Stoke-on-Trent Flog It!


Stoke-on-Trent

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We're in the home of some Flog It! favourites today.

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Moorcroft, Wedgwood, Spode and of course, good old Royal Doulton.

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You've guessed it. We've come to the Potteries.

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Welcome to Flog It! from Stoke-on-Trent.

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Now, the reason this area developed as a world leader in ceramics

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is due to what lies beneath my feet.

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Underneath all these cobbled stones around here,

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and indeed the whole of the local area, lies good, thick, rich clay -

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ideal for throwing all sorts of vessels, like pots and vases.

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There's also an abundance of lead and salt, which is used in the glazes to decorate the vessels.

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And with all the local coal mines, it's no wonder that

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when the potteries first opened up, those kilns were kept hot.

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Now, that sounds like a fantastic use of local resources.

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Well, we've got our own Flog It! resources with us today,

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in the shape of experts David Barby and James Lewis.

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They're keen to get their hands on some local pottery, and I think they could be lucky.

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Well, we've got a great queue here today, loaded with bags and boxes full of treasures,

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and if they agree with David and James's valuation, then it's off to the auction room to...

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ALL: Flog it!

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David's the first expert to the table with a local find.

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Elaine, you were telling me a few moments ago that your family

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has got some involvement with the Stoke-on-Trent pottery industry.

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-Yes, that's right.

-And this refers to this particular tile, doesn't it?

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Yes. My late husband's father was an engraver.

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-Right.

-And we presume that's where this came from,

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-but he said it was a Minton tile, but no mark.

-Did he work for Minton?

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No, he was an individual engraver.

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He'd got a workshop of his own.

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So he would engrave this design...

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-I would imagine so, yes.

-..for replication on Minton blanks.

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-Yes, yes.

-That's quite interesting.

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What I do find interesting is the whole development of tile industry at Stoke-on-Trent.

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It was so important, the industry, in the 19th century.

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-Yes.

-And Mintons was at the head of it.

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-This is an engraving on the top?

-Yes.

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It's a transfer design, and I note when I look at this, there's a sort of mark all the way round.

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-Yes.

-Why is that?

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It was in a frame,

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a wooden frame, which absolutely disintegrated. It was so...

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-Woodworm?

-I've no idea.

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-It just fell apart.

-Yes, yes. It was so old, apparently.

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This belonged to your father-in-law?

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-Yes.

-He had it hanging on the wall?

-I don't know. I never knew him.

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That's interesting. If he'd have done something which he was very proud of,

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he would bring an example home

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and hang it on the wall and say, "This is my work."

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That's right. Yes, that's right. Could well have been.

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-I think so.

-Could've been.

-This type of tile,

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the elongated tile, would be put into a fireplace.

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-There would be two of them either side of the grate.

-Yes.

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Then you'd have simple tiles either side of them, so I think

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-this is where it came from, or was intended originally as a fireplace tile.

-Yes.

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The design itself is of a sort of classical inspiration,

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rather whimsical, rather fey and not exactly in today's fashion, is it?

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-Not at all. Not at all.

-It is slightly over the top.

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It is, yes.

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So the market will be for somebody like ourselves, in that age group...

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-Right.

-..who would want it as a decorative object on the wall.

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-Yes, yes.

-Or it will sell to a tile collector.

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Now, Elaine, I'm going to suggest that when we put this up for sale

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-at the auction house, we're not going to have a reserve.

-No.

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I think the value is somewhere between £40 and £60, but I think

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it's got to run in the sale room,

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and hopefully there's going to be somebody there that collects tiles

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and wants a tile from the beginning of the 20th century, when this was produced...

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-Yes.

-..to fill in a blank that he might have in his collection.

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-You're happy with that?

-Yes, I am.

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-Hello.

-Hi.

-Tell me, are you a nosologist?

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No. I don't know anything about snuff at all.

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-A nosologist is a snuff-taker.

-Yes.

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The early name for a snuff-taker.

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And of course, what we've got here is a little Georgian snuff shoe.

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These were carried by ladies and gentlemen.

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But more often, the shoes were table snuff boxes

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-because of course, the lids are quite loose and you wouldn't want a pocket full of snuff.

-No.

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But snuff-taking really has been in fashion in England from the late 1500s,

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when snuff-taking started,

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and throughout the 1600s and 1700s, very, very popular.

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It really died out in the 1920s, but having said that,

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snuff-taking is coming back into fashion.

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-Aah.

-Imagine you're in a pub, and what do you have?

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-You have nicotine and a pint in a pub?

-Yes.

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That's what most people used to have, but you're not allowed any cigarettes.

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-Have to go outside.

-You wouldn't with this.

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You can have your fix of nicotine with a snort of snuff

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and a pint of beer, and you don't have to leave the pub.

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-Yeah.

-So there are still snuff mills around the country,

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-and they are showing signs of renewed interest in snuff-taking.

-Yes.

