Bath Flog It!


Bath

Series in which experts view and value antiques. Presenter Paul Martin and experts Catherine Southon and Jethro Marles are at the Pavilion in Bath.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Bath. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

The Romans relaxed in its luxurious baths,

0:00:020:00:04

the Georgians strolled its handsome streets, but today we're in Bath for Flog It!

0:00:040:00:09

Bath is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe,

0:00:390:00:42

and it's famous throughout the world for its Roman baths.

0:00:420:00:46

Alongside these ancient ruins, are the elegant facades of its Georgian buildings.

0:00:460:00:51

But the centre of attention today will be the Bath Pavilion,

0:00:510:00:54

where our experts - Catherine Southon and Jethro Marles -

0:00:540:00:57

will be rummaging through bags and boxes, looking for unwanted antiques to take to auction.

0:00:570:01:02

-So, what have we got?

-What's it worth?

0:01:020:01:04

It's time to get out of the rain and onto the seats.

0:01:100:01:13

And Jethro's wasted no time in getting to the table.

0:01:130:01:16

Let's meet his new friend.

0:01:160:01:18

Well, Ken, thank you for bringing in such an attractive...

0:01:200:01:24

-Is that the word I'm looking for? I'm not too sure!

-Grotesque!

-Grotesque. Exactly.

0:01:240:01:28

It's an amazing character jug, this.

0:01:280:01:31

You know quite a lot about it. You tell me what you know.

0:01:310:01:34

Well, my wife's auntie, Auntie Grace,

0:01:340:01:38

was quite an antique collector,

0:01:380:01:41

and I think she purchased it in the '20s, the 1920s, some time then.

0:01:410:01:47

-Who is this character?

-Madame Lafarge.

0:01:470:01:49

-The lady who sat by the guillotine.

-Yes.

-That's as much as I know.

0:01:490:01:53

Yes. She sat knitting by the guillotine, watching the heads roll into the basket.

0:01:530:01:58

And, of course, she had that smile all the time.

0:01:580:02:00

Grinning away, chuckling away to herself.

0:02:000:02:03

The features are lovely but, of course,

0:02:030:02:07

my wife doesn't like it, and my granddaughters -

0:02:070:02:12

we have to put it away when they come round!

0:02:120:02:14

Well, it's not surprising, is it?

0:02:140:02:16

She is a bit terrifying-looking.

0:02:160:02:18

-Yes, she is, yeah.

-And to have this character...

0:02:180:02:21

-Going to the guillotine was bad enough, but to have this woman...

-Sitting there!

-..as you go up...

0:02:210:02:27

Anyway, what's it all about? Well, the first thing is, it's a good size.

0:02:270:02:32

-Yes.

-There is a certain amount of damage to it.

0:02:320:02:35

-I understand, yes.

-You've got some damage on the rim here.

0:02:350:02:39

There is a bit of damage down at the very front here - there's a little chip.

0:02:390:02:42

But the worst damage of all is the handle.

0:02:420:02:46

If we turn it around here, we can see that the handle's been off

0:02:460:02:49

and on completely, and it's been stapled here in the 19th century.

0:02:490:02:53

This is the sort of repair work that would have been done in the latter part of the Victorian period.

0:02:530:02:59

Now, of course, the character Madame Lafarge was a character from the French Revolution.

0:02:590:03:05

-Yes.

-And if we tip it up,

0:03:050:03:07

there is a maker's mark just here.

0:03:070:03:09

Now, my knowledge of this sort of thing is very limited, I have to tell you.

0:03:090:03:14

I've had to consult with one of the off-screen valuers,

0:03:140:03:18

who tells me that you probably know as much as she does, as well! Who is this maker?

0:03:180:03:24

Well,

0:03:240:03:26

Auntie Grace used to correspond with Arthur Negus,

0:03:260:03:30

and what she told me was that they'd discussed this and he'd seen it,

0:03:300:03:37

-and it's Jacque Patine, who was a French ceramic artist.

-So, Jacque Patine?

0:03:370:03:43

Jacque Patine, yes.

0:03:430:03:44

French. It's hard-paste porcelain.

0:03:440:03:46

-It's extremely heavy!

