Reading 31 Flog It!


Reading 31

Antiques experts Anita Manning and Nick Davies put values on Reading's antiques and collectibles, including some American dolls and 19th-century French paperweights.


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Transcript


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Well, I'm certainly in a party mood today and I bet this lot are keen

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-to have a good time, aren't you? Yes!

-Yes!

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Well, we've come to the right place,

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because we're in Reading in Berkshire,

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which is renowned globally for its music, mud and mayhem.

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Yes, I'm talking about the Reading Festival.

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Our venue today is The Concert Hall,

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which is housed inside this magnificent building, the town hall.

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We haven't even opened the doors yet and I've already lost my voice, I'm so excited.

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Today, we are taking centre stage.

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Welcome to "Flog It!"!

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CHEERING AND PAUL LAUGHS

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Let's rock!

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Reading Festival is the world's oldest popular music festival

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that's still in existence today.

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It started life in 1961 at Richmond Athletic Ground in Surrey

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as an annual jazz and blues festival.

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And then, in 1971, it moved to Reading.

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By this time, it was almost exclusively playing rock music.

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Today, Reading Festival is known worldwide for featuring

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the biggest and the best acts of the contemporary music scene.

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Almost 90,000 music fans invade Reading every August bank holiday

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for the festival.

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Now, I know we can't rival that, but just look at this queue,

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because it goes all around the centre of the town.

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I tell you what, today, we are going to rock

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and I can't wait to get inside there and find out

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what all of these antiques and collectables are worth.

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I know this lot are excited,

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so let's get the doors open and get on with the show!

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Already working the crowd like the rock stars they are,

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we have our experts...

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Anita Manning.

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-I think it's lovely.

-Do you really? I like you.

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And Nick Davies.

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-If she was an original...

-Aye-aye.

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You and I would probably elope!

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LAUGHTER

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And it looks as if Anita is the headliner

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and Nick's the supporting act.

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-I'm going to have it, off you go.

-Oh, all right!

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It's time for the first act, so let's get this crowd inside.

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Our valuation tables are set up inside the Victorian concert hall

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and are ready to go.

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So, whilst everybody takes their seats and makes themselves

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comfortable, let's take a look at what's coming up later on.

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An exotic walking cane turns up on Anita's table.

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There is a whole zoo of embossed animals on here.

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This makes it even more interesting.

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And we have a fantastic surprise at auction.

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1,400, 1,500.

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-Wow!

-1,600...

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-Whoo!

-I'm going hot.

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And I'll be paying a visit here to Cliveden House

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to tell you about two events that changed the face of British politics

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in the 20th century.

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But first, we are immersing ourselves back in the world of pop,

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as Nick has come across a piece of music history.

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Now, Sandra,

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you've brought us something I wish I had at the time,

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and it won't make sense till I turn it round, will it?

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A ticket to go and see The Beatles.

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-Were you there?

-I was there, yes.

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I was a student at Newcastle University at the time.

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-Right, what were you studying up there?

-Classics.

-Classics, OK.

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And The Beatles came to Newcastle.

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We had to apply for tickets by post.

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-Oh, yes.

-And so lucky we got some.

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Very lucky dip. And what was it like? Come on, the atmosphere,

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-it must have been electric.

-It was very noisy outside.

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-Yeah.

-Everybody was screaming and yelling.

-Yeah.

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-And I had a seat in the balcony.

-Right.

-Which was excellent.

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-Just like here?

-Just like here.

-Just like here, fantastic.

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Paul McCartney's piano was exactly underneath us.

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-Really?

-I can remember him playing Yesterday.

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-Oh, like it was yesterday?

-Like it was yesterday.

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Fantastic, that's brilliant.

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But this is 1965, so for Beatles collectors,

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it's just a wonderful thing.

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-Yes, it is.

-You know, with all the festivals and things that go on nowadays,

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this is where it really started and really kicked off, didn't it?

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All the music that's come from there was these type of shows

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-in the mid and early '60s.

-Yeah.

-And it's so simple.

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And how much was the ticket? Ten and six?

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-Sixpence.

-Ten and sixpence, what's that? That's about 52p.

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Yes, not much nowadays.

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Could you imagine going to see the Beatles for 52p?

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That would be unbelievable. I'm very envious, I'm very envious,

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cos I'd have loved to see The Beatles,

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one of my favourites, without a doubt.

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I mean, as a bit of memorabilia, it doesn't have an awful lot of value,

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it's just the heritage almost and the story behind it,

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which is so interesting.

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I would probably say at auction, it's going to fetch

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somewhere around about £40 to £60.

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-Oh, as much is that?

-Yeah, which is not bad for a 52p ticket, is it?

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-No.

-We'll put a reserve on of 40, with maybe a bit of discretion,

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but I think it's just such a good entry-level thing for a Beatles

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collector who's going to start off collecting this type of memorabilia.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

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And thank you for telling me the story. Loved it.

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Next, over to Anita,

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who has come across something of interest.

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Well, Barbara, we're going to have a great time today

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playing with these marvellous wee dolls.

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Tell me, where did you get them?

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They were my mother's. She's American.

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-Oh, right?

-So I'm not sure whether they're American dolls or German.

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Yeah. Let's have a wee look at them.

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You know that usually on dolls we look at the back of them.

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-Yeah.

-To see if we can see...

-I've never found anything.

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-Have you not?

-No.

-ANITA LAUGHS

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-Well, if we look on the bigger one...

-Mm.

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Now, there is a very big hint here.

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It was Madame Alexander, New York, USA.

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-Madame Alexander was a doll maker, a New York toymaker.

-OK.

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The label on the dress is giving us another hint.

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It's McGuffey Ana.

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And McGuffey Ana was the name of this doll,

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this particular doll. That was her name, McGuffey Ana.

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If we look at the wee doll...

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Again, looking at the back, this is Judy Ann.

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And again, this is an American doll.

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-Different maker.

-Mm-hm.

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But still round about the same period.

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-OK.

-What I want to now, I want to know about your mum.

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Why did she come across here?

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What did she do in America?

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What brought the family here?

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She was born out there.

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Er, I believe that she was working in a toy shop.

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A toy shop?!

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Erm... And I also believe that that's where she met my father.

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So what happened? Did they come over to...?

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They came over together and my mother was over here,

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-actually, for 27 years.

