St Albans Flog It!


St Albans

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Now, who was Britain's first Christian martyr?

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This might be a clue. This marvellous cathedral

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and abbey church behind me was dedicated to him.

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He was St Alban and today,

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Flog It comes from the town named after him... St Albans.

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Even though St Alban sounds virtuous, which indeed he was,

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and I'll tell you why a bit later,

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this place is reputed to have more pubs per square mile

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than any other town in the United Kingdom.

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And this one is supposed to be the oldest in Britain.

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It's called Ye Fighting Cocks

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and it boasts many illustrious visitors,

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one of whom was Sir Walter Raleigh.

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Well, the weather is slightly inclement. It's been raining

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but thankfully there are no puddles,

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so our gallant expert, Mark Stacey, doesn't have to take his cloak off

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for the wonderful Kate Bliss. Are you enjoying this today?

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-Yeah. Loads of people.

-What have you seen so far?

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Oh, lots of interesting items, Paul. I can't wait to get them inside and unwrapped.

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Well, I think it's 9:30, the doors are open, let's get them in.

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We're in the town hall today

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and some of the owners of family heirlooms you can see below

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are getting rather excited.

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Let's see who has made it to the valuation table first.

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-Hello, Dee.

-Hello.

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It wouldn't be Flog It if we didn't have another piece of Troika.

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-Yes.

-Now, where did it come from?

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Well, it belonged to my parents,

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and in the '60s and early '70s we took many holidays in Cornwall,

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although I don't remember exactly where they bought it.

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It was probably on one of those summer holidays

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and they've had it ever since, and my father

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died several years ago and my mother has recently moved into a care home,

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so this has come to me, and I wondered if I ought to keep it

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but I think they would rather like to think that other people had seen it,

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-someone else had bought it.

-And do you like it yourself?

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I do like it, yes, I do.

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-And this looks almost the original shade?

-It is.

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So, if we take the shade off, Dee,

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and then we can have a little look at the lamp base.

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We've got a typical Troika shade...

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very geometric, very abstract, this circular shape,

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and if we turn it round,

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you've got a completely different design on the other side,

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so you can actually use all sides,

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so if you get bored with looking at that one, you turn it around.

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If we turn it upside down, we can see we've got a cover which will almost certainly be marked Troika,

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possibly then with an artist or designer signature on it,

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initials, but very much late '60s.

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I think if it was a slightly stronger colour,

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where we had a sort of dark blue background and brighter colours,

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we would probably be looking at £300, £400.

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I think because it's got that sort of paler, earthier colours,

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we're probably looking at sort of £150 to £250, with £150 reserve.

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How do you feel about flogging it?

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-Yes.

-Wonderful! Well, I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

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Thank you very much, Mark. I look forward to it as well.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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What a handsome bear, Zoe! So has he got a name?

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-Rupert.

-Rupert? Rupert the Bear!

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-Now we've got three generations here. How old are you, Zoe?

-Six.

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And this is mum, Caroline, isn't it? And we've got your grandma with us,

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so who does this bear belong to?

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-My mum.

-Your mum?

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So how did your mum come by this?

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When I was about three,

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my mum's family worked in a house in St Albans, in Hangar House.

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-Called what, sorry?

-Hangar House.

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Which is a big country house, not far from here?

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-Hangar Park in London Colney.

-OK.

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And apparently when I was three, the lady...what was her name?

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-Calladine.

-Lady Calladine, she took me upstairs to choose something from the nursery, and I chose this.

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-What a lucky girl!

-Mum said there were loads of soft lions up there,

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but I chose the bear.

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-You wanted the bear?

-Yes.

-Not interested in anything else?

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No, the bear. I don't remember it, but I still like him!

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-So has he been much loved?

-Yes, very loved, yes.

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-Ride it up and down the road!

-Did you?

-Yes. Mum lives on a hill,

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so my brother had his go kart and I had Rupert!

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-Did you have races?

-Yes!

-Poor Rupert!

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Now he's up in Mum's loft

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and that's where he's been for quite a few years, so he's just up there.

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I've got three daughters, my brother has children as well

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and you can't divide him between six children, or...

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He's in a remarkable condition

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considering you used to ride him down the hill!

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He's got lovely fur, and he's straw-filled,

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and he's got a few characteristics which help us to date him.

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If we look at his eyes, the early bears that were made -

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in Germany - of this sort of type,

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had what were called "boot black" eyes, or "boot button" eyes...

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little tiny black button eyes, rather like the buttons on boots,

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hence they got their name,

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and then from the 1920s, glass eyes replaced them

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and then from the 1950s, the plastic eyes came in,

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and I think that's what we've got here, with the amber surrounds,

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and also the wheels help us date it.

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Now I would put this probably Post-War, perhaps 1950s even,

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and we've got two little tell-tale signs as well.

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We've got a label actually on the wheels' axle, on the base here.

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It's Muhlhauser,

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and it says sportspiel, which is German for a sporting toy,

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or something that moves, basically, I think, and Muhlhauser would be the manufacturer of that metal base,

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but...is there anything else you have noticed about his ears?

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Have you seen a little button in his ear?

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-Well, you've pointed it out to us...

-But you didn't see it before?

-No.

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Well, we've got a little button here,

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which is characteristic for, really, the top of the tree

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in toy manufacturing in Germany, the factory called Steiff,

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and there were different little buttons in ears

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for different periods of manufacture

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and this also helps me to tell me that it is 1950s.

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Does it do anything else, Zoe?

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-Yes. It growls!

-Listen to that! BEAR GROWLS

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Can we hear it again? Oh, yeah! BEAR GROWLS

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Well, I think it is super that that still works. Lovely.

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So what about value? Any ideas?

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-Not at all.

-Well, if he was slightly earlier,

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if he was 1910 or slightly later,

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then we'd be talking several hundred pounds,

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but I still think

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as a sort of 1950s in date,

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he's going to be worth £100 to £150 at auction.

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Not bad for an old bear, is he? Thank you very much for bringing him along.

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-OK.

-I rather fancy him myself!

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Cathy, this doesn't look like the usual violin cases we normally see.

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Well, I presume it is a violin.

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I can see the violin bow there.

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Let's have a look. Shall I take this out?

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-Yes, please do.

-You don't sound like you're from St Albans.

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There's a slight Irish...

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There is an Irish undertone there

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but I have been made a British citizen now. You're in safe hands.

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-A St Albans citizen!

-St Albans citizen, yes.

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Well, let's move the case.

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I'm kind of getting the picture of what this is all about now.

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I like the original case, that's nice.

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The bow, that's OK.

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It's a typical student bow.

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Some bows are worth an awful lot of money

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if they're silver mounted, but this one is a typical student bow

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with probably no value whatsoever,

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but this is what is intriguing me, because it's not a violin, is it?

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-No, it isn't!

-Aah, look at that!

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It's a practice violin!

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How wonderful!

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Tell me all about this.

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Well, unfortunately, I have very little to tell you

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because it was given to my husband by an uncle

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and he gave us no information about where it came from at all.

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My husband plays the violin, but has a very long neck

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and consequently can't make use of the practice violin.

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-Can I have a look?

-You may.

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Aah! That is exquisite!

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Just look at that shape!

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That's a typical "S" scroll

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that you see on the sound holes either side on the violin.

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That is so beautiful.

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There's a little bit of age to this, you know.

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I would say that is over 100 years old.

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-Really?

-Yes, yes.

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-This is made of mahogany.

-Really?

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Yes, and obviously it would be used to practice fingering positions.

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Yes. I'm sure you're right.

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Any idea of the value?

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None whatsoever. None whatsoever.

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It has kind of puzzled me, really, because this is a hard one to value.

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I can see this quite easily doing £300, put it that way.

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Oh, goodness, wow, yes, OK.

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-That sounds good to start with, doesn't it?

-It does.

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It might even do £400. I don't want to get your hopes up.

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-No.

-But I think that is where we have got to pitch this.

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Yes, let's protect this with a fixed reserve

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-of £250...

-Mm-hm.

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..And put it into auction with a value of, hopefully £300 to £400.

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-Wonderful!

