Winchester and Worcester Flog It!


Winchester and Worcester

Paul Martin presents an extended programme in which the cities of Winchester and Worcester go head-to-head to find the best antiques to sell at auction.


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Transcript


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Today we're plundering the treasures in two cathedral cities.

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And we've been stunned by the riches we've uncovered. First in Winchester...

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-I can't believe it.

-Nor can I. That is just astonishing.

-I am so pleased I was so wrong.

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Then in Worcester...

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You're shaking! It's a wonderful Flog It! moment.

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But which city will turn out to have the antiques that do the best at auction? We'll soon find out.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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Winchester and Worcester are both blessed with stunning cathedrals

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at the heart of their cities and with glorious countryside nearby.

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So it's not surprising that the people who live there

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have found artistic inspiration from their surroundings.

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Later on I'll be getting a taste of art inspired by the great outdoors in Worcestershire

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and by the great indoors in Winchester Cathedral.

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But when it comes to flogging antiques, which of these two venues will get the best results?

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Winchester's queue is already on the move.

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Winchester Guild Hall was built in 1871 and over the years

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it's been home to the city's law courts, a police station, a museum

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and a library, but today it's playing host to Flog It!

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and hopefully it will be brimming with antiques and collectables

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right up to its magnificent ceilings.

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And helping me sort out the weird from the wonderful today are

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our experts, Michael Baggot and Charlie Ross.

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Valerie, I have been waiting for a piece of silver and you've come along

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-on your charger today with this fabulous teapot.

-I'm so pleased.

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What can you tell me? What is the family history to it?

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Not much that I can tell you, unfortunately.

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It belonged to my father's mother's side of the family and, really, more than that, I can't tell you.

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Right, it's a super thing and anybody who knows anything about silver

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will be looking at that and saying, "Oooh, that's a beautiful London teapot of about 1830," but...

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HE STRAINS ..the first hint that something's up

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-is that I'm having difficulty lifting it.

-Yes.

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-And actually, the second thing is this handle.

-Oh, really?

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Because it's horn and English handles are silver with ivory insulators,

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or they're wood, so we're not in England any more.

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Turn it over and, great, that is what we want to see, we've got a series of punches.

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We've got H and C in a rectangular punch,

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then we've got an elephant which is a sign of things, things not English.

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-Not English.

-Interestingly we've got a two-handled cup and a little A.

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Now these are the marks that were used by Hamilton and Company

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who were probably the leading silversmiths in Calcutta

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and they produced some of the best quality silver to the latest designs in Calcutta, using native craftsman.

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Oh, my goodness, that's interesting.

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And things were worked to a very heavy gauge.

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So whenever you see something which is very elaborate,

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which is also an Indian taste, and it weighs a ton,

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those are the warning bells that it's going to be a piece of colonial silver.

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We've got a presentation inscription on it, which is a bit worn,

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but it says "Julia, Eliza and Henry Tucker to Frederick Collicott Esq,

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"a grateful token of esteem and regard, Calcutta, 1832."

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I would have dated this, without that inscription, between 1830 and 1835,

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but we've got it spot on, that is contemporary with when it was made.

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It's still not, frustratingly, as valuable as if it were English.

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-Oh, really?

-Despite the fact that it's much rarer.

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-Oh.

-Perverse, isn't it?

-Yes, very perverse.

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At auction it's going to be in the region of about £350 to £550,

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-that's the sort of bracket.

-Right, OK.

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If you're happy for us to put it in the auction, we'll do that, we'll put a fixed reserve of 350 on it.

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-OK.

-And see how it goes.

-All right, well, fingers crossed.

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Both sets of fingers crossed. I'm so glad to see you today.

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-I'm so glad you are so excited about it.

-Valerie, you've made my day.

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-Good, I'm pleased about that.

-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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Mike and Sue, to whom does this belong?

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It's Mike's because it used to belong to his mother.

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Oh, did it? Have you known it all your life?

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-I have, yes.

-You have, yeah, any more clues about what it is?

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We think it's from Belgium because Mike's mother was from Belgium

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and she met Mike's father at the end of the war in Brussels

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and they got married and came back to England to live

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and we understood it was given to her for a wedding present,

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but we don't think it was new when she had it.

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-How interesting, and when was the wedding?

-1946.

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It's got a real Deco look to it so it just could have been '30s,

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but I wouldn't be at all surprised if it was new then.

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-Right.

-Now, do you know who made it?

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-We did look it up.

-It's got a name on it.

-Yes, it's Val St Lambert.

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Val St Lambert, who was about the most famous glass manufacturer in Belgium

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and the factory was started in 1826

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and Val St Lambert was the official glass producer

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for the King of Belgium and the factory is still in existence today.

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And what type of things does it make now then? Similar?

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A lot of perfume bottles, things like that.

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I mean, this, as we can see, is a flower arranger, it's a vase,

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it's a bit bigger than most items of Val St Lambert that I've seen

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and it has a decoration to it,

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which is overlaid glass and what happens is they made the initial glass vase,

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and then they put an amber layer of glass over the whole vase.

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-Yes.

-OK?

-Yes.

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-And then they cut back to the original glass.

-Right.

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So you can see everywhere that it's cut in, it's back to the clear glass.

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-It's back, yes.

-And it's produced a very heavy,

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very high quality piece of glassware.

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-It isn't, I have to say, considerably valuable.

-No, no.

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Would you have an idea, have a little pop at it?

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£100ish perhaps.

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That's a very good valuation.

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I might even be tempted to put the eternal Flog It! valuation on it

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which is the 80 to 120, which you've probably heard time and time again.

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-Yes, yes.

-And I try to fight against it but if ever an item was suited to an 80 to 120, I think.

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-It's this one.

-I think it's worth about £100.

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-You are happy with us to put it into auction?

-Yes.

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-Yes, please.

-Well, I think we'll put a reserve on it.

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-Yes.

-We don't want to give it away, do we?

-No, no.

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A discretionary reserve at 80 which gives the auctioneer a little bit of leeway if it gets close.

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-OK?

-Yes, that's fine.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Sylvia, did you bring this in for me?

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I did especially.

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Well, you know I love country furniture, don't you?

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-I'm a bit too big to get in it now, Paul.

-Yeah.

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-Was it yours as a child?

-No, it was my husband's.

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Was it? Had it been in his family?

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Well, in his family actually for 200 years, we think.

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Gosh! And you want to part with it.

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Yes, we've a lot of stuff, we haven't got room.

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-Your husband doesn't mind?

-No, no, no because we bought a small house.

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What can he remember about it?

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He can remember sitting on it and he can remember his uncle mending it.

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How this happened, my husband's no idea.

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Well, I felt that earlier and you know when there's a fresh break, it feels quite sharp.

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-Yeah.

-And that's smoothing over the years, isn't it?

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-Children have sat on that for years.

-And chaffed the back of their legs.

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-That's right.

-So it's been in the loft?

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-Yeah, about 30 years.

-Gosh.

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All my children sat on it and all my grandchildren.

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-This has been in your family for 200 years.

-Yeah.

-Are you sure you want to part with it?

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Well, it's my husband's really and he said yes, do.

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It's known as vernacular furniture - country regional furniture

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-and it's generally known as a stick back chair.

-A stick back?

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-Stick back, a Windsor stick back chair, it's got a wonderful colour to it.

-It has, hasn't it?

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-And that's what collectors love.

-What, this patina?

-This patina, yes,

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it's a skin, it's a build-up over the years and this chair dates late 1700s, very early 1800s.

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Ahh, I thought it was pretty old.

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The seat is made of oak and you can see the break

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has broken, that fracture has gone right along the line of the grain.

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Most Windsor chairs, most chairs, are normally made with an elm seat.

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An elm seat has an interlocking, very ambiguous grain

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and because the grain doesn't run in one straight direction,

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it's very strong and it's pliable and it won't break.

