Wolverhampton 1 Flog It!


Wolverhampton 1

Paul Martin presents from Wolverhampton Art Gallery, where he finds out about the life of one of the city's most famous sons, footballer Billy Wright.


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Today, we're in the West Midlands

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and the host for our valuation day

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is the fabulous Wolverhampton Art Gallery.

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Hundreds of people have turned up

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laden with antiques and collectables.

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They're here to see our experts to ask that all-important question -

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what's it worth?

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If you're happy with the valuation, what are you going to do?

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ALL: "Flog It!"! Let's do it.

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This part of the Midlands was once a leading manufacturing centre

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with mines, iron and steel production

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and later, motorcycles and other vehicles,

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including the Defiant fighter planes,

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which played an important role during World War II.

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So, here, outside the fabulous Wolverhampton Art Gallery

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where hundreds of people have turned up

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laden with antiques and collectables,

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we need to pick up the pace

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because all of this lot need attention.

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They want to know the answer to their all-important question,

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which is...

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-ALL:

-What's it worth?

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We're in good hands today

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because James Lewis knows exactly what we like.

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-Hello. Ah, a "Flog It!" Favourite!

-That's right.

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A bit of Moorcroft.

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That's a nice one, you know.

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And Caroline Hawley just keeps us feeling festive all year round.

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Do you know, it's like Christmas, isn't it? Let's have a look.

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But when the experts get together, there's always a bit of rivalry.

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"Hello, James."

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While everyone gets seated, here's a quick look at what's coming up.

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James goes down under with some Aboriginal art...

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Oh, look at the name! Namatjira,

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one of the most famous of the Aboriginal artists in Australia.

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..while it's a life in service story for Caroline's table.

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My father was the butler and my mother was the cook.

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-So they met in service?

-Yes.

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Oh, I've just heard a collective "aw" behind me here.

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Isn't that lovely?

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Well, we can't come to Wolverhampton without talking about

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Wolverhampton Wanderers.

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This football club has had its fair share

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of outstanding players throughout its history

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and, later on in the programme,

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I'm going to be finding out more about the late Billy Wright.

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He was the David Beckham of post-war Britain

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and he captivated the nation when he married a glamorous pop star.

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So, the stage is set here in Wolverhampton Art Gallery.

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While everybody's getting settled in,

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I just want to show you this magnificent staircase.

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It's part of the original building and it's right by the main entrance.

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It really is an architectural delight.

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It was built by local contractor Philip Horsman,

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taken from designs by Birmingham architect Julius Chatwin.

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The building opened in 1884, and this stairwell still serves as

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a fantastic start to your grand tour for the treasures above.

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Now, I wonder if James has found anything sophisticated

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for his first item.

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Well, Bill, I have to tell you, you caused great excitement

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-with a certain Australian on the production team.

-Oh, good.

-Yeah.

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One of the directors. She said, "Oh! Look at the name!"

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Namatjira.

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But...I have to say, she pointed out immediately that is was Enos.

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Enos, son of the great Albert,

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who was one of the most famous of the Aboriginal artists in Australia.

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I think the Queen and Prince Charles collect the works of Albert,

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but close family member, the eldest son.

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What's the history?

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I met a lady at an antique fair and I believe she was family.

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And she said it was unframed and it was in poor condition

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and she said, "Would you like to buy it?"

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I said, "How much do you want?" She goes, "What will you give me?"

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So I said, "I reckon, what do you think, £25?"

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She said, "I'll have your money."

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Since then, I've had it restored and had it up on my wall.

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And my daughter said,

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"It's about time you got rid of some of your stock, now, Dad."

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So there we are.

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Aboriginal art is huge.

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-Yeah.

-Absolutely massive at the moment.

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But it's not an artist that is hugely collected in his own right.

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Albert - yes.

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I mean, we would have them queuing almost all the way to Sydney

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-if it was Albert.

-Uh-huh.

-I mean, just hugely popular.

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But it's likely that his father had influence on him

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-and it is the family, it does have a close link.

-Yeah.

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I love this contrast in colours.

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A totally illogical use of colour that is typical of Aboriginal art.

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Wonderfully stylised, wonderfully stylish

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and in a lot of Aboriginal art they have this...um, symbolism

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but, here, there isn't a lot of symbolism. It's a landscape.

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I guess that's something like a gum tree, is it?

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Well, apparently it was supposed to be...

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Initially, the artist was showing this German artist around.

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-OK.

-And then he said, "I'll teach you to paint in the Western style."

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Ah, that's why.

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And that's how he came to get away

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from the traditional Aboriginal style that we know.

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Because it's not exactly what you'd expect from Aboriginal art.

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It's more interesting as a historical piece

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than it is valuable as a work of art.

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-Right. Yeah, I think so.

-What did you pay?

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-£25.

-OK. I think there might be a small profit in it.

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Yes, I think so. I hope so.

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-I would put an auction estimate of £60-£100.

-Right.

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So it's not going to make mega money.

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I'll be watching with interest.

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You and me both. Fingers crossed.

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Well, Caroline seems to be getting into the swing of things.

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Wow, Bala. Love this.

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This is gorgeous.

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Now, tell me about it.

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I bought it from a charity shop in West Bromwich.

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-How much?

-£2.

-£2!

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I do not believe it.

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Do you know this is quite a rare thing?

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-Is it?

-Yes!

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-Have you played with it?

-No.

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-I don't want to damage it.

-This is wonderful.

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It's made of aluminium, with its original steelwork here.

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-There's no damage at all.

-None at all.

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-And the original handle.

-Handle as well, yeah.

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This red and black handle, which is absolutely...

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And it feels wonderful.

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And it's actually made by

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the Birmingham Aluminium Casting Company.

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Now, that was a company that was set up in 1903

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off the back of the interest in bicycles from the 1890s.

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They specialised in making things in aluminium

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and this really is quite rare.

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Dates from the 1920s.

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-Ooh!

-Are you amazed you found it for that money?

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Yeah, I'm surprised.

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This is called Birmal.

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This is the name of this tennis racket.

