Belfast 42 Flog It!


Belfast 42

Flog It! comes from the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum in Northern Ireland. Presenter Paul Martin visits a family business that builds racing cars.


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Transcript


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MUSIC: Groovy Train by The Farm

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TRAIN HORN BLARES

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This is Cultra Station just east of Belfast city centre.

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On the other side of this footbridge

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is the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum,

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our magnificent location for today's valuation day.

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And in a moment, this train is pulling up,

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hopefully loads of people are getting off it,

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laden with antiques and collectables to join us.

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Welcome to "Flog It!".

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Today's host location, The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum,

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is situated on the grounds of an old estate,

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which once belonged to the Kennedy family.

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It was this family who in 1905

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began a long tradition of hill-climb racing,

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making this venue the oldest existing

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car racing venue in the world.

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So, it feels fitting that today, the estate is where we can find

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Northern Ireland's largest transport collection.

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There are trains from all over Ireland here.

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There's even an original station cafe,

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but now is not the time to be stopping for a cup of tea.

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It's time to meet our experts and get on with the show.

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Caroline Hawley can barely contain herself

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with all the items popping up today.

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-Tension's mounting!

-Well wrapped up.

-It is well wrapped up!

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-Gosh!

-Are you excited?

-I am excited.

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Oh, that's pretty, isn't it?

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And Thomas Plant, who loves a challenge.

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-What's this here?

-That's what I want you to tell me.

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I don't know. Could be an instrument of some description.

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And just as Caroline was starting to get somewhere...

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That's a large glass, isn't it?

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Caroline, you like a large glass, don't you?

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-I've seen you in the bar.

-Not as large as that!

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You could get a whole bottle in there.

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I think you'd be a little bit squiffy after that, wouldn't you?

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I think you would.

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While everyone gets seated, here's a quick look

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at what's coming up on today's show.

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Caroline whizzes back to 1985 in a Belfast-built DeLorean car.

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One seller cannot quite believe his luck in the auction room.

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And later on in the programme, I'll be finding out how a local farmer

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became a big name in the motor racing world.

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There really is a great atmosphere here in the museum

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as people bustle through to the valuations,

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but before we make a start, let me show you this wonderful

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original station kiosk, first pioneered here

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in Northern Ireland by a chap called Charles Eason.

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And there on the top, you can see Eason & Son.

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But if you come around here, look, lit up,

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an advertising sign for The News Letter,

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Belfast's first newspaper.

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Wonderfully evocative.

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You could almost imagine somebody leaning out, saying,

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"Get your News Letter here," as the commuters rushed towards the trains.

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It really does take you back in time.

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We are surrounded by fantastic, historic vehicles here

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at the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum,

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and Caroline has discovered a wonderful example

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of a car made here in Belfast.

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This is the DeLorean DMC 12,

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featured in the 1985 blockbuster Back To The Future

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as a time-travelling car for the main characters.

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-Well, Kevin, this is fantastic.

-It is.

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I'm going to have to get back to reality, though.

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So, Kevin, what delights have you brought along for me?

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I have brought you along a DeLorean tie and a tiepin.

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Wow. So, did you work for the DeLorean company?

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No, I wished I did.

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I was learning to drive

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and my driving instructor, he used to work for them.

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He tested the cars on a big track.

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-The DMC 12?

-He did, yes.

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Wow, what a job. I'd love that.

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So, these were given to him?

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They were given to him,

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-and he gave them to me.

-Fabulous.

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The DeLorean car company, the car has been very iconic,

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and the factory wasn't in existence very long.

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It started in 1975, here in Belfast, and closed in 1982.

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But I believe they're recommissioning the car

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as of next year.

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Now, anything to do with the DeLorean car company

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and this car will have a value.

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So, I think that these are going to have some value,

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not a huge value, you're not going to go

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and buy yourself a car with it, but I would think £20-40?

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-That would feel all right.

-Would it?

-Yes.

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And would you like a reserve on them, Ken?

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-No, I'd like them...

-Right.

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So, we'll take them to auction and see what happens.

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-Yes.

-Brilliant, look forward to it.

-OK, thank you.

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Having a good time, everyone?

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-Yes!

-Yeah, that's what it's all about.

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Thomas is just about to do a valuation there,

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and we're going to see what he's looking at right now.

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Are you a joiner? A carpenter?

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No, but I come from a long line of them.

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-Do you?

-And funnily enough, when I did picture framing,

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I was told I did very good joints.

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-Did you?

-So, it must be in my blood.

-"You did a good joint!"

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Love that. So, tell me, this is a very early book.

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The Carpenter's And Joiner's Assistant.

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Dated for 1805, and it states it's a second edition.

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The first is 1802.

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So, this has been in your family...

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A long time, but I... I don't know how long.

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It originally came from my grandfather.

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I mean, I know we're here to flog it,

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but why have you brought it along?

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Well, my boys wouldn't be interested.

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They're not into anything like this.

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It's the old story, you downsize, don't you?

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I can't keep carting things around, and my husband is a traveller,

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so we travel everywhere and...

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And a 200-year-old book...

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-Is heavy!

-Heavy. And it doesn't take kindly...

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-To being travelled.

-No.

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So, I just want to put this book into context.

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So, we're looking at 1805, 211 years ago.

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What was happening in 1805?

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-Oh, shipbuilding.

-Ship, Trafalgar...

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-Trafalgar, yeah.

-So, we had a big battle in the high seas.

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We also had elegant buildings being built, the Georgian style.

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George III was on the throne.

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You know, I think it would've been a pretty exciting time be alive.

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This would have been your sort of site computer, your laptop.

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And it would tell you how to build...

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I've marked a page here.

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There's a beautiful sky light there with this lovely bit of joinery

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and you can see how the light would fill in, etc.

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A whole list of how you would do it.

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-I think it's lovely.

-Thank you.

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-I really do.

-You appreciate it a lot more than I do, obviously.

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I think it's a man's book rather than a woman's book.

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Probably men would have used this, yes.

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It just wasn't that time, was it?

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-No.

-I mean, now it's a different story.

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-Oh, yeah.

-Right, let's have a think.

