look at another intriguing room.

0:32:300:32:34

Now, earlier on, I showed you the Long Gallery,

0:32:360:32:38

designed by the celebrated architect Robert Adam.

0:32:380:32:41

Well, the sixth Earl also commissioned Adam

0:32:410:32:43

to design and furnish this room, the Tapestry Room, which he did.

0:32:430:32:48

Now, back in the day, these walls would have been lined

0:32:480:32:51

with the finest tapestries and silks from Paris.

0:32:510:32:54

All that's left is the framework that the tapestries were suspended from.

0:32:540:32:58

They were sold off to pay for the family's gambling debts

0:32:580:33:01

in the early part of the 20th century,

0:33:010:33:03

and they were bought by the Metropolitan Museum of Art

0:33:030:33:07

in New York. And then, in 1948,

0:33:070:33:10

the museum decided they wanted to display Croome tapestries in situ,

0:33:100:33:15

in the room they came from, so they bought the whole room!

0:33:150:33:18

It was all cut up and shipped out - the ceiling, the floor boards,

0:33:180:33:22

the skirting boards, the shutters, the dado rails.

0:33:220:33:24

So, what you see here now are replicas.

0:33:240:33:27

So, basically, if you want to see the Croome tapestries,

0:33:270:33:32

you've got to get on a plane and fly to New York.

0:33:320:33:35

Right, time for me to get outside and catch up with our experts.

0:33:390:33:42

And it looks as if David has found our final item of the day.

0:33:450:33:48

People call you Flick, is that right?

0:33:490:33:51

-Yes.

-Can I call you Flick?

0:33:510:33:52

-You may.

-OK, Flick.

0:33:520:33:54

Good to meet you.

0:33:540:33:55

I'm sure viewers will recognise this vase instantly,

0:33:550:34:00

as being the work of that great man Rene Lalique.

0:34:000:34:05

Who designed at first jewellery,

0:34:050:34:07

and then came to specialise in decorative items like this.

0:34:070:34:12

He is a big name.

0:34:120:34:14

We'll have a quick look at the mark.

0:34:140:34:16

And when we do so, we see that the mark is etched.

0:34:160:34:20

Later marks are moulded, so that's a good sign.

0:34:210:34:24

-Yeah.

-How come it's here with us today?

0:34:240:34:27

Well, an elderly neighbour gave it to me.

0:34:270:34:30

She was...

0:34:300:34:32

She lived next door, and I used to go round to her garden,

0:34:320:34:35

and she had some lovely antiques, and she just gave it to me.

0:34:350:34:39

That's lovely.

0:34:390:34:40

Well, what she gave you is very nice.

0:34:400:34:43

Erm, this pattern was designed in 1927,

0:34:430:34:46

towards the end of Lalique's life.

0:34:460:34:49

He was born in 1860.

0:34:490:34:51

He worked in England for a time - at least he was a student in England.

0:34:510:34:56

Which I think is perhaps one of the things

0:34:560:34:58

-that makes his work attractive to English people.

-OK.

0:34:580:35:01

You know, I wouldn't describe that as being typically French.

0:35:010:35:04

-Right.

-But what it IS, of course, is typically art deco.

0:35:040:35:07

These geometric shapes, geometric patterns -

0:35:080:35:11

-these are stylised leaves, in fact.

-Right.

0:35:110:35:13

But what makes this particularly attractive is the fact it's yellow.

0:35:130:35:17

Now, this vase was made in other colours,

0:35:170:35:20

but it's the yellow one that people like.

0:35:200:35:22

-Oh.

-And when you think about it, you know,

0:35:220:35:25

yellow is a colour we associate with the 1920s and 1930s.

0:35:250:35:28

You know, you think of Clarice Cliff...

0:35:280:35:30

-Yeah.

-..And the use of yellow in her palette.

0:35:300:35:33

So, really, what you have here,

0:35:330:35:34

and I'm very pleased you brought it along,

0:35:340:35:37

-is a very nice and very saleable item.