-I'm sure it will find...

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-A good home.

-..A really lovely home.

-Yes, indeed.

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Irene, James. Now, you've brought a nice gold Albert chain to show us.

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It is a family piece?

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Yes. It's my husband's.

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Is it? Where did it come from, James?

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My father gave it to me 20, 25 years ago.

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Do you think it was handed down to him by his father, or did he...?

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Really, that's where I haven't got a clue.

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I don't know where it came from originally.

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I don't know whether it has ever been used. I can assume it has,

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but I don't know for sure.

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-Have you used it yourself?

-No.

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-Have you?

-No.

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Because people do wear them, actually, these days as neck chains,

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but basically what we've got

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is a nice nine-carat gold Albert watch chain.

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This is a gentleman's accessory for keeping his pocket watch

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and other things on and we've got a nice little seal down here

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which has got bloodstone on one side

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and a cornelian on the other side.

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Not marked, so nobody has put their family crest on that,

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and that's quite a typical sort of shape.

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So, where has it lived with you all these years?

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In a little...

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leather pouch...

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In my bedside table.

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It never sees the light of day, really.

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17 years it has been in there, and Jim hasn't known!

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So, it's time for it to go?

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Yes, I think so.

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Well, gold is doing quite well at the moment, the prices are quite high

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because of the current world economic situation, and we've weighed it.

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It comes in at about 60 grams, I think.

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I would have thought we should put this in with an estimate of something like £250 to £350...

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-Wow!

-With a £250 reserve.

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Crikey! I didn't realise that.

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-Is that all right?

-That's good.

-Does that please you?

-It does.

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Better than sitting on the bedside table.

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-Yeah.

-You can put the money to better use, although it's a very attractive thing.

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That's wonderful, so I look forward to seeing you at auction,

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and let's hope you get a good price.

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Thank you very much.

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Marion and Jim, a lovely little period jewellery box.

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Always nice to see jewellery in its original case. But what's inside?

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Let's have a little look.

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We've got a super little dress ring there.

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Now, tell me, is this a family piece?

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Yes. It was a family piece of my mother's at one time,

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we possibly believe.

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So, do you remember your mother wearing this, Jim?

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I remember my mother wearing a ring similar to that.

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Because it was so long ago, I can't swear that was the actual ring.

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-OK.

-So I'm now thinking that is too large.

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So we're not sure whether this is her engagement ring or not?

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-No. We're not.

-OK. Well, certainly, looking at it

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from a jeweller's point of view,

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it certainly could well be an engagement ring.

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I would think, probably, between the wars. Possibly 1930s.

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Maybe a little bit earlier.

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We've got old cut diamond, what we call old cut.

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These ones are slightly duller.

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And diamonds are also graded according to their colour.

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These are slightly tinged with a browny colour,

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so that they're towards the lesser good quality end of the scale.

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What you would expect from stones of this sort of size

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in this sort of quality ring.

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And then we've got a sapphire in the centre.

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And the sapphire is called trap cut, or step cut.

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You can see why with that square shape

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and then the step up to what we call a table, the top of the stone.

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And that's actually quite a good cut for an engagement ring.

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It's in a rubover setting so it doesn't sit too proud.

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So you could wear it every day as engagement rings were designed to be.

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Even do the washing-up in that one.

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Sapphires vary a lot in their blue tone.

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Sapphires from Burma and Sri Lanka and India tend to be

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slightly lighter in colour and you can see that in mine.

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That much lighter blue colour.

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And what we call the more inky stones are generally from Australia

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and from Thailand. What about value?

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-Any ideas?

-Haven't got a clue.

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I think the condition of this sapphire will affect the value quite a bit.

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At auction, I think we've got to be looking at probably 150 to 200.

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I would hope it would make the 200, possibly 250 on a good day,

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if two people like it.

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It would be sensible to set a reserve at 150, if you're happy with that.

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-Yes.

-Yes.

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-So no regrets about getting rid of it?

-No.

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No. Don't think so.

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If you come to Tring during the school holidays,

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you're going to find this building full of excited schoolchildren.

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And they're absolutely loving this place.

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They've been brought here by family that are in the know,

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because this place, it's a real hidden gem.

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It's part of the Natural History Museum.

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Coming here to the Natural History Museum at Tring

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is like stepping back in time

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and visiting a museum straight out of the Victorian era.

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The museum was built in 1889 for the second Baron Rothschild,

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Walter, who turned out to be one of the country's greatest

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collectors of natural history.

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Walter had been obsessed by the natural world from an early age

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and by the time he was ten, he had amassed a collection of insects

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and birds large enough to start his first museum in a garden shed.

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But before long, his collections were filling rented rooms and sheds all over Tring.

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The museum was built as a 21st birthday present from his father,

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to provide a permanent place for them all to be housed.

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For the next 18 years, under duress,

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Walter went to work for the family's banking business,

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but during that time, he spent all his money, his energies

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and his enthusiasm on this place,

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creating possibly the greatest ever natural history collection

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ever assembled by one man.

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His collections included thousands of mammals, reptiles and fish.

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It had everything from gorillas through to hummingbirds

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and even a group of domestic dogs.

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I'm here to meet Katrina Cook, who's a curator here

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at the museum's ornithological department,

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whose passion with animals also started when she was really young.

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Pleased to meet you. So, when and where did it all start?

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It was my mother's fault! When I was very, very young,

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she'd bring me here to the museum

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at least every week of every school holidays.

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I can't remember the first time I came cos every time,

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as you walk in the door, there's that great wow factor, when you walk in

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and see the polar bear. Even now, I've spent a lifetime coming,

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there's always new exhibits to see that you hadn't noticed before.

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But also, I draw and I was obsessive about drawing. In fact, at 11,

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I tried to draw all the birds on the British list.

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-Oh, wow. Did you get through them?

-I've got about halfway. Not too bad.

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Always obsessed with animals. My room was a museum.

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It was full of skins and wings and pinned insects and things.

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-Fantastic.

-I stuffed my first bat at seven.

-Did you really?

-I did. Yeah.

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-At home?

-At home.

-What did your friends think of you doing this,

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cos they're all into their dolls, probably?

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I don't actually think I had many!

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Most young girls get into ponies and horses.

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You got into bats and taxidermy!

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Walter must have been quite an incredible man.

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Possibly slightly eccentric, don't you think?

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I think all natural historians have a slight tendency towards eccentricity

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and Walter had the dangerous combination

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-of sort of money with the madness.

-He's got a lot in common with you!

0:18:070:18:11

-If only you could have met!

-We would have got on like a house on fire.

-Yes!

0:18:110:18:14

# Wild thing... #

0:18:140:18:17

Walter was a complete eccentric.

0:18:170:18:19

He had kept an extraordinary menagerie of exotic animals

0:18:190:18:22

at his home in nearby Tring Park. Among them were kangaroos,

0:18:220:18:26

a tame wolf, 64 cassowaries

0:18:260:18:29

and a giant tortoise.

0:18:290:18:30

He could often be seen in his coach,

0:18:300:18:32

being drawn by zebras, both locally

0:18:320:18:34

and on the occasional trip to the capital.

0:18:340:18:37

Some of the animals which Walter brought back, both alive and dead,

0:18:440:18:48

from his travels and the collecting expeditions that he financed,

0:18:480:18:52

you know, had never been seen before.

0:18:520:18:54

It's really important to remember that not only was he an

0:18:540:18:57

eccentric scientist and a man who did crazy things, but he was also

0:18:570:19:02

a very, very, very serious natural historian

0:19:020:19:04

and made an enormous contribution

0:19:040:19:06

to the understanding of science at that time.

0:19:060:19:08

Your department, the ornithological department,

0:19:080:19:11

that's not open to the general public,

0:19:110:19:13

so can I have a sneak behind the scenes, please?

0:19:130:19:15

-I think we can arrange that.

-OK. This way?

0:19:150:19:18

Follow me.

0:19:180:19:19

The Natural History Museum moved its ornithological collection

0:19:220:19:25

from London to Tring in the 1970s.

0:19:250:19:28

There are 17,000 specimens preserved in jars

0:19:280:19:32

and 16,000 bird skeletons.