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And "13 1/2", here, I think refers to the size of it,

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which is this, 13.5 inches. I haven't measured it,

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but I think that's the size. It would come in different sizes.

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And this just really makes me want to go out and play tennis.

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-Fancy a game?

-I do.

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Now, you've bought this, you've kept it at home.

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-Yeah.

-Has it been on display?

-Just in the wardrobe.

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Some of these have gone for as much as £150.

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Yeah.

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Honestly.

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This one I think is going to go between £80-£120.

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-Are you amazed?

-I'm amazed.

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-Are you thrilled?

-I'm thrilled.

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-So, shall we take it to auction?

-Yes, please.

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-Now, would you like a reserve on it?

-Would you say 50?

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50? You'd like a reserve of 50.

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Well, that won't be any trouble at all.

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I promise you, this is going to fly out of that saleroom,

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and I'm going to follow you to the charity shop next time.

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Bala's definitely got the advantage with that one.

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Well, I'm up here on the balcony of the gallery looking at my watch

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because any moment now - it happens on the hour, every hour -

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this piece of sculpture, this sheep starts to fly in the air.

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It's got this mechanical cage around it

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and apparently it goes right out over the balcony.

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It's all very exciting and I don't know what's going to happen next.

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The art gallery commissioned Baa-bara, as she's called,

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as part of the Millennium celebrations

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and to recognise the city's role in the wool trade.

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There's something else inside. It's a wolf!

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I think that's brilliant. It's absolutely fantastic.

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The wolf is a play on the nickname of the city's football team Wolves,

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and also ties in with the old saying 'a wolf in sheep's clothing'.

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What a great installation.

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I'm so pleased they've put that there

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because it's given me a lot of fun anyway,

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and I'm sure hundreds of thousands of passers-by every day.

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Now, we had better get back to James because, as we're finding out,

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there is still much to uncover here in Wolverhampton.

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Well, Cole, the first thing to say is that this is an intriguing box.

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It's interesting even before we've opened it.

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It's got these green tie strings.

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It's covered in leather and embossed in gilt, so when we open it up...

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Isn't that wonderful?

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It's about as British as you can get.

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-Would you like to...?

-Yeah.

-Perfect.

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The first thing to say is it's clearly an official seal

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in a tin box, and it's a royal seal.

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Now, let's just open this up.

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"William the Fourth, the grace of God."

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So it says, "Henry Elkington of Birmingham in the county of Warwick,

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"he has invented and improved rotary steam engine."

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-So this is like an early patent.

-It is a patent, yeah.

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Wow. And it's to Elkington, who, of course, are probably

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the most famous silversmiths of all time, in terms of silver plating.

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They invented EPNS,

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which was launched at the 1851 exhibition.

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They made things like the trophy at Wimbledon and...

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you know, they are massive names.

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So, this is a patent for a machine that plates.

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-Or just a steam engine?

-To power the plating technique.

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What's the history behind this?

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I started work at Elkington's

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-when it had moved to Goscote in Walsall...

-Right.

-..in 1967,

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and was still employed right up until 2011.

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40-odd years.

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The company's president came in from the States, and he saw over

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all the movements of the plant and the sale of the equipment, etc, etc,

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-and this was down for the skip.

-Well rescued,

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because it really is a connoisseur's piece.

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-It's on vellum - pigskin...

-Is that right?

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..which is why it's survived in such wonderful condition.

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And this border, that we can see in black and white, is printed.

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The central section, that is outlined in red,

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has then been written with quill and ink.

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Wonderfully, wonderfully skilled work.

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And then, if we look down at the base here,

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the seal is pressed in wax, and it's getting on for 200 years old.

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As a value, it's not going to be massive.

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No, I wouldn't have expected it to be.

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It's far more decorative than valuable.

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It's interesting, historically.

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I think £40 to £60 is probably what it's worth.

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-Hmm.

-But what a wonderful thing, and well rescued.

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Well, it certainly has been lights, camera, action.

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We have been working flat out.

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As you can see, we have got a lot of crews here and our experts

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have found their first items to take off to auction.

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This is where the surprises happen.

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Let's up the tempo, let's get to the saleroom.

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Let's find out what it's worth.

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Here's a quick recap of all the items going under the hammer.

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This fabulous Aboriginal painting by Enos Namatjira

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would brighten up any living room.

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Let's hope we can serve up an ace with Bala's 1920s tennis racket,

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bought for a mere £2.

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And this company patent already has the royal seal of approval,

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so will it draw in the collectors?

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We're heading to Whitchurch in Shropshire,

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which is the northern-most market town,

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sitting on the borders of south Cheshire and Wales.

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Trevanion & Dean's saleroom will hold the auction today,

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and Christina Trevanion...

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Looking for five...

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..and Aaron Dean are our auctioneers.

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Remember, you will be paying a commission fee here,

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which is 17% plus VAT.

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With you, sir, in red, at £60... 65.

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First up, the patent. Carl, it's great to see you again.

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Going under the hammer right now, we've got a bit of royal approval.

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King William IV. It's for Elkington's

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-and you worked at Elkington's, didn't you?

-Yes.

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Interestingly enough, though, this was about to go in the skip.

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-That's right.

-That's daft!

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They just got rid of everything on the site

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-and knocked it down.

-And luckily enough, you spotted it.

-I did, yeah.

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-And said, "I'll have it."

-I didn't know what it was at the time.

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It's not a lot of money, James.

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I thought something like that would be worth a bit more.

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-There are very few collectors for them.

-OK.

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And as long as the collectors know that it's here,

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then it will sell for that, should be a bit more.

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Fingers crossed we get that top end plus a bit more. Here we go.

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It's going under the hammer. Full steam ahead.

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Lot 75 is this rather interesting William IV indenture,

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and I'm bid straightaway £35...£40. Here with me on commission at £40.

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Straight away with me on commission at £40. 45, 50.

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With me on commission at 50. Internet against you.

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55 clears my book. At 55.

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Internet bidder at £55.

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£60 now. At £55 now.

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Selling online... If you are all done at 55...

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Sold. £55. Well done, James. Good valuation.