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What do you think it's worth?

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-I have no idea.

-Do you want to just sell it?

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I do. I can't see me building anything like that.

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Sky lights?!

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So, valuation.

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A first edition, 1802, is quite valuable.

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Probably worth a good few hundred pounds.

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This is second and there's a bit of damage, but it's all there,

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so wait for it, typical auctioneer's estimate,

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-you know what I'm going to say.

-80-100.

-Yeah, £80-100!

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-You could do my job!

-I know.

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Now, regarding reserve...

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At your discretion, what do you think?

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Personally, I think half low-end, that bottom estimate.

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-40?

-40. I think that's fair.

-OK, fine.

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-That's fine by me, yes.

-Yeah?

-We're good, good.

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Thank you very much.

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Thank you. Made my day!

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A wonderful item from a traditional craftsmen there,

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which might be the perfect companion for the carpenter

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who made our next pieces.

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Hello, Cynthia. Lovely to see you, and your lovely tables.

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-Thank you.

-Now, how did you come to have these?

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Well, they belonged to the family.

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My mother passed away last year

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and we're just getting round to clearing the house now.

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As far as I know, my granny bought them.

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She enjoyed going to the auctions and she gave them to my mum

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and they've been in our house since then.

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And it's not something that you want in your house?

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Well, they are beautiful and I do think they're lovely,

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but I just don't feel it would fit into our house at the moment

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and my brother and sister aren't interested either,

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-so just happy to...

-Well, I think they're lovely.

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And for lots of reasons, I think they're really quite nice.

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One is it harks back to 17th, 18th-century Dutch marquetry work.

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-It's actually British, I think.

-Right.

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Edwardian period, sort of 1900, turn-of-the-century.

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Mahogany, with these beautiful marquetry panels

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in different types of wood, string inlay here,

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and I think it's made of satin wood, harewood.

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Originally, this would've been much brighter,

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almost garish to our taste today.

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-Yes.

-But the sunlight, over the years, has sort of toned it down.

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And what's really nice about them is there's a full quartet.

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So, if we pull them out gently, we shall see...

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It's almost like a set of Russian dolls, this, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-And the third...

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-Now, look at this colour compared to this one.

-Oh, yes!

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I would suggest that the smallest one and the largest one

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have been in use and these two possibly not.

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-Yes, yes.

-Because look at the colour on this bird.

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Really lovely!

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And the more I look at these, the more I love them.

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-Lovely bobbin-turned sides to them.

-Yes.

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And there's marquetry inlay on every surface you look at.

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On the legs, the top of the legs, the sides here.

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-Yes.

-They're smothered in marquetry.

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But old hawk-eye here has spotted there's a little bit of damage here.

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Can you see, where the marquetry's missing?

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And then, right down here on the foot,

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it's actually been broken and glued together.

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-Right.

-I mean, neither of those are really important.

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-And these I think are very elegant...

-Yes.

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And they would look great in any interior, modern or otherwise.

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Well, yeah... Don't make me change my mind!

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Aw... So you're happy to put them into auction?

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Yes, yes. I think we have decided, yes.

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Right. I would think, because there's a set of four,

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I'm going to stick my neck out and say 2-300.

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-Right.

-Would you be happy with that?

-Yes, yes...

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And would you like a reserve, Cynthia?

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Yes, that would be a good idea. What would you suggest?

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I think if we put a discretionary reserve...

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-Yes.

-..of £200, which means that gives us a leeway of 10%.

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So, if they got to 180, we'd let them go.

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-Right, yeah, OK.

-Would you be happy with that?

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-That's fine, yeah.

-Brilliant.

-Well, let's take them to auction...

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-OK.

-And see what they do.

-Great, OK. Thank you.

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Well, there you are. Three great items to put under the hammer.

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This is where it gets exciting.

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Anything can happen. You've seen the show.

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It's really hard to put a value on an antique.

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I think there's one or two surprises there.

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Let's find out what the bidders think.

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Here's a quick recap of all the items

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we're taking off to auction with us.

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Blink and you're back in the 1980s

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with this DeLorean car company tie and pin.

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A wonderful 1805 edition of a carpenter's assistant book,

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belonging to Kerry.

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And finally, a collection of four inlaid mahogany tables

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from the early 19th century.

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We're heading west into Belfast city centre,

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a thriving and busy city today, with its working port and busy roads.

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100 years ago, it was alive with tramlines and then trolleybuses.

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And in the mid-19th century, our auction house was built.

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Let's step inside and get on with the sale,

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where our auctioneer for the day is Daniel Clark.

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That's four at 180...

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Well, the room's just starting to fill up.

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I can feel the tension rising, there's going to be

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a cracking atmosphere here later on during the day.

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In a moment, the auction's just about to start.

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Now do remember, the commission rate here is 18.5% plus VAT.

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It varies from room to room, so check the details in the catalogue.

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But right now, the talking stops.

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It's all down to the bidders in the room.

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So, stay with us. We could have one or two big surprises.

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And I'm very excited about our first item.

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As a teenager, I can remember the iconic DeLorean car

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built right here in Belfast. I wanted one.

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I saw one in Back To The Future.

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Kevin, it's great to see you. You've got some memorabilia.

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-I have, yes.

-It's not a lot of money but I tell you what,

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it's a great connection. It's a great connection, isn't it?

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So, why are you selling these?

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I just want to, hope to get them to somebody that has a DeLorean.

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-Yeah!

-Well, it's a good start, isn't it?

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If you can't afford the car, and they're real collectors items now,

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you can get the tiepin. Right.

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It's going under the hammer right now. This is it.

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Lot 210, we have a DeLorean tie and a pin.

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What do we say? £40 for it.

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£30, no, take 20.

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20 and bid.

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5, 30.

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5, any more?

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At 35. 40, lady's bid.

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5. We have £45.

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-Which is great, twice the lower end.

-We have £45. Any more?

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45 here.

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All finished at £45?

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Brilliant, brilliant.

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Do you know, it's just nice to have something from DeLorean, isn't it?

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You know, made here in the heart of the city.

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What a car, what a car.

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A wonderful piece of local history there.