0:19:320:19:35

Most impressively, there are almost 700,000 bird skins,

0:19:350:19:39

95% of the world's species.

0:19:390:19:43

How do the birds vary from the mounts, then?

0:19:430:19:46

What's the difference in stuffing them?

0:19:460:19:49

Well, these are what we call skins as opposed to mounts. So they're all

0:19:490:19:54

prepared just lying flat.

0:19:540:19:56

They've got just cotton wool for eyes. They don't need glass eyes.

0:19:560:20:00

They don't have to be wired into a lifelike position.

0:20:000:20:03

This way, they're easier for scientists to look at and measure

0:20:030:20:06

and compare one with another.

0:20:060:20:08

Can I have a look at that? Is that a parakeet?

0:20:080:20:10

That certainly is. That's not just any old parakeet.

0:20:100:20:13

Why? What's different about it?

0:20:130:20:14

This is a Carolina parakeet, which is now extinct in the wild.

0:20:140:20:17

And this is also prepared by the famous artist, John James Audubon,

0:20:170:20:22

who produced a mammoth book of the birds of America.

0:20:220:20:25

You do this as well here, don't you?

0:20:250:20:28

-Actually prepare specimens?

-Part of your job remit?

0:20:280:20:30

Oh, yes. It certainly is. Yep.

0:20:300:20:31

We're adding to the collection all the time. Nowadays, we're not going out and shooting.

0:20:310:20:36

We rely on people to bring birds in to us that they found dead.

0:20:360:20:40

How do you go about preserving this bird?

0:20:400:20:43

OK. When the bird's freshly dead,

0:20:430:20:45

you make an incision from here, mid-sternum,

0:20:450:20:48

down to the vent and then prise the skin away from the actual body.

0:20:480:20:52

Some of the bones stay in. The bones of the legs and the wings.

0:20:520:20:55

-OK.

-Skull, that's the original skull in there, as well.

0:20:550:20:58

So you're literally just taking the skin off the carcass of the bird

0:20:580:21:02

and then when it's all off,

0:21:020:21:04

-make a false body the same size to go back into the skin again.

-Right. OK.

0:21:040:21:08

It's not as gory as people think.

0:21:080:21:10

Now, I believe in this section somewhere,

0:21:100:21:14

there's something quite special you're going to show me?

0:21:140:21:16

-They're all special.

-To you, they are, aren't they?

-Yes.

0:21:160:21:19

I think you're probably referring to these little chaps.

0:21:190:21:22

-Gosh.

-These are Galapagos finches.

0:21:220:21:24

Some of these were actually collected by Charles Darwin himself.

0:21:240:21:27

Is that his handwriting as well?

0:21:270:21:29

No, none of these bear Darwin's original labels,

0:21:290:21:32

but I can show you a bird, not a Galapagos finch,

0:21:320:21:35

but it is one of Darwin's. Most of Darwin's specimens

0:21:350:21:38

don't actually have his own labels on anymore. They were taken off.

0:21:380:21:42

-But this chappy, this is a bobolink, an American bird. It's...

-3374.

0:21:420:21:46

3374, in Darwin's own fair hand.

0:21:460:21:49

Absolutely incredible. It is such a fascinating place, Katrina.

0:21:490:21:53

Thank you so much for showing me around

0:21:530:21:55

and especially behind the scenes.

0:21:550:21:57

Most welcome. My pleasure.

0:21:570:21:59

Well, we're seeing such a variety of items here today,

0:22:070:22:11

but right now it is time to put our experts' theories to the test,

0:22:110:22:14

and find out if they're on the money.

0:22:140:22:16

It's our first visit to the sale room. Here are the items we're taking with us.

0:22:160:22:21

Pity about the colour, Dee!

0:22:250:22:27

Blue might have been better, but Troika always does well.

0:22:270:22:30

Zoe's Steiff bear, Rupert, climbed out of the loft

0:22:330:22:36

straight into the auction room,

0:22:360:22:38

where, with a bit of luck, he's going to find a new home.

0:22:380:22:41

BEAR GRUNTS

0:22:410:22:43

What an unusual piece! I'm hoping there will be plenty of bidders

0:22:430:22:46

in the sale room who might appreciate Cathy's shapely practice violin.

0:22:460:22:52

And with gold prices riding high,

0:22:520:22:54

Irene and James' chain should do really well.

0:22:540:22:58

Or will Kate's choice, the sapphire and gold ring,

0:22:580:23:01

turn out to be the real jewel in the crown?

0:23:010:23:04

Now, I wonder whose heirlooms will be tempting the bidders today

0:23:060:23:10

at Tring Market Auction.

0:23:100:23:13

Well, it's nearly auction time.

0:23:130:23:15

You've just heard what our valuers think back at the valuation day,

0:23:150:23:18

but what does Steven Hearn think, our auctioneer?

0:23:180:23:21

Let's get his opinion.

0:23:210:23:23

This is a bit of quality. It belongs to Irene and James.

0:23:230:23:26

It's a nine-carat fob chain.

0:23:260:23:29

We've got £250 to £350 on here.

0:23:290:23:33

"Phew!" Well, gold is fetching a lot of money right now.

0:23:330:23:36

Well, yes. We're in a period of good pricing for gold

0:23:360:23:38

and other precious metals, and it's just right

0:23:380:23:41

for that gentleman about town, PAUL, isn't it?!

0:23:410:23:45

That's right, gentleman about town.

0:23:450:23:47

I don't like the bloodstone, though.

0:23:470:23:49

Oh, dear! Well, it's a good weight, you know.

0:23:490:23:52

You've got 60 grams,

0:23:520:23:54

excluding the fob, so if you start breaking it down,

0:23:540:23:58

and also a lot of the value now can be attributed to the fact

0:23:580:24:03

that unfortunately,

0:24:030:24:04

once it moves on from the sale room we could have two ladies' bracelets,

0:24:040:24:10

we could have a pendant, or we could just have it... With 60 grams,

0:24:100:24:14

60 grams at metal prices today...

0:24:140:24:17

-Scrap metal.

-..That's going to achieve its reserve for scrap metal!

0:24:170:24:20

And it may get broken up by the trade, so it has legs, hasn't it?

0:24:200:24:24

I think so. I think so, and I think

0:24:240:24:28

we could be close to £500.

0:24:280:24:31

-Suits you!

-Suits me!

0:24:310:24:34

This Troika lamp should light up the room. Your mum bought this in Cornwall, didn't she?

0:24:420:24:47

Yes, she did. My mum and dad, on a holiday in Cornwall

0:24:470:24:50

and she's now moved into a care home.

0:24:500:24:53

-Does she mind you flogging it?

-Oh, no! She's given her permission.

0:24:530:24:56

She's very happy for us to sell it

0:24:560:24:58

and she'd like the money to go towards my daughter's wedding.

0:24:580:25:01

Oh, how super! She will be watching this!

0:25:010:25:03

-Yes, she will!

-I think you'll enjoy this and what a great way of putting money towards the wedding.

0:25:030:25:08

We've got lots of Troika in today's sale.

0:25:080:25:10

-Which is a good thing.

-The buyers are here, the collectors are here.

0:25:100:25:14

-Let's find out what this is going to do.

-Let's.

-This is going under the hammer now.

0:25:140:25:19

Lot number 214.

0:25:190:25:20

Troika, and we have the vase and the shade is in the store.

0:25:200:25:23

£100 to start me, thank you. £100 I'm bid then.

0:25:230:25:26

And ten I have bid now. 120... and 30. Are you 40, sir?

0:25:260:25:30

140, 50 is it? £150 now.

0:25:300:25:35

And 60 I'm bid for.

0:25:350:25:36

And 70 now. No? 160 then.

0:25:360:25:39

60, we've reached it.

0:25:390:25:41

Thank you. At £160, then. Thank you.

0:25:410:25:44

He sold it - £160!

0:25:440:25:46

-Brilliant, brilliant!

-That's not bad, is it!

0:25:460:25:48

No. That might pay for my outfit!

0:25:480:25:51

No, it will pay for the hat!