-Very.

0:03:460:03:48

By the time you've got any liquid in there, if you ever did...

0:03:480:03:51

-It's really just a display object, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:03:510:03:54

So, what's it worth?

0:03:540:03:56

Well, what do you think it's worth?

0:03:560:03:59

Well, I'm not really worried too much about that because, basically,

0:03:590:04:03

my wife and my granddaughters want to get rid of it.

0:04:030:04:06

We do need to do a little bit more research on it, but my gut reaction

0:04:060:04:10

is that it's going to be worth something between £100 and £200.

0:04:100:04:14

Reserve at 100. Start off with that?

0:04:140:04:17

-Very happy with that.

-Put it in the auction?

-Yes.

0:04:170:04:19

-Let's see if she'll fly off.

-"Fly"!

0:04:190:04:23

Norma and Hilary, thank you for coming along today.

0:04:270:04:30

Thanks for bringing along this pocket barometer. Where did you get hold of this?

0:04:300:04:34

It was actually donated by a very nice elderly lady to raise funds for guide dogs.

0:04:340:04:41

And that's a charity that you both get involved in?

0:04:410:04:44

Yes. Yes, we're both friends and puppy walkers.

0:04:440:04:47

Oh, lovely! So you're walking the puppies to raise money.

0:04:470:04:50

Yes, raising them from six weeks to about a year.

0:04:500:04:54

Oh, wonderful! So you've brought along this lovely little piece, little pocket aneroid barometer.

0:04:540:04:59

Some of the earlier ones were the big banjo-type barometers,

0:04:590:05:03

but we've gone right down to a nice small pocket barometer,

0:05:030:05:06

which the gentleman would have kept in his pocket.

0:05:060:05:09

The date of it is gonna be late 19th century, about 1880s, that sort of date.

0:05:090:05:14

The name on it is Aronsberg.

0:05:140:05:16

It's not a name that I'm particularly familiar with.

0:05:160:05:18

Other names that I'm familiar with are Negretti and Zambra.

0:05:180:05:22

They were made very cheaply.

0:05:220:05:24

Lots of these were churned out, so we do see quite a lot on the market today.

0:05:240:05:29

Nevertheless, what I like about it is, it's in its original case.

0:05:290:05:33

A lot of these have been taken out of their case.

0:05:330:05:36

So, it's in its original case.

0:05:360:05:38

Not in bad condition. We can see that it's been used, it's been loved.

0:05:380:05:42

Value-wise, probably be looking at about £100 to £150.

0:05:420:05:48

Gosh! That's wonderful.

0:05:480:05:49

-Are you happy to sell that?

-Yes, definitely.

-Yes. Absolutely.

0:05:490:05:53

And what about the elderly lady who donated it?

0:05:530:05:55

-She'll be delighted.

-She will be delighted, and I do have regular contact with her, as it happens.

0:05:550:06:01

Give her a call, let her know we're putting it in auction. Let's hope that we've got some buyers.

0:06:010:06:05

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:06:050:06:07

Now, Sheila, you have made my day.

0:06:140:06:18

-Oh, good! Good!

-Not just by being you and coming along, but what you've brought with you.

0:06:180:06:23

Now, it's a wonderful little booklet, but before we open it up, tell me how you came about having this piece.

0:06:230:06:30

Well, I had an elderly spinster aunt

0:06:300:06:33

whose family were ruined in Victorian times by a wicked solicitor,

0:06:330:06:37

so they had to leave the big house, and that was all she'd salvaged.

0:06:370:06:41

She'd kept it all these years, so I feel I owe it to her

0:06:410:06:45

-to do something with it.

-So you've just had it tucked away on a shelf.

0:06:450:06:49

-Well, it's delicate, as you will see.

-Yeah. Let's open it up.

0:06:490:06:53

First of all, the outside of this little book is really quite colourful, isn't it?

0:06:530:06:58

-Very good colour.

-And you've got different characters.

0:06:580:07:01

This looks like a fellow from the Far East,

0:07:010:07:04

and then you've got a fellow in European dress on the front.

0:07:040:07:07

He's obviously a sailor. You've got the anchor representing the sailor there. Do you read German?