-Did she worked in a toy shop over here?

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No, no, no, no. She ended up as a book-keeper.

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Ah, right.

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Both of these dolls, they are made of composition.

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-Mm.

-They have painted eyes.

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-Mm-hm.

-They have limbs that move.

-Yes.

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But they're fairly sort of basic little dolls.

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But they are of that wonderful 1940s period,

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just post-war there in America.

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-And we have with them...

-I know.

-..this selection of clothes.

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-I love these wee shoes.

-I know.

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ANITA LAUGHS

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Tell me, Barbara, did you play with these dolls?

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-I did, yeah.

-You did? Well, you were obviously a very careful child,

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because the dolls are still in good condition.

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Price on these,

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I'd like to put them in, conservatively, at £60 to £80.

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Would you be happy to put them in at that price?

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-I would, yeah.

-Yeah? And I think that they're absolutely charming.

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-Thank you.

-So thank you very much for bringing them along.

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Thank you very much.

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Earlier on, I mentioned the Reading Rock Festival,

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where tens of thousands of visitors invade the town each year.

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What's it like living here?

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I found a local resident who's going to tell me a bit more about that.

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So, what is it like? What is it like?

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I don't mind the change to the town at all.

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There's lot of people, I'm ashamed we call them swampies,

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because everywhere gets so muddy.

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My earliest memory of the festival is sitting on my grandad's

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outside toilet, because the music sounded fabulous from there.

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-Did it? You could hear it?

-I heard, you know,

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Rod Stewart in his heyday there.

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But now I've got an allotment,

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which is in the next field to the main stage.

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-Oh, really?

-And the acoustics are fabulous.

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And does it help the vegetables grow?

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Well, there've been some clues. So, yeah, I guess it does.

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-Thank you for talking to me today.

-Thank you.

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Well, we need one more item before we go off to auction

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for the first time. Who is that lucky owner going to be?

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Let's find out.

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-Well, Diane, now you've brought a load of hat pins in.

-Mm-hm.

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When these were in their heyday, 1890-1920,

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everybody would have had a hat on

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and all the ladies would have had a hat pin to secure it in place.

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-True.

-And the reason why it changed about 1920, do you know why?

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-No.

-Haircuts changed.

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As your hair is, the bob came into fashion,

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didn't need hat pins any more.

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They could secure them without going through the hair.

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Where did all these come from?

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A great aunt who had lived as a companion with two sisters.

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-Right.

-And when they died, she inherited...

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So she collected them?

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They did, I presume, because there are two of some of them.

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-OK.

-Which means they must have liked the same things.

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Yeah, sometimes you have pairs of hat pins.

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Oh, possibly.

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I've sold all sorts of hat pins.

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But there's a couple in here that are made by a very famous hat pin maker.

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A chap called Charles Horner.

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-Oh.

-He was based in Halifax

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and he produced that hat pin.

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Shape of the treble clef.

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And that little heart one.

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And he manufactured them, used to hallmark them in Chester,

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and these are bang on his period.

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I think from, that's 1908, and that is 1906,

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so right at his peak of manufacturing hat pins.

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He made all sorts of other things as well,

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but hat pins he is quite known for.

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-Interesting.

-People still collect hat pins,

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even though they don't wear them. They still collect them.

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And I know this is just a sample of what you have,

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there are very many more that you brought along.

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So we've just pulled out the better ones, if you like.

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-Yeah, OK.

-The two little thistle ones topped with amethyst there.

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-Yeah.

-Little Amethyst stones.

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They are quite nice. A little bit of detail to them.

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And they are standing in, what you must have if you have hat pins,

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because I have already been pricked by a couple of these,

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-and I have the scars to show for it...

-Me, too.

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..is a hat pin stander.

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That is a silver-plated one.

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And that is a little silver one.

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So they are just quite nice to go with the collection.

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-Have you ever worn them?

-I have, yes.

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-Ascot?

-No, Henley.

-Henley.

-Yes.

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And you've no use for them any more?

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-I haven't.

-I've got lazy about cleaning.

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Got lazy about cleaning.

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We get that quite a lot, I must admit.

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Should we talk about a value?

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-Yes.

-Yes. I think...

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in total, as a group, we'd sell them as a lot.

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It's not really worth splitting.

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They're not that rare.

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I would put the group lot in at around about £100 to £150.

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-What do you think?

-Yeah.

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We'll put a reserve on them, say £90,

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so we're not giving them away for nothing.

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Can we say 100 as the reserve?

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Oh, go on, then, I'm not going to argue for a tenner. £100 reserve.

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-Brilliant.

-What are you going to do with it?

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Well, that'll get my grandson a trip to Amsterdam.

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Your grandson a trip to Amsterdam?

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Fantastic. Well, that should work out really well.

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You never know, we might get him a flight back as well.

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Well, that would be even better.

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Having a good time, everyone?

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Yes. That is what it is all about.

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Reading is rocking.

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Our experts have now found their first three items

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to take off to auction. This is where it gets exciting.

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Anything could happen. Do not go away.

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Stay with us on this

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because I think there could be one big surprise.

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And here's a quick reminder of what is going under the hammer.

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Will the Fab Four's fans go wild for Sandra's 1965 Beatles ticket?

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Barbara's two dolls have come all the way from America,

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and we are selling them with a selection of dolls' clothes too.

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And finally heading under the hammer are Diane's two stands

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and collection of hat pins.

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Including the treble clef and the heart-shaped pins by Charles Horner.

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Today, it's auction time.

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This is where it gets exciting.

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Now you heard what our experts said about the items at

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the valuation day. You've probably got your own opinion.

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But right now we're going to find out what the bidders think inside

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Martin and Pole auction rooms in Wokingham.

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Come on, let's put them under the hammer,

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and fingers crossed they hit the roof.

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Remember, whether you are buying or selling at auction,

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there is always commission and VAT to pay.

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Here the rate if you are selling is 15% plus the VAT.

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Already hard at work on the rostrum is our auctioneer for today Matt Coles,

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so let's hope the Beatles ticket belonging to Sandra

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doesn't go for a song.

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Talk me through that concert. I want to know what it was like.

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Was it loud, to start with?

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It was, yes. Yes. All the girls were screaming.

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Well, good luck. Let's hope we get top dollar.