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I wouldn't have a clue what to put on that.

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As soon as I saw "royal seal", you think this is a bit special,

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a couple of hundred pounds, but you're right.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Of course.

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It's gone to someone who wants it.

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I'm glad this was saved from the skip.

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Going under the hammer next is the Aboriginal artwork.

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Unfortunately, Joseph can't be with us today

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and has now taken off the £50 reserve in order to let it go.

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-I like this, and Aboriginal art is on the up, isn't it?

-It is.

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Along with all the tribal art things,

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-the ethnographica, as we call it.

-A great family of artists.

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-It's a shame it's not the father.

-Yes.

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Let's find out what the bidders think right now.

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It's going under the hammer.

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On to Australia this time. It's the Aboriginal sketch for you here,

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and we'll say £40. Start me at 40. At £40. Straightaway we have that.

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40 in the room. 45. I will come back to you in a second.

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It's jumping here. 60.

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It's at £60 now. At 60. Do you want to bid 65? 65. 70.

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75. 80. Thank you all the same. It's at £80 now.

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-It carries on. 90 now. 95. 100. 120.

-It's good.

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120. 140 now. At 140...

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150. They're back. New buyer.

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It's slow but it's climbing..

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At least it's going in the right direction.

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Selling in at 150. There's no advance in the room at 150?

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-The hammer has gone down. That's a good result.

-It is.

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It's a great result. Aboriginal art is on the way up.

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-It is sought-after, isn't it?

-It is.

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This isn't a great artist, but he's got a good family.

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-I think we'll get on the phone and tell Joseph the good news.

-Yes.

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I think he'll be happy with that.

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Well, so far, so good.

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Serving up for you right now,

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we have a tennis racket belonging to Bala.

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-Are you a tennis player at all?

-No, not really, no.

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-You're just a good bargain-hunter, basically?

-Yeah.

-£2. Wow.

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This is an early aluminium racket. It is really nice, isn't it?

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Turn of the century. Fantastic quality. I've never seen the like.

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We'll find out what the bidders think of this right now.

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Hoping to serve up a good lot here.

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We've got the Birmingham Aluminium Casting Company, 1903,

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all-metal tennis racket.

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Closed bids here, starting nonetheless at 40, 45,

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£50 straightaway on the commission. £50. With me at 50.

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55. 60 with me.

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65. 70 with me 75.

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75. My commission is out. It's at £75.

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Internet bidding at 75. 80. 85 now.

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At 85... Keep going. 90.

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-95. 100. 110.

-It's good.

-It's really good.

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110. It's at 110 now.

0:18:000:18:03

110. Are you out in the room? 110. 120. 130 now.

0:18:030:18:06

At 130. Looking for some more.

0:18:060:18:08

On the internet at £130. 130, ladies and gentlemen...

0:18:080:18:12

Yes, game, set and match. 130. Are you happy, Bala? Brilliant.

0:18:120:18:16

-Brilliant. Well done, you. Good spot.

-Thank you.

0:18:160:18:20

There you are.

0:18:220:18:23

That concludes our first visit to the auction room today,

0:18:230:18:25

with some great results.

0:18:250:18:27

We are coming back here later on in the show, so do not go away.

0:18:270:18:30

But right now, it's time to return to Wolverhampton,

0:18:300:18:33

and at the heart of the city is its football stadium.

0:18:330:18:36

I went to find out about one of the team's greatest players,

0:18:360:18:39

the late Billy Wright, who has been an inspiration since the '40s.

0:18:390:18:43

"Out of the darkness cometh light."

0:18:530:18:55

These words are the city's motto,

0:18:550:18:57

which are reflected in the black and gold colours of its football team,

0:18:570:19:02

Wolverhampton Wanderers, also nicknamed Wolves.

0:19:020:19:05

The fact that Wolverhampton only has one team,

0:19:080:19:11

and its stadium sits less than half a mile from the centre,

0:19:110:19:15

may be why the city is united when it comes to football.

0:19:150:19:18

Standing proud outside Molineux Stadium,

0:19:210:19:24

in front of the stand that was named after him,

0:19:240:19:26

there's a statue of one of the team's most celebrated players,

0:19:260:19:29

the late, great Billy Wright.

0:19:290:19:31

And there he is there, look, carrying the football.

0:19:310:19:34

Billy had a long list of sporting achievements

0:19:340:19:37

throughout the 1940s and '50s,

0:19:370:19:39

which included captaining Wolverhampton Wanderers,

0:19:390:19:42

winning the FA Cup final in 1949,

0:19:420:19:44

plus several other league championship medals.

0:19:440:19:47

He also captained England throughout three consecutive World Cup finals,

0:19:470:19:51

and he goes down in history as the first player in the world

0:19:510:19:55

to play for his country more than 100 times.

0:19:550:19:59

Billy gained 105 caps for England throughout his 20-year career.

0:19:590:20:04

I first heard about Billy Wright as a kid growing up.

0:20:100:20:13

He was a very famous player for Wolves, England captain.

0:20:130:20:17

As a young professional, I met him, and things have gone full circle

0:20:170:20:22

because, later on as a manager myself, I'm here in Wolverhampton.

0:20:220:20:26

You look at all-time best defenders at the club

0:20:280:20:31

that have been through Wolves,

0:20:310:20:34

and, obviously, his name is the first one on the list, really.

0:20:340:20:37

He is highly regarded by the club, certainly,

0:20:370:20:39

and in the community,

0:20:390:20:40

I'd say he's an important figure for young people to look up to.

0:20:400:20:45

In 1938, a 14-year-old Billy was encouraged by his schoolteacher

0:20:450:20:50

to respond to an advert in a local newspaper

0:20:500:20:53

inviting boys to come along for a football trial.

0:20:530:20:56

At first the manager dismissed Billy for being too small, but he soon

0:20:560:20:59

changed his mind when he could see what he could do with a football,

0:20:590:21:02

and he offered him an apprenticeship on an eight-month trial.

0:21:020:21:06

Although the Second World War interrupted Billy's career,

0:21:060:21:10

at 17 he signed professionally with Wolves,

0:21:100:21:13

and proved himself as a shining, fresh talent.