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And I love our next item, belonging to Kerry,

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which harks back to the era of traditional craftsmen.

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Well, I tell you what, my trip here in Belfast

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just gets better and better, because you brought in this

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stunning carpenter's book, and for me,

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-this is one of the best items in the sale.

-Thank you.

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I love it, love it! This is what it's all about.

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These traditional skills and methods get passed on

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and this is a great book to do it.

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-It's going under the hammer right now. Good luck, Kerry.

-Thank you.

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What can we say? 50, £40?

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40 and bid. 50.

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£50 I have now.

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At £50 bid.

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We have £50. Any more?

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-Brilliant!

-I know, I'm quite happy.

-It's brilliant.

-I couldn't use it.

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But you come from a family of carpenters, though, don't you?

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Yes. Both my grandfathers and my father, so a long line.

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-Yeah.

-Someone said we go back to the Bible.

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Noah's Ark!

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-They built the Ark!

-Definitely.

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It's lovely seeing our sellers leave with happy faces.

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Let's hope we can get Cynthia's tables away.

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I know since the valuation day, you've rang the auction house,

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-you've had a chat to the auctioneer.

-Yes.

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You've put the reserve up to £250.

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-Yes.

-I can understand that.

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So nice, I thought I wouldn't like them to go for next to nothing...

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-You never know.

-No, you don't, do you?

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But they're inlaid, they're quality.

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They're going under the hammer right now.

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Now, number 20 is a reproduction inlaid mahogany nest

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of four tea tables.

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Say 200 to open, please.

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200 and bid.

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220, 220 I have now.

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At 250 with the porter. At 280, new bidder.

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At £300.

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At 320, 350 with the porter.

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-Brilliant.

-380 and bid.

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-Brilliant, brilliant!

-£400, it's back with the porter at £400.

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-Bid's in the room.

-At £400 against you in the room.

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I'm selling at £400.

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Top end, that's what we wanted!

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That's a fantastic result.

0:16:110:16:13

-Really pleased.

-And what do we say?

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-BOTH:

-Quality always sells.

0:16:140:16:16

Well, that's our first three lots done and dusted.

0:16:230:16:25

So far, so good.

0:16:250:16:26

They really are racing out the door here in Belfast.

0:16:260:16:29

But nothing could compete with the speed generated

0:16:290:16:32

by a modest little company that's based just down the coast.

0:16:320:16:35

# We're on a road to nowhere... #

0:16:430:16:46

Well, driving along here,

0:16:460:16:48

I'm thinking, have I taken the wrong turning?

0:16:480:16:51

There's not a sign in sight.

0:16:510:16:54

76 years ago, this was the Dunvilles' estate,

0:16:540:16:57

famous for their whiskey.

0:16:570:16:58

Now, I'm looking for an old red brick building

0:16:580:17:01

that was once the family's laundry.

0:17:010:17:03

But for the last 56 years, has been owned by the Crossle family.

0:17:030:17:07

Well, it looks like it does in the early photographs.

0:17:110:17:14

It's hard to believe this is the headquarters of the world's

0:17:140:17:17

longest-running manufacturer of customer racing cars.

0:17:170:17:20

Where's the corporate signs? Where's the logos?

0:17:200:17:23

But I guess first and foremost, this is a family home.

0:17:230:17:26

It all started with a young man named John Crossle,

0:17:280:17:31

who was brought up by a farming family in County Tyrone,

0:17:310:17:34

Northern Ireland.

0:17:340:17:35

Now as a young man, John discovered he was more interested

0:17:350:17:38

in engineering than farming,

0:17:380:17:40

so fixing tractors became his way of earning a living.

0:17:400:17:44

As a teenager, John had fallen in love with motorcycle racing

0:17:470:17:51

and spent six successful years on the track.

0:17:510:17:54

But something more glamorous caught his eye.

0:17:540:17:56

1950 had seen the launch of Formula 1 car racing.

0:17:560:18:00

Seduced by this new faster sport,

0:18:010:18:04

John decided to swap his motorbike for a racing car.

0:18:040:18:07

There was one problem. It was an expensive sport.

0:18:080:18:11

Undeterred, the self-taught 27-year-old John

0:18:200:18:23

decided to build his own racing car and in 1957,

0:18:230:18:26

he made his debut at Kirkistown racing circuit

0:18:260:18:30

in County Down, Northern Ireland.

0:18:300:18:32

And this is where for the best part of his life,

0:18:330:18:36

John built and designed his cars.

0:18:360:18:38

Now, sadly he died in 2014 but his wife Rosemary,

0:18:380:18:41

who ran the company with him, still lives here.

0:18:410:18:44

And the two of them built a company

0:18:480:18:50

whose cars made a huge impact across the racing world.

0:18:500:18:53

When did you meet John and where was it?

0:18:560:18:59

Well, I had been going to race meetings with his friends

0:18:590:19:02

for a couple of years and when John appeared with his first car in 1957,

0:19:020:19:07

I didn't really notice him.

0:19:070:19:09

So, when he appeared with his second car in 1958,

0:19:090:19:12

which was more successful than the first car,

0:19:120:19:16

that was when I noticed him.

0:19:160:19:18

So, we met in '58, got engaged in '59 and married in '60.

0:19:180:19:22

-Wow!

-And moved into a very derelict house,

0:19:220:19:26

and John sold machinery over the next few months in the workshop.

0:19:260:19:31

Were you worried financially it might not work to start with?

0:19:310:19:35

Well, when you're young and enthusiastic,

0:19:350:19:37

-finance doesn't really...

-No, you're a bit more reckless!

0:19:370:19:39

..come into it, really.

0:19:390:19:41

Once he started winning and customers ordered cars,

0:19:410:19:45

well, then, production began to take, to take over.

0:19:450:19:49

And was he much of a businessman, or was that your side of things?

0:19:490:19:52

He did, in fairness to him, keep all his paperwork,

0:19:520:19:55

albeit in a large flowerpot.

0:19:550:19:58

But he gave that to me...

0:19:580:20:00

-Did you?

-And I turned that into a set of books.

0:20:000:20:03

-Yeah.

-And that's where the book-keeping started.