0:25:510:25:53

You know as well as I do, a wedding is so expensive, isn't it?

0:25:530:25:57

-But it will pay for...

-I'll tell you what you can do. You could buy the shoes and hire the hat for that!

0:25:570:26:02

Yes, what a brilliant idea!

0:26:020:26:04

Thank you, Paul!

0:26:040:26:06

We see plenty of Steiff bears on the show, and they all go,

0:26:140:26:17

but a Steiff with wheels, that's definitely going to go!

0:26:170:26:20

It's about to go under the hammer.

0:26:200:26:22

I've been joined by the gorgeous Zoe, Kate, and, of course,

0:26:220:26:26

mum and grandma - Maureen and Caroline.

0:26:260:26:28

Three generations are going to wave off... What's teddy called?

0:26:280:26:32

-Rupert.

-Rupert! They're all going to wave Rupert off!

0:26:320:26:36

We've got £100 to £150, so what are you going to do with the money?

0:26:360:26:40

Hopefully we're going to get loads.

0:26:400:26:42

I'll put it in the building society for my three daughters.

0:26:420:26:45

I think we could do... ooh, £250 hopefully.

0:26:450:26:48

Well, there are two other bears in the sale.

0:26:480:26:51

They're just ordinary teddy bears and they've actually got good labels too,

0:26:510:26:55

so I think that will attract the toy buyers.

0:26:550:26:57

-I think it is in for a good chance.

-Right. Good luck, you two.

0:26:570:27:00

Good luck, Zoe. It's going under the hammer now.

0:27:000:27:03

Lot number ten. We have now the Steiff pull-along bear.

0:27:030:27:07

This is a lovely one.

0:27:070:27:08

What a lovely condition this is in. Isn't that a grand one?

0:27:080:27:12

Rupert's going! Oh, no!

0:27:120:27:13

At least, we think he's going!

0:27:130:27:14

120 for him, 80 for him.

0:27:140:27:16

Are you £80, madam? £80. £90.

0:27:160:27:19

Are you £100?

0:27:190:27:21

Yes, 100 I'm bid then.

0:27:210:27:22

100 for the bear. £110 I am bid now for it.

0:27:220:27:26

£120. £130 now...

0:27:260:27:28

-It's going up, Zoe!

-140. 150, sir.

0:27:280:27:31

£150. And 60, and 170 we have now.

0:27:310:27:35

170 for him. Are you 80?

0:27:350:27:37

180, yes, that's... 190 now.

0:27:370:27:40

180, then, I'm selling bear.

0:27:400:27:43

At £180 then. Thank you very much.

0:27:430:27:45

-Yes. Great result!

-Well, done!

-Yeah!

0:27:450:27:48

-180!

-Rupert has done the business!

0:27:480:27:50

180!

0:27:500:27:52

We're all happy with that, aren't we? Lots of smiles?

0:27:520:27:55

-Yes.

-They can share the 80, I'll have the 100.

-Sorry?

0:27:550:28:00

She'll have the 100. They can share the 80!

0:28:000:28:03

-What a smart cookie!

-That is a shrewd business lady down there!

0:28:030:28:07

Right. My turn to be the expert. I've just been joined by Cathy

0:28:140:28:17

and we've got that wonderful "S" scroll training violin,

0:28:170:28:20

it doesn't make a lot of noise, so you can put up with somebody practising

0:28:200:28:24

and learning their fingering.

0:28:240:28:26

-Yes indeed.

-It is a great cause. All the money is going to charity,

0:28:260:28:29

so tell us a little bit about it.

0:28:290:28:31

Well, I have been a volunteer for many years at Grove House in St Albans.

0:28:310:28:34

It is the local day hospice and we treat not only cancer patients,

0:28:340:28:39

but patients with other life-threatening illnesses

0:28:390:28:42

and we have to raise an awful lot of money

0:28:420:28:45

so anything that we can do, we like to in order to boost the funds.

0:28:450:28:48

-Right. So we need top dollar, right here, right now, don't we, basically?

-We'll do our best.

0:28:480:28:53

We'll find out because it's going under the hammer.

0:28:530:28:56

There we are, the training violin.

0:28:560:28:58

I think that one, we ought to be looking somewhere in the region

0:28:580:29:01

of £300 for it, surely.

0:29:010:29:02

300, 200 for it.

0:29:020:29:04

Yes, at £200 then.

0:29:040:29:06

At £210. Are you 20? 30 now

0:29:060:29:09

and 240 and 250, is it? At £260.

0:29:090:29:14

and 70 now... 280 and 90. No?

0:29:140:29:18

At £280... then I'm selling at £280.

0:29:180:29:22

-Thank you.

-Yes! That's OK, isn't it?

-It will do very nicely, thank you.

0:29:220:29:26

-He sold it. Just did it, just, just, just did it.

-Mmm-hmm.

0:29:260:29:31

Jim and Marion, Kate, good luck.

0:29:330:29:35

It's just about to go under the hammer.

0:29:350:29:37

It's that gold and sapphire ring. We've got £150 on this.

0:29:370:29:40

You never thought of wearing it, did you?

0:29:400:29:43

-Too small.

-Too small. Wouldn't get past the knuckle.

0:29:430:29:45

With jewellery, you have to wear it.

0:29:450:29:47

-There's no point sticking it in the bank.

-No, no. No.

0:29:470:29:50

So, hopefully, someone's going to fall in love with it.

0:29:500:29:53

It's going under the hammer.

0:29:530:29:55

Good-looking gold, sapphire and diamond ring.

0:29:550:29:57

Are we going to bid £200 for it?

0:29:570:29:59

£100 bid. 100, I'm bid there now.

0:29:590:30:01

10. Thank you. 120, I've got. 130.

0:30:010:30:04

And 40, I'm bid. 140. And 50 now.

0:30:040:30:07

At 150. And 60?

0:30:070:30:09

A bit more. A bit more. A bit more.

0:30:090:30:12

No more? At £160, then.

0:30:120:30:15

I'm selling at £160.

0:30:150:30:18

Yes! £160. The hammer's gone down.

0:30:180:30:22

Good valuation. It's a hard pitch, isn't it?

0:30:220:30:24

Yeah. I think it's cos that sapphire is really quite worn.

0:30:240:30:27

It's obviously been worn and loved and the wear on the stones

0:30:270:30:30

is going to count against it, but it's a fair price.

0:30:300:30:33

Remember that swivel!

0:30:420:30:43

My word, didn't it go on the end of that Albert watch chain.

0:30:430:30:46

It belongs to James and Irene.

0:30:460:30:48

We're looking for around £300, aren't we? £250 to £350.

0:30:480:30:53

Had a chat to the auctioneer and he said it's got to do that.

0:30:530:30:56

The gold is worth that at scrap value.

0:30:560:30:58

Unfortunately that is what you judge a lot of these values on,

0:30:580:31:02

because the fob itself, while it is quite nice quality, it is not rare,

0:31:020:31:05

it is not 18th century,

0:31:050:31:06

it hasn't got a good armorial or anything like that on it,

0:31:060:31:09

so it basically is the gold value

0:31:090:31:11

and we're riding a bit of a high in gold at the moment.

0:31:110:31:13

-It's selling well.

-The right time to sell it.

-It's going under the hammer. This is it.

0:31:130:31:18

Very fine quality Albert chain, with the bloodstone swivel fob.

0:31:180:31:22

Lot 586. Where do we start for this one?

0:31:220:31:25

Do we start at 200? Thank you.

0:31:250:31:26

200, I'm bid there. At 220...

0:31:260:31:29

That's a good in.

0:31:290:31:30

240, 260, at 280, £300, 320,

0:31:300:31:35

340, 360, 380...

0:31:350:31:38

Wow, they love it!

0:31:380:31:40

£400, 420, 450, 480,

0:31:400:31:44

£500, 520, 520.

0:31:440:31:47

On my right at 520, then.

0:31:470:31:49

You lose it, sir. I'm selling on the right here.

0:31:490:31:51

It's going for £520. Sold.

0:31:510:31:54

Yeah, £520! James, you were standing with your mouth open!