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It's going under the hammer right now.

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Start this for me at £28.

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30 anywhere?

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With me at £28.

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Any further offers at £28?

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I've got 30. 32, 35, 38.

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40, 42, 45. 48, 50.

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I'm running out of breath. 65, 70, 75.

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80, 85. 90, 95. 100.

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So £100 on the internet.

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Any more in the room at £100?

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I don't know why I'm here, it's all on the internet.

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At £100, any more?

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At £100 and selling.

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Are we all done now? Fair warning.

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£100.

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£100!

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Great. I can't believe it.

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No, it was a good result, wasn't it?

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Good provenance as well.

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-Yes. I was there.

-I wish I could say that.

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The Beatles' fans are definitely online today.

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Next, hold on to your hats, it is Diane's collection of hat pins

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with two stands.

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And I know you want to sell these to raise money for some flights

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-to Amsterdam.

-That's right, yeah.

-Send your grandson to Amsterdam?

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-That's right. He's going to work for Mattel for a year.

-OK.

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So either for him or him and his brother.

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-Who knows?

-Little trip out there?

-Yeah.

-Oh, good on you.

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-Good on you.

-Should do it.

-We should do this.

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There is a lot here.

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Yeah. Let's stick it to them, let's find out.

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It's going under the hammer now.

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A collection of Victorian hat pins.

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Start this off for me at £75.

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80 anywhere?

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With me at £75.

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Any further offers? At £75...

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At £75, are we all done then?

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At £75?

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At 75, then, all done.

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I'm so sorry, I don't know what to say, I'm actually lost for words,

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thinking that was obviously going to sell because of the quantity.

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It just goes to show, there wasn't a market for them today, not here,

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not even online.

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-C'est la vie!

-I'm ever so sorry.

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-Don't worry.

-They'll get to Amsterdam, won't they?

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-They will.

-They'll have to row!

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Next, it's those two American dolls and a selection of clothes.

0:15:390:15:43

These were your mum's dolls, weren't they, Barbara?

0:15:430:15:45

-Yes.

-Nice thing, though, nice thing.

0:15:450:15:47

We know there are lots of doll collectors out there,

0:15:470:15:50

so hopefully we're going to find them right now,

0:15:500:15:52

as they go under the hammer.

0:15:520:15:54

This is it, good luck.

0:15:540:15:56

I have an absentee bid here of £45.

0:15:560:15:58

48 anywhere?

0:15:580:15:59

Oh.

0:15:590:16:00

Selling at £45...

0:16:000:16:02

48 on the internet.

0:16:020:16:04

50 now on the internet.

0:16:040:16:05

-50.

-55.

-55.

-60. 65. 70. 75.

0:16:050:16:11

-Good, good.

-80. 85. 90. 95... At 95.

0:16:110:16:16

Look, it's two internet bids bidding against each other.

0:16:160:16:19

-At £100 now. And ten.

-Yes, yes!

0:16:190:16:22

At £110.

0:16:220:16:23

Are we all done on the internet? I've got people in the room here,

0:16:230:16:25

they might want to bid as well. £110.

0:16:250:16:27

That was a good little flurry.

0:16:270:16:29

-£110. 120 on the internet.

-Oh, brilliant.

0:16:290:16:33

£120.

0:16:330:16:34

Any more? At £120.

0:16:340:16:38

On the internet, then, at £120.

0:16:380:16:40

-Are we all done?

-Fantastic.

0:16:400:16:42

Absolutely brilliant.

0:16:420:16:44

Yes! You know, wasn't that great?

0:16:440:16:47

You know,

0:16:470:16:48

and hopefully bought online, the internet,

0:16:480:16:50

hopefully they're going to go back to America.

0:16:500:16:52

-It would be lovely, wouldn't it?

-It would be good.

0:16:520:16:54

What a great result for Barbara,

0:16:540:16:56

and we'll be back at the auction for more surprises later on in the show.

0:16:560:17:00

While we are filming in Berkshire,

0:17:000:17:02

I had the opportunity of visiting the magnificent,

0:17:020:17:05

the majestic Cliveden House, to find out more about the role

0:17:050:17:09

the house has played in British politics.

0:17:090:17:11

Cliveden was purchased at the end of the 19th century by William Waldorf Astor,

0:17:160:17:22

one of the wealthiest men in America.

0:17:220:17:24

He and the Astor family settled quickly in England

0:17:240:17:28

and soon became part of the British aristocracy.

0:17:280:17:31

In 1906, William gave Cliveden House to his son Waldorf

0:17:310:17:35

and his American wife Nancy Langhorne as a wedding gift.

0:17:350:17:39

Nancy and her husband gave Cliveden a new lease of life -

0:17:390:17:42

they entertained on a lavish scale.

0:17:420:17:46

The house quickly became a destination for film stars

0:17:460:17:49

and politicians such as Charlie Chaplin,

0:17:490:17:51

Ghandi and Winston Churchill.

0:17:510:17:54

Nancy Astor, the First Lady Astor,

0:17:540:17:56

came from the American South and shortly after her arrival here

0:17:560:18:00

she came a figure of great interest, everybody wanted to know her.

0:18:000:18:03

She was only five feet high,

0:18:030:18:05

yet on all accounts she was both beautiful and very intelligent.

0:18:050:18:10

Both the young Astors were actively involved in politics

0:18:100:18:13

and they saw themselves as being a lot more liberal than the former,

0:18:130:18:16

more conservative Lord Astor.

0:18:160:18:18

And it would be Nancy who went on to become the more famous of the two.

0:18:180:18:23

In 1919, just one year after women were given the right to vote

0:18:230:18:26

and become a member of Parliament,

0:18:260:18:29

Nancy Astor, to a fanfare of worldwide publicity, made history.

0:18:290:18:33

She became the first woman to take a seat as an MP for

0:18:330:18:36

the Conservative Party.

0:18:360:18:38

Women had died for the vote.

0:18:400:18:43

Mrs Pankhurst and that woman who threw herself...

0:18:430:18:46

and I realised

0:18:460:18:48

that I was there because of what they'd done.

0:18:480:18:52

I've come to the Lady Astor bedroom to meet Sue Williams,

0:18:520:18:56

general manager here at Cliveden,

0:18:560:18:58

to hear more about Nancy's political life.