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-Now unfortunately this has got an oak seat.

-And that will split easy?

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And that will split easy, yes, but it's a gorgeous little piece

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and I love the little turnings, I love this steam bending,

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a lot of chairs you find were made with ash sticks,

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-elm seats and oak arms and oak backs and the wood didn't match.

-No, no.

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So they would stain it all or colour it or paint it, but it's only

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a scaled down version of the real thing which you and I would sit on.

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-It is, oh, yeah.

-It's beautiful, but it's badly damaged.

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-It is, it's a shame.

-If it was in brilliant condition,

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-£300 no problem.

-Wow.

-But it's not, is it?

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-No.

-It's not really repairable. You could do it, but the cost

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of repairing it, moving this front leg forward and patching this section up would cost...

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-Would ruin it.

-It would take the character and personality out of the chair.

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-Yes, quite right.

-It's going to be worth around £60 to £80,

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that's all in this condition, but on a good day, it might do the £100.

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-Yeah. All right.

-Is that all right?

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-Yeah.

-Let's put it into auction with a valuation or £80 to £100.

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-OK, Paul, that's fine.

-Let the auctioneer use his discretion at the lower end of 80.

-All right.

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-OK.

-Yeah, thank you very much.

-Is that a sad goodbye?

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Yeah, never mind, thank you very much.

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Thank you for coming along today with this watch,

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but you've also brought these photographs as well, so can you tell me where does the watch come from?

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Well, the watch comes from my grandfather who was called Eli Pope and this is his picture there.

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-Oh, right.

-And he built this five wheel bicycle and he then also

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raced with it on road and on the old Crystal Palace track and he won, he got this medal for winning a race.

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So rather than a cup,

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-he got a watch.

-A gold watch, yes.

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Well, hopefully if we have a look inside,

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we've got an inscription, which is nice.

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It says, "Pilsley Athletic Sports June 1st, 1895.

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-"One mile bicycle handicap, won by E Pope."

-Yeah.

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E Pope, it's fantastic to see a watch with a presentation inscription,

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but when you've actually got the picture that relates to someone over 100 years ago, I mean it's fantastic.

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And, I mean we've got a picture of him there on... I don't know the name for a five-seater bicycle!

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-They call it a quinary.

-You learn something every day on Flog It!

-I've never ever heard it.

-Even I do.

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-And, there you've got a picture of, I suppose, teams of them and he's in one of the teams.

-Yes, racing.

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-And it seems to be at the Crystal Palace.

-Yes, that's right.

-And is this the man himself?

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That's the man himself, yes.

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Good Lord. I think he possibly used to carry this around

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-when he was racing because it's got a fair few dents in it.

-It's well marked, yes.

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But it's appropriate to a cyclist and someone of its time because it's got a special feature to it.

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-Do you know what the feature is?

-I think it's a stop watch.

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It is. If we press the top here, off we go and it records the seconds

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and when you finish recording the amount of time, you press it again

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and you've got the reading there and to reset it,

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you press this side button and then again and it clips back into place.

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-Oh, yes.

-Any idea of what the watch is made of or...?

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-I think it's gold plate or something.

-Gold plate.

-Yes.

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The back plate is plated because for strength, but actually the case

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and the bezel are 18 carat gold and the chain itself, which is beautiful.

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-Very pretty, isn't it?

-Victorian chain and that is about 1892, that's 9 carat gold.

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-So it was a worthy thing to win.

-Yes.

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And it's marvellous to have the history with it.

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That's really what's quite touching.

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It's very difficult to value this because it's got a little chip to it.

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-Right.

-Which knocks the value of the watch per se.

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I think if we put it into auction, we should be in the region of about £150 to £250 on it, would that be?

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Yes, my brother has given me his permission to sell it.

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-He's given you the thumbs up.

-Yes.

-Hopefully, if the auctioneer catalogues it properly

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and illustrates a couple of the photographs in the catalogue it will do close to the top end of that.

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-Oh, that would be lovely, yes, thank you.

-It was a great pleasure to see it.

-Thank you very much.

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Well, what a game lot the people of Winchester are.

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Let's have a quick reminder of what's on its way to the auction.

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Michael got steamed up by the quality of this rare teapot from India.

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Let's hope it brews up a storm at auction.

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Next, a piece of Belgian glassware, Charlie hopes its famous name will attract the bidders.

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Sylvia's chair has been in the family for 200 years, I just hope the damage doesn't hold it back.

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This watch belonged to a world record holder. I think it's a real winner.

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Before we find out if the bidders in Winchester will race away with our antiques,

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I'm going to see how contemporary artworks can help to illuminate

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the beautiful, ancient interior of the city's cathedral.

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Winchester Cathedral has been at the heart of the city for more than 900 years.

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Coronations, christening, royal weddings and burials have all taken place under these magnificent,

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soaring ceilings which really do make your eyes lift up and gaze towards the heavens...

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But the cathedral is as much a venue for the new as for the old.

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Today, amongst its gothic arches, you'll see modern works of art.

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Winchester is proud of the fact that it has a living cathedral that embraces contemporary art.

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It not only speaks to today's visitors, it also inspires them.

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My tour starts in the crypt with Canon Keith Walker, he commissions most of the new art work.

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We're here to see a sculpture which has become as renowned as any of the stained glass or stone work.

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Well here we are, it's by Sir Antony Gormley we've featured his work on the show before.

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How did it end up getting in the crypt? It's made of lead, isn't it?

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It is made of lead and it's hollow. TAPPING

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Well, Sir Antony Gormley submitted a possibility for a sculpture in the Lady Chapel.

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It was not accepted but in preparation for it, he wanted to walk round the cathedral.

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And I showed him the way.

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And we walked around on the ground floor and then came down into the crypt.

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Then he suddenly stopped, as if struck by lightning.

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And he said, "This is the very place for my Sound II".

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And he donated it to the cathedral which is an act of great generosity.

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Some winters, I know it floods down here, there's a shallow pool of water which creates a dynamic,

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-gives this thing vitality.

-Absolutely right, I think the presence of water,

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is what determined him to let his piece come here.

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In fact, if you look down at the feet, you can see the scales

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that come from water being present.

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And the come up almost to the knees.

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So the amount of water, when it's here, is quite considerable.

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How do people react to this when they first come down to the crypt?

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It's curious because I take many groups round the cathedral, 20 or 30 at a time

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and I always ask people what they think and I tell them to be very honest.

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Predominantly, people react positively. They seem to see the meditative quality of this.

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And when I explain about the water in the cupped hands, they're very impressed.

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So, the idea is water is coming out of the hole, this hollow vessel?

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Yes. It's in the region of the heart, the centre of life.

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It's the inner life coming out, being expressed.

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And much of Antony Gormley's work is interested in crisis points.

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Here, he has suffered some shock and is examining his inner self.

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It is as if the person is saying, "I held my life in my hands".

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Set where it is, Sound II is a deeply moving sculpture

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but not what you might expect to find in a cathedral.

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Other commissioned pieces however, do directly reflect traditional images of Christian art.

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I like this, it's the Mercy Of Mary Towards Her Dead Son.

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-You'd call it a Pieta.

-That's right.

-Who designed this?

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This was designed and created by Peter Eugene Ball who has done

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a lot of work in cathedrals and churches and follows very much his own kind of inspiration.

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When the Pieta first came into the cathedral, I did wonder if we'd made the right choice.

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No sooner had I thought that than tragically the Clapham rail disaster took place.

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And we literally on TV and in newspaper photographs,

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saw people cradling other people in their arms with all the mark of grief and sorrow which they had.

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Secondly, one noted many people who worked in London lived about here.

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Some of them died in the Clapham rail disaster and for literally a few months...

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people would congregate in this chapel and just look

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at this Pieta. It was really extraordinary.

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There's so much to see in each of these pieces when you know what you're looking at.

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That is certainly true of one of my favourites...