0:31:540:31:58

Good grief!

0:31:580:32:01

-Wow!

-That was wonderful!

0:32:010:32:03

Just goes to show, doesn't it? If you've got stuff like this

0:32:030:32:05

lying around, bring it into one of our valuation days.

0:32:050:32:08

We'd love to see you. You can get details on our BBC website or just check details in your local press.

0:32:080:32:13

Come on, bring it along!

0:32:130:32:15

Have you ever wondered what is behind the name of the village,

0:32:250:32:28

the town or the city that you live in?

0:32:280:32:30

Well, sometimes the answer can often reveal a fascinating glimpse

0:32:300:32:34

into the historical events that have shaped the place you live in,

0:32:340:32:38

and St Albans, well, that's definitely no exception.

0:32:380:32:41

During the Roman occupation in the third century AD,

0:32:430:32:46

St Albans was called Verulamium.

0:32:460:32:49

It was the second largest town in the Britain.

0:32:490:32:52

You can still see remnants of the Roman occupation here today.

0:32:520:32:56

The ruins of St Albans' Roman theatre, for example,

0:32:560:33:01

were unearthed in 1847.

0:33:010:33:03

This was the scene of all sorts of Pagan ceremonies and entertainments

0:33:030:33:07

played out in front of several thousand cheering spectators.

0:33:070:33:13

Now, among the crowd here, some 1800 years ago,

0:33:130:33:16

was a man whose name would go down in history.

0:33:160:33:19

And he was called Alban.

0:33:190:33:22

St Alban was the first Christian martyr in Britain and is venerated

0:33:280:33:32

to this day by the cathedral for his integrity,

0:33:320:33:35

courage and self-sacrifice.

0:33:350:33:37

And someone who knows all about Alban's extraordinary life story

0:33:400:33:44

is Jeffrey John, the Dean of St Albans Cathedral.

0:33:440:33:48

So, tell me about this extraordinary man, Alban.

0:33:480:33:51

Well, Alban was a citizen of Verulamium,

0:33:510:33:54

that's the Roman city that is down the hill from the cathedral.

0:33:540:34:00

It was one of the biggest of the Roman cities.

0:34:000:34:03

Alban lived around about the middle of the third century, about 250 AD,

0:34:030:34:09

and it was a time when the Christian faith

0:34:090:34:14

fell in and out of favour with the empire.

0:34:140:34:16

It all rather depended on the whim of the Emperor whether Christianity was legal or not.

0:34:160:34:21

Alban himself was not a Christian, he was a Pagan.

0:34:210:34:24

He would have worshipped the old Roman gods and sacrificed to the Emperor as citizens had to do,

0:34:240:34:30

but the important thing is

0:34:300:34:32

that he befriended a Christian priest

0:34:320:34:36

at a time when Christianity was out of favour

0:34:360:34:40

and when a time of serious persecution came,

0:34:400:34:42

he took him into his house, he hid him from the authorities.

0:34:420:34:45

This is despite the fact that he wasn't Christian himself,

0:34:450:34:49

but he must have been impressed by this priest,

0:34:490:34:51

and began to learn a little bit about Jesus and about the Christian faith.

0:34:510:34:56

But of course, the day came when the Roman soldiers were looking for him,

0:34:560:35:00

came to the house and Alban protected the priest by changing clothes with him.

0:35:000:35:04

Because Alban was a citizen, he had a special cloak.

0:35:040:35:07

The priest, by taking the cloak, would have been able to pass

0:35:070:35:10

through the guards, through the city walls and escape, which he did.

0:35:100:35:14

Alban took the priest's garb, so he was wearing a priest's cloak

0:35:140:35:17

and when the soldiers came they therefore arrested Alban as the priest, so he took his place.

0:35:170:35:23

Incredibly brave, deeply Christian thing to do.

0:35:230:35:26

So Alban was taken to the Roman forum, put on trial

0:35:290:35:32

and asked his name and religion.

0:35:320:35:35

He replied, "My name is Alban and I'm Christian".

0:35:350:35:38

This was enough to incriminate him and he was taken to be beheaded

0:35:380:35:42

on the site of where the cathedral stands today.

0:35:420:35:45

Legend tells us that spring water miraculously

0:35:480:35:52

popped up out of nowhere

0:35:520:35:54

and began to refresh Alban right at the moment of his death,

0:35:540:35:58

and on seeing this, his executioner refused to carry out the deed

0:35:580:36:03

and converted to the faith, there and then.

0:36:030:36:06

He was also beheaded and became Britain's second martyr.

0:36:060:36:10

His replacement, another executioner who did carry out the execution

0:36:100:36:15

on Alban, is said to have gone blind shortly after.

0:36:150:36:20

His eyes literally fell out.

0:36:200:36:23

Now that is an incredible story.

0:36:230:36:26

Do you think we can witness the same sort of courage today, Jeffrey?

0:36:360:36:41

Well, there's an answer here, I think. Here we've got a...

0:36:410:36:44

Gosh! Brightly coloured!

0:36:440:36:46

-They are, yes.

-They would have been originally, wouldn't they?

0:36:460:36:48

Yes. The Medieval statues would have been very brightly coloured. These are very modern ones.

0:36:480:36:53

These were made by our young people here at the abbey.

0:36:530:36:56

They're actually made of papier mache.

0:36:560:36:58

-Very clever, very lightweight.

-Yes, they are!

0:36:580:37:01

Yes, they were made by a group of our young people for our pilgrimage

0:37:010:37:05

and they represent modern martyrs.

0:37:050:37:08

We've got Alban in the middle there, with St Amphibalus, the priest

0:37:080:37:12

that he rescued on his left, but all the others are 20th century martyrs.

0:37:120:37:16

I can recognise one - that's Martin Luther King.

0:37:160:37:19

That's Martin Luther King, yes.

0:37:190:37:21

Then on Amphibalus's left here, we have Manche Masemola.

0:37:210:37:25

She is a South African martyr, a young girl

0:37:250:37:27

who was converted to Christianity

0:37:270:37:30

but very much against the wishes of her family, and very tragically,

0:37:300:37:34

her martyrdom, her death, was arranged by her own parents.

0:37:340:37:37

She was stoned to death in the Transvaal, that was about 1928.

0:37:370:37:42

And then more famously, I think, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, right at the end,

0:37:420:37:46

of course, was martyred under the Nazis in 1945,

0:37:460:37:50

just right at the end of the War.

0:37:500:37:52

-It looks like St Alban is in good company today!

-Absolutely.

0:37:520:37:55

I wonder how many people today know the remarkable tale of heroism

0:37:570:38:01

attached to the city of St Albans

0:38:010:38:03

or that their home town's name commemorates a man

0:38:030:38:06

who was prepared to give his life for what he believed in.

0:38:060:38:09

St Alban is buried in the tomb behind me, and as you can see,

0:38:120:38:15

the stonemason's work is absolutely incredible.

0:38:150:38:18

His shrine really is the centrepiece of the cathedral,

0:38:180:38:22

and for nearly two millennia, thousands of Christians

0:38:220:38:25

have made the pilgrimage to his final resting place.

0:38:250:38:29

Back in St Alban's town hall,

0:38:360:38:38

Kate has found something for a sweet tooth.

0:38:380:38:42

Lynne, I would call this a pretty smart silver sugar caster.

0:38:420:38:45

But I doubt you use it, do you?

0:38:450:38:46

No, not at all. It's kept in the cupboard.

0:38:460:38:48

-Is it?

-Yes.

-Stashed away?

-Yes, it certainly is.

0:38:480:38:51

Where did it come from?

0:38:510:38:52

It was actually a wedding anniversary present for my parents

0:38:520:38:56

for their 25th wedding anniversary.

0:38:560:38:58

OK. So how long ago was that?

0:38:580:39:01

-Mid '80s, I think that was.

-OK. Right.

0:39:010:39:04

So, do you like it?

0:39:040:39:05

Yes, I like it,

0:39:050:39:07

but it's not, sort of to my taste to actually have out on display.

0:39:070:39:11

The sad thing is, they're just not very practical these days.