0:07:070:07:14

No, unfortunately not.

0:07:140:07:16

"Kunstlicher Erd Globus".

0:07:160:07:18

Well, I only recognise one word - "Globus",

0:07:180:07:21

which obviously means something to do with the globe.

0:07:210:07:24

And as we open it up...

0:07:240:07:27

..we have got

0:07:280:07:30

first of all this arrangement of folding cards

0:07:300:07:34

which, if we do it carefully -

0:07:340:07:37

and we do have to be very careful when we do this...

0:07:370:07:41

..we have...

0:07:420:07:45

-A globe.

-..a globe.

0:07:480:07:51

Perfect in every respect at the time that it was created,

0:07:530:07:58

which I'm guessing is something between 1820, maybe 1850.

0:07:580:08:03

So, first of all, that's the globe. Isn't that fantastic?

0:08:030:08:07

And, then, in here we have the different representations

0:08:090:08:15

of the globe at different times of the sun and the moon.

0:08:150:08:18

We have other information over here which is,

0:08:180:08:21

again, information to do with the globe,

0:08:210:08:23

to do with the Earth as it revolves around the sun in its orbit.

0:08:230:08:28

Fascinating work, when you think this was done 180 years ago.

0:08:280:08:32

Yes.

0:08:320:08:33

Amazing.

0:08:330:08:35

And then we open out this pull-out sheet,

0:08:350:08:40

and we have...

0:08:400:08:42

-the nations of the known world at that time.

-Beautiful.

0:08:420:08:46

And now, the colours really are vibrant, aren't they?

0:08:460:08:50

-They're almost as fresh as they were done.

-I don't think it's been taken out very much.

0:08:500:08:55

No, I think you're absolutely right.

0:08:550:08:57

This has been hidden away, folded up, in immaculate condition.

0:08:570:09:01

Absolutely wonderful.

0:09:010:09:02

So, how much do you think this is worth?

0:09:020:09:05

Well, I wouldn't sell it for less than 200, which I was offered some years ago.

0:09:050:09:09

Well, I don't blame you, and I think it's worth more than 200.

0:09:090:09:14

I think...

0:09:140:09:16

-we're gonna get something between £600 and £800.

-Wow! Good.

0:09:160:09:20

-I'd be very happy with that.

-That would be a bit of a wow?

0:09:200:09:23

Oh, I think so. It's from my Auntie Bessie.

0:09:230:09:25

What would you do with the money?

0:09:250:09:28

Give it to my granddaughter, who's going up to university and will have massive debts.

0:09:280:09:33

Well, so in a way, you're putting this educational tool towards the education of a new young person.

0:09:330:09:38

-Yes.

-Fantastic.

0:09:380:09:40

Jane, you've brought along a classic piece of Clarice Cliff,

0:09:470:09:50

which is always what we like to see on Flog It!

0:09:500:09:53

Where did you get this?

0:09:530:09:56

Actually, it's my mother's.

0:09:560:09:57

She's not with me today.

0:09:570:09:59

It was my grandmother that bought it, certainly before I was born,

0:09:590:10:03

probably 45 or 50 years ago,

0:10:030:10:05

in a church jumble sale for the princely sum of one and sixpence!

0:10:050:10:09

One and six! If only she knew!

0:10:090:10:12

Yes!

0:10:120:10:14

-And you've had it in your family ever since.

-Yes.

0:10:140:10:17

My mother is a regular watcher of Flog It!

0:10:170:10:19

Once she knew it was worth something,

0:10:190:10:21

she's had it wrapped up in cotton wool in the back of the cupboard ever since.

0:10:210:10:25

Good old Mum! That's good to hear.

0:10:250:10:28

Is it something you quite like? Or does your mother like it?

0:10:280:10:32

-No, none of us like it.

-Oh, really?

0:10:320:10:34

-I think it's hideous, myself!

-Oh, well, at least you're honest!

0:10:340:10:38

D'you know anything about this particular pattern?

0:10:380:10:41

Other than it's called Melon, nothing.

0:10:410:10:44

OK. Indeed it is called Melons.

0:10:440:10:47

We can see all the shapes around it.