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This, I suppose, was made around 1780, 1800.

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All decorative.

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And I suppose this is copying the stitching off the shoe.

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You can pretty much date the shoe by the fashion and the design on it.

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Also, of course, ladies took them, and ladies had these snuff shoes.

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It was as much a lady's habit as it was a gentleman's habit.

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George III's wife, Charlotte - Snuffy Charlotte, as she was known - was a great snuff-taker,

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and almost 100 years before that,

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-Queen Anne was patron of the British snuff-taking society.

-Oh, right.

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It's always been a controversial subject, but always been something

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that has been enjoyed by the working class and the upper class.

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-Perhaps I should start the habit again, then.

-Have a go!

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Where has it been? Where do you keep it?

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We've had it for about 15 years now, just in the cupboard.

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It was in a skip that my husband was working on the house at the time,

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and he brought it home.

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-It really wants cleaning now, but it was even dirtier then.

-My goodness!

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We just wiped it over and just kept it in the cupboard.

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-It's amazing what people throw away.

-Yeah.

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But it's a good thing. I really like it.

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And I suppose the value, £50 to £80, something like that, and it'll do well.

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-OK.

-Definitely want to sell it?

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-Yes, yes.

-Why not keep it in a little drawer and enjoy it.

-No, no.

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We'll sell it and put the money towards a holiday.

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It doesn't take up much space.

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-I'm not convincing you, am I?

-I'm sure. I'm sure.

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Lorraine, I think this is absolutely fantastic. I love it.

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It caught my eye from across the room.

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It really is. For me, it's a piece of sculpture now. It's got everything going for it.

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It's really tactile and it's incredibly naive. It's a hobby horse in the form of a tricycle.

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Late-Victorian, circa 1890, and it's definitely continental.

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Where did you get this from?

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-I bought it in France.

-You did.

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Bought it in Lamont, in an antique shop.

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How long ago?

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About seven years ago.

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And I just loved it. I still do.

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It's got the look... If this had been restored, it would have lost its naive charm for me.

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There's something here that says "heart and soul".

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It's got an essence to it, which, well, if you look...

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Half its head is missing on this side.

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-Yes.

-It's had an awful lot of abuse, because this is a chain-driven tricycle.

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The chain's round there on the back axle, and it's driven by the handlebars up there.

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That's taken a lot of abuse. That's why the horse's neck has fallen off, and that's cast metal.

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But for me,

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that whole side of the horse looks Picasso-esque.

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-Yes.

-If you can imagine a Picasso picture or a sculpture,

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you start to see something in it, and it just is quite incredible.

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I can see beauty in this, and I'm thinking people

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could be thinking, "He's gone mad." But there's something here.

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If this was in perfect condition, something like this hobby horse,

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a Victorian hobby horse like this,

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would fetch around £800 to £1,200, but it would have to be in very, very good condition.

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For me, this is going to go to a decorator, an interior designer,

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and he's going to use it as a prop on the floor in a magazine shot.

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Why do you want to sell this?

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Because it's so raw.

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You haven't had it that long.

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It exudes beauty, to me.

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I do love it, but it hasn't...

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I've got nowhere to actually put it,

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and it was actually living out in the barn, which is sacrilege, really.

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That's terrible. And I do love it.

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I really, really love it, but...

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Do you mind me asking how much you paid for it?

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-I paid 200.

-You paid £200.

-So I really liked it.

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I think we'll get you your money back.

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-OK.

-I'm pretty sure we will.

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I think we should put this in to auction with a value of £200 to £300.

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-You paid £200, so we're going to put a £200 reserve on this.

-Right. OK.

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-That's got personality and that's what's going to sell it.

-Right.

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He said!

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Rosemary, people at home, looking at this, would not be criticised

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for thinking these were pretty modern, because they are so fashionable, aren't they?

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They are so contemporary. You can imagine any young lady in the street today wearing something like that.

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I love them. They really are good things. But they're not modern.

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They're 100 years old, approximately.

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They're Art Nouveau in style.

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They're in blue, green and yellow, and they're enamelled onto silver.

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-Yes.

-So 1900 to 1910. Little suspension chains there,

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with another silver chain link support there.

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They are really very, very nice things.

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How did you come to have them?

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-I bought them at an antiques fair.

-Did you? How long ago?

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-About 10 or 12 years.

-Do you remember what you paid?

-I can't, I'm afraid.

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That lets me off the hook, then.

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The artist and the silversmith that is most well-known for this sort of work is Charles Horner.

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He was working in the Midlands and in London around that sort of time.

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But these aren't marked. There isn't a lion, there is no English hallmark on them at all.

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I think they are English, although they're not hallmarked.

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-So legally, we have to call them silver-coloured metal.

-Yes.

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But really, there's no value in the silver content of these.

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It's purely in how pretty they are as a necklace.

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-I see.

-Even though they are greatly fashionable things, they don't make a fortune.

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-No.