0:39:110:39:14

People don't need sugar casters really. I know in the States

0:39:140:39:18

they sprinkle on their doughnuts,

0:39:180:39:20

but today, we don't use them in this country at all.

0:39:200:39:22

-No, no.

-I have to say, the design

0:39:220:39:25

dates right back to the mid 18th century, to about 1760,

0:39:250:39:29

the Georgian period, when things, of course,

0:39:290:39:33

would have been used at the table

0:39:330:39:36

in a pretty well-to-do household in the dining room and would have

0:39:360:39:40

been a very normal accoutrement to have on the dining table.

0:39:400:39:45

It's what I call a baluster shape,

0:39:450:39:47

obviously with this pierced lid here, which comes off.

0:39:470:39:51

There we go.

0:39:520:39:53

So we've got the hallmark just here, as you would expect, on the side,

0:39:530:39:57

dated for London 1894 and these initials here,

0:39:570:40:02

"GM", stand for GM Jackson, who is the silversmith, quite well known.

0:40:020:40:07

-Yeah.

-But the date, I just told you, is 1894.

0:40:070:40:10

So it is a Victorian piece,

0:40:100:40:12

although the design goes right back to the Georgian period.

0:40:120:40:15

-Oh, right!

-So, I am afraid the good news is, if it was Georgian,

0:40:150:40:19

it would be about £600 to £800 at auction.

0:40:190:40:22

The bad news is that it is Victorian,

0:40:220:40:26

-and, if you like, it is in the Georgian style.

-Yes.

0:40:260:40:29

And as it is, it is worth £60 to £90.

0:40:290:40:33

Right. I won't moan at that.

0:40:330:40:36

-If you're not using it...

-Yes.

-..it's going to be a bonus.

0:40:360:40:39

-That's right, yes.

-So you're not worried about getting rid of it?

0:40:390:40:42

-Not at all.

-Pleased to see the back of it?

0:40:420:40:45

-Yep!

-Well, thank you very much for bringing it along.

-Thank you. Thanks.

0:40:450:40:49

-Hello, Neil.

-Hello.

-One of my favourite items.

0:41:030:41:05

Now, Geoffrey Baxter for Whitefriars, this Banjo vase.

0:41:050:41:09

Tell me about it. Where did you get it from?

0:41:090:41:11

Well, I used to work in a department store up in Oxford Street,

0:41:110:41:15

and Whitefriars were clearing out a warehouse,

0:41:150:41:19

and they found a load of vases,

0:41:190:41:22

and they were selling them for 15 shillings or 75 pence.

0:41:220:41:27

-75 pence?

-And it didn't matter

0:41:270:41:29

whether it was a large vase like that

0:41:290:41:31

or one of the small Whitefriars' vases.

0:41:310:41:34

-So you bought it for 75p?

-Yes, I bought it for 75 pence,

0:41:340:41:37

and in fact, on the first day of clearance,

0:41:370:41:41

only about half a dozen vases went out on display.

0:41:410:41:44

They were bought by the staff, weren't they?

0:41:440:41:46

Most of the staff bought them for wedding presents.

0:41:460:41:48

-Of course, at that sort of price! It's amazing, isn't it?

-It is indeed.

0:41:480:41:52

And you've had it on display, have you, at home?

0:41:520:41:54

-Yes, but it's been at my parents' house.

-Oh, right.

0:41:540:41:57

And my dad's not very well,

0:41:570:41:59

so basically, we would like to buy him something with it.

0:41:590:42:03

To cheer him up? Oh, wonderful!

0:42:030:42:06

Well, I hope we can, because I think...

0:42:060:42:08

We can certainly turn 75p into a bit of a profit,

0:42:080:42:12

because this particular shape vase - the Banjo vase -

0:42:120:42:15

comes, of course, in 12 different colourways,

0:42:150:42:18

and depending on the colour, depends on the value, really.

0:42:180:42:22

Those striking ones, all the rare colours that were tried,

0:42:220:42:25

but weren't commercial, so weren't produced so much.

0:42:250:42:29

This is the willow pattern, which isn't the more sought-after design.

0:42:290:42:33

-Oh, no, but for 15 shillings...

-For 15 shillings...

0:42:330:42:36

You had not much choice, really.

0:42:360:42:38

No, no, but it's fantastic,

0:42:380:42:40

and we've done a lot of Whitefriars on the show,

0:42:400:42:42

so we all know how it was made.

0:42:420:42:44

Now, we know it was by Geoffrey Baxter,

0:42:440:42:46

but it still remains quite popular,

0:42:460:42:48

although the prices have become more realistic

0:42:480:42:50

than they were two or three years ago, so my estimate

0:42:500:42:54

-on this would be somewhere around £500 to £700.

-That would be fine!

0:42:540:42:58

-So quite a lot more than the 75p!

-Indeed!

-Which is really good news.

0:42:580:43:02

We'll put the reserve at £500, with 10% discretion,

0:43:020:43:07

but I think, you know, we'll have...

0:43:070:43:09

Hopefully, there'll be a few other bits of Whitefriars in the sale

0:43:090:43:12

-and that will rub together and we'll get a good price.

-Let's hope so.

0:43:120:43:16

-And you're happy to flog it now?

-Yes, indeed.

-Wonderful!

0:43:160:43:19

-I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

-Thank you.

0:43:190:43:22

Denise, what a splendid piggy-wig!

0:43:330:43:35

Isn't he great?

0:43:350:43:36

Yes, he's lovely. Always loved him.

0:43:360:43:38

-Do you feel quite attached to him?

-Well, I do, really.

0:43:380:43:41

He belonged to my husband's nana, and he used to sit on her hearth,

0:43:410:43:45

and when she passed away,

0:43:450:43:47

it was the first thing I said, could I have?

0:43:470:43:50

What can you tell me about the manufacturer of him?

0:43:500:43:53

Do you know what factory he is?

0:43:530:43:55

-He's Wemyss, which is a Scottish factory.

-That's right.

0:43:550:43:58

And I know they closed in the 1930s.

0:43:580:44:01

The factory was in Fife, in Scotland,

0:44:010:44:03

-named after Wemyss Castle and the family who lived there.

-Oh, right!

0:44:030:44:08

So it wasn't the manufacturer, then?

0:44:080:44:10

-No.

-Ah!

-And if we just have a look underneath,

0:44:100:44:13

I'm just looking for the all-important mark,

0:44:130:44:16

and there we go, so we've got the standard mark here,

0:44:160:44:20

impressed on the base, and that helps us to date it as well.

0:44:200:44:23

We've got Wemyss Ware there.

0:44:230:44:25

I would say he's roughly sort of circa 1900.

0:44:250:44:27

-Oh, right!

-Perhaps a little bit later.

0:44:270:44:30

The factory started in 1880, but in 1883, a very important man joined.

0:44:300:44:35

His name was Karel Nekola. He was actually a Bohemian designer,

0:44:350:44:39

and he brought to the factory a very distinctive hand-painted style,

0:44:390:44:45

which is what you normally associate with Wemyss,

0:44:450:44:47

and instead of this sort of lime green glaze,

0:44:470:44:50

he hand-decorated useful and ornamental wares

0:44:500:44:54

with big cabbage roses, with animals...

0:44:540:44:59

The most sought-after of his designs are cockerels and hens...

0:44:590:45:02

-I didn't know that!

-Or ducks amongst reeds, which he hand-painted.

0:45:020:45:05

I have to say, the hand-decorated wares are more commercial.

0:45:050:45:10

They're a little bit prettier, and I have noticed,

0:45:100:45:13

-sadly, he's lost his tail!

-Yes, he's missing his tail!

0:45:130:45:16

Did that happen when he came to you?

0:45:160:45:19

-No. He was always like that.

-Right.

0:45:190:45:20

I guess it was because he was against the hearth.

0:45:200:45:23

So what about value?

0:45:230:45:25

You've always been attached to him, you say. What about monetary value?

0:45:250:45:29

I've always thought he was collectable,

0:45:290:45:32

but I've never really known how much he was worth,

0:45:320:45:35

because he is a plain glaze.