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I like this, the Blue Cross, it's made of glass, isn't it?

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It is. It is Czech glass,

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which for centuries has been renowned for its purity and beauty.

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There's a trick of the eye here. I don't know if you can work it out but there is one, isn't there?

0:19:400:19:45

-Oh, yes.

-You can explain it.

-Well, I hope!

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It's an optical illusion which pleases an artist and puzzles everyone else.

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You would think the horizontal here, is broader than the horizontal there,

0:19:540:20:01

But these are less in length than the two uprights. It's not so.

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-They are all four pieces of the same length.

-Exactly the same size?

-Yes.

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It's clever.

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It's very clever and it's neat.

0:20:150:20:18

I think beauty and appropriateness can be in stark, puritanical, minimalist structures

0:20:180:20:25

-as well as in ornate and flowery structures.

-Yes.

0:20:250:20:29

This is such a beautiful cathedral and is a unique part of our nation's heritage.

0:20:350:20:40

It's been beautifully restored. Just being inside the fabric of this wonderful building

0:20:400:20:45

gives you an overwhelming sense of peace and history. It's also a wonderful place to come

0:20:450:20:50

to contemplate where the ancient meets the contemporary and they sit in perfect harmony,

0:20:500:20:54

giving us inspiration for the future.

0:20:540:20:58

And we're hoping to inspire the bidders as we put our items to the test at Andrew Smith's saleroom -

0:21:030:21:08

just outside the city.

0:21:080:21:10

How much will they part with for the privilege of owning a rare Indian teapot,

0:21:120:21:17

and for the unusual Art Deco vase picked by Charlie?

0:21:170:21:20

The little child's chair I found deserves to be a winner.

0:21:200:21:24

But will it be pipped at the post by the bike race watch and memorabilia?

0:21:240:21:29

Let's see what happens.

0:21:290:21:33

This is an interesting item, gold pocket watch - that's quality.

0:21:350:21:39

There's a lot of work there and I love the chain

0:21:390:21:42

but there's a great cycling connection and we've got a valuation of 250 to £350 on the collection.

0:21:420:21:49

I think as a watch on its own that would probably be about right,

0:21:490:21:52

it's not in very good condition, it needs quite a lot of work on it.

0:21:520:21:56

But it does have this connection with Mr Pope who I think is on the end of the Goodies bicycle there.

0:21:560:22:01

-The Goodies, yes!

-He obviously didn't pass the audition,

0:22:010:22:05

but he went on to do great things in the cycling world and I think he was a member of the Dunlop team.

0:22:050:22:12

Right, so sporting memorabilia really we're looking at now.

0:22:120:22:15

Well, there's the clock and watch people, but there is also the memorabilia people,

0:22:150:22:20

getting international interest as well through the cycling connection, we think this one could fly.

0:22:200:22:26

We're thinking certainly in excess of 500.

0:22:260:22:29

That is what I call pedal power.

0:22:290:22:32

-Fingers crossed.

-Watch this space.

0:22:320:22:34

Right now it's time for Andrew to get on the rostrum and weave his magic.

0:22:340:22:39

First up is the Deco vase.

0:22:390:22:42

It's 1930s, it's Belgian and it's art glass and it belongs to Mike and Sue

0:22:420:22:47

-and, in fact, it was your parents' wedding present, wasn't it?

-My mother's, yeah.

0:22:470:22:51

Your mother's yeah, 1930s, wow, and you are flogging this now, we're looking at a value of £80 to £120.

0:22:510:22:58

Why are you getting rid of this now?

0:22:580:23:00

It doesn't really mean anything to us any more. His mum's gone and we've got other things

0:23:000:23:05

that we can remember her by, so we just decided this one could go.

0:23:050:23:08

-Bring it along to Flog It!

-Yes, yes.

0:23:080:23:10

-Hey, presto, Charlie put the valuation on it.

-Which is spot on.

0:23:100:23:14

Yeah, I think so as well. Well, we're going to find out, aren't we?

0:23:140:23:17

Lot 233, this is the Val St Lambert's rose vase.

0:23:170:23:23

Who will start me at £100 on this? £100. £100.

0:23:230:23:26

80 then, £80 surely.

0:23:260:23:29

60 if you like, £60.

0:23:290:23:31

£60 bid, thank you, and 5, 70,

0:23:310:23:33

-and 5, 80, and 5, 90 and 5, 100, and 10, 120.

-Steady climb.

0:23:330:23:40

130, 120 seated, is there 30?

0:23:400:23:44

At £120, any more? At £120 for the last time.

0:23:440:23:49

-Yes, the hammer's gone down, spot on Charlie.

-Good man.

0:23:490:23:52

We'll take that, top end of that estimate.

0:23:520:23:54

-Yes. Thank you very much.

-What are you going to put £120 towards?

0:23:540:23:58

-Well, our daughter is expecting our first grandchild.

-Oh, congratulations.

0:23:580:24:02

-We're going to put it in the trust fund with some other money.

-Ahhh.

0:24:020:24:06

OK, it's my turn to be the expert. We've got some vernacular furniture

0:24:080:24:12

and it's a lovely bit of country furniture, a child's chair,

0:24:120:24:15

and it belongs to Sylvia here and you've brought along one of your granddaughters.

0:24:150:24:20

-Philippa.

-Philippa. Hi, Philippa.

0:24:200:24:22

-Hello.

-How many granddaughters have you got?

-Four.

-How many grandsons have you got?

0:24:220:24:26

-None.

-None, so it's all girls.

0:24:260:24:28

-All girls.

-Can you remember sitting on this little chair when you were around Granny's?

0:24:280:24:34

Yes, it used to be sat around in the corner of the conservatory and all four of us used to sit on it.

0:24:340:24:38

You've all perched on that little chair? Do you really want to see it go? Bit late now, isn't it?

0:24:380:24:44

A little bit, but it's going towards a laptop for Gran, the money for it,

0:24:440:24:48

-so it's worth it.

-Yes, so I understand.

-It will keep her happy and quiet.

0:24:480:24:51

-So we need to get maximum money.

-Do you think so?

0:24:510:24:54

Oh, yee, pressure's on, isn't it?

0:24:540:24:56

Lot 611.

0:24:560:24:58

We've got a different auctioneer for this because Andrew has taken

0:24:580:25:01

a quick break to rest his voice, so new man on the rostrum.

0:25:010:25:04

£60 can I say? 50 then, I have 50, I'll take 5 on it. At 55, 60 now,

0:25:040:25:09

at £55, anyone else in at 55?

0:25:090:25:14

60 now, and 5, 70, 5, 80.

0:25:140:25:16

I hate these moments where I feel like I'm letting the owners down.

0:25:160:25:19

-£80, anyone else in? At £80, all done.

-We're selling!

0:25:190:25:25

-Just did it at £80.

-Well done, you. Thank you, Paul.

0:25:250:25:28

-Oh, that's all right, that's OK.

-Right on the mark.

0:25:280:25:32

There you go, we've got the money and it's going towards the laptop.

0:25:320:25:35

Get surfing, that's all I can say.

0:25:350:25:37

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

-So kind.

0:25:370:25:39

It's about this time of day that some of you may sneak off to the kitchen and put the kettle on

0:25:470:25:52

and make a cup of tea, but I bet it won't arrive in a teapot

0:25:520:25:55

as gorgeous as Valerie's, because it's absolutely stunning.

0:25:550:25:58

-Silver, made in Calcutta, with a valuation of 350 to 550.

-Absolutely.

0:25:580:26:05

Right, well, you don't know this, but Valerie has had a chat to the auctioneer just before the sale.

0:26:050:26:11

-Yes.

-And you've upped the reserve

0:26:110:26:14

-to £600, but it's the top end of your estimate, though.

-It is.

0:26:140:26:18

All is not lost, because he agrees with Valerie.