-But if we were to put £100 to £150 on the two, would that be OK for you?

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-That would be fine.

-Lovely, because I think they are super.

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Having bought them 12 years ago, why do you want to sell them?

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-Well, I've got better jewellery. I like Arts and Crafts.

-Oh, do you?

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It's a little bit earlier.

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Yes. I started by buying a big dresser and went on from there.

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-So not just the jewellery, it's the whole...

-The whole lot.

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With these, they might not be Arts and Crafts,

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but if they're not going to be Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau is the next best thing.

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-Yes.

-And they're going to do very, very well.

-Lovely.

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Well, I don't know about you, but I think we've just seen some real gems.

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And now it's time to put those valuations to the test.

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And our experts normally get it right, don't they?

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-ALL: Yes!

-But things could go wrong, that's why we go off to auction.

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So while we make our way over there, here's a quick rundown of the items we're taking with us.

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Elaine's Minton tile is a nice local item made by a family member.

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With no reserve on it, it could be a bargain buy.

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This snuff box was a lucky find in a skip, so let's hope the bidders sniff it out in the sale room.

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I really love the naive look of this hobby horse.

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It's just the sort of decorative item I would love to own.

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Rosemary prefers Arts and Crafts jewellery to Art Nouveau, so it's time for her pendants to go.

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They don't have a hallmark, which may just put the bidders off.

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Today our auction comes from Knutsford at Frank Marshalls,

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and on the rostrum we've got Flog It! favourite Adam Partridge

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hopefully doing us proud and selling all our lots.

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Are you a fan of contemporary sculpture?

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Why do you ask me that?

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Because you're looking at a wonderful piece for only £200.

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You're trying to sell it to me?

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Do you know, when this came in, I had no trouble

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telling who had valued it and who had been attracted to it.

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I fell in love with this. I just think it's so naive.

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When you look at it, it's so Picasso-esque.

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You know, there's something quite raw about it.

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It belongs to Lorraine, and she paid £200 for this in an antique shop in France. It is French.

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Mid-Victorian, and I think it's...

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I think it's got the look and it's worth £200, Adam.

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-OK.

-OK.

-Keep telling yourself that, Paul.

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-You know it is.

-Yeah. ADAM LAUGHS

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-Well, yeah. It's not quite all there, is it?

-No.

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But it is decorative in a rustic, charming sort of way.

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It's got a chance, hasn't it, Paul?

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-Because it's got interiors appeal to it.

-Yes.

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If you're dressing a room with a horse theme - there you go.

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But is it two hundred quid's worth, is it?

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-Two to three hundred. Yeah!

-Yes, OK.

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-You're happy with that?

-I am.

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OK. Well, I hope it proves right.

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Something for the ladies right now.

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A bit of Art Nouveau jewellery, It's stunning.

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Belongs to Rosemary, possibly for not much longer, with a valuation of £100 to £150.

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-Who've you brought along?

-Richard.

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Richard, pleased to meet you.

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-What do you think of this piece of jewellery?

-Beautiful.

-Stunning, isn't it?

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It caught James's eye.

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-You like that sort of Deco period.

-It's got a real style to it.

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It appeals to the youth of today too.

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Why are you getting rid of them?

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They're so fashionable.

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Well, I wanted a Flog It! experience.

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Ooh, you're getting that, aren't you, in the sale room today?

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You've been well looked after, anyway. This is it, we're going under the hammer now.

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601 - Art Nouveau Charles Horner-style enamel pendants

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and another smaller example. Lot 601.

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Lovely things, these, lot 601.

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Start me at £100, please.

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£100... I need £80, then.

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£80 on the Art Nouveau jewellery there. 80 bid. £80, take 5. At 80.

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Any more now at 80? All done... 5.

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90. 5 now. 95.

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Is there 100? At £95, any more?

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At 95... 100 online, £100.

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110's on the phone. Any more on this lot at 110?

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-Yes! £110.

-Great!

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-It was short and sweet, the Flog It! experience, wasn't it?

-Yes!

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Blink and you'll miss that one!

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MUSIC PLAYS

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Next up, Elaine's tile. There's no marks, there's no maker's name, but we do know it's Minton, don't we?

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-Yes, we do.

-Yes, we do.

-Yes.

-And it's catalogued at £40 to £60.

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-That's right.

-Hopefully you get the top end,

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we will get the top end of that estimate.

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I hope so. What I like about it, it came from Stoke-on-Trent,

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this part of this wonderful industry, late 19th, early 20th century, of tile manufacturing.

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-Yes, that's right.

-And your husband's grandfather was an engraver.

-Was an engraver.

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-He was a lithographer. He drew onto stone.

-Yes.

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-That's right.

-And then he took the image from the stone.

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-Yes, yes.

-Great little story. It's a wonderful package, really.

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-I think it's excellent.

-Yes.

-Fingers crossed, OK?

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-Yes.

-Let's hope we get £60-plus.

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-Well, I hope so.

-You never know, do you?

-No, no.

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Next lot, 295, is a pressed dust rectangular tile.

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Girl holding flowers. £40.

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40.

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£40. Start me £40. £30 for the tile.

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£30 for the pressed dust tile. Anybody?

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£20 for the tile. Don't be surprised.

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20 bid. 5 now? 30. £25.

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£25. Any further at £25.

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Sold it.

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-£25.

-It's OK.

-That'll buy my after-dinner coffees in Menorca.

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-Is that where you're off to?

-In May, end of May, yes.

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-Oh, lovely.

-That'll just pay for those.

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MUSIC PLAYS

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I've been looking forward to this.

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I'm feeling slightly nervous because I had a chat to Adam before the sale

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and he said, "When this arrived in my sale room,

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"I knew who valued it."

0:18:160:18:18

He said, "You!" I said, "I know, I'm a big fan of sort of sculpture and that is so Picasso-esque."

0:18:180:18:25

-He doesn't rate it.

-I don't care, because I still like it.

0:18:250:18:29

-I know you do, I know, I know.

-It won't make any difference.

0:18:290:18:32

You won't be cycling it home - it's too precious.

0:18:320:18:36

It's going in the boot of the car. It's going under the hammer now.

0:18:360:18:39

Next lot is 171.

0:18:390:18:41

Late-Victorian hobby horse.

0:18:410:18:43

What a lovely rustic bygone that is.

0:18:430:18:46

Lot 171. Who'll start me at a couple of hundred pounds. 200?

0:18:460:18:50

£200.

0:18:500:18:53

-£100?

-My poor horse!

0:18:530:18:54

£100 bid. Take 10. At £100 - not all bad, you know.

0:18:540:18:57

£100 all bid, all done. Take 10.

0:18:570:19:00

-110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160.

-It's going up.

0:19:000:19:04

160 in the room now.

0:19:040:19:06

160. Any more now? 170. 180...

0:19:060:19:08

No... 170. Any more now at 170? At 170.

0:19:080:19:11

-Any more at 170.

-Come on... Close.

0:19:110:19:14

-Yeah.

-A couple of bids more.

0:19:140:19:15

Well, I'm afraid we can't sell it.

0:19:150:19:17

I've got firm instruction not to go any less than 200.

0:19:170:19:21

Oh, I'm so sorry.

0:19:210:19:23

-Do you know what...

-I don't mind.

0:19:230:19:25

-It's going back to a loving home.

-Yes.

-Enjoy it.

-Yes.

0:19:250:19:29

MUSIC PLAYS

0:19:290:19:32

That is a cracking tan you've got. Have you just got home from holiday?

0:19:360:19:40

-Yes, last Wednesday.

-Where from?

-Cape Verde.

-Oh, the Canaries.

0:19:400:19:44

Look at that tan, James.

0:19:440:19:46

-Only sunbathed.

-Just sunbathed... I can see that.

0:19:460:19:48

Well, at a pinch, at 50 to 80, coming up next is that lovely little snuff shoe. I like the valuation.

0:19:480:19:54

It's priced right.

0:19:540:19:56

It's not the best we've ever seen, but it's a lovely little item and he is our snuff expert.

0:19:560:20:03

He can't resist. Every time. He just can't resist.

0:20:030:20:06

Lot 32. The Georgian tree novelty snuff box in the form of a shoe.

0:20:060:20:10

What a sweet little item there. I can start with a bid of £45 and take 50.

0:20:100:20:15

£45. 50 now.

0:20:150:20:17

55, 60, 5, 70, 5, 80, 5, 85 here...

0:20:170:20:21

Any more now. £85, you're all done, then.

0:20:210:20:24

90? And 5. 100?

0:20:240:20:27

I've got 105. 110? 110's on the phone. 120 comes next.

0:20:270:20:31

£110 on the phone. Any more on this lot at 110?

0:20:310:20:34

All done. 110 on the Georgian snuff shoe, at 110.

0:20:340:20:38

-Great.

-£110.

0:20:400:20:42

-It's a good result, isn't it? Holiday fund?

-Yes, definitely.

0:20:420:20:47

Top up the tan.

0:20:470:20:49

That's right.

0:20:490:20:50

This pineapple I'm holding costs a couple of quid today.

0:21:050:21:08

But back in the 1700s, this would have set you back the equivalent of £5,000. Yup!

0:21:080:21:14

A lot of money, wasn't it? Certainly a rare and expensive commodity.

0:21:140:21:18

Brought back on very large sailing vessels

0:21:180:21:21

from the Tropics, and they certainly were a status symbol for the rich.

0:21:210:21:24

They had large estates and they would employ

0:21:240:21:27

teams of gardeners to cultivate things like this under glass.

0:21:270:21:30

Pineapples were just one of many plants grown here at Tatton Park Estate.

0:21:340:21:38

It's been the home of the Egerton family since 1598,

0:21:380:21:42

and as the family fortunes flourished, so did their gardens.

0:21:420:21:46

Sam Wood, the gardens manager, is going to tell me more

0:21:460:21:49

about the plants and the fruit that were grown here in the expensive glasshouses.

0:21:490:21:54

Sam, what a great glasshouse.

0:21:580:22:00

It looks and feels brand new. Is it a reconstruction of the original?

0:22:000:22:04

It is. It's rebuilt on the original foundations.

0:22:040:22:08

And we've taken great care to try and make sure it's authentic.

0:22:080:22:12

I can see what you're growing - pineapples.

0:22:120:22:15

Yeah. Well, of course, this is what the house was built for

0:22:150:22:20

and the plants are planted in pots

0:22:200:22:22

and you have to remember that pineapples only fruit every third year.

0:22:220:22:26

-Ah, I never knew that. So what year are you looking at?

-Year two now.

0:22:260:22:31

Obviously, I mean to the family and the growers -

0:22:310:22:34

very fashionable and exotic, but what do the outsiders think?

0:22:340:22:37

Nobody actually knew what to do with them. They were a bit wary of them.

0:22:370:22:40

Some people thought they might be poison.

0:22:400:22:44

Other people thought that they were a great status symbol, because if you grow pineapples,

0:22:440:22:49

you're obviously somebody who could afford... It's a full-time job growing pineapples.

0:22:490:22:54

So they would also take them to dinner parties just as exhibits.

0:22:540:22:59

-Never use it, just taking it around, showing it off.

-Right.

0:22:590:23:03

And there were records of servants being murdered for the pineapple.

0:23:030:23:09

And of course, pineapple growers don't have any fingerprints.

0:23:090:23:14

-It removes your fingerprints.

-That could be very useful, couldn't it?

0:23:140:23:19

Because it eats your flesh away. So they are flesh-eating pineapples.

0:23:190:23:22

You have to remember that's why we keep them here enclosed.

0:23:220:23:26

You've got a tray with a pineapple behind you.

0:23:260:23:29

-Are you going to show me something?

-Yes. So we can propagate pineapples

0:23:290:23:33

-today and they're pretty tough to cut.

-Can we do this at home?

0:23:330:23:37

Yes, you could.

0:23:370:23:39

-So all you do is you'll take the top off your pineapple.

-Which you would do anyway.

0:23:390:23:43

As you would anyway, and then to trim off all of this stuff around the edge here.

0:23:430:23:49

So we've got like a little plug here, and then the next thing is

0:23:500:23:55

-you really want to try and get some of these leaves off.

-Why?

0:23:550:23:58

Because this is where the thing is going to root from, eventually.

0:23:580:24:01

-You take it off, strip all this off, and get to the bottom of it.

-Is that about...?

-That's about right.

0:24:010:24:07

And then you finish off by just trimming that down a little bit more.

0:24:070:24:10

Yes? And then that will probably do it, you know?

0:24:100:24:14

And then all we need to do is get a pot

0:24:140:24:17

-and crock it up, and then simply stick it in like that.

-Is that compost?

0:24:170:24:23

Some compost which is fairly well drained

0:24:230:24:25

and it needs to be watered and then just kept moist

0:24:250:24:28

and then it will grow. They make a good foliage plant, as well.

0:24:280:24:31

-Yes, it's very decorative, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:24:310:24:35

It wasn't only pineapples that the Egertons liked to show off to their guests.

0:24:350:24:41

Orchids were an incredibly popular trend of the time.

0:24:410:24:45

Here at Tatton, we had 25 houses just of orchids. I mean, that was the...

0:24:500:24:53

But what did they do with them, the family here?

0:24:530:24:56

Well, they simply just kept them. They used them to decorate the house.

0:24:560:25:00

They used them to impress people. They put them in a show house.

0:25:000:25:04

And they were just so popular and I suppose the flower of the aristocracy.

0:25:040:25:09

Yes.

0:25:090:25:11

One last glasshouse for me to visit is the biggest on the estate.

0:25:120:25:17

It was built in 1860 and designed by Joseph Paxton, famous for the Crystal Palace.

0:25:170:25:22

It's a very impressive home for an exotic collection of ferns.

0:25:220:25:27

Oh, this is spectacular, Sam.

0:25:320:25:35

I think you saved the best for last on my list.

0:25:350:25:38

So many different shades of green.

0:25:380:25:41

There's ferns everywhere. There's a lot of them. Ferns were so popular, weren't they?

0:25:410:25:47

They were around that time, yes. A lot of ferneries in the big houses.

0:25:470:25:51

Made to impress people.

0:25:510:25:53

This is a fantastic piece that was built originally to house

0:25:530:25:57

these tree ferns that one of the Egerton family was bringing back.

0:25:570:26:01

Randall Egerton was a Royal Naval guy and he brought these ferns back when he was in Australia and New Zealand.

0:26:010:26:08

They were only about nine inches high.

0:26:080:26:11

And you know, the great visionary as all these people were,

0:26:110:26:15

they would never have seen them grow to the height they are now.

0:26:150:26:18

And these are still the original plants

0:26:180:26:20

and the great thing about tree ferns is that when they grow to the roof,

0:26:200:26:24

you simply decide what size you want the next one and saw it off, and put it in the ground and it grows again.

0:26:240:26:30

Cos most of the root's on the outside of the stem, so some of these have been to the roof twice.

0:26:300:26:34

-Already.

-Cut back down, and you've got to remember

0:26:340:26:38

that the last Lord Egerton used the space for other things as well.

0:26:380:26:44

He was a great collector, so he collected things like tree frogs in here. Poison tree frogs.

0:26:440:26:49

And snakes, just wild in here, so it was kind of a real adventure place.

0:26:490:26:54

It was an adventure playground, really, for the aristocracy.

0:26:540:26:58

What a remarkable achievement.

0:26:580:26:59

-And this is your office.

-Yes.

-So to speak!

0:26:590:27:04

-I think you're a lucky man, Sam.

-So do I.

0:27:040:27:06

I thoroughly enjoyed my little visit to Tatton Park.

0:27:140:27:18

And it's inspired me to go out and buy a pineapple and start growing one at home.

0:27:180:27:24

Right now, it's straight back to the valuation day.

0:27:240:27:27

It's still very busy at the Kings Hall in Stoke-on-Trent, and David has found something he really loves.

0:27:330:27:40

Sheila, these are absolutely fabulous.

0:27:410:27:44

You think so?

0:27:440:27:46

-Yes. Where on earth did you get them from?

-Bingley Hall.

0:27:460:27:50

Was that an antique fair?

0:27:500:27:52

-Yes.

-Do you remember how much you paid for them?

-I can't remember.

0:27:520:27:57

It's a good while ago.

0:27:570:27:59

They are beautiful. Why were you first attracted to them?

0:27:590:28:02

Because I like pink and green.

0:28:020:28:04

-Interesting colour combination.

-They're lovely.

0:28:040:28:08

They are lovely. What I like about them is the sheer quality.

0:28:080:28:12

-And they are Worcester porcelain.

-Yes.

0:28:120:28:14

When you consider that Worcester, along with Derby, is probably the only factory

0:28:140:28:18

that is still in production from when it started in the 18th century, right through to now.

0:28:180:28:24

Consistent, consistent quality.

0:28:240:28:27

It's the decoration, the pink and green in the form of roses

0:28:270:28:31

against that hedgerow background which is absolutely unbelievable.

0:28:310:28:37

All painted by hand.

0:28:370:28:40

It's like...having a painting

0:28:400:28:43

in your house. A still life.

0:28:430:28:46

Instead of a thing on a canvas, this is on a porcelain object.

0:28:460:28:50

-Yes.

-Why on earth are you parting with it?

0:28:500:28:53

Because I'm moving home.

0:28:530:28:56

-You're downsizing.

-Yes.

-I've just gone through that.

0:28:560:28:59

-It's very, very difficult knowing what to keep and what to part with.

-It is, yes. It is.

-The date.

0:28:590:29:05

The date's 1910.

0:29:050:29:08

-I was looking for a signature on these, because it's most important to have a signature.

-Yes.

0:29:080:29:14

And I found one.

0:29:140:29:16

The signature here is not a name that I recognise.

0:29:160:29:19

From here, it looks very much like it could be either a G or an S.

0:29:190:29:25

T-A-U-N-T.

0:29:250:29:28

S or G Taunt.

0:29:280:29:30

-The very fact that it's signed puts it into a different category.

-I see.

0:29:300:29:34

So I think we're looking at round about £240 to £300.

0:29:340:29:41

-All right.

-How does that sound?

0:29:410:29:43

That sounds very good.

0:29:430:29:45

-I hope you get that price.

-Yes.

0:29:450:29:47

The auction house will want to tuck the reserve and we ought to put a reserve on these...

0:29:470:29:52

-Right.

-..under the estimates.

0:29:520:29:54

So I think we should put a reserve of £200.

0:29:540:30:00

-Right.

-Would that be acceptable?

0:30:000:30:01

-Yes, thank you.

-I hope the Worcester collectors are looking at them.

0:30:010:30:05

I hope so as well.

0:30:050:30:07

Liz, Yvonne. Wow, what a thing to find.

0:30:130:30:17

They really are great. Tell me about them.

0:30:170:30:19

They were my dad's. My dad's passed away.

0:30:190:30:22

I have two brothers who both want them and causing a bit of

0:30:220:30:27

friction in the family and so my mum decided to put them to auction.

0:30:270:30:31

Best way, because if they want them, they can buy them.

0:30:310:30:34

-Exactly, yes.

-Well, what do you know about the pistols themselves.

0:30:340:30:38

-Very much?

-Absolutely nothing.

0:30:380:30:41

Of course, handguns today are such a controversial subject, but I don't see these as weapons.

0:30:410:30:46

I see these as pieces of history.

0:30:460:30:49

These go back right to the times of the Napoleonic Wars.

0:30:490:30:53

The early 19th century. But these weren't military issue.

0:30:530:30:58

These would have been owned by a gentleman of title, somebody of quite important status

0:30:580:31:03

because the maker, I don't know if you know anything about him, but if we have a look here,

0:31:030:31:09

Franz Ulrich.

0:31:090:31:11

He was probably the best gun-maker in Switzerland of the 19th century.

0:31:110:31:17

-He was known as the Forgotten Master.

-Right.

-Fantastic.

0:31:170:31:21

What you would have to do to actually fire this pistol

0:31:210:31:25

is prime that little pan there, the gold pan, with powder.

0:31:250:31:29

And then you would close that down,

0:31:290:31:33

you would bring the hammer back and that contains the flint.

0:31:330:31:36

The flint, as you pull the trigger, fires,

0:31:360:31:40

the steel pan lifts, the spark of the flint hitting the steel pan goes into the air with the gunpowder.

0:31:400:31:48

So that's fires and it ignites the gunpowder in there and fires.

0:31:480:31:53

And you have to do that every time you fire.

0:31:530:31:56

-You could be dead.

-You could be dead by then!

0:31:560:31:59

-What do you think they're worth?

-Haven't got a clue.

-What do you think?

0:31:590:32:05

-400?

-No idea.

0:32:050:32:08

-I think we ought to put £1,500 to £2,000.

-You're joking!

0:32:080:32:13

Lovely. Yes, that's fine.

0:32:130:32:16

-That should stop them fighting, shouldn't it?

-It will do, yeah.

0:32:160:32:19

Now, I think it's important that we protect them with a reserve.

0:32:190:32:23

Weapons are quite a specialist market.

0:32:230:32:25

With a lot of other things, they'll find their own market.

0:32:250:32:29

With these, they're fantastic, so we must protect them.

0:32:290:32:32

Just in case the right buyers aren't there on the day.

0:32:320:32:35

So let's put a reserve of £1,200, put that firm, and if they don't make that, then have them back.

0:32:350:32:42

-Right. That's great. It could be pistols at dawn.

-It could be.

0:32:420:32:47

Phil, looking at all these used ticket stubs,

0:32:520:32:54

you're obviously a big music fan and so am I.

0:32:540:32:56

Look, Dr Feelgood, Joe Walsh...

0:32:560:32:59

Gosh, everybody's in here, but what has caught my eye

0:32:590:33:02

are these two little posters, they're like flyers really.

0:33:020:33:05

I guess these would have been used

0:33:050:33:07

in shop windows, local stores

0:33:070:33:09

around the venue to promote the gig.

0:33:090:33:11

Jimi Hendrix, and it says it all because that sums up

0:33:110:33:14

the Seventies with that sort of purple haze.

0:33:140:33:16

-Psychedelia.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:33:160:33:19

-There's no date on it. Do you know what date it was?

-I think it's 1970.

0:33:190:33:22

And he was playing in Oklahoma.

0:33:220:33:24

You've got an American accent,

0:33:240:33:26

-I guess you grew up in Oklahoma.

-That's where I'm from, yeah!

0:33:260:33:29

-So what brought you over to the UK then?

-My wife.

-Your wife?

0:33:290:33:33

-You married an English lass?

-Yeah.

-Aaah!

0:33:330:33:35

Did you get to see Led Zeppelin?

0:33:350:33:37

-No, I didn't. I was a bit young at the time.

-You look a bit young.

0:33:370:33:40

I grew up playing the drums and I still listen to John Bonham

0:33:400:33:43

and try and copy all his sort of licks and his moves and his sound.

0:33:430:33:46

-The question is, were you any good?

-No, I was rubbish!

0:33:460:33:50

Again, no date.

0:33:520:33:54

I think that's also 1970.

0:33:540:33:56

Right. Great band, but I don't think our auction is the right one for you.

0:33:560:34:01

It's a general antique auction. I think what you've got here, rock

0:34:010:34:05

and pop memorabilia, needs to go to a specialist musical memorabilia

0:34:050:34:09

sale, where you'll find a bigger audience, and I'm pretty sure

0:34:090:34:12

this one is worth around £80 to £150, and so is that one.

0:34:120:34:17

So that's not bad, is it?

0:34:170:34:19

For flyers that were just sellotaped to the shop window, and what I like

0:34:190:34:23

is the fact that you've looked after them,

0:34:230:34:25

you've put them behind perspex on a clip frame,

0:34:250:34:29

so it's kept them from being bent and screwed up and ripped and torn,

0:34:290:34:32

so good for you, because condition is so important.