0:18:580:19:02

So what was she like outside of politics, as a person?

0:19:020:19:05

She's written up as a tale of two halves.

0:19:050:19:07

She had a big heart, but with her own family I think she was very,

0:19:070:19:11

-very tough.

-And in politics, what was she like?

0:19:110:19:13

Her real aim was to improve the welfare for families,

0:19:130:19:17

so that would cover everything from education, health,

0:19:170:19:21

living accommodations and actually it is Nancy

0:19:210:19:23

who brought in our drinking laws of today, which are...

0:19:230:19:26

I didn't know that, really?

0:19:260:19:27

Yeah, being able to drink over the age of 18.

0:19:270:19:30

So how was Nancy treated in the House of Commons upon her election?

0:19:300:19:33

Her attributes really offended all the male politicians

0:19:330:19:36

that she kind of was working alongside.

0:19:360:19:38

Her whole style was just, just tenacious.

0:19:380:19:40

I mean, my best friends didn't speak to me hardly, they couldn't.

0:19:400:19:44

It was like going into a members club.

0:19:440:19:47

-MAN:

-An all-male club, as it were?

0:19:470:19:48

An all-male club.

0:19:480:19:49

And I was very conscious of that.

0:19:490:19:52

She was controversial.

0:19:520:19:53

They really shunned her and wouldn't speak to her barely at all.

0:19:530:19:56

They wouldn't sort of open doors and stand up for her to move along

0:19:560:19:59

the benches and things like that.

0:19:590:20:00

They didn't disagree, many of them,

0:20:000:20:02

and certainly this was the position of Winston Churchill.

0:20:020:20:04

They didn't disagree with the vote for women and women in politics,

0:20:040:20:08

but he didn't care for some of the more aggressive tactics

0:20:080:20:11

that they would use. Nancy and Churchill were...

0:20:110:20:15

-They didn't get on?

-They did not get on at all.

0:20:150:20:17

There was this one wonderful occasion that is well recorded.

0:20:170:20:21

Nancy was so wound up by him, she said,

0:20:210:20:24

"Sir, if you were my husband I'd poison your coffee".

0:20:240:20:26

He came back with his razor-sharp wit and said,

0:20:260:20:29

"Ma'am, if you were my wife, I would drink it".

0:20:290:20:32

Wonderful sort of put you down with just wit and intelligence.

0:20:320:20:36

Lady Astor died at the age of 84.

0:20:370:20:40

Her life at Cliveden and her involvement in British politics

0:20:400:20:44

meant she left a lasting impression and legacy.

0:20:440:20:47

Thanks to the next generation of Astors,

0:20:470:20:49

the parties at Cliveden continued throughout the '50s and '60s,

0:20:490:20:53

and it was in 1961 that a meeting took place here that rocked

0:20:530:20:57

the British establishment.

0:20:570:20:59

It was the height of the Cold War

0:20:590:21:01

and the building of the Berlin Wall

0:21:010:21:04

had created a divide between East and West.

0:21:040:21:07

This was the backdrop to a meeting that put Cliveden at the centre of

0:21:070:21:11

political life for the second time in a century.

0:21:110:21:14

Now a frequent visitor of the Astors here at Clivedon the early 1960s

0:21:160:21:20

was a successful Harley Street osteopath called Stephen Ward.

0:21:200:21:24

He'd massaged the backs of the rich and the famous,

0:21:240:21:27

people like Winston Churchill, the Royal family, Elizabeth Taylor,

0:21:270:21:30

but he also specialised in introducing beautiful women

0:21:300:21:34

to powerful and influential men, who attended parties here at Cliveden.

0:21:340:21:39

Stephen Ward had friends in high places,

0:21:390:21:41

including the British secret services - MI5.

0:21:410:21:45

And Ward would frequently stay here in Spring Cottage on the estate

0:21:450:21:48

and he'd arrived with handfuls of gorgeous young women by his side.

0:21:480:21:54

One of these women was a model, 19-year-old Christine Keeler,

0:21:560:22:01

and on one summer's evening at the Cliveden swimming pool in July 1961,

0:22:010:22:06

she caught the eye of the Conservative Member of Parliament

0:22:060:22:10

and Secretary of War John Profumo.

0:22:100:22:12

The minister became smitten with the model

0:22:150:22:17

and they began a three-month affair.

0:22:170:22:20

Profumo's affair would have probably remained unknown if it hadn't been

0:22:200:22:24

for the arrival here, at the swimming pool,

0:22:240:22:27

of a handsome Russian spy called Yevgeny Ivanov.

0:22:270:22:31

Now, the very same weekend that Ward introduced Ivanov to Christine Keeler here,

0:22:310:22:35

later on that evening John Profumo turned up on the scene

0:22:350:22:40

and the inevitable happened.

0:22:400:22:42

The Russian spy met up with the British Secretary of State for War, John Profumo.

0:22:420:22:47

Shortly after that, the circle was complete.

0:22:470:22:49

Ivanov also had an affair with Christine Keeler.

0:22:490:22:53

Now I know this is beginning to sound like a John le Carre novel,

0:22:530:22:56

but the plot is about to thicken.

0:22:560:22:58

Due to the growing influence of the tabloid press in 1960s Britain,

0:22:580:23:03

the story soon came out.

0:23:030:23:05

The love triangle between the British cabinet minister,

0:23:050:23:08

the Russian spy and their girlfriend became headline news,

0:23:080:23:11

and a political scandal for the Government of the day.

0:23:110:23:15

Rumours of the affair between Keeler and Profumo were raised in

0:23:150:23:18

the House of Commons. John Profumo, the British Minister of War,

0:23:180:23:21

was hauled before his party to answer questions about the affair.

0:23:210:23:25

Harold Macmillan, the Prime Minister of the day,

0:23:250:23:27

was furious that the reputation of the Government was at stake -

0:23:270:23:31

both at home and abroad.

0:23:310:23:33

John Profumo denied having an affair with Christine Keeler.

0:23:330:23:36

He lied. And later on in a statement of the House of Commons

0:23:360:23:40

when he addressed them he read out the same lies.

0:23:400:23:43

The press and the Opposition were determined to get to the truth.

0:23:430:23:47

The Minister John Profumo eventually confessed

0:23:470:23:50

and made a public admission of guilt and resigned from the Government.