0:26:180:26:23

But teapots aren't as collectible as they used to be,

0:26:230:26:27

and Indian colonial silver isn't quite as sought after,

0:26:270:26:31

so I think £600 is what you would pay in a shop for it, absolutely,

0:26:310:26:36

but the trade value of it is more around the £400 mark. So we'll see.

0:26:360:26:41

Do you know what Andrew said?

0:26:410:26:43

He said that he's looking for £1,000 on this.

0:26:430:26:46

-He can look for a long time.

-Well, maybe not, who knows?

0:26:460:26:50

-But we want £1,000.

-We absolutely do.

0:26:500:26:54

We're going to find out now, because all the talking is over with,

0:26:540:26:58

it's purely academic, it's up to the bidders in this room.

0:26:580:27:01

-Let's see what they think, shall we? OK.

-Cross fingers.

0:27:010:27:05

This is the Indian colonial teapot

0:27:050:27:08

-showing in the corner there, we have telephone.

-Oh, Lord, telephone bid.

0:27:080:27:13

And a commission bid, we'll start the bidding at 600,

0:27:130:27:16

is there 20 in the room?

0:27:160:27:18

At £600 and selling, is there 20? At £600, then, any more?

0:27:180:27:24

At £600 commission.

0:27:240:27:25

Scared off the telephone bidder.

0:27:250:27:28

Are we all done? At £600, last time.

0:27:280:27:30

Yes, the hammer's gone down. £600.

0:27:300:27:33

I think you were both right on that occasion.

0:27:330:27:36

It touched the upper end. If it had made £1,000, I'd have retired.

0:27:360:27:40

I'd have to be carried out of here on a trolley, foaming at the mouth!

0:27:400:27:44

You really had me scared, but even the phone bidder, when he heard 600, collapsed.

0:27:440:27:48

On the other end of the telephone like that, but it was a fantastic result.

0:27:480:27:53

It's got the top end, that is what you wanted.

0:27:530:27:55

What is the money going to go towards?

0:27:550:27:57

Well, we have just had our 45th wedding anniversary

0:27:570:28:01

and we are trying to get back to South Africa to visit our children and grandchildren,

0:28:010:28:06

so this is going in the pot to start to get the fund up a little bit.

0:28:060:28:09

-Fantastic, the pot is going in the pot. Marvellous.

-Yes, the pot is going in the pot.

0:28:090:28:14

Excuse the pun.

0:28:140:28:16

Next up, we've got a gold watch. It's 18 carat, but it's got pedal power.

0:28:200:28:24

There's a lot of memorabilia attached to this, because old Pope was on the back, wasn't he?

0:28:240:28:29

-Riding at Crystal Palace in 1896 or somewhere around there.

-'97.

0:28:290:28:33

'97. Sylvia, it is a real gem, who have you brought along with you?

0:28:330:28:38

I've brought my brother along with me, who is called Peter.

0:28:380:28:41

-Right, hi Peter, how do you do?

-Pleased to meet you.

0:28:410:28:44

Let's hope, let's hope this breaks all the records, even the one at Crystal Palace.

0:28:440:28:48

We've had a chat to the auctioneer earlier,

0:28:480:28:51

he said there has been loads of interest.

0:28:510:28:53

-Fantastic.

-Even from abroad, and he thinks it should do 300 to 500.

0:28:530:28:58

Marvellous, marvellous.

0:28:580:29:00

-Very nice.

-Which would be fantastic.

0:29:000:29:03

-Brilliant.

-Fingers crossed.

0:29:030:29:05

Why are we flogging it, though, Sylvia, why?

0:29:050:29:08

I don't think we know, it just came out the attic and we thought,

0:29:080:29:11

this is interesting, maybe other people will think so.

0:29:110:29:14

How long has it been in the attic?

0:29:140:29:17

30 or 40 years, I suppose.

0:29:170:29:19

Dig it out and bring it along to valuation day and, hey presto, they are in the auction room

0:29:190:29:23

and they might be going home with...we're going to find out right now.

0:29:230:29:26

Pocket watch, fantastic pocket watch.

0:29:260:29:29

All the cycling history with it,

0:29:290:29:31

-I have got to start the bidding here at £300.

-Fantastic.

0:29:310:29:35

£300, 320 can I say?

0:29:350:29:39

Against the room now at £300, 320 on the phone. 340, 360.

0:29:390:29:45

-Sylvia!

-It's going up.

0:29:450:29:46

£340, 360 you say, 360, 380, 400...

0:29:460:29:51

£400 and 20, 440, 460.

0:29:510:29:56

-I can't believe it.

-That's fantastic.

-500.

0:29:560:29:59

520, yes, 550,

0:29:590:30:04

520 on the phone, 550 now, 580.

0:30:040:30:10

580 on the phone, 600 can I say?

0:30:100:30:12

No, 580 on the phone. At 580, then, have you done?

0:30:120:30:17

-Pedal power, £580.

-Wowee!

0:30:170:30:21

I can't believe it.

0:30:210:30:23

Nor can I, that is just astonishing.

0:30:230:30:26

I'm so pleased I was so wrong.

0:30:260:30:27

That is the cycling memorabilia for you, unbelievable.

0:30:270:30:30

Sporting memorabilia is big business, obviously bigger than watch business right now.

0:30:300:30:35

Well, that's it from Winchester, and what a result for Sylvia and Peter

0:30:350:30:40

and their amazing £580 windfall,

0:30:400:30:43

but can we beat that when we go west to visit our rival cathedral city -

0:30:430:30:47

Worcester?

0:30:470:30:49

This city, standing on the River Severn,

0:30:490:30:54

has been famous for the production of fine porcelain since 1751,

0:30:540:30:58

but will any turn up at the Guildhall today?

0:30:580:31:02

I'll need some help to get through this lot to find out!

0:31:020:31:06

Luckily, I've got Davie Barby and James Lewis, today's experts, to help out.

0:31:060:31:11

Come on, stop reading the lonely hearts column! We have work to do!

0:31:110:31:16

'David's already fallen in love with his first item.'

0:31:170:31:21

Michael, why are you letting your mother, Sheila, part with these?

0:31:220:31:27

Well, there's three sons and only two objets d'art.

0:31:270:31:31

It wouldn't be equal anyway, cos they're different sizes.

0:31:310:31:35

-Why are you parting with them? Not for that reason?

-Yes.

0:31:350:31:38

-It is, yeah.

-I thought you'd say cos you don't like cleaning!

0:31:380:31:42

-That as well!

-Ooh, what have I said!

0:31:420:31:45

The trouble is, these are so ornate, aren't they?

0:31:460:31:48

-One is always fearful of damaging or breaking them.

-Yes.

0:31:480:31:52

-You know what they're used for?

-No.

-These are claret jugs.

0:31:520:31:56

-Even the little one?

-That would be an individual claret jug.

0:31:560:32:00

-Oh!

-So if you were having supper on a tray...

0:32:000:32:03

-I see.

-..you would have a small claret jug.

0:32:030:32:06

These are beautiful. Where did they come from?

0:32:060:32:09

They were my mother's. I don't know where she got them from.

0:32:090:32:13

She liked to buy nice things, second-hand or antique.

0:32:130:32:18

-We called them second-hand then. Not antiques.

-Junk shops.

-Yes.

0:32:180:32:23

I love these.

0:32:230:32:25

These are French. Date-wise, probably about 1900, 1905.

0:32:250:32:29

They are silver mounts.

0:32:290:32:31

There is a silver mark for France.

0:32:310:32:35

Not only is the glass etched with these wonderful whiplash designs,

0:32:350:32:40

a feature of Continental Art Nouveau,

0:32:400:32:42

but you've also got the repeated designs round the top.

0:32:420:32:46

And also on the lid itself.

0:32:460:32:48

It's absolutely lovely.

0:32:480:32:51

Exquisite. It's the workmanship that's so good.

0:32:510:32:54

When you consider this was all cut by hand.