0:10:470:10:49

This is a good classic 1920s Art Deco piece.

0:10:490:10:53

It's about 1927, that sort of date.

0:10:530:10:56

A wonderful piece in really good condition,

0:10:560:10:58

which is always what we like to see.

0:10:580:11:01

You say your grandmother bought it for one and...?

0:11:010:11:05

-Sixpence.

-One and sixpence. Well, I think we can say it's worth a little bit more than that today.

0:11:050:11:10

How about a valuation of about £500 to £600? How does that sound to you?

0:11:100:11:15

-That sounds very good.

-Happy with that?

0:11:150:11:17

-Yes.

-OK, we'll put it at £500 to £600, 500 reserve,

0:11:170:11:21

and let's hope that it flies.

0:11:210:11:23

-Good.

-Thank you very much for bringing it along.

-Thank you.

0:11:230:11:27

A couple of real gems at the valuation day today,

0:11:270:11:31

but the real jewel in the crown is the city of Bath itself,

0:11:310:11:35

so I'm off to find out more.

0:11:350:11:37

It wasn't just the Romans who came, saw and conquered Bath, it was the Georgians, too.

0:11:370:11:44

And just like their Roman predecessors, they left lasting monuments to their memory.

0:11:440:11:48

But even among these rich architectural treasures, of which there are some 5,000

0:11:580:12:04

listed buildings, there's two of them which really do stand out.

0:12:040:12:08

The Circus and the Royal Crescent are the work of just two men, both by the name of John Wood,

0:12:100:12:17

father and son - an unassuming name, but their legacy is the Georgian wonder of Bath.

0:12:170:12:24

To tell me a bit more about their achievements

0:12:240:12:28

-is the Director of the Building of Bath Museum, Cathryn Spence.

-Hello.

0:12:280:12:32

Thank you for taking time out to talk to us. Let's take a stroll down here.

0:12:320:12:36

Now, what I want you to do is paint a picture of what Bath was like when John Wood the elder was living here.

0:12:360:12:42

Well, John Wood was here at the very beginning of the 18th century, but Bath was incredibly small,

0:12:420:12:49

really only within a 40-hectare space round a medieval wall system.

0:12:490:12:54

So, what was his dream for Bath? What did he try and create? What did he want to do?

0:12:540:12:59

Well, John Wood realised that the type of people who were coming to Bath wanted good-quality houses.

0:12:590:13:06

At the time before, it was just rather pokey, vernacular architecture, sort of lodging houses.

0:13:060:13:12

You've got royalty coming, They need something more prestigious to stay in.

0:13:120:13:16

So he really wanted to bring back Bath.

0:13:160:13:20

He called himself the Restorer of Bath. He wasn't the Builder of Bath.

0:13:200:13:24

So, we've got quite an interesting man here.

0:13:240:13:27

-So he was a modest man(!)

-Yes!

0:13:270:13:30

He says in his obituary, which he probably wrote himself,

0:13:300:13:34

that if you want to know about me, look around you.

0:13:340:13:37

Cathryn, we're in the centre of the Circus.

0:13:440:13:47

It is one huge architectural circle.

0:13:470:13:50

Where did he get the idea for this from?

0:13:500:13:53

It's John Wood's absolute masterpiece, and he always wanted to build a circular building in Bath.

0:13:530:13:58

-His inspiration is actually coming from his beliefs in early British history, in the Druids...

-Ah, right.

0:13:580:14:06

-..and Stonehenge.

-Really?!

0:14:060:14:09

He actually measured Stonehenge, with his son, and there are various mathematical things which add up -

0:14:090:14:16

the amount of stones and the actual space that it occupies.

0:14:160:14:19

-It's actually a temple to the sun.

-That is incredible!

0:14:190:14:25

Looking around, it's all very soft and very delicate, but when you look at the facades

0:14:250:14:30

of the building, you can see three orders of classic column going on there, Doric, Ionic and Corinthian.

0:14:300:14:35

What's going on? It's a mix-match.

0:14:350:14:38

Well, I think John Wood knows what's popular, what's fashionable.

0:14:380:14:41

He knows people like Palladian architecture. He's commercially minded. He's gotta sell these things.