0:23:500:23:55

The Russians spy Yevgeny Ivanov fled back home.

0:23:550:23:58

The publicity around the case alarmed the secret services, MI5,

0:23:580:24:03

who felt that Stephen Ward's intelligence activities

0:24:030:24:07

and links to the Russian spy might be revealed,

0:24:070:24:10

so they decided the best course of action was to hand him over to

0:24:100:24:13

the police.

0:24:130:24:15

Stephen Ward was charged with living off immoral earnings

0:24:170:24:20

and his trial began in July 1963.

0:24:200:24:22

It was characterised as an act of political revenge,

0:24:220:24:26

for the embarrassment it caused the Government.

0:24:260:24:28

After a damning speech by the trial judge,

0:24:290:24:32

Ward committed suicide before the verdict was read out.

0:24:320:24:36

Ward felt he'd been made a scapegoat of the Establishment

0:24:360:24:39

and many of Ward's so-called well-connected friends

0:24:390:24:42

didn't turn up to speak on his behalf.

0:24:420:24:44

And MI5 didn't reveal the uses they made of Ward

0:24:440:24:48

as a channel of communication to the Russian spy.

0:24:480:24:53

In a separate trial later that year,

0:24:530:24:55

Christine Keeler was found guilty of perjury

0:24:550:24:57

and served six months in prison.

0:24:570:24:59

She always insisted Stephen Ward was not guilty of the charge

0:24:590:25:03

of living off immoral earnings that he had faced.

0:25:030:25:06

The Profumo affair had aroused such national interest

0:25:060:25:09

that seven months after the death of Stephen Ward,

0:25:090:25:12

the Conservative Prime Minister Harold Macmillan resigned.

0:25:120:25:16

In the following year, the party lost the 1964 election to

0:25:160:25:21

the Labour Party,

0:25:210:25:22

who went on to hold power for the rest of the decade.

0:25:220:25:26

So there you have it, two dramatic events that put Cliveden House at

0:25:260:25:29

the centre of British politics during the 20th-century.

0:25:290:25:33

Now that's quite some story for one house.

0:25:330:25:36

Back at The Concert Hall in Reading, it's still a packed house,

0:25:420:25:45

with hundreds of people waiting for a valuation.

0:25:450:25:48

Let's now join up with our experts

0:25:490:25:51

and see what else we can find to take off to auction.

0:25:510:25:54

Hillary, welcome to "Flog It!".

0:25:570:25:59

Now there is nothing more elegant than a silver-topped walking stick,

0:25:590:26:05

but tell me, where did you get them?

0:26:050:26:08

They belonged to my husband's grandfather

0:26:080:26:11

and were passed down to his daughter,

0:26:110:26:14

my husband's mother, and then they were passed to my husband.

0:26:140:26:17

Have they been used throughout the family?

0:26:170:26:20

They would have been used by the grandfather.

0:26:200:26:22

I myself have used this one,

0:26:220:26:24

I used it to help me along sometimes because it was more elegant

0:26:240:26:28

-than an ordinary walking stick.

-Exactly, exactly!

0:26:280:26:31

What you have here is fashion and style.

0:26:310:26:34

Let's have a wee look at them.

0:26:340:26:36

Now I like this one here, with this...

0:26:360:26:39

It's mythical or exotic-looking bird, with a bit of a hooked bill.

0:26:390:26:47

I thought it was a swan,

0:26:470:26:48

but my husband said he thought it was an eagle.

0:26:480:26:50

-Right, OK.

-Because it's got the hook, as well.

0:26:500:26:53

That's right, that's right.

0:26:530:26:55

What I like about this one are the details of the eyes.

0:26:550:26:59

We have these glass eyes, which give it an almost human, animated look.

0:26:590:27:06

So I do like that.

0:27:060:27:08

Now I've had a wee look over this top and I can't see a hallmark,

0:27:080:27:13

but it feels like silver.

0:27:130:27:16

But I think this may have been a continental one.

0:27:160:27:19

The walking sticks that are making money in the salerooms today

0:27:190:27:24

are ones which have an added element,

0:27:240:27:27

or a little bit of novelty value or a little bit different.

0:27:270:27:31

This one certainly fits into that bill.

0:27:310:27:35

LAUGHTER

0:27:350:27:38

So it's a good-looking item.

0:27:380:27:39

The base of the stick,

0:27:390:27:42

we usually have a little metal sleeve that fits in there.

0:27:420:27:47

That's missing,

0:27:470:27:49

but we're not bothered too much about that, easily replaced.

0:27:490:27:53

And the shaft is made of some sort of hardwood.

0:27:530:27:56

This one is a very interesting stick.

0:27:560:28:00

Oriental. This silver is Chinese silver.

0:28:000:28:05

The motifs are beautifully embossed,

0:28:050:28:10

so I want to have a wee closer look at the decoration on this one here.

0:28:100:28:16

And you know, as I look at it,

0:28:160:28:18

there is a whole zoo of embossed animals on here.

0:28:180:28:23

-I've never noticed that.

-There are tigers,

0:28:230:28:25

some sort of antelope-type creature, there's an elephant...

0:28:250:28:31

This makes it even more interesting, and it's, again,

0:28:310:28:35

in perfect condition.

0:28:350:28:37

You have this ebonised shaft here.

0:28:370:28:39

We do have the base on that one,

0:28:400:28:42

so we've got two really quite nice sticks here.

0:28:420:28:46

Price...

0:28:460:28:48

-I think that they should be sold together...

-Yeah.

-..in one lot.

0:28:480:28:52

And probably, maybe 80-120 on the pair.

0:28:520:28:58

They might go further than that, in fact, I hope they do.

0:28:580:29:00

-That's fine.

-Would you be happy with that, Hillary?

0:29:000:29:03

Yes, yeah, I would be. And the reserve, would you put a reserve?

0:29:030:29:06

-We'll put a reserve of £80 on them.

-10% is discretionary normally?

0:29:060:29:09

-10% is discretionary.

-That's fine, yes, yeah.

0:29:090:29:11

Thank you so much for bringing them along.

0:29:110:29:13

-Thank you so much, thank you.

-Terrific.

0:29:130:29:15

Next I'm meeting Mick,

0:29:150:29:17

who's worked as stage security at Reading Festival since the 1970s.

0:29:170:29:21

And he has amassed a huge collection of memorabilia.

0:29:230:29:27

So all of this is basically band detritus.

0:29:270:29:30

Plectrums that have been lost or flicked about.

0:29:300:29:32

Drumsticks that were dropped from the kit

0:29:320:29:34

and set lists that were Sellotaped to all the monitors and PAs.

0:29:340:29:38

-That's right, yeah.

-You just picked it up and took it home?

0:29:380:29:40

I certainly did, but I gave a lot of it away to fans down at

0:29:400:29:42

-the front of the stage.

-Aw, that's a really good thing to do.

0:29:420:29:45

You must have met a lot of these guys as well,

0:29:450:29:47

showing them backwards and forwards?

0:29:470:29:49

That was the big thing about it, it was who you were going to meet,

0:29:490:29:52

who you were going to have a drink with

0:29:520:29:53

and who were you going to talk to and what would they give you?

0:29:530:29:56

Look at all the plectrums you've got.

0:29:560:29:57

What's the most famous plectrum there?

0:29:570:29:59

Guitarists would personalise their own plectrums.

0:29:590:30:02

So you'd see someone like that,

0:30:020:30:05

Rick Nielsen from Cheap Trick with his autograph on one side

0:30:050:30:08

and his picture on the other.

0:30:080:30:10

It became things like that that you would pick up.

0:30:100:30:14

That's the bass guitarist from the Ramones.

0:30:140:30:16

And he gave me a handful.

0:30:160:30:18

It was people like Phil Collins, gentleman that he is,

0:30:180:30:21

"Phil, can I have a set of sticks?"

0:30:210:30:23

-He would say...

-"Of course you can."

0:30:230:30:26

It's all here, rock and roll history.

0:30:260:30:28

Thank you so much for talking to me.

0:30:280:30:29

You know what? You brought back memories for me.

0:30:290:30:31

-Lovely, thank you.

-What a fantastic contemporary collection.

0:30:310:30:35

Next it's over to Nick who's found some much older items.

0:30:350:30:39

Well, Susan, here we are in the choir stalls

0:30:390:30:42

with our ace choir behind us.

0:30:420:30:44

Don't worry, I'm not going to ask you to sing,

0:30:440:30:46

and even more importantly, I'm not going to sing!

0:30:460:30:49

-So you've brought in these lovely paperweights.

-Mm-hm.

0:30:490:30:51

Where on earth did you get them from?

0:30:510:30:54

In the '70s my husband found them in an old sack by a skip

0:30:540:30:58

and he said he liked them and they were quite pretty

0:30:580:31:01

and he didn't want to leave them

0:31:010:31:02

and he thought perhaps I would like them.

0:31:020:31:04

There was a lot in there and they were all damaged,

0:31:040:31:07

but these were among them, these were about the best

0:31:070:31:09

-and I kept these in my cabinet.

-Do you know anything about them?

0:31:090:31:11

I don't know anything about them at all.

0:31:110:31:13

Except I found some dates.

0:31:130:31:16

There's a date on that one and a date on this one.

0:31:160:31:18

-That's right.

-I didn't know what they were.

0:31:180:31:21

If you look really carefully, that's got 1847,

0:31:210:31:25

that's the date that was made.

0:31:250:31:26

Gosh!

0:31:260:31:28

That's pretty impressive.

0:31:280:31:29

We got some "oohs" and "ahs" from behind!

0:31:290:31:31

Wow! These are all by the same company.

0:31:310:31:34

Are they?

0:31:340:31:36

It's a French company called Baccarat,

0:31:360:31:38

who are very famous for making glass.

0:31:380:31:40

They started in 1745 under Louis XV from France

0:31:400:31:43

and they made all sorts of things -

0:31:430:31:45

chandeliers and drinking glasses and decorative pieces.

0:31:450:31:49

These paperweights, there is a classic period about 1845 to 1860,

0:31:490:31:55

these are all from that period.

0:31:550:31:57

Now there's some odd things about them.

0:31:570:32:00

This one is my personal favourite.

0:32:000:32:02

It's called a scramble because it just looks like a mess.

0:32:020:32:05

All these multicoloured canes in here start in a length of glass

0:32:050:32:09

and then they cut them and insert them in there

0:32:090:32:12

and lay them on this base and then encase them.

0:32:120:32:15

It's quite a complex process. It's so beautiful when it's in your hand.

0:32:150:32:19

All these canes have got little motifs on them

0:32:190:32:22

and there's one round the side here, just there,

0:32:220:32:26

it's called the Diablo cane, which is the devil came.

0:32:260:32:30

And Baccarat used to put them in,

0:32:300:32:32

just a little tweak of what he used to do.

0:32:320:32:34

The one you're holding in that hand...

0:32:340:32:35

-That's the one I think is prettiest.

-You like that one?

0:32:350:32:38

Butterfly garland, but there's a problem with it.

0:32:380:32:40

You can see the difference between all three of them.

0:32:400:32:43

What's the difference with that one? It's all been faceted, hasn't it?

0:32:430:32:46

-Yes, yes.

-I believe they didn't do faceted paperweights.

0:32:460:32:49

I think that's had a bruise in it at some time

0:32:490:32:51

and they've cut the bruise out and made the facets.

0:32:510:32:56

So you're getting different styles,

0:32:560:32:58

but by accident really with that one.

0:32:580:33:01

Then we move again now to the third one.

0:33:010:33:03

Not as crisp, not as clear and really with the millefiori canes,

0:33:030:33:09

all these canes round here, the whites and the blues and greens,

0:33:090:33:12

you really have to have a little bit more definition to them.

0:33:120:33:16

It just looks, if you compare them, a little bit blurry, I think.

0:33:160:33:19

-Yeah.

-Collectors like crisp and clean.

0:33:190:33:22

Shall we talk about value?

0:33:220:33:23

The one I like the most, I think at auction would fetch £300 to £500.

0:33:230:33:29

OK? That one, even with the facets, same sort of value.

0:33:290:33:34

-£300 to £500.

-Gosh.

0:33:340:33:36

Not so exciting, not so well made,

0:33:360:33:39

I would say that one is probably near £150 to £250.

0:33:390:33:42

-Yes.

-Reserve?

0:33:420:33:45

£300, a bit of discretion?