0:32:540:32:57

The symbols of Art Nouveau, incorporated into the designs,

0:32:570:33:03

were often of an organic nature.

0:33:030:33:05

Here you have seed pods, here.

0:33:050:33:07

-Oh, yes.

-A seed pod.

0:33:080:33:10

With this sort of naturalistic detail

0:33:100:33:12

that whips all the way round, so it's called whiplash design.

0:33:120:33:15

Tcha, like that. And the whip goes along.

0:33:150:33:18

I would like to see these polished.

0:33:180:33:20

I'm sure the auction house will polish these up

0:33:200:33:23

to show them off to their best advantage.

0:33:230:33:25

-Where have they been in the house?

-In the glass cabinet.

0:33:250:33:28

In the cabinet. They've been there for how long?

0:33:280:33:31

-40 years.

-40 years. And did you ever use them?

0:33:310:33:35

No! Never.

0:33:350:33:37

What do you think they're worth?

0:33:370:33:39

-Well, I hope they'll be 150.

-Michael?

0:33:410:33:44

I'd say more like 350, but I could be well out.

0:33:440:33:47

Anything to do with wine and serving wine is very much in vogue at the moment.

0:33:470:33:52

I would think, if they go up for auction,

0:33:520:33:54

350 is closer to the mark for the two.

0:33:540:33:57

-Right.

-350, £500, that's the sort of price level.

0:33:570:34:02

-So shall we put a fixed reserve of 280 on them?

-Yes, that'll be fine.

0:34:020:34:06

-They're very nice.

-My mum bought nice things.

0:34:060:34:09

She had good taste. I'm sure you have, too.

0:34:090:34:11

-Hmm...

-Well, you've got Michael!

0:34:110:34:14

Say no more! Right.

0:34:140:34:15

I can't believe for one moment you've brought this in to flog.

0:34:220:34:25

I've got nowhere really to put it.

0:34:250:34:28

It doesn't go with my decor. Everyone says that.

0:34:280:34:31

-But that's exactly what it is.

-And that's the reason?

0:34:310:34:34

Yes, it's just lying in a bedroom on the floor.

0:34:340:34:37

-Not on a wall even?!

-No.

-Oh, shame on you!

0:34:370:34:40

This is a Royal Worcester artist.

0:34:400:34:43

-Yes.

-Very prolific in the 1930s

0:34:430:34:46

and he's renowned for his roses and other exotic blooms.

0:34:460:34:50

Ah. These are hydrangeas.

0:34:500:34:53

I'm just going to take it off the easel

0:34:530:34:56

and admire it while you're telling me

0:34:560:34:59

the story of how you came by it.

0:34:590:35:01

Well, it belonged to my mother

0:35:010:35:03

and I think she bought it in an auction in the late 1950s.

0:35:030:35:09

She died just over four years ago

0:35:090:35:12

and both my sister and myself wanted it

0:35:120:35:15

so it was suggested by the solicitor

0:35:150:35:19

that we should have a blind bid each.

0:35:190:35:23

-Like a silent auction.

-That's right.

-OK.

0:35:230:35:26

-You obviously won, then?

-Yes, I did.

0:35:260:35:28

-How much did you write down?

-£350.

0:35:280:35:31

£350. Right. OK.

0:35:310:35:33

It's a lovely watercolour. It's quite loose, almost impressionistic.

0:35:330:35:37

It's not the fine detail he would have done on the Worcester vessels.

0:35:370:35:42

It's so typically British, that lovely cottage garden feel about it

0:35:420:35:46

with lupins here and foxgloves as you look through the sash window.

0:35:460:35:51

-Yes. It is pretty, but as I say...

-Very pretty. Signed WH Austin.

0:35:510:35:55

He had a brother. They both worked at Royal Worcester in the '30s.

0:35:550:35:59

I do think to enhance its value it needs to be reframed

0:35:590:36:03

and mounted. It needs a bit of money spending on it.

0:36:030:36:06

-Whoever buys it will reframe it.

-Yeah, I would imagine so.

0:36:060:36:10

I'd love to get you your money back.

0:36:100:36:12

-But no.

-I think it's gonna be a bit of a struggle.

0:36:120:36:15

Nevertheless, he is a name and we're in the right place to sell it.

0:36:160:36:20

We're going to the Malvern sale room so we're in the right place.

0:36:200:36:23

-But I'm going to put a valuation of £180 to £280.

-Right.

0:36:230:36:30

-That's fine.

-How keen are you on keeping it?

0:36:300:36:33

Not really, at all. There's no-one I can pass it on to.

0:36:330:36:38

My children wouldn't want it.

0:36:380:36:40

I think we should let the auctioneer use his discretion on the 180

0:36:400:36:44

so it might go for £150.

0:36:440:36:47

-Worst case.

-Yes.

-But you know what auctions are like!

0:36:470:36:50

People get carried away. You tried to outbid your sister.

0:36:500:36:54

And I did!

0:36:540:36:55

-Fingers crossed, we get your money back.

-Yep.

0:36:550:36:59

John, when I was a boy, my parents used to take me camping

0:37:030:37:06

in a little VW camper van.

0:37:060:37:09

-Is that so?

-When it was wet and raining,

0:37:090:37:11

we'd sit in there and play chess,

0:37:110:37:13

a game just like this - but ours was plastic!

0:37:130:37:16

Yours is a little bit better!

0:37:160:37:18

What a fantastic set. Just look at the quality.

0:37:180:37:21

It's very good, isn't it?

0:37:210:37:23

-Chess sets are highly sought after.

-Oh, good! I like to hear that!

0:37:240:37:28

We have a good combination here. We have chess, we have good quality.

0:37:280:37:34

-And we've got travelling or campaign.

-Uh-huh.

0:37:340:37:38

This really is a travelling chess set.

0:37:380:37:40

But if we put the word "campaign" in,

0:37:400:37:43

it always gets more interest.

0:37:430:37:45

Imagine you're an officer going out to the Boer War, going out to Africa,

0:37:450:37:50

most of your time wasn't spent fighting, it was waiting for instructions.

0:37:500:37:55

So you had these games to amuse you and your fellow officers.

0:37:550:37:58

This one is around turn-of-the-century.

0:37:580:38:00

-It could be late Boer War, First World War, that sort of time.

-Yes.

0:38:000:38:05

Campaign stuff is always sought after.

0:38:050:38:08

Just look at the quality of the carving as well.

0:38:080:38:10

Each one of these pieces individually turned and carved.

0:38:100:38:14

-They're in boxwood and ebony.

-Is it? I wondered what it was.

0:38:140:38:19

The best name is a firm called Jakes, in chess sets.

0:38:190:38:23

If we find "Jakes" on there,

0:38:230:38:26

then it's good news.

0:38:260:38:28

-I had a look at it earlier and I can't find it!

-Oh!

0:38:280:38:31

But it's a really good thing. Did you play with it as a boy?

0:38:310:38:35

No, I haven't. I used to play chess when I was at school,

0:38:350:38:39

but I've never played with that set, no.

0:38:390:38:41

-So where did it come from?

-It came from my mother, actually.

0:38:410:38:46

I don't know the origins of it.

0:38:460:38:47

But it's been around for a long time in the family.

0:38:470:38:51

-You don't use it today?

-No.

-Just want to get rid of it?

0:38:510:38:54

-No, we play Scrabble more than...

-Really?

-That's our main interest.

0:38:540:38:58

I can never understand Scrabble. I can't spell!

0:38:580:39:01

-I'm not very good at chess, either! But never mind!

-Nor was I, really.

0:39:010:39:06

-What do you think it's worth?

-Fifty quid?

0:39:060:39:10

I hope it's more than that.

0:39:100:39:11

-If we put 80 to 120 on it.

-Fine.

-Auctioneers' favourite estimate.

0:39:110:39:17

I think it'll do that and possibly a bit more.

0:39:170:39:20

-Philip Serrell is the auctioneer.