0:14:410:14:47

It is architectural detail, and he was stickler for attention.

0:14:470:14:51

Absolutely. The things like, at the very top we've got actual acorns.

0:14:510:14:55

It was quite fashionable at the time to have pineapples, and many people wouldn't have realised

0:14:550:15:01

that these were acorns, but what that refers to is the Druids, the Princes of the Hollow Oak.

0:15:010:15:06

There's lots of little things that if you want to look beyond that surface layer...

0:15:060:15:10

-Lots of symbolism.

-Absolutely.

0:15:100:15:13

And I've noticed, looking around, it's built in three sections around this circle. Why is that?

0:15:130:15:19

I think it's got a lot to do with the symbolism.

0:15:190:15:22

Some people believe John Wood was a Freemason,

0:15:220:15:25

although we've got no evidence of that, and they read these symbols.

0:15:250:15:30

The three entrances or exits, they form a triangle within a circle, the all-seeing eye.

0:15:300:15:35

Sound a bit like The Da Vinci Code!

0:15:350:15:37

I think some people here would like to think that this may be where the Holy Grail is.

0:15:370:15:41

You have to remember, none of these trees were here.

0:15:410:15:44

This as completely cobbled, and underneath

0:15:440:15:47

was a container for water, to actually supply the houses up here.

0:15:470:15:51

But of course, there's this great unknown chasm underneath the Circus that could hold all sorts of secrets.

0:15:510:15:58

How long did it take him to complete this?

0:15:580:16:01

Unfortunately, as with most of these things, there's money problems,

0:16:010:16:04

and only this first segment is up for quite a long time.

0:16:040:16:07

And unfortunately, John Wood the elder didn't actually see his vision completed. He died in 1754.

0:16:070:16:15

But his son, also John Wood, who he worked very closely with,

0:16:150:16:18

finished this and then went on and created the Royal Crescent.

0:16:180:16:22

The Royal Crescent is one of the greatest examples of Georgian architecture in the world,

0:16:320:16:37

and it certainly was part of the master plan of the elder John Wood.

0:16:370:16:42

What I've noticed straightaway, though - all Ionic capitals on the columns. Architecturally correct.

0:16:420:16:49

Yes, this is John Wood the Younger. Probably a far better architect.

0:16:490:16:53

Technically much more accomplished than his father.

0:16:530:16:56

When you think what has been achieved here, in the 18th century, when they

0:16:560:17:00

didn't have the sort of equipment and computers we've got now -

0:17:000:17:03

to be able to create this perfect crescent,

0:17:030:17:07

with the two end houses in line, is just phenomenal.

0:17:070:17:12

Well, there's a fantastic address here - No. 1, Royal Crescent.

0:17:120:17:15

It is as good inside as it is outside?

0:17:150:17:18

It's a beautiful museum, and they've set it up to give us, the hoi polloi,

0:17:180:17:23

a taste of what it must have been like here.

0:17:230:17:25

-Looking out over all of this.

-This wonderful architecture.

0:17:250:17:28

It's stunning, isn't it? Let's go inside and have a look.

0:17:280:17:30

Well, when you're inside, it really doesn't let you down.

0:17:400:17:43

It's rich, it's sumptuous.

0:17:430:17:45

Just how the elite lived in those days. It's wonderful.

0:17:450:17:48

-And what a view as well!

-Absolutely superb.

0:17:480:17:51

You'd come into the drawing room, which we're standing in now, to take tea, to entertain your friends.

0:17:510:17:56

-Look, it's beautifully laid out.

-The amount of windows as well in these end houses.

0:17:560:18:00

You've got so much light in these rooms. As you say, you'd take tea.

0:18:000:18:05

Tea, of course, was such an expensive commodity.

0:18:050:18:07

-Only the lady of the house had the key...

-For the caddy!

0:18:070:18:11

Supposedly kept it down their bosoms!

0:18:110:18:14

Cathryn, thank you very much for showing us around. It's been a real pleasure.

0:18:140:18:19

It definitely gives you a sense of connection back to your past.

0:18:190:18:23

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:18:230:18:24

Back in the 21st century, and the auction's almost upon us.