0:20:030:20:06

But at the very beginning, in the early '60s,

0:20:060:20:10

I would've pretended to be John's secretary.

0:20:100:20:12

Sure, cos not many women were running companies.

0:20:120:20:15

Women weren't expected to be...

0:20:150:20:17

So, it was probably about 20 years later

0:20:170:20:19

before I called myself financial director.

0:20:190:20:22

And while Rosemary made sure the business ran smoothly,

0:20:240:20:27

John was busy coming up with new ideas.

0:20:270:20:29

He was quite passionate about getting his design thoughts...

0:20:300:20:34

-Sure.

-..onto the track to prove that he could drive a car,

0:20:340:20:39

or build a car as good as anybody else's car.

0:20:390:20:43

As well as working at the factory,

0:20:430:20:45

the couple were regular faces on the racing circuit.

0:20:450:20:47

Was there a lot of travelling?

0:20:480:20:50

We went to Paris and that was very exciting,

0:20:500:20:55

with the sports cars.

0:20:550:20:56

They said, "Come to a nightclub..."

0:20:560:20:58

Wasn't quite sure what was going on. I was a bit naive!

0:20:580:21:02

Rosemary might have been naive when it came to nightclubs,

0:21:030:21:06

but her and John were socialising with some of the world's

0:21:060:21:09

most famous racing drivers of the era.

0:21:090:21:12

Lots of them went on to become Formula 1 superstars,

0:21:120:21:15

like Nigel Mansell.

0:21:150:21:16

I'd imagine all the people from the racing world in the '60s and '70s

0:21:180:21:22

have sat around this kitchen table with you and John.

0:21:220:21:24

They certainly did. Especially Americans.

0:21:240:21:27

They were inclined to come and stay for,

0:21:270:21:30

one of them, three weeks.

0:21:300:21:32

But a lot of Formula 1 drivers did start in our cars.

0:21:320:21:35

Nigel Mansell was very, very good. He used to ring after every race.

0:21:350:21:39

And Henry was at the age where he liked to answer the telephone.

0:21:390:21:43

So, he would answer the telephone and then he'd arrive and...

0:21:430:21:45

"Dad! It's Nigel, he's won again!"

0:21:450:21:48

It was so...

0:21:480:21:50

It was just a sort of, so nice of Nigel to keep John up-to-date.

0:21:500:21:54

-Sure, sure.

-Eddie Jordan, very good driver.

0:21:540:21:57

And a great friend.

0:21:570:21:59

And Eddie Irvine was another one and he was local.

0:21:590:22:03

He's from here too, you see.

0:22:030:22:05

With the business headquarters based at Rory's Wood,

0:22:060:22:09

it was very much a family affair.

0:22:090:22:11

And from a young age, John and Rosemary's youngest child Caroline

0:22:110:22:15

took a strong interest in the business,

0:22:150:22:17

and it still continues today.

0:22:170:22:18

I'd imagine John would've loved the fact that, you know,

0:22:210:22:24

the company would be in safe hands with Caroline's involvement.

0:22:240:22:28

Yes. John was very happy about that.

0:22:280:22:30

I arranged for Caroline to show me around the workshop.

0:22:300:22:33

-This is my daughter, Caroline.

-Hello, pleased to meet you.

0:22:330:22:36

How do you do, Paul?

0:22:360:22:37

-Can I have a tour of the cars and see the workshops?

-Yes, yes.

0:22:370:22:39

See where they're still being built today?

0:22:390:22:41

-Just through here, attached to the house.

-OK, OK. Thank you.

0:22:410:22:44

-It's been a pleasure talking to you.

-Nice to see you.

0:22:440:22:46

-Right, just through here, Paul.

-OK.

0:22:470:22:50

-Dad didn't have too far to go to work.

-No.

0:22:510:22:52

Do you know what? I can smell engine oil and grease.

0:22:520:22:55

It's so close to the kitchen. Wow, look at this! Whoo!

0:22:550:22:58

This is brilliant. I mean, this really is quite exciting.

0:23:000:23:03

For you, this must be normal. You grew up with this.

0:23:030:23:06

It's all, all totally normal.

0:23:060:23:08

It was more like a playground for myself and my brother, actually.

0:23:080:23:12

We used to go round on trikes and bikes,

0:23:120:23:15

and all around the workshop and have races.

0:23:150:23:17

-As toddlers here?

-As toddlers, yeah.

0:23:170:23:19

It must have been exciting going away with Dad,

0:23:190:23:22

getting track-side and hearing these things start up and the pressure of

0:23:220:23:26

"Are we going to do it today? Will the car let us down? Will it win?"

0:23:260:23:29

Must have been brilliant as a kid!

0:23:290:23:31

It was fantastic. And particularly, once I got to about 12 or 13,

0:23:310:23:35

Dad and I would've gone a lot on our own or with the racing team,

0:23:350:23:38

but just the two of us. Around Ireland and then England

0:23:380:23:41

and then we went to America quite a few times,

0:23:410:23:43

just the two of us together.

0:23:430:23:45

Dad was a super person to travel with

0:23:450:23:47

and be with around the racetracks, because he treated you as an adult.

0:23:470:23:51

He treated you as one of the team.

0:23:510:23:53

What kind of man was your dad?

0:23:540:23:57

Very quiet and unassuming.

0:23:570:23:59

Dad wouldn't have asked anybody to do anything for him in the workshop

0:23:590:24:03

that he wasn't prepared to do himself

0:24:030:24:05

and I think people appreciated that and

0:24:050:24:08

of the 60 or so people we had working with us,

0:24:080:24:10

they all seemed to enjoy working with him.

0:24:100:24:13

-They appreciated him as a boss.

-Yeah.

0:24:130:24:16

John's personality was clearly part of his incredible success

0:24:160:24:20

and the fact that Crossle Cars is still here 60 years later

0:24:200:24:24

is testimony to that.

0:24:240:24:26

As well, of course, as the legacy of these beautiful cars.

0:24:260:24:29

What are they like to drive?

0:24:310:24:32

Well, they're exhilarating. You're very low to the ground,

0:24:330:24:35

which is the first thing that you notice,

0:24:350:24:37

which takes a little bit of getting used to.

0:24:370:24:39

But that's probably part and parcel.

0:24:390:24:41

-Part of the excitement, isn't it?

-Would you like a go on them?

-I...

0:24:410:24:44

Do you know, I was thinking you'll never ask. Yes, please!

0:24:440:24:47

I don't know which one, but I'd love to have a go.

0:24:470:24:49

I think the 9S would be most suitable for you.

0:24:490:24:51

-The yellow one?

-Yes.

-Yeah!

0:24:510:24:53

ENGINE REVVING

0:24:550:24:58

I could get really carried away in this car, but don't worry,

0:25:020:25:05

I'm not allowed off this private road.

0:25:050:25:08

This is just fantastic.

0:25:090:25:11

The biting point on the clutch is really low,

0:25:110:25:14

so you've got to balance it up with the revs.

0:25:140:25:16

Too much and this car's going to shoot off.

0:25:160:25:18

I can feel its power.

0:25:180:25:19

It's incredible!

0:25:200:25:22

Welcome back to the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum,

0:25:310:25:33

where our experts are whizzing through the wonderful items,

0:25:330:25:37

which is just as well, as we've had an incredible turnout here today.

0:25:370:25:40

With car racing so big over here in Ulster,

0:25:420:25:44

it's lovely to see our next item.

0:25:440:25:46

So, over to you, Thomas.

0:25:460:25:48

-Hello, John.

-How are you?

-Very good, thank you.

0:25:490:25:52

-Good.

-Are you from Ulster?

0:25:520:25:54

-I am from, yes, Donaghadee.

-Dona...

0:25:540:25:57

And today, you've brought along this lovely Ulster TT Race badge,

0:25:570:26:02

-this enamel badge.

-Yes.

-Tell me about it.

0:26:020:26:04

Well, that comes from the 1932 race.

0:26:040:26:07

My father was a great man for racing

0:26:070:26:10

and he attended all the Ulster TT races.

0:26:100:26:14

And this is a badge from the 1932 one.

0:26:140:26:17

It wasn't in my day, it was after.

0:26:190:26:21

You are a bit too young for 1930s, aren't you?

0:26:210:26:24

A bit too young for that, yes. Yes, I am.

0:26:240:26:26

-And this has been in your family possession?

-Yes, ever since, yes.

0:26:260:26:30

How long was the route? Was it sort of...?

0:26:300:26:31

The route was 13-odd miles. And they raced round it 35 times.

0:26:310:26:36

-35 times?

-Yes, 35 times.

0:26:360:26:38

And do you know what kind of route it is?

0:26:380:26:40

-Is it in a triangle, a circle...?

-It's a triangle.

-Is it?

0:26:400:26:43

It goes from Dundonald down to Newtownards,

0:26:430:26:46

and along Strangford Lough shore, to Comber, and then back up to...

0:26:460:26:51

Have you done it yourself?

0:26:510:26:52

Well, I've been around the course, so I have.

0:26:520:26:54

-Have you?

-Yes, I have, yes.

0:26:540:26:56

-In your supercar?

-In my supercar, yes.

0:26:560:26:58

What is it, like, an F1 McLaren outside...?

0:26:580:27:01

Well, I changed the name to a Peugeot 307.

0:27:010:27:05

HE LAUGHS

0:27:050:27:07

-It surprises people when you pass them.

-Does it?

0:27:070:27:09

-So, this is a souvenir badge?

-Souvenir badge.

0:27:110:27:13

If you were a spectator, you could buy a badge,

0:27:130:27:15

and the badges in the 1930s

0:27:150:27:17

were made out of a base metal with an enamel.

0:27:170:27:19

-Yes.

-Probably made in Birmingham.

0:27:190:27:22

In a firm called Fattorini's. But it's not marked on there.

0:27:220:27:26

But it is a rather lovely commemorative souvenir

0:27:260:27:30

of a very exciting, exhilarating race.

0:27:300:27:34

-Yes.

-Can you imagine in the age of power, of steam and petrol,

0:27:340:27:39

and all that going on, all very new to us?

0:27:390:27:42

They came from all over Ireland to this race.

0:27:420:27:44

From every place. It was a big thing in those days.

0:27:440:27:47

And they came from all over Britain as well, didn't they?

0:27:470:27:50

-Yes, they did, yes.

-The reason why I picked out this badge

0:27:500:27:53

is because it's so local, it's got that connection

0:27:530:27:57

with where we are today, but because it's such a short race,

0:27:570:28:01

as in the length of time it was on,

0:28:010:28:04

from '28 to '36,

0:28:040:28:08

it's a short period of time.

0:28:080:28:09

-Yes.

-So, therefore, I think the collectors

0:28:090:28:12

might be quite interested in this

0:28:120:28:13

because it's such a short period this race was on.

0:28:130:28:16

-So, the TT stands for...?

-Tour Trophy.

0:28:160:28:20

-A bit like the Isle of Man TT.

-It is, yes.

0:28:200:28:22

-But this was for motor cars.

-Yes, motor cars.

0:28:220:28:25

The interesting thing is about this is that the reason why it could run

0:28:250:28:29

in Ulster was the law was slightly different here, is that right?

0:28:290:28:32

Yes, I think, as far as I know, yes.

0:28:320:28:33

-So, they could actually close the roads.

-Yes.

0:28:330:28:36

And so, we could race.

0:28:360:28:38

Why do you think people are interested in these things?

0:28:380:28:42

Just because they're very enthusiastic about old cars

0:28:420:28:45

and re-doing them.

0:28:450:28:47

I think they're enthusiastic about old cars, racing, transport, and...

0:28:470:28:52

-Trains.

-Trains, and you link it in with the Art Deco period,

0:28:520:28:56

you've got it all encompassed in this one snippet of our society,

0:28:560:29:02

of human endeavour, of real sort of pushing the boundaries.

0:29:020:29:06

And this is what these guys were doing in 1932.

0:29:060:29:09

And I love the blue and the green, and a big vehicle it is there.

0:29:090:29:13

Have you ever thought about a value?

0:29:140:29:16

Not really, you know.