-Oh, yes.

0:39:200:39:23

-Yes.

-He's a good chap. He'll market it properly.

-Yes.

0:39:230:39:26

He'll be online, letting the chess people know.

0:39:260:39:29

-Chess and chess pieces are fashionable. Let's see how it does.

-I'm happy with that!

0:39:290:39:34

-I see a piece like this, it sets your heart pounding.

-Is that so?

0:39:370:39:43

Because it's so good. It's so good.

0:39:430:39:45

The beauty is it's so early as well.

0:39:450:39:48

William Moorcroft trained at Wedgwood.

0:39:480:39:51

Went on to work with a company called McIntyre

0:39:510:39:55

who made ceramic insulators for the top of telegraph poles.

0:39:550:39:58

So the kilns had to be at a very high fired temperature.

0:39:580:40:02

They'd already started a small art or commercial pottery business within the industrial sector.

0:40:020:40:09

But it was only when Moorcroft came along

0:40:090:40:11

that he introduced the old decorating method of tube lining.

0:40:110:40:15

Tube lining is, you can feel the raised section on this piece.

0:40:150:40:20

That's rather like an icing sugar bag going over the surface.

0:40:200:40:23

That's how they decorate it.

0:40:230:40:25

They created these little reservoirs

0:40:250:40:28

so that when the colour was put in, it wouldn't run.

0:40:280:40:31

But because the temperature was so high, the glazes and the colours ran together.

0:40:310:40:36

So we have this sort of washed-out look on the greens.

0:40:360:40:40

What I love about this piece is the fact that it has a green ground,

0:40:400:40:44

not the normal sort of blue to maroon.

0:40:440:40:48

This has this lovely, almost celadon green effect.

0:40:480:40:51

The design all the way round is called pomegranate.

0:40:510:40:55

But you must know that from all the times this particular design of Moorcroft's

0:40:550:40:59

-has been on television.

-I did realise it was pomegranate, yes.

0:40:590:41:03

It's a lovely design. These pieces were never made to be used as vases,

0:41:030:41:08

-with a flower stuck inside!

-It wouldn't go!

-Wouldn't go.

0:41:080:41:12

These were set on one side, to be put on a shelf and admired.

0:41:120:41:16

You'd look and say, "Oh, the beautiful glazes."

0:41:160:41:19

Exquisite! Now the interest with this particular piece,

0:41:190:41:22

and why it's going to boost the price, is the date on the bottom.

0:41:220:41:26

Now, we have the full signature, from William Moorcroft,

0:41:260:41:31

a pressed-in mark and then this date, 1911.

0:41:310:41:36

1911,

0:41:360:41:37

-he was still working at McIntyre & Company.

-Yes.

0:41:370:41:41

He didn't establish his factory until 1913.

0:41:410:41:45

So this fabulous piece

0:41:450:41:47

was produced when he was still at McIntyre & Company.

0:41:470:41:51

For a collector, that's a lovely bonus find,

0:41:510:41:54

to have it dated prior to the establishment of his own factory.

0:41:540:41:58

This is fabulous. I love it. Price?

0:41:580:42:00

I'd like to see between 500 and 700.

0:42:000:42:04

Yeah!

0:42:040:42:06

We'll put the reserve at 400.

0:42:060:42:08

Yeah.

0:42:100:42:12

That's a lot of money!

0:42:120:42:13

It is a lot of money to have stuck on your shelf. Now...

0:42:130:42:16

It is. I've had it so long and it's survived such a long time.

0:42:160:42:21

I think I'm pushing my luck if I keep it for my children or grandchildren.

0:42:210:42:25

-What will they say if you part with it? Have you told them?

-Yeah. They said, "It's up to you, Mum."

0:42:250:42:30

Tell them to come to the auction.

0:42:300:42:32

They could always buy it!

0:42:320:42:35

Jan, thank you. You've given me a thrill today.

0:42:350:42:38

Thank you very much! I'm glad you were pleased!

0:42:380:42:41

And hopefully, the bidders are going to be out in force for today's sale.

0:42:410:42:45

Sheila's claret jugs can't be equally divided

0:42:450:42:49

between her three sons so she's decided to sell them.

0:42:490:42:52

Pauline's hydrangea painting is by a local artist

0:42:520:42:55

so here's hoping it does really well!

0:42:550:42:57

John's a Scrabble fan, so his campaign chess set no longer gets used.

0:42:570:43:02

And David's certainly excited about Jan's Moorcroft vase.

0:43:020:43:05

It's a very early piece and I think it could fly away.

0:43:050:43:11

'But before we find out how they get on at auction,

0:43:150:43:18

'I'm heading for the hills

0:43:180:43:20

'to see how the local landscape has inspired one artist.'

0:43:200:43:23

This is a seven-mile-long ridge of granite

0:43:230:43:27

separating Worcestershire from Herefordshire.

0:43:270:43:30

You have to agree, it is truly breathtaking.

0:43:300:43:34

For one man, it's truly inspirational.

0:43:340:43:36

Artist David Prentiss has lived in the shadow of the Malvern Hills

0:43:390:43:43

for almost 20 years.

0:43:430:43:44

Ever since he was a small child,

0:43:440:43:46

they've played an important part in his life and work.

0:43:460:43:49

Let's go and meet David and find out why this spectacular place

0:43:510:43:55

has rooted itself so deeply in his heart.

0:43:550:43:58

-David, there you are.

-Oh, hi, Paul.

0:44:040:44:06

I hope you don't mind me joining you.

0:44:060:44:08

-No, it's very nice to see you.

-What are you sketching at the moment?

0:44:080:44:12

I'm just having a look at this favourite view of mine,

0:44:120:44:15

looking down south down the hills.

0:44:150:44:17

-It's very early days.

-When did the love affair start with the Malverns?

0:44:170:44:21

I started... In fact, I was curious about what you're asking.

0:44:210:44:25

I must have been with my father and mother, but I think Gran was with us too.

0:44:250:44:29

There used to be donkeys that brought people up the Malverns.

0:44:290:44:33

I remember her being sat on a donkey,

0:44:330:44:35

"to save her legs", as my dad called it.

0:44:350:44:38

-Nice image.

-I was a little boy and I was put on a donkey as well.

0:44:380:44:42

Lovely.

0:44:420:44:43

Malvern has become a kind of homecoming, in a way.

0:44:430:44:47

-A calling.

-You know how elderly people go back to their roots.

0:44:470:44:52

I think that's what's happened to me.

0:44:520:44:54

All I know is I come up here and work on the spot,

0:44:540:44:57

get a lot of images into my head and then improvise when I'm in the studio.

0:44:570:45:01

You'd think you'd get tired of it,

0:45:010:45:04

but it's the weather, the changes of conditions and the light.

0:45:040:45:08

It's a fairly overcast day today.

0:45:080:45:10

Then you get days when sun comes through the clouds.

0:45:100:45:13

It gets like searchlights sweeping across the landscape

0:45:130:45:17

and the light follows the form of the trees and the land.

0:45:170:45:22

-I can see.

-It's wonderful for painting.

0:45:220:45:24

Can we go to the studio and look at some?

0:45:240:45:26

Of course. I'd be delighted to show you.

0:45:260:45:29

-This is the studio, Paul.

-This is where it all happens.

0:45:350:45:38

Love the smell. Turpentine, linseed oil.

0:45:380:45:42

-You don't notice it when you're working in it.

-No.

0:45:430:45:45

Everybody says the same thing when they walk in.

0:45:450:45:49

You could bottle it, almost.

0:45:500:45:52

Gosh. I can see two styles straightaway there.

0:45:520:45:56

-Very block abstract in oils, and that one is watercolour.

-Yes.

0:45:560:46:01

You wouldn't think they were done by the same artist.

0:46:010:46:04

I have two different fan bases as well!

0:46:040:46:08

-You must have, actually!

-I do.