0:18:290:18:32

Here's a recap of all our items.

0:18:320:18:35

We've a frightening figure from revolutionary France.

0:18:350:18:38

I get the feeling Ken will be happy to see the back of Madame Lafarge.

0:18:380:18:41

The pocket barometer whose profits will go to the guidedogs for the blind.

0:18:410:18:46

Sheila's pocket book with the whole world between its pages

0:18:460:18:50

and that incredible folding globe.

0:18:500:18:52

Finally, a 1902s Art Deco vase by the legendary Clarice Cliff.

0:18:520:18:57

Will this classic item deliver the goods for Jane?

0:18:570:19:00

For our auction today, we've come to sunny North Somerset,

0:19:000:19:05

the Clevedon sale rooms where Marc Burridge is in charge of the day's proceedings.

0:19:050:19:10

Let's hope he can work his magic on our lots.

0:19:100:19:13

Remember the porcelain jug, it's about to go under the hammer.

0:19:150:19:18

-It's Ken's, and who have you brought along?

-My wife.

0:19:180:19:21

Hello, you look absolutely lovely.

0:19:210:19:23

-Has he been in the garden or on the golf course?

-Both.

0:19:230:19:26

I noticed straight away. Both. What a tan, eh?

0:19:260:19:29

We're looking at £100-200 for this porcelain mug.

0:19:290:19:33

Early 19th century. A bit of damage. Will that hold it back?

0:19:330:19:37

-Damage always does. The fact it looks like one of your former girlfriends might hold it back.

-Oh!

0:19:370:19:43

-I dunno...

-Oh!

-It's one of those things, I've no idea. Absolutely no idea.

0:19:430:19:48

-Let's find out. It's going under the hammer now. Good luck.

-Thanks.

0:19:480:19:52

The Jacob Petit French character jug, Madame Lafarge.

0:19:520:19:58

Base with a JP mark. Lot 324.

0:19:580:20:00

What can we say? 40. 5. 50.

0:20:000:20:03

5. 60. 5. 70. 5. 80.

0:20:030:20:07

-80. 80. 80.

-Come on, come on.

0:20:070:20:11

5. 90. 5. 100. Now 10?

0:20:110:20:14

110? 110? It's £100 in the room.

0:20:140:20:17

Selling on £100, then.

0:20:170:20:20

We've done it at the bottom end. Hammer's gone down.

0:20:200:20:22

-Madame Lafarge, goodbye!

-You didn't like it, did you?

-No!

0:20:220:20:26

The grandchildren hated it.

0:20:260:20:29

They didn't want to inherit it, did they?

0:20:290:20:31

Grace and Louise, our granddaughters, will probably get the money.

0:20:310:20:36

-Some of it.

-Oh.

-"Some of it," she says!

0:20:360:20:40

Treat yourself as well, won't you?

0:20:400:20:42

Thank you very much indeed.

0:20:420:20:44

Thank you very much.

0:20:440:20:46

I've been joined by Norma and Hilary,

0:20:510:20:54

and we have a pocket barometer up for grabs,

0:20:540:20:57

valuation £100 to £150, and all the money is going towards these.

0:20:570:21:02

Come on, let me pick you up.

0:21:020:21:03

This is little Lottie.

0:21:030:21:06

Look at this. The money is going towards the guide dogs. I've gotta be careful of my microphone.

0:21:060:21:11

Here we go, Lottie, say hello to the camera.

0:21:110:21:14

Oh! Awww, look!

0:21:140:21:18

-And she's only, what, six weeks old?

-Nine weeks.

-Nine weeks old, right.

0:21:180:21:21

Is that a little blind dog I see down there?

0:21:210:21:24

Very nice. Little puppy there.

0:21:240:21:26

Lot 358 is the glass-cased pocket barometer, with a thermometer,

0:21:260:21:32

in its leather case. Lot 358.

0:21:320:21:34

Nice small but quality item,

0:21:340:21:37

and I can start at 70, 80, £90.

0:21:370:21:41

-Good start!

-£90. Come on, come on.

0:21:410:21:42

..Guide Dogs for the Blind.

0:21:420:21:44

-At £90 here.