0:45:350:45:37

I know the ones that are painted are more valuable,

0:45:370:45:40

-so that's why I brought him along today.

-OK.

0:45:400:45:43

-I can see a collector paying £400 to £600 for him...

-Really?

0:45:430:45:49

..certainly at auction.

0:45:490:45:50

-Would it be all right to put a reserve on?

-Certainly. Yes.

0:45:500:45:53

-I would suggest a reserve at the bottom level, so at £400.

-Right.

0:45:530:45:56

-OK.

-I certainly hope he would fetch that.

-Yes, I would as well.

0:45:560:45:59

Will you be sad to see him go?

0:45:590:46:01

I will, in a way, but then, my husband has just retired and we're

0:46:010:46:05

planning on spreading our wings, so we don't want to take a pig with us!

0:46:050:46:09

-Hello, Robert.

-Hello.

0:46:160:46:18

You've bought this absolutely exquisite piece of porcelain in.

0:46:180:46:21

Tell me about it.

0:46:210:46:22

Well, my father-in-law was a polo pony trainer

0:46:220:46:28

and he was employed by a wealthy man

0:46:280:46:30

in the south of France, in the 1930s.

0:46:300:46:33

And he married a local French lady

0:46:330:46:37

and they lived down there quite comfortably until the War.

0:46:370:46:42

And at that stage, all English people were advised to get out

0:46:420:46:46

of the country within 24 hours.

0:46:460:46:48

When they knew they had to get out of France,

0:46:480:46:50

they decided to hide a few things,

0:46:500:46:54

-cos you couldn't take it with you.

-Quite.

0:46:540:46:56

So they dug a hole in the garden, put that in it,

0:46:560:46:58

-but obviously with packing, of course...

-And buried it.

0:46:580:47:03

-In 1946, they went back for a holiday, dug it up.

-Oh, God.

0:47:030:47:07

So between burying it and digging it up,

0:47:070:47:10

that's where the damage occurred.

0:47:100:47:12

There is a little bit of damage to two of the legs

0:47:120:47:16

and also to some of the beading.

0:47:160:47:18

If we actually look at the piece,

0:47:180:47:20

it's like a jewelled golden egg, isn't it?

0:47:200:47:23

-Yes.

-You know, with this wonderful finial on the top and this wonderful

0:47:230:47:27

turquoise enamelling, forming these graduated beading decoration

0:47:270:47:33

from tiny, tiny bits at the top to larger bits at the bottom.

0:47:330:47:36

All this decoration behind it.

0:47:360:47:38

And then these, sort of, almost pearl-like beading down the side.

0:47:380:47:43

And when we open it up, we've got the mark

0:47:430:47:45

of one of Britain's finest porcelain makers, Worcester.

0:47:450:47:49

I think it's a very difficult thing to value.

0:47:490:47:51

I think in perfect condition,

0:47:510:47:53

-we could be looking for something like £500, £1,000.

-Yes.

0:47:530:47:57

The damage will hold it back, so I think what we've got to do is put

0:47:570:48:01

an estimate at auction which reflects the fact that we know it's damaged,

0:48:010:48:04

-but it won't put off the buyers.

-No, no.

0:48:040:48:07

I would like to put, maybe, £150 to £200 on it, with 150 reserve.

0:48:070:48:13

-It wouldn't surprise me if it doubled.

-Oh, good.

0:48:130:48:15

Cos I think there'll be a lot of people who are saying,

0:48:150:48:19

-"Well, actually, I can have that restored better."

-Yes.

0:48:190:48:22

Have you had it out on display all these years since you've had it?

0:48:220:48:25

It's been on my wife's dressing table all these years and it hasn't

0:48:250:48:29

come in the way of any damage or accidents,

0:48:290:48:33

-but you never know. And I would hate to knock that over.

-Yes. Exactly.

0:48:330:48:37

Your wife is happy to sell?

0:48:370:48:39

-Yes, indeed.

-Fantastic.

-That's why she sent me along today.

0:48:390:48:42

Let's just remind ourselves of what we've got

0:48:450:48:48

before we head off to the sale room.

0:48:480:48:51

First, the fabulous Worcester egg with the unforgettable story

0:48:510:48:54

of being buried during the Second World War.

0:48:540:48:58

Lynne's glad to be rid of her sugar shaker,

0:48:580:49:00

so let's hope it spreads sweetness in the auction today!

0:49:000:49:03

Well done, Neil! What a buy!

0:49:050:49:08

I don't think we'll have any problem making a profit out of your 75p!

0:49:080:49:14

And if pigs had wings,

0:49:140:49:16

Denise's should fly right out of the auction room!

0:49:160:49:18

So, it's back to the auction room

0:49:290:49:30

where Steven Hearn is on the rostrum.

0:49:300:49:33

Denise's Wemyss pig.

0:49:370:49:39

Now, Kate's put a valuation on this at £400 to £600.

0:49:390:49:44

-Well, that's a fair valuation for a pig without a tail, isn't it?

-Mmm.

0:49:440:49:50

He is an old pig. If we turn him over, belly up as they say,

0:49:500:49:54

you can see underneath,

0:49:540:49:56

he's got a good impressed crescent mark on there.

0:49:560:49:58

-Yes.

-Which is going to put him as one of the earlier piggies,

0:49:580:50:01

and he is probably going to be 1885, 1890.

0:50:010:50:04

Another good sign of these older pigs is the furrowing

0:50:040:50:08

or the wrinkles on his snout and his face.

0:50:080:50:12

You know, they do say, Paul,

0:50:120:50:14

the more wrinkles you get, that dates you, you know!

0:50:140:50:17

Ha ha ha! Well, I'm getting a few!

0:50:170:50:20

Well, there you go. Say no more about the pig and the wrinkles,

0:50:200:50:24

but price-wise, I think it's...

0:50:240:50:26

I think he'll go beyond the estimate.

0:50:260:50:29

Yes, he's got to, hasn't he?

0:50:290:50:31

It's a great name, the condition is there.

0:50:310:50:33

As you say, the tail's missing. If we had the tail,

0:50:330:50:36

-you'd be looking at £800 to £1,000.

-Well, there you are!

0:50:360:50:39

Robert, I don't know. How could he sell this after

0:50:480:50:51

that story we've just heard back at the valuation day?

0:50:510:50:54

This little egg has been through hell and high water.

0:50:540:50:56

The story's wonderful.

0:50:560:50:58

It's just so touching and it's lovely. It's absolutely lovely.

0:50:580:51:02

-It really is.

-It's a pity it's damaged but otherwise,

0:51:020:51:05

-it'd have been triple the figure, I suppose.

-Yeah.

0:51:050:51:08

But it is Worcester at its height of opulence.

0:51:080:51:12

The wonderful quality of that pearl beading.

0:51:120:51:15

And everything is decorated. I love it to bits.

0:51:150:51:18

Every little facet of it.

0:51:180:51:20

Any way you look at it, it just smacks quality.

0:51:200:51:24

Let's find out what this lot here in Tring think of it, shall we?

0:51:240:51:27

Because here it is, going under the hammer.

0:51:270:51:30

Lot 290, this time.

0:51:300:51:32

This is interesting, this one.

0:51:320:51:34

Worcester jewel ovoid vase and cover, there you are.

0:51:340:51:37

I think we ought to be looking for £200 for this one. At £200 for it.

0:51:370:51:41

200. At £100. Are we a £100 bid? 100, I'm bid for that one, then.

0:51:410:51:45

Thank you. 110, I'm bid for it.

0:51:450:51:48

120. And 30. 140. And 50.

0:51:480:51:51

Are you 60, sir?

0:51:510:51:53

160. And 70, is it? 180.

0:51:530:51:56

£180. At £180. At 190, now.

0:51:560:52:01

No? 180, I'm selling, then. At 180.

0:52:010:52:04

90, is it? I'm selling at 180.

0:52:040:52:06

Yes? £180, then.

0:52:060:52:10

-Happy with that?

-Absolutely. Yes.

0:52:100:52:12

-Will the wife be pleased?

-She's there.

-Is she?