0:29:160:29:18

-It's hard to...

-It is... It is just a badge.

0:29:180:29:20

-Yes.

-And it is just base metal and enamel.

0:29:200:29:23

But it's 1932 and it's the Ulster TT.

0:29:230:29:25

And it's perfect.

0:29:250:29:27

I think, as a badge like that, and it's perfect,

0:29:270:29:31

-I think it's worth between 50-80.

-Yes.

0:29:310:29:34

And I think we deserve to fix a reserve on it of £30.

0:29:340:29:37

-That'll do, yes.

-But I wouldn't be surprised if it did better.

-Yes.

0:29:370:29:42

-You want to do it?

-Oh, yes, we will go and flog it.

0:29:420:29:46

We're going to...!

0:29:460:29:47

-I hope it races away for you.

-So do I, yes!

0:29:470:29:50

Men and their motors.

0:29:510:29:53

What is it about cars that brings out the inner boy in grown men?

0:29:530:29:57

It's fantastic being surrounded by so many incredible cars

0:29:580:30:02

here at the museum and there is one quirky little car

0:30:020:30:06

built for land and sea that has caught my eye.

0:30:060:30:09

It's a German amphibious car and it was built in the 1960s.

0:30:090:30:13

And this very car had quite an adventure.

0:30:130:30:16

In the summer of 1968,

0:30:180:30:20

two friends from Scotland decided to rise to a challenge to cross

0:30:200:30:24

the North Channel all the way from Scotland to Ireland.

0:30:240:30:27

On that summer's day, there was one boy

0:30:300:30:32

holidaying on the beach at Ballycastle.

0:30:320:30:35

This is Roy McCahon. Now, as a small boy, he can remember -

0:30:360:30:39

you can, can't you? - standing on the beach with your bucket and spade

0:30:390:30:42

and seeing one of these amphibious cars drive out of the sea.

0:30:420:30:46

And, in fact, that's a copy of the newspaper cutting

0:30:460:30:49

on the wall over there of you, isn't it, standing there watching?

0:30:490:30:52

-I'm fairly sure, yeah.

-Yeah.

0:30:520:30:54

I was playing on the beach with my cousin and sister.

0:30:540:30:58

And I saw this car come out of the water.

0:30:580:31:00

And I can remember, as it came out,

0:31:000:31:02

the propellers spinning as it drove past my sandcastle.

0:31:020:31:06

And that in a choppy sea, I would imagine,

0:31:060:31:08

would be your worst nightmare.

0:31:080:31:11

Well, we got in contact with one of those guys that made that journey -

0:31:110:31:15

Sam Allen, he now lives in Brazil -

0:31:150:31:17

and he says it's not a journey he would like to make today.

0:31:170:31:20

I mean, very brave men or very stupid, one of the two!

0:31:200:31:24

Well, thank you very much, Rory, some wonderful childhood memories.

0:31:240:31:28

Well, let's hope our experts are in fine spirits as they look

0:31:280:31:31

for more treasures to take off to auction.

0:31:310:31:33

Over to you, Caroline.

0:31:360:31:38

-Hello, both of you!

-Hello.

0:31:380:31:40

Hello, thank you so much for bringing this

0:31:400:31:43

gorgeous jewellery set along.

0:31:430:31:46

It's a pair of earrings and a brooch.

0:31:460:31:48

I love my jewellery.

0:31:480:31:51

And I love this.

0:31:510:31:52

Now, tell me about it.

0:31:520:31:54

Well, it's Dominic's late wife.

0:31:540:31:57

She was Canadian and lived a long time in America.

0:31:570:32:00

-Right.

-And it was hers.

0:32:000:32:03

I see, and did she used to wear it, Dominic?

0:32:030:32:05

I have only saw her wear it once.

0:32:050:32:08

And I think it was a wee bit on the big side for her.

0:32:080:32:12

Big? I don't think anything could be too big.

0:32:120:32:15

-Too big a statement, maybe.

-No! It's gorgeous.

0:32:150:32:18

How did your late wife come by it? Do you know?

0:32:180:32:21

She was Canadian but she lived for a while in America.

0:32:210:32:26

So, I am assuming - we didn't discuss it -

0:32:260:32:28

I am assuming she picked it up in America.

0:32:280:32:31

Well, it dates from the late 19th, early 20th century.

0:32:310:32:35

It's in the style of 16th century Italian Baroque.

0:32:350:32:38

This brooch here is set with the tremolo mount,

0:32:380:32:42

which would sparkle beautifully in candlelight with enamelling.

0:32:420:32:48

Emeralds, diamonds.

0:32:480:32:50

What more do you want?

0:32:500:32:53

-It's not something you would wear?

-It's a little bit too fancy for me.

0:32:530:32:56

And I wouldn't wear those type of earrings anyway.

0:32:560:32:59

Now, on the back, it's marked 750,

0:32:590:33:01

which tells me that that is 18-carat gold.

0:33:010:33:05

-Which means it's very, very good quality.

-Really?

0:33:050:33:09

No damage, as far as I can see, apart from, sadly,

0:33:090:33:12

we've lost the top of the earring.

0:33:120:33:14

And this brooch could be worn as a brooch,

0:33:140:33:17

but also, I think it would have at one time,

0:33:170:33:20

had an attachment so it could be worn as a pendant as well.

0:33:200:33:24

And a lot of late 19th, early 20th-century jewellery

0:33:240:33:28

would be used to be worn in different ways,

0:33:280:33:31

to make more use of it.

0:33:310:33:33

It really is a lovely set.

0:33:330:33:36

And I would put an auction estimate of £300-500 on it.

0:33:360:33:40

-Right.

-Are you happy with that?

0:33:400:33:43

-Yes.

-And would you like a reserve?

0:33:430:33:45

Well, we had initially thought of around 250, but 300?

0:33:460:33:50

-What do you think?

-I think, well, if we put a reserve of 250?

0:33:500:33:55

-Yes, perfect.

-Fixed reserve of £250.

0:33:550:33:58

And I am sure that will go to a very, very happy lady.

0:33:580:34:02

That's lovely, thank you.

0:34:020:34:03

The crowd here are so friendly and lots of people

0:34:060:34:09

have made quite a journey to be with us today.

0:34:090:34:12

-Thank you so much for coming in today.

-I love you so much!

0:34:120:34:14

Without the general public, we wouldn't have a show.

0:34:140:34:17

We love you. We just love you. We're jubbling!

0:34:170:34:19

Right now, it's time to see what Thomas has found

0:34:200:34:22

as we take a look at our last item before heading off to auction.

0:34:220:34:26

So, Paul, tell me about your cruet set.

0:34:270:34:30

In the 1970s,

0:34:300:34:33

when I was going as a young un-married clergyman

0:34:330:34:38

to a large rural manse,

0:34:380:34:41

my parents gave me this cruet set.

0:34:410:34:43

What's a rural manse?

0:34:440:34:46

A rectory in the country.

0:34:460:34:48

Right, is that an Irish way of...?

0:34:480:34:50

A manse is the house provided by a Presbyterian or Methodist Church

0:34:500:34:55

-for the use of the Minister.

-OK.

0:34:550:34:57

And I was going to County Donegal...

0:34:570:34:59

..in the north-west of Ireland, to a large house...

0:35:000:35:03

..with very little furniture.

0:35:040:35:06

And my parents gave me this cruet set for use, for dinner parties,

0:35:060:35:11

when I would be entertaining church dignitaries.

0:35:110:35:15

And did that happen often?

0:35:150:35:17

Rarely, because my cooking skills

0:35:170:35:20

did not warrant such a beautiful cruet set.

0:35:200:35:24

Did your cooking get better?

0:35:240:35:26

-Not much better.

-What about now?

0:35:260:35:28

Well, now, I am married and my wife is a wonderful cook.

0:35:280:35:33

So, I'm well looked after.

0:35:330:35:35

I'm not sure where this came from.

0:35:360:35:38

I think it was a gift to my parents.

0:35:400:35:42

My father was also a clergyman,

0:35:420:35:44

and it may have been given to him with the hope that he would use it

0:35:440:35:48

when entertaining church dignitaries.

0:35:480:35:50

But it was passed down to me and we wanted to come today

0:35:500:35:53

to "Flog it!", and we brought this.

0:35:530:35:55

I think that's marvellous. What a fabulous story. I love the story.

0:35:550:35:59

-This would have been second-hand when you got it.

-Yes.

0:35:590:36:03

-Cos it dates from the 1930s.

-Yes.

0:36:030:36:06

And it's been assayed, as in hallmarked, in Sheffield.

0:36:060:36:12

And it's also got a Sheffield retailers here.

0:36:120:36:15

-Right.

-We call it a cruet set.

0:36:150:36:16

Pair of peppers, pair of salts, and of course, a mustard.

0:36:160:36:20

So, it's in a very sort of

0:36:200:36:22

pseudo-Edwardian Art Deco style, isn't it?

0:36:220:36:26

-Yes.

-Would it be something you would...

0:36:260:36:28

You've considered using at all?

0:36:290:36:31

No. I think we would be willing to sell it because today,

0:36:310:36:36

our daughter is getting the keys to her first house.

0:36:360:36:40

And we would use the proceeds of this

0:36:400:36:43

to help her furnish her first house.

0:36:430:36:45

Well, that is very good.

0:36:450:36:46

And where would you furnish? Would you go to an auction?

0:36:460:36:49

That's a very good suggestion.

0:36:490:36:51

-I think we'll follow your advice.

-I think you should, Paul!

0:36:510:36:54

Because I'm afraid I'm not going to get you

0:36:540:36:56

huge amounts of money for this.

0:36:560:36:57

I mean, I might get you between £120-180.

0:36:570:37:00

-That'd be wonderful!

-And I'm hoping for the upper end of the estimate.

0:37:000:37:03

But I think we better reserve it at £100.

0:37:030:37:05

So, at least we get something back for your daughter.

0:37:050:37:07

-That'd be wonderful.

-Would it?

0:37:070:37:09

-We're very happy with that.

-Thank you.

0:37:090:37:11

And delighted to be here today at "Flog It!".

0:37:110:37:13

No, it's a pleasure to meet you.

0:37:130:37:14

Well, that's it, our experts have now found their final items

0:37:180:37:20

to take off to auction, which means we have to say goodbye

0:37:200:37:23

to our magnificent host venue, the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum.

0:37:230:37:27

I've had a wonderful time here. Have you all enjoyed yourselves?

0:37:270:37:30

-Yes!

-Yeah, that's what it's all about.

0:37:300:37:32

Everybody's been so friendly, I don't want to leave.

0:37:320:37:34

But we have to. We've got some unfinished business

0:37:340:37:37

to do in the auction room.

0:37:370:37:38

And here's a quick recap of all the items we're taking with us.

0:37:380:37:41

John's wonderful memento from the 1932 Ulster TT race,

0:37:420:37:47

an upbeat little enamel badge.

0:37:470:37:48

A beautifully ornate set of Italian baroque-style gold earrings

0:37:500:37:54

and brooch, decorated with emeralds and diamonds.

0:37:540:37:57

And, finally, a pristine 1930s silver cruet set.

0:37:580:38:02

It's back to the auction house in central Belfast

0:38:050:38:08

to see if we can sell our final items.

0:38:080:38:11

At £170... Thank you.

0:38:110:38:14

Well, right now, we're revving up and I feel the need for speed.

0:38:140:38:17

We've been joined by John and we've got this wonderful

0:38:170:38:20

Ulster TT race badge. And it is superb, isn't it?

0:38:200:38:23

-It's brilliant.

-Why are you selling this?

0:38:230:38:25

Because it's just so great.

0:38:250:38:26

Just had it in the house for many years, my father had it...

0:38:260:38:30

Yeah. Do you wear it?

0:38:300:38:31

No, not really. It goes into the box.

0:38:310:38:34

Right, OK. Lovely bit of enamelling and of course,

0:38:340:38:37

great bit of memorabilia.

0:38:370:38:38

And it's going under the hammer right now.

0:38:380:38:41

Lot number 380.

0:38:410:38:42

We have a 1932 metal and enamel Ulster Tourist Trophy

0:38:420:38:48

motor race pin badge.

0:38:480:38:50

Unusual lot.

0:38:500:38:51

Can we say £50?

0:38:520:38:55

£20. 20 I'm bid. 30.

0:38:550:38:57

£30 now for the pin badge, any more?

0:38:570:39:00

40? 5.

0:39:000:39:03

50. 50 against you, sir.

0:39:030:39:05

£50.

0:39:050:39:06

At £50, we have now.

0:39:060:39:08

-£50.

-£50.

0:39:080:39:10

For a badge, that's a lot of money.

0:39:100:39:11

An unusual lot. We're bid 50.

0:39:110:39:13

We're selling at 50.

0:39:130:39:15

You're all finished?

0:39:150:39:17

At £50 with you, sir.

0:39:170:39:19

£50. Great.

0:39:190:39:21

-Happy?

-Yes.

-Brilliant. Thank you very much.

0:39:210:39:23

It's a lovely thing, that. I love that.

0:39:230:39:26

One down. Now, let's see if we can sell Paul's silver cruet set,

0:39:260:39:30

from his early clergyman days.

0:39:300:39:32

And it's cased, it's boxed, it's ready to go.

0:39:330:39:35

The dealers and the collectors will love this.

0:39:350:39:38

Fingers crossed. It's in mint condition!

0:39:380:39:40

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:39:400:39:42

At lot 310, we have a five-piece silver condiment set.

0:39:420:39:49

Sheffield, 1933.

0:39:490:39:52

There's 11 troy ounces in it.

0:39:520:39:54

And it's complete with the original case.

0:39:540:39:57

Very nice lot. Could we open the bidding, please, at £100?

0:39:570:40:01

£100 anywhere? £100, I'm bid.

0:40:010:40:04

10, 120.

0:40:040:40:06

130, 140, 150, 160.

0:40:060:40:09

160 now, any more?

0:40:090:40:11

170. Bid's here at 170.

0:40:110:40:14

At 170 on my left.

0:40:140:40:16

At £170, I have. Now, I'm selling.

0:40:160:40:19

At £170...

0:40:190:40:22

-Thank you.

-Get in!

0:40:220:40:24

That's brilliant. £170. Good christening present.

0:40:240:40:26

It's a really good christening present.

0:40:260:40:28

Very good, yeah. Thank you so much.

0:40:280:40:30

That's a brilliant result.

0:40:300:40:32

It just goes to show, you've got to look after your things

0:40:320:40:34

-to get top money.

-Not use them!

-Not use them.

0:40:340:40:37

But it would be a crime to see our next items locked away.

0:40:390:40:42

Hopefully, they'll find a new home today.

0:40:420:40:44

Dominic and Jennifer, it's great to see you again.

0:40:460:40:48

And good luck. Going under the hammer right now, some real quality.

0:40:480:40:51

-We've got a brooch and earrings.

-They're absolutely beautiful.

0:40:510:40:54

They're enamel, 18-carat gold.

0:40:540:40:56

Emeralds, diamonds...

0:40:560:40:58

The kind of thing you gravitated towards.

0:40:580:41:00

-I did.

-Isn't it? So, fingers crossed we get that 300-500.

0:41:000:41:05

I mean, you know, you get a lot for your money actually, don't you?

0:41:050:41:08

-Yes, good. Bring it on.

-Happy? Bring it on, big it up!

0:41:090:41:13

Let's get it over there, under his hammer,

0:41:130:41:15

and let's get you away with loads of money.

0:41:150:41:17

-Absolutely, yes.

-I think that would be job done, don't you?

-Yes!

0:41:170:41:20

Number 150. 18-carat gold brooch, pendant and a pair of earrings.

0:41:200:41:25

What will we say for it? £300.

0:41:250:41:27

Very nice lot. £200, please.

0:41:270:41:30

200, I'm bid. £200.

0:41:300:41:32

20. At 260 online.

0:41:320:41:35

The bid's online, 280 against you, it's in the room.

0:41:350:41:37

At 280. 300 online.

0:41:370:41:40

320 in the room.

0:41:400:41:41

340 online, 360 in the room.

0:41:410:41:44

380, new bidder.

0:41:440:41:46

£400 with the lady.

0:41:460:41:48

420 with you, sir.

0:41:480:41:50

440 online.

0:41:500:41:51

460. 460, 480 now.

0:41:510:41:55

£500.

0:41:550:41:56

The lady has bid at 500.

0:41:560:41:58

520, 540.

0:41:580:42:00

-540!

-540 now.

0:42:000:42:02

-Back with the lady...

-Quality, quality!

0:42:020:42:04

560, new bidder, 580. £600.

0:42:040:42:08

£600, the lady seated at 600.

0:42:080:42:11

At £600 now, you all done?

0:42:110:42:14

All finished at 600? Last call. At £600....

0:42:140:42:18

-Bang! Dominic, Jennifer, £600!

-Well done!

0:42:190:42:24

That's fantastic, isn't it?

0:42:240:42:26

I'm ever so pleased.

0:42:260:42:27

Hotly contested online, on the phone, in the room.

0:42:270:42:30

-Brilliant.

-More than you'd expect?

0:42:300:42:32

Well, they're good quality.

0:42:320:42:34

There was a little bit missing from one of the earrings,

0:42:340:42:36

which is difficult, but the quality was just amazing.

0:42:360:42:40

Nothing missing in the price, though, and thank you so much.

0:42:400:42:43

And what a way to end today's show.

0:42:430:42:45

I knew there'd be a surprise for all of us,

0:42:450:42:47

and I hope it surprised you.

0:42:470:42:48

Join us again for many more.

0:42:480:42:50

But, until then, from Belfast, it's goodbye.

0:42:500:42:52

Flog It! comes from the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum in Northern Ireland. The gallery is a wonderful celebration of traditional ways of life and today hosts antiques experts Thomas Plant and Caroline Hawley. Turning up out of the hundreds of bags and boxes is something which harks back to the era of traditional craftsmen. Presenter Paul Martin visits a family business that builds racing cars.


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