-Good calls.

0:21:440:21:46

-Yes. We're in. 100.

-Who's gonna make it 110?

0:21:460:21:49

110? 110?

0:21:490:21:50

That's £100. £110.

0:21:500:21:53

-Come on, somebody.

-120?

0:21:530:21:55

No. £110 in the middle.

0:21:550:21:57

And selling on 110, then.

0:21:570:22:00

Well done, well done!

0:22:000:22:02

That's £110 towards the guide dogs.

0:22:020:22:05

-Oh, smashing!

-Who's training her?

-I am.

0:22:050:22:08

You are. And how long will you hang on to her for?

0:22:080:22:11

-Till she's about a year old.

-So it's a year's training, virtually.

0:22:110:22:14

Yes. And then they go for the harness training.

0:22:140:22:17

-So at the moment she's just sort of toilet training, isn't she?

-Yes.

0:22:170:22:21

That's the tricky bit. Ohhh!

0:22:210:22:24

Oh, I think Catherine wants to take Lottie home.

0:22:240:22:27

I really do! She's one Lot I would take home, definitely!

0:22:270:22:32

£600 to £800 - a lot of money riding on this gorgeous little map of the world as a globe.

0:22:370:22:43

It belongs to Sheila, who cannot be with us.

0:22:430:22:45

-You're Sheila's sister. What's your name?

-Mhairi.

-Sorry?

-Mhairi.

0:22:450:22:48

Mhairi. What a lovely name!

0:22:480:22:50

It's Gaelic for "Mary". It's spelled M-H-A-I-R-I.

0:22:500:22:53

Oh, how beautiful!

0:22:530:22:55

-Sheila's in New Zealand.

-She is.

-She's a long, long way away.

0:22:550:22:59

So, fingers crossed.

0:22:590:23:00

Are you gonna get on the phone to her and tell her the result?

0:23:000:23:03

Yes, I think definitely.

0:23:030:23:05

-Jethro, our expert, very brave man, you've stuck your neck out here - £600 to £800.

-I have.

0:23:050:23:11

This is something for the academics, and the academics do normally have

0:23:110:23:14

a lot of money, so, hopefully, they're gonna part with it.

0:23:140:23:16

It's a lovely example of its type.

0:23:160:23:19

It's in pristine condition, really.

0:23:190:23:21

I haven't seen one as good as this for a long time.

0:23:210:23:24

It's not my field, really. I'm confident in my estimate.

0:23:240:23:27

-It's gonna make £600 to £800, I'm pretty sure about that.

-A brave man!

0:23:270:23:32

-He's sticking by his guns.

-Indeed!

0:23:320:23:34

307 is the early 19th-century Bauer of Nuremberg globe.

0:23:340:23:41

Interesting item.

0:23:410:23:43

What can we say?

0:23:430:23:45

-£300 I'm bid. 320.

-Come on, come on.

0:23:450:23:49

-350. 350. 380.

-I'm getting hot.

0:23:490:23:53

400.

0:23:530:23:54

420. 450. 480.

0:23:540:23:58

500.

0:23:580:24:01

520. 550.

0:24:010:24:04

-Come on, now.

-We're so close.

0:24:040:24:06

£520 against the phone. 550.

0:24:060:24:09

-Oh, yes!

-It's gonna go.

-600. 600 in the room.

0:24:090:24:13

-620.

-Come on.

-650. 680.

0:24:130:24:16

680. 700. 720.

0:24:180:24:22

750. 780. 800.

0:24:220:24:25

820?

0:24:250:24:29

£800 in the room.

0:24:290:24:32

And selling on £800. Make no mistake.

0:24:320:24:35

We've got a Jethro dance!

0:24:350:24:36

-Do it!

-Thank you very much!

0:24:360:24:38

How very good of you!

0:24:380:24:40

Well, it wouldn't be Flog It without Clarice Cliff, would it?

0:24:480:24:51

I've just been joined by Jane and her mum, Queenie,

0:24:510:24:54

and our gorgeous expert, Catherine Sutton.

0:24:540:24:56

This is your Melon vase, isn't it?

0:24:560:24:58

-Yes.

-500-600 Catherine's put on this.