0:46:080:46:11

Some people say, "I don't like your picture-postcard paintings.

0:46:110:46:15

"I like those wild abstracts." And vice-versa.

0:46:150:46:18

When you start an abstract, it's a question I've always wanted to ask an artist,

0:46:180:46:23

Does it ever go wrong? Do you think, "This is not working."

0:46:230:46:27

"Does it ever go wrong?"

0:46:270:46:29

Does it evolve into something that turns into something?

0:46:300:46:35

Yeah, it does. It's an interesting observation.

0:46:350:46:38

I put wrong things into the painting, deliberately.

0:46:380:46:41

I was actually taught that.

0:46:410:46:43

"What you do", he said, "is put a blob of bright red into the painting

0:46:430:46:47

"and leave it there while you do the painting

0:46:470:46:50

"so you've got something to fight against all the time."

0:46:500:46:53

It's almost a principle of the way I work now.

0:46:530:46:56

These paintings are going to Cornwall.

0:46:560:46:58

Each exhibition was 30 paintings.

0:46:580:47:01

You've got to be quite prolific. Is that a year's work?

0:47:010:47:04

About. A bit more than that.

0:47:040:47:06

It's not bad, though, is it?

0:47:060:47:07

Well, I don't have a proper job, you see!

0:47:070:47:11

This is a proper job!

0:47:110:47:13

Talking of proper job, there's one going on here.

0:47:140:47:17

-This is a job in progress.

-Yes.

0:47:170:47:19

Is that you, the figure down there?

0:47:190:47:21

The eternal toil, climbing, struggling?

0:47:210:47:25

I wonder, when I put figures in paintings, which I do fairly often,

0:47:250:47:29

whether it isn't a kind of self-portraiture in a sense.

0:47:290:47:32

That's what I'm interested in, being on the hills, is walking them.

0:47:320:47:36

That's so low. It's quite a bold move.

0:47:360:47:38

It takes your eye-line right down to the bottom of the painting.

0:47:380:47:42

What I wanted to do, Paul, it went in quite late, that figure.

0:47:420:47:47

A couple of days ago. I had this sense of height

0:47:470:47:51

and going back

0:47:510:47:52

and I thought it just sort of drops out at the bottom.

0:47:520:47:56

Right. And so in order to make your eyes lift up again,

0:47:560:48:00

-that's what it does.

-I wanted it to go down and up.

0:48:000:48:03

I see what you've done. It's really clever.

0:48:030:48:05

I feel like I can walk that path over those three peaks now.

0:48:050:48:08

-Yeah.

-Look at that.

-It does help. One of the nice things about the Malvern landscape

0:48:080:48:13

is that it does have this sort of journey quality about it.

0:48:130:48:17

-Wherever you look.

-The more you look, you see where the journey is.

0:48:170:48:21

You've been painting a long time on the Malverns.

0:48:210:48:25

-Yeah.

-Are you carrying on painting in the Malverns?

-I am at the moment.

0:48:250:48:28

I've been ill this year, so I've not been out working on the spot

0:48:280:48:33

which is why you're looking mainly at big oil paintings.

0:48:330:48:37

-I'd like to carry on.

-The calling is still there.

0:48:370:48:39

Oh, God, yes. It's a wonderful format.

0:48:390:48:43

-It's like having... You know how Monet had his garden?

-Yes.

0:48:430:48:47

He painted the water lilies for 20 years, I think.

0:48:470:48:50

It's just like that. I've got this wonderful garden out at the back.

0:48:500:48:54

The hills are right behind the house.

0:48:540:48:56

-It's a stunning place to be.

-Long may it continue.

0:48:560:49:00

-Thank you so much for showing me around.

-It's been a pleasure.

0:49:000:49:04

Magnificent.

0:49:040:49:05

Well, I hope the fresh air is blowing through the saleroom in Malvern today,

0:49:120:49:17

where our old friend Philip Serrell is auctioning off all our lots.

0:49:170:49:21

We've got these lovely claret jugs looking for a new home.

0:49:210:49:26

I've got my fingers crossed for the hydrangeas.

0:49:260:49:28

James is keen to be champion with his chess set.

0:49:280:49:32

But I can't wait to see what happens when the collectors clap eyes on this unusual Moorcroft find.

0:49:320:49:37

Let's get the benefit of Philip's experience.

0:49:410:49:44

-I fell in love with this.

-You did well to spot this.

0:49:460:49:49

-I did.

-I'm impressed, Paul. I'm impressed.

0:49:490:49:52

I viewed it on its own merits, really. I like the picture.

0:49:530:49:56

I like the hydrangeas and the fact you're looking through a sash window

0:49:560:50:00

looking at the lupins and foxgloves. It reminds me of my back garden.

0:50:000:50:05

I kind of identified with it before I knew it was by Austin,

0:50:050:50:08

a Royal Worcester artist.

0:50:080:50:09

I've put £180 to £280 on this watercolour.

0:50:090:50:14

I think I would pay that easily for it.

0:50:140:50:17

I think you're right.

0:50:170:50:19

I mean, it's gonna make 200 to 250.

0:50:190:50:22

But these were done, I suppose Reg and Walter were around in the 1940s.

0:50:220:50:28

These watercolours, predominantly by the Austins, were done for beer money!

0:50:280:50:32

They didn't earn a fortune

0:50:320:50:34

so all those people who painted at the factory, like the Austins, Skinton, Harry Davis,

0:50:340:50:41

-they all did watercolours.

-To make up the money.

-Yeah.

0:50:410:50:46

They're lovely.

0:50:460:50:47

Living in and around Worcester, we see these regularly.

0:50:470:50:50

They come up in auction. We normally have a fair stock of them

0:50:500:50:54

-and we've got some avid collectors.

-Great.

0:50:540:50:56

That's what I wanted. Lots of interest. Fantastic.

0:50:560:51:00

First, let's see if there are any wine buffs amongst the bidders.

0:51:000:51:04

We've got the claret jugs. You've been raiding the display cabinet!

0:51:040:51:09

These have been in there for 40 years!

0:51:090:51:13

No interest in them any more?

0:51:130:51:15

-Not really.

-Did you realise they were worth 350 to £500?

-No.

0:51:150:51:20

What?

0:51:210:51:23

That's a big surprise, isn't it?

0:51:230:51:25

-Well...

-It's quality.

-It is quality.

0:51:250:51:27

I love the design. Etched glass, that whiplash design.

0:51:270:51:31

-Typical Art Nouveau.

-Yes. You couldn't expect more from that period.

0:51:310:51:35

Why two claret jugs? Or is one a claret jug and the other...

0:51:350:51:38

I'm assuming one would be for table serving

0:51:380:51:40

and the smaller one would be for, say, a supper tray.

0:51:400:51:43

-An individual one.

-An individual one.

-You're right.

0:51:430:51:47

Well, all the talking's over with.

0:51:470:51:50

Let's find out what the bidders of Malvern think.

0:51:500:51:53

Two Continental Art Nouveau claret jugs.

0:51:530:51:55

Bid me for those. 300, someone. Is that a yes?

0:51:550:51:59

300 bid for the claret jugs. At 300.

0:51:590:52:02

-Any more?

-We're in at 300.

-320.

0:52:020:52:05

330. 340. Go on! 350.

0:52:050:52:10

360.

0:52:100:52:11

-They like them!

-370. 380. It's only money!

0:52:110:52:15

390. 400.

0:52:150:52:17

410.

0:52:170:52:19

-Your bid, madam, at 410.

-Come on, come on!

0:52:190:52:22

At £410, seated. They sell, then, at £410. Done!

0:52:220:52:27

-We'll take that, £410!

-That's not bad.

-That's not bad, is it?

0:52:270:52:31

Brilliant!

0:52:310:52:33

Not bad at all for something you don't want to clean any more!

0:52:330:52:36

Don't even want to use. What will you do with £410?