0:33:450:33:47

Same for that one and 150 on that one.

0:33:470:33:50

-How does that sound?

-That's lovely, yes.

0:33:500:33:52

We could skip off together.

0:33:520:33:53

Lovely.

0:33:550:33:56

Now for our final valuation of the day, over on Anita's table.

0:33:560:34:00

Veronica, welcome to "Flog It!"!

0:34:010:34:03

You've brought along a "Flog It!" favourite.

0:34:030:34:07

Two terrific pieces of Troika.

0:34:070:34:11

Tell me, where did you get them?

0:34:110:34:13

The small piece came from a car boot

0:34:130:34:16

and it was actually filled with dried flowers.

0:34:160:34:19

The larger piece, I think I got from a charity shop,

0:34:190:34:22

-but many, many years ago.

-Can you remember what you paid for them?

0:34:220:34:27

I think I paid £1 for this.

0:34:270:34:29

£1? Wow!

0:34:290:34:31

I have no idea, I wouldn't have paid a lot for it.

0:34:310:34:33

Tell me what drew you to them.

0:34:330:34:35

Oh, the designs. The abstract and the colour.

0:34:350:34:40

I collect studio ware, so I do like it.

0:34:400:34:44

Was that before the time when Troika was, I suppose,

0:34:440:34:49

known to us all or became popular?

0:34:490:34:51

-Yes.

-So you'd a good eye?

0:34:510:34:53

-Hopefully, yes.

-Troika, of course, was the wonderful Cornish studio

0:34:530:34:59

which made these wonderful abstract or modernist designs set up by

0:34:590:35:06

the three potters and, really,

0:35:060:35:09

it went from '62 to maybe '83, but we had many designs.

0:35:090:35:14

This particular design is called the wheel design.

0:35:140:35:19

If we look underneath,

0:35:190:35:20

the monogram will tell us who made this particular wheel vase.

0:35:200:35:26

We see LJ, that's Louise Jenks.

0:35:260:35:29

-OK.

-OK. So it's good that we can identify the potter.

0:35:290:35:34

This one here, this possibly could be...

0:35:340:35:38

I'm not recognising that monogram,

0:35:380:35:41

but your auctioneer will do his research

0:35:410:35:43

and identify it before the sale.

0:35:430:35:46

-OK.

-I have to say to you that the bigger the vase is, very often,

0:35:460:35:50

the more expensive it is.

0:35:500:35:53

-OK.

-These are, I suppose, more traditional shapes.

0:35:530:35:58

I'd put them together and I would put an estimate of say

0:35:580:36:02

£200 to £300 on the pair.

0:36:020:36:06

If you're happy, we can go forward and sell them at that.

0:36:060:36:09

-Yes.

-So you bought well, you bought well.

0:36:090:36:12

Do you want to put a reserve on these vases?

0:36:120:36:16

-I would like a reserve.

-Perhaps £180.

0:36:160:36:19

-OK.

-And give the auctioneer a little discretion?

0:36:190:36:23

-Yes.

-Thank you for bringing them along.

-Thank you.

0:36:230:36:26

Well, there you are. You've just seen them,

0:36:280:36:31

our experts have now found their final items

0:36:310:36:33

to take off to auction. So, sadly,

0:36:330:36:35

it's time to say goodbye to our magnificent venue,

0:36:350:36:38

The Concert Hall here in the heart of Reading.

0:36:380:36:40

Have you had a good time, everyone?

0:36:400:36:42

-ALL:

-Yes!

-Well, thank you so much for turning up.

0:36:420:36:45

We thoroughly enjoyed it today, but right now

0:36:450:36:48

we have some unfinished business to do in the auction room,

0:36:480:36:51

so here's a quick recap of all the items we're taking with us.

0:36:510:36:54

Let's hope Hillary's two walking sticks appeal to the animal lovers.

0:36:560:37:00

Nick split Susan's collection of 19th century glass paperweights

0:37:020:37:06

into three separate lots.

0:37:060:37:07

And finally, heading under the hammer are the two pieces of Troika

0:37:140:37:17

belonging to Veronica.

0:37:170:37:19

Back at Martin and Pole in Wokingham,

0:37:210:37:24

auctioneer Matt Coles is still hard at work on the rostrum and first up,

0:37:240:37:28

it's Hillary's two walking sticks.

0:37:280:37:31

I think these will go to a collector.

0:37:310:37:33

I think these will be highly sought after.

0:37:330:37:35

Yeah, I think they are more collectable as a say for a collector

0:37:350:37:38

rather than someone using them.

0:37:380:37:39

Yeah. Happy, everyone?

0:37:390:37:41

Shall we find out what the bidders think?

0:37:410:37:43

This is the moment of truth, isn't it?

0:37:430:37:45

You've probably got your own idea,

0:37:450:37:47

but let's find out exactly what they're worth.

0:37:470:37:49

They're going under the hammer right now.

0:37:490:37:51

We'll hand the proceedings over to the auctioneer.

0:37:510:37:53

Absentee bids on this.

0:37:530:37:56

I'll start it with me at £90.

0:37:560:37:57

95 anywhere?

0:37:570:37:59

With me at £90.

0:37:590:38:01

Any further offers at £90?

0:38:010:38:02

95, 100.

0:38:020:38:05

110, 120, 130 with you now. £130.

0:38:050:38:09

Any more at 130?

0:38:090:38:11

Selling then at £130.

0:38:110:38:13

All done?

0:38:130:38:14

-That's a good result, £130.

-That's good.

0:38:140:38:17

-We're happy.

-They deserved that.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:38:170:38:19

-Did well.

-Pleased?

0:38:190:38:21

Very pleased, thank you.

0:38:210:38:23

-Good.

-Next let's see if we can make a good profit for Veronica.

0:38:230:38:28

We're talking about Troika.

0:38:280:38:30

Yes, and you know I love my Troika.

0:38:300:38:32

And two, twice as good as one.

0:38:320:38:36

Antiques travel well, that's what it's all about.

0:38:360:38:38

Troika in vogue right now and hopefully we'll get the top prices.

0:38:380:38:42

We're putting them under the hammer now.

0:38:420:38:44

We'll have to start it with me at 170. 180.

0:38:440:38:48

It's on the internet for £180.

0:38:480:38:51

Any further offers at £180?

0:38:510:38:54

I'm selling at 180. 190, 200 now on the internet. At £200.

0:38:540:38:59

Right, we're in. We have 200.

0:38:590:39:01

We all done, £200?

0:39:010:39:03

Selling at £200.

0:39:030:39:05

Any more? Are we all done on the internet?

0:39:050:39:07

I see you're hovering. Are you all done?

0:39:070:39:09

-Come on, come on!

-£200, all done?

0:39:090:39:11

The gavel's gone down.

0:39:130:39:14

We had 2-3, they gone for £200.

0:39:140:39:17

-That's fine.

-Happy with that?

0:39:170:39:18

-I am, yes.

-Well done, thank you.

0:39:180:39:20

And finally, it's Susan's three paperweights.

0:39:230:39:26

Since the valuation day,

0:39:260:39:27

the auction house have had more time to study them

0:39:270:39:30

and they've now catalogued the last one that's going under the hammer

0:39:300:39:34

as being by a different maker called Saint-Louis.

0:39:340:39:37

I love your little collection, I really do.

0:39:380:39:40

We've got three to sell.

0:39:400:39:42

We're splitting them up into individual lots.

0:39:420:39:44

They are quality, aren't they?

0:39:440:39:45

The clarity when you look deep inside them, it's exquisite.

0:39:450:39:49

Right, this is my favourite going under the hammer.

0:39:490:39:51

This is the first one. Hopefully it does £300 plus.

0:39:510:39:53

Let's find out. We'll add it all up at the end, OK?

0:39:530:39:55

-Yes, yes.

-With a big grand total. Here's the first one.

0:39:550:39:59

Lot 345 is the Baccarat paperweight.

0:39:590:40:03

With me at £280. 290, 300, 320,

0:40:030:40:06

350, 400.

0:40:060:40:09

I have £400.

0:40:090:40:11

450. 500. 550.

0:40:110:40:15

600. 650. 700.

0:40:150:40:21

Anyone want to come in at £700? 750 on the internet.

0:40:210:40:23

-800.

-Brilliant, absolutely brilliant.

0:40:230:40:26

Any more at £800?

0:40:260:40:28

850 on the telephone.

0:40:280:40:30

850 on the telephone.

0:40:300:40:32

900 on the internet.

0:40:320:40:33

950 on the telephone.

0:40:340:40:36

At £950 on the telephone.

0:40:360:40:40

All done?

0:40:400:40:41

Yes! £950.

0:40:410:40:44

Two more to go. Your favourite's going under the hammer right now.

0:40:440:40:47

Let's find out what it's worth. Here we go.

0:40:470:40:51

Start this with me at £240.

0:40:510:40:52

250 anywhere? We've got 250 on the internet.

0:40:520:40:55

300, 350 now.

0:40:550:40:57

380 now.

0:40:570:40:58

It's creeping.

0:40:580:41:00

420, 450, 480, 500, 550, 600.

0:41:000:41:06

650, 700, 750, 800.

0:41:060:41:10

850 now on the internet.

0:41:100:41:12

At 900 now.

0:41:120:41:13

Are we all done at 900?

0:41:130:41:16

900, another great result for that one.

0:41:160:41:19

-Gosh!

-What's going through your mind right now?

0:41:190:41:21

My heart's racing.

0:41:210:41:23

I bet it is.

0:41:230:41:24

Mine would be if I owned them!

0:41:240:41:26

One more to go yet.

0:41:260:41:27

-Oh, dear!

-Oh!

0:41:270:41:30

I'm going hot.

0:41:300:41:32

OK, fingers crossed, this is the last. Here we go.

0:41:320:41:36

The Saint-Louis millefiori paperweight.

0:41:360:41:39

Start this with me at £100.

0:41:390:41:41

200, 300, 400, 500, 600,

0:41:410:41:44

700, 800. 900. 1,000.

0:41:440:41:49

At 1,000. 1,100, 1,200, 1,300, 1,400, 1,500.

0:41:490:41:55

Wow! I'm speechless.

0:41:550:41:58

1,800. At £1,800.

0:41:580:42:01

1,900. 2,000.

0:42:010:42:04

At £2,000 on the internet.

0:42:040:42:07

2,100.

0:42:070:42:08

Any more? At 2,100.

0:42:080:42:10

2,200 on the internet.

0:42:100:42:12

2,200 on the internet now.

0:42:120:42:15

2,300 on the internet.

0:42:150:42:16

2,300.

0:42:160:42:18

2,400 on the telephone.

0:42:190:42:22

At 2,400 on the telephone now.

0:42:220:42:26

-Susan!

-My goodness!

0:42:260:42:28

2,600 on the telephone.

0:42:300:42:32

2,700.

0:42:320:42:34

2,800 on the telephone.

0:42:360:42:38

At 2,800.

0:42:380:42:41

I don't know what to say!

0:42:410:42:42

Lost for words!

0:42:420:42:44

-Susan's spellbound.

-I'm spellbound.

0:42:440:42:47

Are we all done at £2,800?

0:42:470:42:49

Give us a hug! £2,800.

0:42:510:42:55

Susan, my darling, that's such a lot of money.

0:42:560:42:59

-I can't believe it.

-Those three paperweights add up to £4,650,

0:42:590:43:03

if I'm right.

0:43:030:43:05

-Some serious collectors out there.

-Some serious collectors.

0:43:050:43:07

-I didn't think there would be.

-Wow, what a day!

0:43:070:43:10

-You've got tears in your eyes.

-Thank you for bringing them in.

0:43:100:43:13

Please, please, please, please enjoy the money, won't you?

0:43:130:43:15

Thank you very much.

0:43:150:43:17

If you've got anything like that, we would love to sell it,

0:43:170:43:19

but until then, join us again for many more surprises,

0:43:190:43:21

but it's goodbye from all of us here in Wokingham,

0:43:210:43:24

especially Susan here with such a lovely star lot.

0:43:240:43:27

-Well done, you.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:270:43:29

Today Flog It! comes from Reading in Berkshire, where antiques experts Anita Manning and Nick Davies put values on the town's antiques and collectibles. Anita falls in love with a couple of American dolls and Nick finds some 19th-century French paperweights which get pulses racing at the auction.

Paul Martin takes a trip to Cliveden House, which was at the centre of two important events in British politics in the 20th century.


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