0:24:580:25:02

-You don't like it, do you?

-No, it's hideous!

0:25:020:25:04

-Do you like it?

-No.

-No!

0:25:040:25:07

It's been in my cupboard for years.

0:25:070:25:10

At least you've looked after it.

0:25:100:25:12

-Oh, yes, definitely.

-Its condition is fantastic.

0:25:120:25:14

It is, isn't it? Yes.

0:25:140:25:16

I've got to admit, I can't get my head around Clarice Cliff.

0:25:160:25:19

I like this one, actually.

0:25:190:25:21

-I think it's quite nice.

-You do, yes.

0:25:210:25:23

We're looking for £500-600.

0:25:230:25:25

-Good luck!

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:25:250:25:27

Fingers crossed. It's going under the hammer now.

0:25:270:25:29

And 188, the Clarice Cliff Isis vase.

0:25:290:25:34

Melon pattern.

0:25:340:25:37

Good example. Interest here on the book and on the phones.

0:25:370:25:40

What can we say? 300. 320. 350. 380.

0:25:400:25:45

400. 420. 450. 480.

0:25:450:25:48

£500 with me. 520.

0:25:480:25:52

-520!

-520. 520. 550. 580.

0:25:520:25:57

580 on the phone. 600 now.

0:25:570:26:00

-600, Queenie.

-Oh, lovely.

0:26:000:26:02

620. 650.

0:26:020:26:06

Exciting, this, isn't it?

0:26:060:26:08

Especially as you don't like it.

0:26:080:26:10

720. 750.

0:26:100:26:14

780.

0:26:160:26:19

£750. Anyone else in the room?

0:26:190:26:21

All done, selling at 750...

0:26:210:26:26

£750.

0:26:260:26:28

-That's lovely. Thank you so much.

-Oh, no. Thank you, Catherine.

0:26:280:26:31

-She put the valuation on.

-And you, my dear.

0:26:310:26:35

It just goes to show how collectible Clarice Cliff is worldwide.

0:26:350:26:39

Yes, I'm surprised. Really surprised.

0:26:390:26:43

I can't understand the values.

0:26:430:26:44

I do respect it. I do know that every single piece is hand-painted.

0:26:440:26:48

-Yes.

-Unlike White Friars glass, which fetches an awful lot of money, but it's all moulded.

0:26:480:26:53

-Yes.

-Right, OK, £750.

0:26:530:26:56

Who gets that, Queenie? Are you going to share that out?

0:26:560:26:59

-It's all yours, I bet.

-Yes, I think perhaps a holiday or something.

0:26:590:27:03

Where do you fancy going?

0:27:030:27:05

I don't know. I haven't thought yet.

0:27:050:27:07

Where would you like to go?

0:27:070:27:09

What's the first place that comes to Queenie's mind?

0:27:090:27:12

-Austria.

-Austria.

0:27:120:27:15

-Yes.

-Why did you say that?

0:27:150:27:16

Because I was supposed to go on one

0:27:160:27:19

and I wasn't able to go. I had a bad leg.

0:27:190:27:22

-Ah!

-It would be nice to go some other time, perhaps, wouldn't it?

0:27:220:27:26

-Jane, make sure she gets there.

-I certainly will.

0:27:260:27:29

-Enjoy it.

-Have a great time.

-Thank you.

0:27:290:27:31

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:27:310:27:33

Well, it's all over for our owners.

0:27:380:27:40

As you can see, the auction's still going on behind me.

0:27:400:27:43

We've had a mixed day here, but I've got to single out one very good result.

0:27:430:27:47

Clarice Cliff does it again for Flog It,

0:27:470:27:51

Jane's vase making a "fantastique" £750.

0:27:510:27:55

I hope you've enjoyed the show. Join me next time for lots more fun.

0:27:550:27:58

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made,

0:28:060:28:11

visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle.

0:28:110:28:14

Series in which experts view and value antiques. Paul Martin presents from the Pavilion in Bath, where experts Catherine Southon and Jethro Marles size up the city's antiques and collectibles. Paul explores the elegant architecture in a bid to find out more about the men who built this Georgian wonder of the world.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS