Yeovil Flog It!


Yeovil

A collection of risqué magazines is among the items to be valued in Yeovil. And Paul Martin ventures onto the moors in search of Exmoor ponies.


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Transcript


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So why have all these people here, these lovely people, come to Yeovil

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to queue up on a freezing cold Sunday morning,

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all laden with bags and boxes containing family heirlooms,

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treasures and charity shop bargains?

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Well, there can only be one answer.

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They're all hoping to find out that their treasures are worth lots of money.

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Some of them might even make a profit at auction later.

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Our two experts today are Michael Baggott and James Lewis,

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the two heavyweight experts,

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and boy, do these guys know their stuff. They're red hot.

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The great thing about Flog It! is you never know what's going to turn up, do you?

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-You don't, no. Today an Argyle.

-Wow.

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It's not my sort of thing. It's really for Michael.

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-Marvellous. What do you think? Teapot? No?

-Mmm. Looks like it.

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-It's for keeping your gravy warm.

-Is that what it is?!

-Marvellous.

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Very rare with a medallion.

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Wow. Well, there you go. Well, it's now 9.30.

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We better not make a meal of it.

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Let's get the doors open, and get the show on the road.

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Chris, this little gem that you've brought along,

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what can you tell me about it?

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Well, very little, really.

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I've always collected miniature scent bottles,

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and this I have no idea whether I bought it,

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or whether it was given to me, I honestly don't know.

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But it just sits in the cupboard with the others, and I love it.

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-It crept into the house unnoticed.

-It did, really.

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Well, I mean, the joy of this thing is really the outside of the case.

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If we have a look here, it's tortoiseshell,

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which is actually turtle shell,

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and the Georgians absolutely loved inlaying it.

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So they'd pierce this out and then you'd inlay

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all this silverwork and then it's all been bright cut afterwards.

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So you've got swags and festoons.

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Um, the top's a little bit dull.

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-Yes.

-I wonder if maybe that's a later replacement.

-Right.

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-Cos it does seem to have come off there and you'd expect something a little bit grander.

-Yes.

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But there's a surprise when we open it because I have seen many, many

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of these little cases and they don't have their bottles in.

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If they do, they don't have their stoppers or they're cracked.

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Now as far as I can see, that's all original.

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That's a little 18th-century cut-glass scent bottle

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that has survived in its original case.

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If you pop it back in here, it's not the tightest fit in the world.

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-These are made for travelling.

-Yes.

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In coaches, along the street, it's protected in this little box.

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So again, this usually takes a few knocks and damages.

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I've given the game away really with the date of it.

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It is a little 18th-century piece and it could date anywhere from

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-1785, 1790...

-Gosh, that old?

-..up to about 1810.

-Really?

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And they made a lot of these in Birmingham.

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Birmingham produced these in quite large numbers.

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-As it just arrived at your house, I can't say what did you pay for it.

-I honestly can't remember.

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-I just... I really don't know.

-Any ideas what it's worth then?

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Haven't a clue. Not a clue.

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With its original bottle

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and because it's in relatively nice condition,

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we should put it into auction with maybe £100 to £150 on it.

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-Really?

-Fixed reserve of £100.

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I could see two or three people fighting for that because it's a good old

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proper antique, which I love to see.

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So would you be happy to put in the auction at that?

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-Reluctantly, I think.

-Reluctantly.

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Hopefully someone will start a new collection with this? You never know.

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Dave, what an amazing collection of theatre,

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the risque sort of theatre-land from the 1920s right through to the '50s.

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They're not yours. Whose were they?

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Well, they were Val's uncle's actually.

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-OK.

-Um, he died some 20 years ago. Val was the next living relative

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-and when we cleared the house out, we looked in the attic and we found these.

-Hidden away.

-Hidden away.

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-A sordid past.

-A sordid past.

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But you know the thing is these things were...

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OK, they were a little bit risque at their time,

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we had women protesting outside the Windmill Club and the Folies Bergere and the Moulin Rouge,

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it was really controversial.

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-Yes.

-And whenever we get something

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at auction that is revolutionary in its time,

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-a little bit risque, they are really sought after today, because they're a collector's item.

-Yes.

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But they're interesting for the historical context as well.

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So tell me about your uncle, the man who collected these.

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All right. He was born in 1898 and, um, was an electrician to trade

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but always had quite an interest in photography...

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-OK.

-..and particularly the female form, I have to say, yeah.

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And I remember he used to go to the baths at Morecambe and actually photograph bathing beauties.

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-All secretly from behind a bush or...?

-Oh, no, no. No, no.

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And his photographs were actually displayed in front of the baths.

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Ah, wonderful.

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-So I suppose if he was born in 1898, the earliest one that we have is 1927...

-Yes.

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-..in his late twenties, is when his interest started?

-I presume so.

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If you look through the magazines it's not difficult

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-to see why his interest was, was generated from that.

-Yes.

-But they really are...

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We've got here at the far end, we've got the Windmill Club.

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That was the British equivalent of the Moulin Rouge I suppose.

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But of course the most famous is the Folies Bergere.

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Now if we have a look at this one here, wonderful, wonderful condition -

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it's even got its original tissue paper over the top.

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And here we have this great front cover. And if we open it up... she is unveiled to her full glory.

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There she is.

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And if we go all the way through, this one is particularly interesting because of one person.

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There she is...Josephine Baker.

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She was one of the first ever black strip dancers, or naked dancers, at the Folies Bergere.

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She was very well known and has gone down in history as one of the best ever.

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And really, you know, it's hard to believe how exotic it would have been seen to see

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a black lady naked and that is what we're seeing. And, historically, that is why this is quite important.

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And this magazine is full really of all the different theatre shots.

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There we are, again Josephine Baker, there she is...

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There we go. I mean, I-I, valuing this sort of thing is very, very difficult.

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-I mean we've got hundreds.

-Yes.

-Some of them are worth less than a pound.

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That has to be worth something like £30-40 on its own,

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and I hope that someone with a passion for theatre history will go for these.

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I think we ought to put a conservative but realistic estimate on them

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and we need to protect them with a reserve as well.

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So if we put an estimate of £100 to £150 on them, would that be OK for you?

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-With a reserve of about £100?

-I think so.

-That's fine.

-That would be fine.

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-We shouldn't let them go for any less than that.

-Oh, no.

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-Thank you for bringing them in.

-Thank you.

-I've learnt a lot.

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Pete, nice little pot. Where did you get your nice little pot from?

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From a place called Sherbourne, about five miles away from here.

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I know it well. Lots of antiques shops in Sherbourne.

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Did you buy it in one of those?

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Yeah. Well, a bric-a-brac shop I would call it.

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-Bric-a-brac?

-Yeah.

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-Not, not an expensive, um, antique shop then?

-No.

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-Was it expensive then, in this bric-a-brac shop?

-It cost me a few pounds.

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A few pounds?

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-About 5, actually.

-£5? £5, right. This never happens to me.

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I go round bric-a-brac shops and I don't... You know what I find?

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-Yeah?

-Bric-a-brac. I don't find things like this.

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It looks ostensibly, when you look at it, a bit of Chinese porcelain from the 18th century.

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But, of course, Chinese porcelain

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was so fashionable in the 18th century,

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all the English manufacturers were fighting one another to produce similar wares.

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-Yeah.

-Now, as with all porcelain, there should be a mark on it

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to help us out and there we go, we've a little S.

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Anyone who knows anything about 18th-century blue and white knows that a little S means Salopian

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which is Latin for Shropshire which means that it is from Caughley.

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-The Caughley factory which was set up as a rival to Worcester by Thomas Turner.

-Yeah.

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And this also has a distinct feature -

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this gilt decoration that Turner did and also, more confusingly, you see pieces of genuine Chinese ceramic

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-with this later gilt border which is English as well.

-Right.

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And it's a little tea canister. And the cover's there, you know,

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in the bric-a-brac shop...

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-It's amazing, isn't it?

-And there are no...

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There is one little chip on it so that, I mean frankly, that's amazing.

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230 years old.

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Bit of proper genuine antique English porcelain. For a fiver!

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Um, you did extraordinarily well.

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-The shame is that at auction they aren't a fortune...