0:52:120:52:15

It was what the buyer's taken

0:52:150:52:17

into account, of course. they've got to get it restored.

0:52:170:52:20

That will take a bit of money, but it's a beautiful thing.

0:52:200:52:23

-A great story and it's wonderful to have something like that.

-It is.

0:52:230:52:27

Right, it's time to put the Victorian sugar caster under the hammer,

0:52:320:52:36

and we've got £90 hopefully, top end... £60 to £90 on this.

0:52:360:52:40

-It's good to see you, Lynne.

-Thank you.

0:52:400:52:42

-Who is this you?

-This is Katie.

0:52:420:52:43

Hello, Katie. We've got our expert Kate here,

0:52:430:52:46

who fell in love with this. You like this.

0:52:460:52:48

Yeah. It's a Georgian design but of course, it's Victorian.

0:52:480:52:51

Silver... It's not the most commercial item in the world,

0:52:510:52:54

but it should sell well!

0:52:540:52:56

It's just about to go under the hammer, Katie. Not really bothered!

0:52:560:53:01

Anyway, this is it.

0:53:010:53:02

There you are, lot 629, the sugar caster.

0:53:020:53:06

1894. Victorian one.

0:53:060:53:08

£80 for it. 50 I'm bid for it.

0:53:080:53:10

Five, 60, five, 70, five, 80...

0:53:100:53:13

-Brilliant!

-Five, 90...

-Fantastic!

0:53:130:53:15

-Five, 100, surely.

-Excellent!

0:53:150:53:17

At £100...and five now. No?

0:53:170:53:20

Sir's got it then, for £100.

0:53:200:53:22

I'm selling to sir for £100, then.

0:53:220:53:25

-Sweet!

-Brilliant!

-Perfect!

-£100!

-Top of the estimate.

0:53:250:53:29

Perfect! What do you think, Katie?

0:53:290:53:32

£100!

0:53:320:53:34

Oh, it's still gone right over her head, hasn't it?

0:53:340:53:37

-That was a great result.

-Yes, that was brilliant!

0:53:370:53:39

My mum's got one of these at home - a Banjo Whitefriars vase.

0:53:530:53:56

She'll be interested to know.

0:53:560:53:57

She's got the same colourway. This one goes under the hammer.

0:53:570:54:00

It doesn't belong to my mum, but to Neil.

0:54:000:54:03

We've got £500 to £700 on this, Mark.

0:54:030:54:04

-Yes, we should...

-I think we're going to get that.

0:54:040:54:07

We should do, should do.

0:54:070:54:09

-Happy with that?

-I am indeed!

0:54:090:54:10

He should be, cos he only paid 75p for it, didn't you?

0:54:100:54:14

-I did indeed!

-If we get £700, what would you put the money towards?

0:54:140:54:18

Well, hopefully towards my dad's...

0:54:180:54:20

helping him towards some of his care at home.

0:54:200:54:23

Well, it's about to go under the hammer right now!

0:54:230:54:26

Right. Here's another good piece of Whitefriars. There you are.

0:54:260:54:29

Nice Banjo, in willow. What do we say for this one?

0:54:290:54:33

Are we going to get around 600 for this one? 600?

0:54:330:54:36

Are we 400? 300 bid, thank you.

0:54:360:54:38

320 I have it now. At 350 and 80, 400, three of you, 420...

0:54:380:54:43

-Good!

-Are you 80? 480 now.

0:54:430:54:47

-Come on!

-480 I'm bid for it. 480.

0:54:470:54:50

500 I'm bid, 520, sir, and 550 there. 58... 50 in the corner.

0:54:500:54:56

580, yes? 600 we've got it.

0:54:560:54:59

At 620 now. 620, 650, 680 now.

0:54:590:55:04

At £680 then, you're out in the room.

0:55:040:55:08

I'm selling away from you then at £680, then. Thank you.

0:55:080:55:11

£680! We're going to settle for that! I think you are, Neil!

0:55:110:55:16

-Yes, I am indeed.

-Better than 75 pence, isn't it?

0:55:160:55:19

It is, indeed! It's a good profit.

0:55:190:55:21

Right. What's next off to market?

0:55:360:55:38

Yes, you've guessed it, the Wemyss pig, which belongs to Denise.

0:55:380:55:41

-Hello, Denise!

-Hi.

-Who have you brought?

0:55:410:55:43

-This is my son George.

-George, pleased to meet you.

-Hi.

0:55:430:55:46

-I gather all the proceeds are going to George's...

-Driving...

0:55:460:55:50

-Driving lessons.

-How many have you had so far?

0:55:500:55:52

None so far. I'm waiting until summer, cos I've got my exams.

0:55:520:55:55

Oh, OK. OK. So this Wemyss pig should do...should do £400 to £600!

0:55:550:56:01

-Kate, you fell in love with it.

-I'm hoping!

-It will!

-Even with the missing tail?

-He's off to market.

0:56:010:56:05

This is it. Ready? He's hot to trot. It's going under the hammer.

0:56:050:56:09

Right. Now we change direction, and we start off with the Wemyss pig.

0:56:090:56:14

There he is. Lost his tail.

0:56:140:56:17

What shall we say for him? Are we going to start him off at £500?

0:56:170:56:20

500, 400 for him? Yes. 400. That's it. I thought you would like that.

0:56:200:56:24

-400 is bid for him, then.

-Straight in!

-At £400.

0:56:240:56:27

420 we're bid, at 450,

0:56:270:56:30

480, 500, £520, 550...

0:56:300:56:34

-That's good!

-Yeah.

-That's very good!

-580, 600...

0:56:340:56:38

We've got somebody on the phone, that means they're keen!

0:56:380:56:41

680 is it for him? 680,

0:56:410:56:43

700 we're bid, 720...

0:56:430:56:45

-Ooh!

-720 and 750, I have it.

0:56:450:56:48

780, yes.

0:56:480:56:49

-This could be a new car as well!

-At 750 for him. 780.

0:56:490:56:53

800 bid. Are you going to bid 20?

0:56:530:56:56

820, 850, 880 now, £900.

0:56:560:57:01

Gosh! Could we do that magic thousand?

0:57:010:57:04

920. 950. Is he 980?

0:57:040:57:06

-Let's get where we should have started. £1,000.

-Yeah!

0:57:060:57:10

1,000 I'm bid for him. 1,020 now?

0:57:100:57:13

Yes? No. £1,000 then for pig.

0:57:130:57:17

-£1020.

-Oh!

-We have a new bidder at £1,020.

0:57:170:57:22

The new bid against it, there you go, just one bid takes it.

0:57:220:57:25

He's going then at £1,020, then.

0:57:250:57:29

-£1,020, yes, bang, under the hammer!

-Oh, that's brilliant!

0:57:290:57:33

-George and Denise, what do you think of that?

-That's fabulous!

0:57:330:57:36

-Oh, I'm really, really pleased!

-You're pleased!

-I'm just ecstatic!

0:57:360:57:41

A group of lessons.

0:57:410:57:42

If you pass first time, well, there's probably £500 left

0:57:420:57:46

in the kitty to put towards a car.

0:57:460:57:48

That's definitely going towards a car, then!

0:57:480:57:50

Oh, what a kind mum! Give your mum a big hug!

0:57:500:57:52

Yeah, thanks, Mum, for the new car as well!

0:57:520:57:55

-"Thanks, Mum!" "Thanks, Mum!"

-And maybe some new clothes?

0:57:550:57:59

That's what I call a great mum. I mean, what a great result as well.

0:57:590:58:03

That is double what I thought.

0:58:030:58:05

I thought we might top the top of my estimate,

0:58:050:58:07

but with the damage, that's a very good price.

0:58:070:58:09

-I'm really pleased!

-Right. I think that's great!

-That's brilliant!

0:58:090:58:13

George got his driving lessons, we've had a brilliant day in Tring.

0:58:130:58:17

I hope you've enjoyed the show. Join us next time for plenty more surprises on Flog It.

0:58:170:58:21

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:410:58:44

Experts Mark Stacey and Kate Bliss find some gems in St Albans, while presenter Paul Martin visits the cathedral to get to the root of the city's name.


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