0:21:130:21:16

He became the David Beckham of his day,

0:21:190:21:21

admired by his peers and loved by the ladies,

0:21:210:21:25

but Billy only had eyes for one woman and, at the time,

0:21:250:21:29

she was part of the biggest pop band in the UK.

0:21:290:21:33

# I was left right out of your arms

0:21:330:21:36

# Oh, I was left right... #

0:21:360:21:38

In the 1950s, the Beverley Sisters where the highest-paid female act,

0:21:380:21:43

adored by millions across the globe.

0:21:430:21:46

The eldest sister, Joy Beverley,

0:21:460:21:47

always sang in between her twin sisters, Teddie and Babs,

0:21:470:21:52

and she caught Billy's attention

0:21:520:21:54

when the ladies performed in Wolverhampton.

0:21:540:21:57

It must have been love at first sight

0:21:590:22:01

because, in 1958, after a three-month whirlwind romance,

0:22:010:22:04

they decided to tie the knot.

0:22:040:22:06

The plan was to have a quiet, low-key wedding,

0:22:060:22:08

but word soon got out

0:22:080:22:09

and thousands of people turned up

0:22:090:22:11

to see one of Britain's first celebrity weddings.

0:22:110:22:14

I'm meeting up with local-born Baroness Heyhoe Flint,

0:22:140:22:18

who's a former captain of England's women's cricket team

0:22:180:22:22

and is currently vice-president at Wolves.

0:22:220:22:24

Rachael, you knew Billy personally, didn't you?

0:22:270:22:30

Yes, that was through my father, actually,

0:22:300:22:32

who used to take Billy Wright for Physical Education lessons -

0:22:320:22:35

or it was called keep-fit in those days.

0:22:350:22:37

My father was Director of Physical Education for Wolverhampton,

0:22:370:22:41

and, one evening, Billy Wright turned up and wanted to get fit.

0:22:410:22:44

So when people refer to Billy Wright as being so fit,

0:22:440:22:47

and he could head higher than anybody...

0:22:470:22:49

-And he could hang in the air.

-Hang in the air...

0:22:490:22:51

That was my dad, actually.

0:22:510:22:52

So it was through my father that I got to know Billy Wright

0:22:520:22:56

in the sort of '50s onwards, really.

0:22:560:22:58

And Billy is such a legend.

0:22:580:22:59

I mean, everywhere you go around here,

0:22:590:23:01

it's "Billy Wright, Billy Wright..." -

0:23:010:23:03

why was he such a legend?

0:23:030:23:04

Billy was one of the people.

0:23:040:23:06

He came in on the bus to matches

0:23:060:23:08

and just walked with the crowd here into the stadium,

0:23:080:23:11

and he could be seen in the local shops and the local pubs,

0:23:110:23:14

whereas now they're probably behind secure gates and that sort of thing.

0:23:140:23:18

I mean, in Billy's mind, he wasn't a celebrity.

0:23:180:23:21

There wasn't, you know, social media in those days,

0:23:210:23:24

and when he met and fell in love with Joy Beverley

0:23:240:23:27

and they got married,

0:23:270:23:28

not a great big sort of OK!, Hello! magazine-type occasion,

0:23:280:23:32

and Billy was just one of the people.

0:23:320:23:35

He just meant everything to people in Wolverhampton,

0:23:350:23:38

and still does.

0:23:380:23:39

And every time I come in,

0:23:390:23:40

I look at Billy Wright and that wonderful statue by James Butler,

0:23:400:23:44

and I just give him a little nod and wink and hope he brings us luck.

0:23:440:23:48

It's obvious that the club is still in awe of Billy -

0:23:500:23:53

there are pictures of him everywhere in the stadium

0:23:530:23:57

and he has a whole area dedicated to him in the club's museum.

0:23:570:24:00

Upstairs, there's even a Billy Wright boot room.

0:24:030:24:07

And here are some of Billy's possessions.

0:24:090:24:11

These are his football boots, his shin pads and his socks.

0:24:110:24:15

And just look at those whacking great big leather studs

0:24:150:24:17

on those boots -

0:24:170:24:19

my, have they changed today!

0:24:190:24:20

Billy has influenced generations of players,

0:24:260:24:29

including another Wolves legend, Steve Bull.

0:24:290:24:32

Throughout Steve's career,

0:24:320:24:34

during the 1980s and 1990s,

0:24:340:24:36

he scored 306 goals

0:24:360:24:38

and still holds the club's goal-scoring record.

0:24:380:24:41

He was also capped 13 times for England

0:24:410:24:44

and awarded an MBE.

0:24:440:24:46

Steve, you've got something in common with Billy -

0:24:480:24:51

you've both got stands named after you.

0:24:510:24:52

How does it feel? I know that's your stand over there, isn't it?

0:24:520:24:55

It is. It's absolutely brilliant. I'm very fortunate.

0:24:550:24:58

I wish I got a pound for every time somebody sat there -

0:24:580:25:00

but I ain't going to get it!

0:25:000:25:02

I ain't going to get it.

0:25:020:25:03

But, no, I think if Billy was still here now,

0:25:030:25:05

he'd be exactly the same - very, very privileged.

0:25:050:25:08

Yeah, both legends.

0:25:080:25:10

Why was Billy such a good player - because he wasn't that tall, was he?

0:25:100:25:13

He wasn't that tall for a defender. You know what I mean?

0:25:130:25:15

-But he rose like a salmon.

-He could jump high.

-He could jump for fun.

0:25:150:25:19

And he always got the ball cleanly

0:25:190:25:21

and made sure he didn't hurt the defenders,

0:25:210:25:23

and he was just a great player.

0:25:230:25:24

-And he was the captain, so was he a good team leader?

-He was a leader.

0:25:240:25:28

He was a leader on the field and off the field.

0:25:280:25:30

I met him towards the end of my career.

0:25:300:25:32

He was guiding me the path to say, listen, when you slow down,

0:25:320:25:35

go this way towards that defender, that way towards that defender,

0:25:350:25:38

and he was a good inspiration towards the end of it.

0:25:380:25:41

What does Billy mean to this club, though?

0:25:410:25:43

He means absolutely everything.

0:25:430:25:45

When you pull down the Waterloo Road and you see his stand here,

0:25:450:25:47

he's left a legacy here. He was the main man here

0:25:470:25:50

and he started this club like a snowball,

0:25:500:25:52

to get it up and running.

0:25:520:25:53

Billy was never cautioned or sent off in his entire career.

0:25:540:25:59

Now, I find that incredibly impressive -

0:25:590:26:01

it just goes to show what a gentleman he was.

0:26:010:26:03

And that's one of his caps.

0:26:030:26:05

He gained 105 caps playing for England

0:26:050:26:08

and, in fact, he got his 100th cap

0:26:080:26:10

on the same day his daughter Victoria was born in 1959.

0:26:100:26:15

Billy Wright, this must be quite a week for you.

0:26:160:26:19

It is, yes. The most fantastic week.

0:26:190:26:20

I shall never forget Sunday,

0:26:200:26:22

because I think that's the most...

0:26:220:26:24

wonderful day of my whole life.

0:26:240:26:27

Having my wife giving birth to our baby daughter

0:26:270:26:30

at 8:22 on Sunday morning

0:26:300:26:31

and then being selected to play for my country for the 100th time,

0:26:310:26:34

just after noon,

0:26:340:26:36

well, that was a most remarkable day and I shall never forget it.

0:26:360:26:39

In 1959, he was awarded the CBE from the Queen,

0:26:420:26:45

and in that same year he retired from the game.

0:26:450:26:48

30,000 fans turned up to watch his final match,

0:26:480:26:52

to salute one of England's finest footballing sons.

0:26:520:26:55

Back amid the fun and commotion at Wolverhampton Art Gallery,

0:27:070:27:11

people are still flocking to the valuation tables,

0:27:110:27:14

and it could take some time

0:27:140:27:16

for Caroline to scrub up on her knowledge.

0:27:160:27:19

Roslyn, I am excited to see this gorgeous washstand.

0:27:210:27:27

It's French. I absolutely love it.

0:27:270:27:31

Now, tell me what you know about it.

0:27:310:27:33

I bought it at an antique fair in Buxton in 2003.

0:27:330:27:37

-So not France at all?

-No, no, not at all.

0:27:370:27:40

Ohhh...

0:27:400:27:42

-And you fell in love with it?

-I did.

0:27:420:27:43

-Did you pay a lot for it?

-I did.

-Oh!

0:27:430:27:45

Never mind.

0:27:450:27:47

I was once told you always regret more what you don't buy

0:27:470:27:52

than what you did buy.

0:27:520:27:53

Absolutely.

0:27:530:27:55

Why were you drawn to it?

0:27:550:27:56

Well, I thought it was very attractive.

0:27:560:27:58

I'd never seen one before.

0:27:580:28:00

It's a bit Kate Greenaway,

0:28:000:28:02

although they're not actually Kate Greenaway figures,

0:28:020:28:05

but it's very similar.

0:28:050:28:07

It was complete.

0:28:070:28:08

There's absolutely nothing wrong with it.

0:28:080:28:11

I didn't have any grandchildren at that time,

0:28:110:28:14

but I was hoping I was going to have grandchildren,

0:28:140:28:17

and so I bought it in anticipation.

0:28:170:28:19

I go to France an awful lot, and I haven't seen one of these.

0:28:190:28:22

-It's a washstand, as you know.

-That's right, yes.

0:28:220:28:25

But it's a child's washstand. A sort of doll's washstand.

0:28:250:28:28

You've got the jug down here, a little dish.

0:28:280:28:32

It's absolutely gorgeous.

0:28:320:28:34

It's made by the French company Sarreguemines.

0:28:340:28:36

It's been recently repainted.

0:28:360:28:39

-Have you painted it?

-No.

0:28:390:28:41

See, I think originally this would have been in a fruitwood.

0:28:410:28:44

-Right.

-All these figures, transfer-printed,

0:28:440:28:47

very Kate Greenaway in style, you're right.

0:28:470:28:50

It dates from 1910, 1920.

0:28:500:28:53

It's just a lovely thing.

0:28:530:28:55

And in its condition, which is all but perfect -

0:28:550:28:59

I think there's a tiny little hair line on the bowl -

0:28:590:29:02

I would put an estimate of £100-£150.

0:29:020:29:06

What do you think?

0:29:060:29:07

I think that's fine.

0:29:070:29:08

What did you pay for it?

0:29:080:29:10

I'm not telling you.

0:29:100:29:11

You're still not telling me!

0:29:110:29:13

Oh! Well, look, we'll see what it gets.

0:29:130:29:15

-It might even get what you paid for it.

-Yes.

-Whisper it to me later.

0:29:150:29:18

I will.

0:29:180:29:20

We promise to do our best for you, Roslyn.

0:29:210:29:23

Now, I wonder why James is looking pleased with himself.

0:29:240:29:28

Pat, at last - I've got something here

0:29:300:29:34

from my favourite period of time.

0:29:340:29:37

-Really?

-1790-1820.

0:29:370:29:41

George III, late George III.

0:29:410:29:44

What's the family story behind it?

0:29:440:29:46

My grandfather gave it to my mum

0:29:460:29:49

on her wedding day in 1946.

0:29:490:29:53

And that's really all I know about it.

0:29:530:29:56

I did see her wearing it occasionally,

0:29:560:29:58

but very rarely.

0:29:580:30:01

If you were living in the late 18th century

0:30:010:30:06

and you had gone to your final schooling,

0:30:060:30:10

the finishing school would recommend

0:30:100:30:13

that you went on what was called the Grand Tour.

0:30:130:30:16

This is a piece that would have been brought home

0:30:160:30:20

by somebody who had gone on that Grand Tour.

0:30:200:30:23

There were three main types of cameo that you find.

0:30:230:30:27

The most common is the hard-shelled cameo,

0:30:270:30:30

then you get a hard-stone cameo,

0:30:300:30:33

but you also get lava cameos.

0:30:330:30:35

This one is a hard-shelled cameo -

0:30:350:30:38

-out of the conch shell, most commonly.

-Oh, right.

0:30:380:30:41

And here we have the subject of a Roman warrior

0:30:410:30:46

having his lower leg examined.

0:30:460:30:48

Traditionally, I suppose, it could be somebody like Achilles,

0:30:480:30:51

but it could be somebody else.

0:30:510:30:52

Probably made in Milan.

0:30:520:30:54

Really?

0:30:540:30:55

Yeah, that was a centre for cameo carving.

0:30:550:30:58

I've never given it a thought as to where it would have been made.

0:30:580:31:01

Yeah. And a lot of them are signed on the reverse as well.

0:31:010:31:05

The surroundings is...

0:31:050:31:07

It's almost certainly gold, low-grade,

0:31:090:31:12

and the pin that's on the back -

0:31:120:31:14

you can see quite obviously that that has been replaced.

0:31:140:31:19

So I would say the chain and the pin are probably around 1900 in date,

0:31:190:31:23

and the rest of it is about 1800, 1820.

0:31:230:31:27

So it's a gift from your grandfather to your mother,

0:31:270:31:31

on her wedding day.

0:31:310:31:33

-Yes.

-Do you not want to keep it?

0:31:330:31:35

Well...

0:31:360:31:38

It's the usual thing,

0:31:380:31:40

-it's lying in a box.

-Yeah.

0:31:400:31:41

My son and daughter, they don't want it,

0:31:410:31:45

-and I don't wear brooches.

-No.

0:31:450:31:47

I think it'll end up going to

0:31:470:31:49

a neoclassical or a Grand Tour collector

0:31:490:31:52

and I think it's a super little lot.

0:31:520:31:54

I'm not going to put a huge valuation on it.

0:31:540:31:57

-No, no.

-£80-£120.

0:31:570:32:00

If you want it to go ahead,

0:32:000:32:01

then we'll take it to the saleroom for you.

0:32:010:32:03

Let's put a reserve of £80 on it.

0:32:030:32:04

If it doesn't make that, you'll have it back.

0:32:040:32:07

-But super, I think it's a great little lot.

-Thank you.

0:32:070:32:10

Now, Caroline seems to have spotted some sparkle.

0:32:110:32:14

Hello, Anne.

0:32:150:32:17

Lovely to see you and your wonderful array of silver items.

0:32:170:32:22

Have you been polishing all day?

0:32:220:32:24

-Not really!

-Where did you come by these?

0:32:240:32:27

They came from my parents.

0:32:270:32:29

And my parents worked for Sankeys,

0:32:290:32:34

the steel people, of Bilston.

0:32:340:32:36

Right, very important family.

0:32:360:32:39

My father was the butler

0:32:390:32:41

and my mother was the cook.

0:32:410:32:43

-So they met in service...

-Yes.

-..for the Sankeys.

-Yeah.

0:32:430:32:46

Oh, I've just heard a collective "aw" behind me here.

0:32:460:32:50

Isn't that lovely? And do you think these items are something

0:32:500:32:54

that they might've got from that family

0:32:540:32:56

-when they were working there...

-Yes, that's possible.

0:32:560:32:59

-..they gave them to them?

-That's possible, yes.

0:32:590:33:01

Now, these, they're not candlesticks,

0:33:010:33:04

which a lot of people think they are, and they're not spill vases,

0:33:040:33:07

which a lot of people think they are.

0:33:070:33:09

They're just specimen vases.

0:33:090:33:10

The weight is not all silver but they're very, very pretty.

0:33:100:33:15

The first part of the 20th century,

0:33:150:33:17

-sort of 1920, that sort of period.

-Oh.

0:33:170:33:21

And this item in front is a similar sort of date, 1920s.

0:33:210:33:26

-Do you know what this might be?

-Sugar shifter.

0:33:260:33:29

It's very beautifully pierced at the top.

0:33:290:33:32

It's got a little bruise, they call it a bruise,

0:33:320:33:35

it just means a bash.

0:33:350:33:36

So those are what they are,

0:33:360:33:39

they're nothing particularly special,

0:33:390:33:42

no particular interest, really, or antique interest

0:33:420:33:46

and they would have a collective value, I would think, of...

0:33:460:33:49

-..£50-£80 for the three.

-Mm-hm.

0:33:500:33:54

Now, these two, I think these are gorgeous.

0:33:540:33:58

Well, this little pig is a pincushion

0:33:580:34:01

and he's got the original velvet top to him

0:34:010:34:04

and it's got the magic initials here,

0:34:040:34:07

"Sampson Mordan & Company" which is...

0:34:070:34:10

-Have you heard of this make?

-Yeah.

0:34:100:34:11

It's a fabulous maker, Birmingham maker, dated 1905

0:34:110:34:16

and there are lots of people that would like him

0:34:160:34:19

and because of the Sampson Mordan,

0:34:190:34:21

that puts him into a slightly higher piggy bracket.

0:34:210:34:25

But my favourite thing of all, Anne, is this.

0:34:250:34:29

-Do you use nutmeg?

-Yes, I love my nutmeg.

0:34:290:34:33

-So do I, on rice pudding.

-It's lovely.

0:34:330:34:34

-Nice home-made rice pudding.

-Yeah.

0:34:340:34:36

This is a nutmeg grater and it's absolutely gorgeous.

0:34:360:34:41

Take the top off.

0:34:410:34:43

It's in three pieces and the maker here is Thomas Willmore, 1813.

0:34:440:34:50

Gosh, I didn't realise.

0:34:500:34:52

-So it's very early.

-Quite old.

0:34:520:34:54

And it's in absolutely wonderful condition.

0:34:540:34:58

And you'd put your nutmeg inside here, to keep it,

0:34:580:35:02

and then you get it out, put this together,

0:35:020:35:05

and you'd grate it.

0:35:050:35:06

It is absolutely adorable.

0:35:060:35:09

And these little bits of silver are always saleable.

0:35:090:35:13

So, these two items I would be happy to put into auction

0:35:130:35:19

with an estimate of £150-£250.

0:35:190:35:22

-Oh.

-How do feel about that?

0:35:220:35:24

Yes.

0:35:240:35:26

Surprised.

0:35:260:35:27

-Good! Pleasantly surprised?

-Yes.

0:35:270:35:29

-Now, would you like a reserve?

-Yes, please.

0:35:290:35:32

You would. What would you like?

0:35:320:35:33

-£150 on these two?

-Mm.

-Yeah?

-Yes.

0:35:330:35:37

-And we'll fix that, shall we, Anne?

-Yes, I think so.

0:35:370:35:39

OK, 150 fixed on these and these, would you like a reserve on these?

0:35:390:35:43

-Yes, please.

-What if we said 50?

-Mm.

0:35:430:35:47

-Yeah?

-Yeah. Yes, I think so.

0:35:470:35:49

Excellent, and I'm sure they will fly on the day.

0:35:490:35:52

Even flying pigs!

0:35:520:35:54

-Thank you, Anne.

-Thank you.

0:35:540:35:57

Well, there you are, lots of people and lots of antiques.

0:36:010:36:04

What a fantastic day we've had here at Wolverhampton Art Gallery.

0:36:040:36:07

-It's been brilliant, hasn't it?

-It has been.

0:36:070:36:09

It has, and we've learned a lot and we've seen so much but, right now,

0:36:090:36:12

we have some unfinished business to do in the auction room.

0:36:120:36:15

We're going over for the last time

0:36:150:36:17

to put our experts' valuations to the test,

0:36:170:36:18

so we're going to say goodbye to Wolverhampton Art Gallery

0:36:180:36:21

and head over to the saleroom,

0:36:210:36:22

and here's a quick recap of what's going under the hammer.

0:36:220:36:25

This children's washstand is over 100 years old

0:36:270:36:30

and in such great condition,

0:36:300:36:32

it will surely catch someone's eye.

0:36:320:36:34

James hopes we can pin a decent price on this cameo brooch.

0:36:370:36:40

And I hope this collection of silver,

0:36:440:36:46

which includes vases, a pincushion and a nutmeg grater,

0:36:460:36:49

could change Anne's fortunes for the better.

0:36:490:36:52

We're back at the saleroom in Whitchurch

0:37:020:37:04

and Christina Trevanion is on the rostrum.

0:37:040:37:07

First up, the child's washstand.

0:37:070:37:09

Roswyn, it's good to see you again, and Oscar has come along

0:37:090:37:14

because there's no school on the weekends, is there?

0:37:140:37:16

-No school today.

-No!

-Oscar, you're how old, nearly seven?

0:37:160:37:20

-Er, yeah.

-Going on 30? ROSWYN:

-Yeah.

0:37:200:37:21

This washstand, did you buy it for Oscar?

0:37:240:37:26

-I did...

-You did.

-..but he wasn't there at the time.

0:37:260:37:28

-He wasn't, no.

-It was a potential.

-Yeah, it's a nice thing to...

0:37:280:37:32

-That's a proper granny thing to do, isn't it?

-Yep.

0:37:320:37:34

Good luck with this, I know you like this. It's French.

0:37:340:37:36

I think it's lovely. It's French, Sarreguemines pottery.

0:37:360:37:40

-It's really lovely.

-Here we go, it's going under the hammer right now.

0:37:400:37:43

Good luck, both of you.

0:37:430:37:45

The French nursery washstand set, the Sarreguemines one there.

0:37:460:37:49

Really dinky little example, this. It's so sweet.

0:37:490:37:52

And I've got 80, 90, £100 straightaway...

0:37:520:37:55

At £100.

0:37:550:37:57

At £100 here, looking for 110.

0:37:570:37:59

At £100.

0:37:590:38:00

110. 120.

0:38:000:38:02

130, madam?

0:38:020:38:04

130 clears my book.

0:38:040:38:05

At £130. Standing in the room at £130.

0:38:050:38:09

Looking for 140 now.

0:38:090:38:11

-At £130...

-Well done.

-..to the lady, then,

0:38:110:38:13

if we're all done at 130.

0:38:130:38:15

-High-five, Oscar.

-Yeah, high-five.

0:38:150:38:18

-£130.

-There you go.

0:38:180:38:21

Well, it seems we'll never know what Roswyn paid

0:38:210:38:23

but let's hope she made some profit.

0:38:230:38:27

Next up, the cameo brooch.

0:38:270:38:29

Pat, it's great to see you again.

0:38:300:38:32

We're just about to put the brooch under the hammer,

0:38:320:38:34

-your mum's brooch.

-That's right.

-Any regrets? Any regrets...?

0:38:340:38:36

I had an inkling, but I'm all right now.

0:38:360:38:39

-You're OK.

-Once I saw a photograph of it, I was OK.

0:38:390:38:42

-OK.

-It's lovely.

-It's a nice cameo brooch, George III.

0:38:420:38:45

-Yeah.

-It's a sweet thing, isn't it?

0:38:450:38:47

Brooches aren't that fashionable, though.

0:38:470:38:49

-This is the sticking point, isn't it? It really is.

-Yes.

0:38:490:38:52

-For me, I remove the fact that it's a brooch in my mind...

-Yeah.

0:38:520:38:56

-..and just look at it as an oval panel...

-Yes.

0:38:560:38:58

..carved out of shell, with that classical scene.

0:38:580:39:02

So it's got to go. There are collectors out there

0:39:020:39:03

and fingers crossed they're here right now,

0:39:030:39:05

because we need to sell this

0:39:050:39:07

and it's going under the hammer right now.

0:39:070:39:09

19th-century carved shell cameo brooch.

0:39:100:39:12

We weren't just sure whether they were Greek or Roman,

0:39:120:39:14

so we've called them classical.

0:39:140:39:16

Very sweet example. And interest here with me,

0:39:160:39:18

I've got to start this at £130.

0:39:180:39:20

-With me on commission at 130.

-That's good.

0:39:200:39:23

At £130, here with me on commission at 130.

0:39:230:39:25

140. 150.

0:39:250:39:27

150 here, internet, my commission bidder.

0:39:270:39:30

At 150, looking for 160 now.

0:39:300:39:33

160 is bid. Clears my book.

0:39:330:39:35

At £160.

0:39:350:39:36

Internet bidder, then, at £160.

0:39:360:39:38

-If you're all done at 160.

-160, that's good.

0:39:380:39:41

Online at £160.

0:39:410:39:43

-Sold.

-Great!

0:39:430:39:44

-Sold online.

-Great.

0:39:440:39:46

-You were there, weren't you?

-Yeah, he was, spot on.

0:39:460:39:48

-Well done, James.

-It's a lovely little thing, I like that.

-Yeah.

0:39:480:39:52

What a great result for Pat.

0:39:520:39:54

Now it's time for the collection of silver items

0:39:560:39:59

and the auction house has decided to split up the nutmeg grater

0:39:590:40:02

and the piggy pincushion.

0:40:020:40:05

Anne, good luck, OK?

0:40:050:40:07

Christina thinks they will do a lot better if she splits them up,

0:40:070:40:11

so let's find out what the bidders think.

0:40:110:40:14

And the first of Anne's lots are the vases and the sugar shaker.

0:40:140:40:19

It's a pair of silver posy vases,

0:40:190:40:21

John William Caldicott, Birmingham, 1916

0:40:210:40:23

and we've also got a sugar sifter or sugar caster there.

0:40:230:40:26

Three in the lot altogether, nice little lot, bid me £40 for them.

0:40:260:40:30

40 is bid.

0:40:300:40:31

45 bid, sir. And 50 clears my book.

0:40:310:40:33

At £50 standing at the back, at £50.

0:40:330:40:36

Where's 5? At £50 I have.

0:40:360:40:38

55 online, sir. Go 60?

0:40:380:40:40

60 is bid.

0:40:400:40:42

At £60 in the room, looking for 5 now.

0:40:420:40:44

Selling to the room at 60.

0:40:440:40:47

It's good going.

0:40:470:40:48

The very sweet little Edwardian silver pig pincushion,

0:40:510:40:54

Sydney & Co, Birmingham, 1905.

0:40:540:40:57

And interest here, showing me I've got to bids in line,

0:40:570:41:00

starting at £50,

0:41:000:41:01

straightaway with me at 50.

0:41:010:41:03

55. Clears my books, sir, at £55 in the room.

0:41:030:41:06

60.

0:41:060:41:08

5.

0:41:080:41:09

At 65 in the room.

0:41:090:41:10

Against you, internet, at £65.

0:41:100:41:12

70... 5.

0:41:120:41:14

80.... 5.

0:41:140:41:16

-That's more like it.

-90... 5.

-Let's do £100.

0:41:160:41:18

100. Thank you. 100 with you, sir.

0:41:180:41:21

Standing at 100. Looking for 110, 110.

0:41:210:41:24

110 here, sir. 120.

0:41:240:41:25

Everybody loves a little piggy.

0:41:250:41:27

At 110 with the gentleman standing.

0:41:270:41:29

120 at the back.

0:41:290:41:30

Against you, sir. 130.

0:41:300:41:32

140.

0:41:320:41:34

OK, she's at the very back at 140.

0:41:340:41:37

150.

0:41:370:41:38

-Against you...

-So we've done the top end?

-Yeah.

0:41:380:41:40

-Done the top end.

-Oh, gosh.

0:41:400:41:44

At £150 if you're all done, then, at 150.

0:41:440:41:48

Good result.

0:41:480:41:50

One more to go.

0:41:500:41:51

A silver nutmeg grater, Thomas Willmore, Birmingham, 1801.

0:41:510:41:56

And I've got interest here at £180. With me on commission at 180.

0:41:560:42:00

Great, punchy, straight in.

0:42:000:42:02

190, 200.

0:42:020:42:04

220 clears my books, sir.

0:42:040:42:05

At 220 with you.

0:42:050:42:07

At £220. Standing by the cabinets at 220.

0:42:070:42:10

240.

0:42:100:42:11

260.

0:42:110:42:12

280.

0:42:120:42:13

300.

0:42:130:42:14

-320.

-Ooh, this is good.

0:42:140:42:16

At £320.

0:42:160:42:18

Selling to the room at 320.

0:42:180:42:20

Yes! The hammer's come down, we've done it.

0:42:200:42:22

They've all sold.

0:42:220:42:23

That's a grand total of £530.

0:42:230:42:25

-That's a lot of money, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:42:250:42:29

-It really is.

-Very good.

0:42:290:42:31

-But lovely items, that's what it's all about.

-Gorgeous items.

0:42:310:42:33

And you've been brilliant, thank you so much.

0:42:330:42:35

-I've enjoyed talking to you.

-Pleasure.

-You've been fantastic.

0:42:350:42:38

That's a nice little profit for Anne to take home.

0:42:380:42:42

You're all done then at 150.

0:42:420:42:44

Well, that's it, we've run out of time here in the auction room

0:42:450:42:48

but at least all of our owners have gone home happy.

0:42:480:42:51

We've had a few ups and downs

0:42:510:42:52

but that's life in an auction room, as you know.

0:42:520:42:55

And if you want to take part in the show,

0:42:550:42:57

join us at one of our valuation days.

0:42:570:42:59

Details of up-and-coming dates and venues

0:42:590:43:01

you can find on our BBC website...

0:43:010:43:02

You could check out our BBC Facebook page, we have gone digital!

0:43:020:43:05

Look at us online and come and join us,

0:43:050:43:07

dust them down and bring them in and let's flog 'em!

0:43:070:43:10

But until then, from the West Midlands, it's goodbye.

0:43:100:43:13

Flog It! comes from Wolverhampton Art Gallery. The gallery has a wonderful collection of paintings and hosts antiques experts James Lewis and Caroline Hawley. Turning up out of the hundreds of bags and boxes is some aboriginal art and a 1920s tennis racket. And presenter Paul Martin finds out about the life of one of the city's most famous sons, footballer Billy Wright.


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