-No.

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..because they were produced in relatively large numbers.

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The only fault apart from the chip is some wear to the gilding.

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-Yeah.

-Still, we could do you a fair return on your fiver.

-Yeah?

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-I think if we popped it into auction at £60 to £90.

-Really? Yeah.

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-So that's a clear £50 profit when it sells.

-Thank you very much.

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-So you'd be happy to do it?

-Very happy.

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-Fabulous. Well, we'll pop it in the auction for you and do our best.

-Yeah.

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John, whenever I'm looking down the Flog It! queues,

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I'm always searching for something unusual, something slightly different

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and I have to say I found something so unusual that I've never seen one before here.

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-Right.

-So I'm going to sort of take this in a slightly different way.

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I'm going to ask you first, what do you know about it?

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Well, I had it about 1975 and I've always had it.

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I've got a little bar at home and I always hang it inside the door

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and a lot of people come and look at it, and always ask me what it is and I'd say,

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"I used to use it for self-defence,"

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and they used to laugh about it. And I hung it there and hung it there

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and then when I was watching Flog It!

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I thought, "Well, I'm going to take it along."

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-And where did it come from?

-Well, I don't know.

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Either in the family somewhere or... I'm not really sure.

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Well, I think it is the most fantastic thing I've seen all day.

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I'm flying by the seat of my pants to a degree

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but I'll tell you what I think it is.

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I think it's from New Zealand and I think it's a hunting club.

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Tribal art is such a specialist field.

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All I know is that about 15 years ago, when I first started as a valuer,

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there was a chap who'd come to the valuation days with a shopping trolley and that shopping trolley

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used to be full of absolute rubbish week after week after week.

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But one day he came with a Maori paddle and the decoration on the Maori paddle

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was very similar to this. I am sure that this dogtooth decoration and this hatched decoration

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is classic Maori. Wonderful. Really is beautifully carved.

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-And it's so heavy, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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-So I think that's either a hunting club or a war club.

-Yeah.

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I love it. I'll go away today and I'll do some research into this

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and see if I can find out more.

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-But if it is, and it's an early one, it could be a really good thing.

-Right.

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-Now I've never done this before but I'm not going to put a value on it.

-No? Right.

-I'm going to fudge it.

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I'm gonna say that without question it's worth 300 to 500, but it may well be worth more.

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-Mm-hm.

-And hopefully by the time the auction day comes, we might have a pleasant surprise for you

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because I love it. Do you want to sell it?

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-Yeah, I will sell it, yeah.

-Thank you so much for bringing it in.

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I know I haven't been able to tell you much about it and I feel a buffoon

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not being able to tell you much. I loved it so much I wanted to do it.

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-Do you mind?

-No. That's fine.

-Fantastic.

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Exmoor straddles the counties of Somerset and Devon.

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It's a wild and barren place, especially in the winter months.

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But there's one animal that has adapted perfectly to this beautiful but harsh landscape -

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and that's the Exmoor pony.

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This is the only moorland pony in Britain that can be called truly prehistoric.

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Exmoors have been roaming this area for 100,000 years and they remain

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largely unchanged from their Ice Age ancestors with their barrel-shaped bodies and their wide heads.

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Today, I'm lucky enough to be getting a bit more of an insight into this fascinating breed

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I'm here with Dawn Williams from the Exmoor Pony Society. Hi, Dawn.

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-Hello.

-Thanks for meeting me and showing me around this beautiful bit of landscape.

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-It's stunning!

-It's wonderful.

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-I can see a couple of ponies. Any chance of getting closer?

-Let's go and meet the herd.

-I'll follow you.

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What herd is this called?

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This is the Hawkwell Herd, one of the founding herds of Exmoor ponies.

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What about breeding here, how many ponies do you think they breed each year?

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Well, this year on Exmoor, in total,

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there were 180 foals born but about 60 of those were born on Exmoor itself,

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so not very many. Various things have happened to them over the years to deplete them.

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During the Second World War, some of them were stolen for meat, some of them were used,

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unfortunately, for target practice and the breed ended up with

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only 50 ponies and 4 stallions existing in the world.

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So the breeders got together, the Exmoor Pony Society worked very hard

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and now it's been a conscious effort to build up such a tiny gene pool to the number of ponies there are today.

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They're still considered to be endangered but there are now about 2,700 ponies in the world

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so this is a huge, you know, achievement.

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-If we could just go in this direction a little bit.

-OK.

-We need to zigzag

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and just go really slowly. OK, if we just pause here for a moment.

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-You can see that mare over there is grazing...

-Mm-hm.

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..and she's got her back to us so you know she's showing that she doesn't find us a threat.

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In days gone by, what were they used for?

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Well, Exmoor ponies were actually the pillar of Exmoor society.

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This is a very harsh and steep terrain, it's a beautiful National Park.

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Because of its deep coombs and because of the weather conditions

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and the fact it was the last place in England to have metal roads,

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-for a long time it was a very inhospitable place.

-So you needed a pony to get about.

-You did.

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These ponies were used for harrowing fields,

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even when they used bigger horses, the ponies were used for the steep-sided fields and for the edges.

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They did the post rounds, they took children to school, they took supplies to and from market,

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they were used for everything and they enabled the community

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to communicate, particularly during the winter.

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They were very important. That's Hawkwell Great Gatsby,

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the stallion out with the mares at the moment.

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But they're slowly getting closer, they're curious.

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-He's curious, isn't he? Shall we try and get a bit closer.

-Yes.

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Why do they rely on humans to look after them if they've sort of

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been around for 100,000 years and can withstand this kind of terrain?

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-Why do they need our help?

-Well, it's largely because the land is now owned.

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Exmoor is a unique National Park but it is actually not very big and because there are so many people,

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-the ponies haven't got these great wild areas to roam.

-Oh, I see.

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-Now, if we just pause here...

-Yes.

-..and let Gatsby take us in.

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Oh, he's lovely. I could hang around all day and watch this herd

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but I'd like to take an even closer look.

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-You said you've got three at home.

-Yes, I have.

-Shall we go and take a look?

-Yes, let's do that.

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-I love your place. So this is where all the schooling's done.

-Yes.

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And that is some dog. What is it?

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Yeah this is... Suky! Come here, Suky.

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Come on. Good boy. This is a Bergamasco from the Italian Alps.

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Gosh.

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-Looks like Dougal from The Magic Roundabout.

-His nickname is Dougal.

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Now you stay there while we go in the school.

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-Good boy.

-Stay.

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What's the first thing you do when you get the ponies back here? What would you do with them?

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Well, when they come straight off the moor they obviously haven't had any human contact or very little.

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They may just have seen their, their herd owner, so they are very shy,

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very unused to human contact and with Exmoors, we need to socialise them.

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-Right, so it's a bonding process. Very much so. Lots of love.

-Yes.

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About six months to a year I suppose?

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Some of the ponies come to it within a few days,

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and you can put a head collar on and accept you touching them all over.

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Some of them take a long time and a lot of patience but it's worth persevering.

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OK, show me, show me one of the schooling disciplines.

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OK, well, I'll ask the ponies to move off and then it's just

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a process of getting them to accept that, from a distance, I'm asking to move their feet.

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And what you'll do is get them to run around on one rein, in one direction and then turn them?

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-Yes.

-And then make sure that they turn the right way and go back.

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-Yes, that's the idea.

-OK. All right.

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And they should always turn obviously, when they do turn, turn towards the fence.

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Yes, sometimes they'll turn in if they're watching you and sometimes they'll turn away.

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I love the mane, I love the long hair. Ha-ha-ha. And the feathers on the feet.

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-Good boys.

-Oh, they turned beautifully then.

-Come on.

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How long did it take you to achieve that?

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Once they'd actually accepted me, you know, touching them and putting head collars on... Hoo hoo hoo,

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hoo hoo...

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We're turning the other way now.

0:18:500:18:52

Good boys. Then, and once there's trust between you then this, this actually comes very quickly.

0:18:520:18:58

-Give me my hand back.

-And that's the reward really, isn't it?

0:18:580:19:02

And you can see they're built for working.

0:19:020:19:04

They're built for surviving. They're very intelligent

0:19:040:19:07

and they need that to exist on the moor and survive.

0:19:070:19:10

Dawn, thank you so much, so much for showing me

0:19:100:19:14

these wonderful ponies and telling me about their history.

0:19:140:19:17

-I'm going to look at them in a different light now.

-Good.

0:19:170:19:20

We saw items from far and wide at our valuation day in Yeovil,

0:19:280:19:31

but now it's time to pack up and head to the auction.

0:19:310:19:35

Michael's hoping for the sweet smell of success with Christine's Georgian scent bottle.

0:19:350:19:39

Will the bidders be tempted by the theatre magazines and the charms of the beauties within?

0:19:390:19:45

I'm sure Pete's pretty little tea canister is going to prove popular with the china collectors.

0:19:450:19:51

And finally, if there's any trouble, the tribal club is just the thing to bring the bidders into line.

0:19:510:19:56

Today's auction comes from Bearne's in Exeter.

0:20:010:20:04

The man with the local knowledge wielding the gavel is auctioneer, Nick Sainty.

0:20:040:20:08

First up, we're hoping the smell of money is in the air.

0:20:080:20:13

I absolutely love this next lot.

0:20:170:20:19

It belongs to Christine. It's an 18th-century scent bottle.

0:20:190:20:23

£100 to £150. I wouldn't be selling it, Christine, if I was you.

0:20:230:20:28

-Really?

-Mmm. Why, why?

0:20:280:20:29

-I know it's tiny and you don't look at it any more...

-I don't, no.

0:20:290:20:32

..but it's just so beautiful.

0:20:320:20:34

Neither of the boys want it. So, let's sell it, let's flog it.

0:20:340:20:38

I spotted this, I spotted this at the valuation day and I thought, oh, I love it, I want to talk

0:20:380:20:42

about it, I just want to muse over it and touch it but I didn't feel qualified to.

0:20:420:20:47

And I asked Michael and he said "Oh, I love it, let me do it, so..."

0:20:470:20:50

-Let me do it, give it to me.

-There you go, take it away.

0:20:500:20:53

After a tug of love.

0:20:530:20:55

It's a lovely thing, I mean it's tortoiseshell,

0:20:550:20:58

which you can't get any more, it's a finite material now.

0:20:580:21:01

-The work that's gone into it is tremendous but the lovely thing is the bottle's there...

-Yes.

0:21:010:21:06

and it's in perfect condition. That will hopefully make the difference today.

0:21:060:21:10

Well, it'll help pay for the car park fine.

0:21:100:21:13

-Oh, what, today? You've got a car park fine?

-Don't know yet. Might have.

0:21:130:21:17

Oh, dear. I know parking is a big problem anywhere now in any city

0:21:170:21:21

isn't it, it really is, especially around auction houses.

0:21:210:21:24

We'll get you away as soon as possible!

0:21:240:21:26

The George III tortoiseshell and pique scent bottle, cased.

0:21:260:21:30

Interest here, a number of commission bids.

0:21:300:21:32

Away here then 180, 190,

0:21:320:21:34

200, £210 is bid, we've reached a bid of £210. 220 will you?

0:21:340:21:40

It's with me at 220. 230.

0:21:400:21:42

240. The book is out. With you, sir at £240. 50 will you?

0:21:420:21:47

Book's out, it's in the room then. We're selling at £240.

0:21:470:21:52

Fantastic. £240.

0:21:520:21:54

That's the fine paid and a bit for yourself.

0:21:540:21:57

-Yes.

-I wish they could all be as easy as that.

-It is marvellous, wasn't it?

-Phew.

0:21:570:22:01

They're not all that easy because they're not all that wonderful quality.

0:22:010:22:05

No. Quality always sells. What's the money going to go towards, Christine?

0:22:050:22:09

Well, genuinely I've not looked at the car, there may well be a ticket on it.

0:22:090:22:13

It might be for that but one of my Great Danes

0:22:130:22:15

-has chewed up one of his beds so I think he needs another bed so...

-It's a big bed as well.

0:22:150:22:20

-It's a big bed.

-It's a big dog!

0:22:200:22:22

This lot will put a big smile on your face, can you remember it?

0:22:260:22:30

It was the theatre magazines, the saucy French ones belonging to Val and David.

0:22:300:22:34

They put a smile on our faces and I had a chat with Nick, the auctioneer,

0:22:340:22:39

and they put a big grin on his face. I love them.

0:22:390:22:41

He was dubious and thought they'd struggle but interior designers could do something with them.

0:22:410:22:47

-It's a question of whether they want it, isn't it? If they want it, they pay for it.

-Yes.

0:22:470:22:52

-It must have put a smile on your face when you found them in the attic.

-It did, yes, that's right.

0:22:520:22:57

-Especially his.

-Especially my face. Yeah.

0:22:570:23:00

I'd hang on to one if I was you then. Just keep the best one.

0:23:000:23:03

-Of course I wasn't allowed to look at them. That's why they're in good condition.

-Ha ha(!)

0:23:030:23:09

-A collection of theatre magazines.

-Good luck.

0:23:090:23:12

I'm sure you've looked through these and studied them carefully.

0:23:120:23:16

There is some interest here and we start the bidding at...

0:23:160:23:20

100, 120, 130,

0:23:200:23:25

140 is bid. Commission bid of £140.

0:23:250:23:28

50 will you? Commission bid of 140 and 50, will you?

0:23:280:23:31

It's with me on the book at £140.

0:23:310:23:34

And 50, will you?

0:23:340:23:35

Are you all done?

0:23:350:23:37

Do you want to take a second look? No?

0:23:370:23:41

It's on the book then and we're selling at £140.

0:23:410:23:44

Yes, hammer's gone down. Great. Good valuation.

0:23:440:23:47

-Brilliant.

-Brave man.

0:23:470:23:48

-£140. Happy?

-Yes, lovely, that's great.

0:23:480:23:52

-What are you going to do with that?

-Well, we're going to China later in the year.

-Are you?

0:23:520:23:56

-Have you been before?

-No.

-Oh, what a wonderful trip.

0:23:560:23:59

-That's somewhere I'd love to go.

-Yes.

-I really would.

-It will go towards that.

0:23:590:24:03

Peter is with me right now and he's hoping to do some trading up.

0:24:060:24:09

We've got that lovely little tea canister.

0:24:090:24:12

Michael's put a valuation of 60 to 90.

0:24:120:24:14

-Yes.

-70 to 90?

-60 to 90.

-60 to 90.

-Little bit of discretion on the reserve.

0:24:140:24:18

OK, OK.

0:24:180:24:20

But this was purchased for a fiver.

0:24:200:24:22

-£5.

-How long ago?

-About 2 months ago.

-So you are trading up. Oooh.

0:24:220:24:27

Well, that's the way to go, trade up, don't trade down.

0:24:270:24:30

We can't possibly lose on this one. Why do you want to flog it? Did you buy it to sell or...?

0:24:300:24:35

I bought it because I like the pattern on it. We put it on the windowsill,

0:24:350:24:39

we've got two cats and the cats were going to knock it off so I thought...

0:24:390:24:43

-Protect your investment?

-Yep.

0:24:430:24:45

-Make a bit of money.

-Yep.

-He's gonna do it, isn't he?

0:24:450:24:47

-He must do.

-He must do!

-He must do.

0:24:470:24:49

It's 18th century, it's in perfect condition and it's a tea caddy.

0:24:490:24:54

Now those are three very good points and when you think of £50,

0:24:540:24:58

-what can you buy for £50?

-Not a lot.

-You certainly can't buy one of those...

-Not a period tea caddy.

0:24:580:25:03

Hopefully everyone will think that and their hands will shoot up in the air.

0:25:030:25:07

Fingers crossed, it's under the hammer now.

0:25:070:25:10

The Caughley tea canister in the temple pattern. Interest here.

0:25:100:25:14

Commission bid 48. 50, 55,

0:25:140:25:17

£60 pounds is bid, commission bid is £60. 5 will you?

0:25:170:25:20

5. 70. 5.

0:25:200:25:23

80. 5. 90. 5.

0:25:230:25:26

-It's so popular.

-100.

0:25:260:25:28

And 5. My bid is 110. 15 will you?

0:25:280:25:32

The book's out. With you then at £115.

0:25:320:25:36

-20 new place. 130.

-Fresh legs in the room.

-Seated bidder

0:25:360:25:39

at £120. 30 will you?

0:25:390:25:41

We're all done, the book's out.

0:25:410:25:43

I'm selling then, the seated bidder at £120.

0:25:430:25:46

-Great.

-Gone, the hammer's gone down.

0:25:460:25:49

-£120.

-Fantastic.

0:25:490:25:50

-Brilliant.

-We'll take that.

-We will indeed.

-And I'm sure you will.

0:25:500:25:54

-What are you going to do with the £120?

-My other half's having an operation on her hand

0:25:540:25:58

-so I'm treating her to a weekend away.

-Convalescing somewhere.

-Yep.

-Lovely.

-Somewhere in the country.

0:25:580:26:04

Ah, how lovely.

0:26:040:26:05

This lot is for all the academics, it's a bit of tribal art.

0:26:110:26:14

It belongs to John, with a value of £300 to £500.

0:26:140:26:18

-Mmm.

-At the valuation day, James had a look at it and he thought it was Maori but he couldn't be sure.

0:26:180:26:23

The auctioneer's done more research on it and he's discovered that it's Tongan.

0:26:230:26:28

Hopefully there's going to be interest on this.

0:26:280:26:30

Why have you decided to sell this?

0:26:300:26:32

-Well...

-Because this is your security, isn't it?

0:26:320:26:35

Yes, and after that I brought it back to see you to tell me what it was

0:26:350:26:41

really and wasn't really sure and I would like to send it back

0:26:410:26:45

to New Zealand, whoever buys it.

0:26:450:26:48

I'm pretty sure it's going to go back home, that's for sure,

0:26:480:26:51

because this has been picked up on the internet

0:26:510:26:54

and there's a lot of overseas buyers that always buy tribal art and it's lovely.

0:26:540:26:59

It is a wonderful thing.

0:26:590:27:01

Now as you say, I wasn't sure that it was Maori but it's that area, isn't it?

0:27:010:27:05

-Yes.

-All these Polynesian islands, that sort of area.

0:27:050:27:08

And the good thing about it is it's so crisp and that's how the academics like it.

0:27:080:27:13

-Anyway, ready for this?

-Yeah.

-Shall we flog it?

-Yeah.

-Here it is.

0:27:130:27:16

The late 19th century...

0:27:160:27:17

We catalogued it as Maori, but it is Tongan,

0:27:170:27:20

with zigzag and geometric decoration. There's some interest here,

0:27:200:27:23

a number of commission bids.

0:27:230:27:25

£440, £460, £480 is bid.

0:27:250:27:29

-That's good. That's straight in at the top end.

-500, will you?

0:27:290:27:33

Commission bid of 480.

0:27:330:27:35

500, sir. 520. 540.

0:27:350:27:38

That's us out.

0:27:380:27:40

It's in the room at £540.

0:27:400:27:44

560. 580. 600.

0:27:440:27:48

And 20. 640.

0:27:480:27:50

660. It's a nod of the head, distant, then.

0:27:500:27:55

640 closest, it's with you at £640 and we're selling, closest to me then

0:27:550:28:00

at £640.

0:28:000:28:03

-Yes!

-Yes!

-Fantastic. Are you happy with that?

0:28:030:28:07

-Yes, very well.

-Over the moon with that.

-Brilliant.

0:28:070:28:10

Oh, what a minefield it is but I know that will go back to where it came from.

0:28:100:28:14

-It's part of their heritage and they want to treasure things like that.

-Right.

0:28:140:28:18

Thank you. That was the most wonderful thing and we have thoroughly enjoyed ourselves.

0:28:180:28:23

I hope you've enjoyed watching the show. So from Bearne's in Exeter until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:28:230:28:28

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:28:350:28:38

E-mail [email protected]

0:28:380:28:41

A collection of risqué magazines is among the items that turn up to be valued in Yeovil.

And Paul Martin takes a walk on the wild side when he ventures onto the moors in search of Exmoor ponies.


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