0:52:360:52:40

I was going to give it to my three sons,

0:52:400:52:43

but they've told me, "Don't be ridiculous! Keep it."

0:52:430:52:46

-Oh, yes!

-Nice boys!

-Yes.

0:52:460:52:48

My turn to be the expert right now.

0:52:530:52:55

I don't feel threatened. I've had a chat with Philip Serrell.

0:52:550:52:58

Pauline's lovely watercolour, painted by Austin, a Royal Worcester artist.

0:52:580:53:02

It's going to be a sad moment to sell this for you, really?

0:53:020:53:06

Yes, but I've no place for it at home.

0:53:060:53:09

It doesn't fit in with the decor.

0:53:090:53:12

Hopefully, you'll get lots of money.

0:53:120:53:15

-Hopefully.

-We'll find out right now.

0:53:150:53:17

Walter Austin. A watercolour study of hydrangeas. There we are.

0:53:170:53:22

At £50. 50. 60. 70. 80. 90.

0:53:220:53:26

100. 110. 120. 130.

0:53:260:53:31

-It's a slow old climb.

-140. 150.

0:53:310:53:34

160. 170. 180.

0:53:340:53:37

190. 200.

0:53:370:53:41

210. 220.

0:53:410:53:42

230. 240.

0:53:420:53:45

250. And 60 with me on the book. 260.

0:53:450:53:48

-Good.

-Any more?

-He's coming out at 260.

-Any more at all?

0:53:480:53:52

-At £260. I sell at £260... Done.

-Brilliant.

0:53:520:53:57

I'm happy with that. Top end of the estimate. Bang on.

0:53:570:54:01

Wonderful.

0:54:010:54:02

What will you put that money towards? £260.

0:54:020:54:05

Um, I'll put it towards some tickets for relatives to join us in our home in Cyprus.

0:54:050:54:10

Oh, lovely.

0:54:100:54:13

-A family reunion.

-Yes, it would be.

0:54:130:54:17

I've just been joined by John, ex-Lloyds bank manager!

0:54:210:54:25

From Yorkshire. We're doing battle right now

0:54:250:54:28

because we've got that lovely campaign travelling chess set.

0:54:280:54:31

£80 to £120, James put on it. As soon as I saw it

0:54:310:54:34

I knew James was the valuer. You always fight me for academic toys.

0:54:340:54:39

-We like those!

-We love them!

0:54:390:54:41

It's about to go under the hammer. Good luck, John. And James.

0:54:410:54:45

Lot number 240 is the 19th-century mahogany travelling chess set.

0:54:450:54:51

-Bids are on the book.

-Bids on the book.

0:54:510:54:53

£20 bid at 20. 30.

0:54:530:54:55

40. 50. 50 bid. At 60. 70.

0:54:550:54:58

80. 90. 100.

0:54:580:55:01

-110. 120.

-This is good.

0:55:010:55:04

Don't say no. Don't put a line through it. At 130. 130.

0:55:040:55:07

It's your bid, sir. At £130, your bid.

0:55:070:55:10

-Yes.

-And I sell at 130 and done!

0:55:100:55:13

£130!

0:55:130:55:16

-We'll settle for that!

-Yes, indeed.

0:55:160:55:18

What will you put it towards?

0:55:180:55:19

My wife's talking about a cruise, but I don't think it'll go far!

0:55:190:55:25

-Day trip on the Thames, maybe!

-Across to the Isle of Wight!

0:55:250:55:28

-Yes!

-That would be nice.

-Yes.

0:55:280:55:31

Taking the rostrum for our final item is Sophie Hutton,

0:55:330:55:36

a regular behind-the-scenes expert on Flog It.

0:55:360:55:39

We've got quality for you and great condition. Moorcroft, what a name!

0:55:390:55:44

The pomegranate vase belonging to Jan,

0:55:440:55:46

who's flogging the family heirloom.

0:55:460:55:49

We have a valuation of £500 to £700 on it.

0:55:490:55:52

-It could be a "come and buy me".

-It was!

0:55:520:55:54

The auctioneer agrees it's gonna fly. This is it!

0:55:540:55:57

Lot 503. The Moorcroft pottery vase. Lots of interest in the book

0:55:570:56:01

and I can go straight in at £900.

0:56:010:56:05

CROWD GASPS

0:56:050:56:06

900 I am bid. 900.

0:56:060:56:08

-Did you hear them in the room?!

-At £900. 950.

0:56:080:56:12

£1,000. And 50 with me. 1,100 if you want it.

0:56:120:56:17

1,100. And 50. 1,200 now?

0:56:170:56:20

1,200. The book's out at 1,200. 1,250?

0:56:200:56:23

1,250. 1,300.

0:56:230:56:27

-1,350?

-They seriously want this!

-1,350.

0:56:270:56:29

1,400. 1,450?

0:56:290:56:32

1,500. 1,550?

0:56:320:56:35

-Excuse me while I faint!

-Hold on!

0:56:350:56:38

1,600. 1,650?

0:56:380:56:39

-1,650!

-1,650. 1,700?

0:56:390:56:42

Paul, hold on to me!

0:56:420:56:43

Let's hold on to each other!

0:56:430:56:46

1,750. 1,800? 1,800.

0:56:460:56:49

1,850? 1,850.

0:56:490:56:51

1,900?

0:56:510:56:52

Phones are ringing. Room's buzzing. Electric atmosphere.

0:56:520:56:55

-Two-one.

-2,100!

0:56:550:56:58

Two-two.

0:56:580:57:00

I can't get over it!

0:57:000:57:02

Two-three. Two-four?

0:57:020:57:03

Two-four. Two-five?

0:57:050:57:06

No.

0:57:060:57:07

No? Two-four I have. Two-four I have on the telephone.

0:57:070:57:10

At two-four. Two-five anywhere in the room?

0:57:100:57:13

-It was a "come and buy me"!

-At £2,400, then.

0:57:130:57:16

2,400!

0:57:160:57:18

Hammer's down. Yes! £2,400 for the pomegranate vase!

0:57:180:57:23

Listen to the room!

0:57:230:57:24

Jan, you're shaking!

0:57:240:57:26

This is a wonderful Flog It moment!

0:57:260:57:29

-You enjoyed it, too?

-Yes, that's what it's all about!

0:57:300:57:34

You get such a buzz from something going well over the top.

0:57:340:57:39

-Two people have fallen in love with it.

-We had four phone bids!

0:57:390:57:42

-Yes.

-Absolutely amazing.

-2,400?

-How stunning!

0:57:420:57:46

-Wonderful!

-Amazing.

-What will you do with that?

0:57:460:57:49

I don't know. It's a large amount of money.

0:57:490:57:52

-Spend it wisely. Put it in the bank to start with.

-Yeah.

0:57:520:57:56

That's the end of our tale of two cathedral cities.

0:57:560:58:01

We found some rare and unusual items,

0:58:010:58:03

like the bike race memorabilia in Winchester

0:58:030:58:07

which did so well for Sylvia and Peter, bringing in £580.

0:58:070:58:12

It was in Worcester that the bidders really went in to a frenzy

0:58:120:58:15

over Jan's Moorcroft vase,

0:58:150:58:17

sending the price up to a staggering £2,400.

0:58:170:58:23

What a great surprise. I hope you've enjoyed watching the show.

0:58:230:58:27

We enjoyed making it.

0:58:270:58:28

From Jan and myself, here in Malvern, cheerio till next time!

0:58:280:58:32

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made,

0:58:320:58:39

visit the website at bbc.co.uk.

0:58:390:58:43

In a specially extended edition presented by Paul Martin, the two cathedral cities of Winchester and Worcester go head-to-head to find the best antiques to sell at auction.

While an Indian teapot and rare biking memorabilia cause a stir in Winchester, some claret jugs and a stunning piece of Moorcroft bring a buzz to the Guildhall in Worcester. But which town wins on the day?


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