-Oh, good.

0:35:370:35:40

But...there is a bit of a catch, isn't there?

0:35:400:35:43

-The chip.

-It is chipped, as you rightly say.

0:35:430:35:46

-Yeah.

-And these chips are significant.

0:35:460:35:50

-Mm.

-Sometimes, a skilful restorer can grind them out,

0:35:500:35:55

but if you tried to grind these out, you'd affect the pattern,

0:35:550:35:58

you'd affect the moulding.

0:35:580:35:59

Do you have any hopes or aspirations for it?

0:36:010:36:03

It would be good to fetch as much as possible for the grandsons!

0:36:030:36:08

You can guarantee that! So, the money's going to your grandson?

0:36:080:36:11

Yes, I've got two grandsons.

0:36:110:36:13

Good. OK.

0:36:130:36:14

Now, I think in good condition,

0:36:140:36:16

it would have been worth between £700 and £1,000.

0:36:160:36:19

-Really? Oh, wow.

-But these chips are significant.

0:36:190:36:22

-Mm.

-And I think we have to...

0:36:220:36:25

..perhaps think in terms of 200-300.

0:36:270:36:29

Oh, wow! That's brilliant.

0:36:290:36:30

-Well, I'm glad you're pleased.

-Yeah, definitely.

0:36:300:36:32

-But it's a significant reduction, isn't it, really?

-Yes, yeah.

0:36:320:36:35

But I can understand, with the chips.

0:36:350:36:37

But that's the way the market is - you know, people want these things in good nick, really.

0:36:370:36:41

So, I suggest we put a reserve just below the £200

0:36:410:36:43

bottom estimate on it.

0:36:430:36:44

So, say 180?

0:36:440:36:46

-Yeah.

-And I think it could do...

0:36:460:36:48

Could do really well. Good. I'm optimistic.

0:36:480:36:50

Well, there you are, that's it, our experts have now found

0:36:520:36:54

their final items to take off to auction, which means sadly,

0:36:540:36:57

we have to say goodbye to this magnificent host location, Croome,

0:36:570:37:01

in the heart of Worcestershire.

0:37:010:37:02

I've thoroughly enjoyed myself today,

0:37:020:37:04

and I know so many people have here.

0:37:040:37:06

But right now we have some unfinished business to do

0:37:060:37:09

in the auction room. Here's a quick recap

0:37:090:37:10

of all the items that are going under the hammer.

0:37:100:37:13

The autograph book belonging to Norman is full of famous names,

0:37:150:37:18

but the standout signatures are those of the Beatles.

0:37:180:37:21

Murray's decorative walnut pistol, which still has its original ramrod,

0:37:230:37:27

has been languishing in a cupboard.

0:37:270:37:29

Time to find a new home.

0:37:290:37:30

And finally we're selling Flick's Rene Lalique vase from 1927,

0:37:320:37:37

with geometric designs.

0:37:370:37:39

Let's hope the art deco fans are in the room,

0:37:400:37:43

as it's heading under the hammer now as we return to Littleton Auctions,

0:37:430:37:46

where auctioneer Martin Homer is still ruling the rostrum.

0:37:460:37:50

The money's going towards your two grandchildren.

0:37:510:37:53

And what are their names?

0:37:530:37:55

George and Max.

0:37:550:37:56

George and Max, good luck!

0:37:560:37:57

Grandma's here, we're all rooting for you two, OK?

0:37:570:38:01

Now, this has got an etched "R Lalique" on it, Rene Lalique,

0:38:010:38:04

so it's done in his lifetime, OK?

0:38:040:38:06

So this is worth a lot more than something etched just Lalique?

0:38:060:38:08

-Absolutely.

-Right.

0:38:080:38:10

Downside, a little chip on the rim, there.

0:38:100:38:14

I think this will sell, and I think it will do the estimate.

0:38:140:38:17

-I hope so, I've got my fingers crossed.

-Good luck.

-Good luck.

0:38:170:38:19

-Thank you.

-OK?

0:38:190:38:21

Rene Lalique vase, design circa 1927.

0:38:210:38:24

I'd like to start that off at £200.

0:38:240:38:27

At £200?

0:38:270:38:28

And we're off at 200 on the internet.

0:38:280:38:31

-On the internet.

-Asking for 210, now.

0:38:310:38:34

Do we have any interest in the room?

0:38:340:38:36

For a piece of Rene Lalique?

0:38:360:38:38

At 200... 220, now.

0:38:380:38:41

At £220.

0:38:410:38:43

The guy who bid 200 is bound to bid again.

0:38:440:38:47

He should do, shouldn't he?!

0:38:470:38:48

At 220, and I'm going to sell to that gentleman at 220.

0:38:480:38:51

Going one... 240, now.

0:38:510:38:53

At 240.

0:38:530:38:55

We're at £240.

0:38:550:38:57

We'll give it 250, now?

0:38:570:38:59

At £240.

0:38:590:39:01

At 240 going once...

0:39:010:39:02

Going twice...

0:39:040:39:05

Sold at £240.

0:39:050:39:07

240, and the grandchildren are going to get something?

0:39:070:39:10

-Yes. They'll be very happy.

-Supergran, here!

0:39:100:39:12

From one 20th-century collectable to another,

0:39:150:39:18

and it's Norman's autograph book

0:39:180:39:20

which include signatures from the Fab Four.

0:39:200:39:22

The auction house has authenticated the Beatles' signatures.

0:39:220:39:26

So what's the verdict?

0:39:260:39:27

Has it changed David's original £1,000-1,500 estimate?

0:39:270:39:31

Ringo's and Paul's were correct...

0:39:330:39:35

Original signatures.

0:39:350:39:36

The original signatures.

0:39:360:39:38

And Paul signed George's and John's.

0:39:380:39:41

-Sure.

-So...

0:39:410:39:42

And that went on.

0:39:420:39:44

I love that, Paul,

0:39:440:39:45

because you can imagine Paul McCartney

0:39:450:39:48

rather liking being a star,

0:39:480:39:49

you know, conscientiously signing away.

0:39:490:39:51

And John Lennon, insouciant about the whole thing, really.

0:39:510:39:55

So Paul signs for John.

0:39:550:39:56

Which is rather what you'd have expected, really.

0:39:560:39:58

-I like that.

-It's a sensible price, now, the auction house have put on.

0:39:580:40:01

It's £500-800, so good luck.

0:40:010:40:04

Good luck with that, OK?

0:40:040:40:05

It's going under the hammer right now. Here we go.

0:40:050:40:07

Here we are, lot number 110,

0:40:070:40:09

which is the autographed book to include the Beatles' autographs.

0:40:090:40:13

To start at £500.

0:40:130:40:15

Looking for £500 on the autographs.

0:40:150:40:16

Do I have any interest at £500?

0:40:180:40:21

In the room or on the net, ladies and gentlemen?

0:40:210:40:24

I've got to start at 500, if not I'm going to have to pass, gentlemen?

0:40:240:40:28

OK, we're going to have to pass on that.

0:40:280:40:30

Fine, I'll put it back on the shelf and I will look at it

0:40:300:40:33

-from time to time.

-I'm so sorry.

0:40:330:40:34

It is disappointing, because it was such a good lot.

0:40:340:40:37

Hang onto them, OK, because, you know they are worth...

0:40:370:40:40

They are definitely worth £5-800.

0:40:400:40:42

Finally, let's hope we have better luck with Murray's pistol.

0:40:430:40:47

So why are you selling this?

0:40:470:40:48

Well, it's been in the cupboard for so many years.

0:40:480:40:51

I thought that somebody else could care for it better than I am.

0:40:510:40:55

Yeah. Yeah. Needs to be displayed, really.

0:40:550:40:58

It's a perfectly legal item to have.

0:40:580:41:00

And do you know what, you look at it and you go, "Yes, history."

0:41:000:41:03

Absolutely. It's a wall piece, but it's got a nice feel to it.

0:41:030:41:06

It's a pleasing object, that one.

0:41:060:41:08

I hope this goes to a good collector and it's put on display

0:41:080:41:10

-and enjoyed.

-It should do, shouldn't it?

0:41:100:41:12

It should do. Good luck with it, Murray.

0:41:120:41:14

-Thank you very much.

-We're looking for around £80-100

0:41:140:41:17

with a £70 reserve,

0:41:170:41:18

so fingers crossed we get that.

0:41:180:41:20

Got interest on this one, ladies and gentlemen.

0:41:200:41:23

At 60, 70, 80, 90...

0:41:230:41:25

-£100.

-There we go.

-Yes!

0:41:250:41:28

At 100. 110. 120 back to me.

0:41:280:41:31

130, net. It's 140 to me.

0:41:310:41:33

170.

0:41:330:41:35

I can go 180 on the book.

0:41:350:41:37

Takes me out at 190.

0:41:370:41:39

I've got £190 on the internet.

0:41:390:41:41

I've got 190. 210, now.

0:41:410:41:44

At £210.

0:41:440:41:45

The net has it at 210.

0:41:450:41:47

230, now.

0:41:470:41:48

At £230.

0:41:480:41:50

At 230. Looking for 40.

0:41:500:41:52

250, now.

0:41:520:41:54

At £250.

0:41:540:41:56

And 270. 280. 290.

0:41:560:41:59

At £290.

0:41:590:42:02

320, now.

0:42:020:42:04

360.

0:42:070:42:08

At £360, the bid's on the net at 360.

0:42:080:42:12

Are we done, ladies and gentlemen?

0:42:120:42:13

-Four!

-400.

0:42:130:42:15

-That's very good money.

-Wonderful.

0:42:150:42:17

440, now.

0:42:170:42:19

480, now. At £480, there we go, at 480.

0:42:190:42:23

At... 520, now.

0:42:230:42:26

At 520, the net has it at 520.

0:42:260:42:30

At £520, I think we're done, there.

0:42:300:42:33

540, OK.

0:42:330:42:36

£540!

0:42:360:42:38

Murray's enjoying this, I think Adam is as well.

0:42:380:42:41

At £540 going once...

0:42:410:42:43

-Going twice...

-Going twice...

0:42:430:42:45

Sold!

0:42:450:42:47

Yes! Great result.

0:42:470:42:49

Great result. Murray, that got a round of applause.

0:42:490:42:53

I think we hit the bull's-eye, there.

0:42:530:42:55

-Wow!

-I can't believe it.

0:42:550:42:58

Obviously belonged to someone very famous.

0:42:580:43:00

Duke of Wellington!

0:43:000:43:02

Well, thank you very much.

0:43:040:43:06

I bet you're pleased you've looked after it, you know,

0:43:060:43:09

and kept it safe, you know?

0:43:090:43:10

And I'm glad I brought it to you at Croome Park.

0:43:100:43:12

-Thank you for coming, Murray.

-Well, I knew there'd be a surprise.

0:43:120:43:15

-Well, yeah, I wasn't expecting...

-I didn't think it would be this one

0:43:150:43:18

right at the end of the show. We have, sadly, ran out of time,

0:43:180:43:20

but that was our last item, and what a surprise.

0:43:200:43:23

Bull's-eye! Join us again the next time for many more but, until then,

0:43:230:43:27

from Adam, from Murray and from myself, here in Worcestershire,

0:43:270:43:30

it's goodbye.

0:43:300:43:31

Paul Martin presents from Croome, a Palladian mansion in Worcestershire, with antiques experts Adam Partridge and David Fletcher. Adam's interest is sparked by a hand-operated fire pump from the Second World War and David is tickled pink when he discovers a collection of humorous prints based on imaginary postcards. Plus Paul goes on a tour of the house to see how some of the key pieces from the historic collection have been incorporated into modern works of art.


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