0:34:320:34:36

MUSIC: "Haiti" by Arcade Fire

0:34:360:34:38

Bill, Lillian, we've come all the way to Staffordshire,

0:34:420:34:45

the heart of the Potteries in England,

0:34:450:34:47

and what do we find? Worcester! Anyway, there we go.

0:34:470:34:50

A bit of Worcester for us, and, obviously, out of its area,

0:34:500:34:53

but one of the most famous factories of all time.

0:34:530:34:56

-Indeed.

-Are they family pieces?

-They were my father's, actually.

0:34:560:34:59

My father was a pottery manufacturer and he used to work

0:34:590:35:02

as a chief chemist for Wedgwood before the war, and he formed his own collection

0:35:020:35:06

of Wedgwood pieces, and also from other companies,

0:35:060:35:10

but as I think things have moved on, these tend to not be on display,

0:35:100:35:16

and it seems a terrible shame, really.

0:35:160:35:18

Worcester is so well known for its fruit-painted porcelain,

0:35:180:35:22

and here we've got three very good examples.

0:35:220:35:24

Albert Shuck is the artist for these two, and this one, you don't see as

0:35:240:35:28

much of this - this is by Bagnall but all around the same sort of period.

0:35:280:35:33

Worcester is very easy to date, and if you look at this mark here,

0:35:330:35:36

you see three purple circles,

0:35:360:35:38

or puce circles, and on either side of that there are a series of dots.

0:35:380:35:41

The three interlinked circles were 1932,

0:35:410:35:47

and then you add a dot for each year.

0:35:470:35:49

You've got nine dots, that's 1941.

0:35:490:35:52

That's quite unusual, really, because you wouldn't see British

0:35:520:35:56

people buying porcelain in the middle of World War Two,

0:35:560:36:00

but we've got a little telltale giveaway here - Buenos Aires.

0:36:000:36:04

We've got a Buenos Aires retailer, so this was made in Worcester,

0:36:040:36:07

has gone over to Argentina, has been sold in Argentina...

0:36:070:36:11

-And come back again!

-Back to Stoke!

0:36:110:36:14

Well, there we are, so that's got a bit of interesting history about that one.

0:36:140:36:18

You do get factories who are transfer-printing these pieces

0:36:180:36:21

and then hand-painting little bits over the top,

0:36:210:36:24

but these are all hand-painted, so these are very, very sought after.

0:36:240:36:28

This one is the best.

0:36:280:36:29

The softness of the painting of those wonderful grapes, you could almost

0:36:290:36:33

eat them, a real feel to them.

0:36:330:36:35

Now, values. Any ideas?

0:36:350:36:39

Not really. We've never had them professionally valued.

0:36:390:36:43

OK. I'm gonna put them as a group.

0:36:430:36:45

-OK.

-And that will give the auction room that ability to

0:36:450:36:49

split them up if they want to, it depends on their own client base.

0:36:490:36:53

We'll say £80 on this one.

0:36:530:36:55

The larger one, I think, is worth around £120.

0:36:550:37:00

This one, £200 to £300.

0:37:000:37:03

-Right.

-So, if we say an estimate of £400 to £500 on them, as a three?

0:37:030:37:09

That sounds very good.

0:37:090:37:11

-Could we put a reserve on them?

-Absolutely.

0:37:110:37:13

As a group, let's put 400 on them. So what are you gonna do?

0:37:130:37:17

Buy a great big piece of fantastic Wedgwood to replace them with?

0:37:170:37:20

Oh, I don't think so, actually,

0:37:200:37:22

because I'm a model railway enthusiast, so I may very well buy

0:37:220:37:25

-something for the collection.

-Fantastic.

0:37:250:37:28

Well, Worcester is something that we just can't get enough of.

0:37:280:37:32

-Yes.

-That's good news.

-Lovely.

0:37:320:37:34

Let's take them along and see how we do.

0:37:340:37:36

-Yes, thanks.

-Thank you.

0:37:360:37:38

-Pam.

-Yes.

0:37:430:37:45

I can't say I like dolls.

0:37:450:37:48

I'm not fascinated by them, but what appeals to me is the way that they're dressed.

0:37:480:37:54

If I see a doll that's in the original costume,

0:37:540:37:58

then I think it's obviously a great deal more interesting.

0:37:580:38:01

-Now, this one dates from the end of the 19th, just turning into the 20th century.

-Oh.

0:38:010:38:09

Does it have a family history?

0:38:090:38:11

Just a little bit.

0:38:110:38:13

We actually got this from my mother who was given it by a great auntie, a good many years ago, and as much

0:38:130:38:19

as we understand, she was actually given this by the Jessop family that she used to work for.

0:38:190:38:24

-The Jessop family is who?

-Well, they sort of own

0:38:240:38:28

the Jessop stores in Nottingham and my aunt worked for the old Miss Jessop

0:38:280:38:32

as a cook and housekeeper for a good many years

0:38:320:38:36

and on her retirement, she actually acquired this lovely gift.

0:38:360:38:39

It is a beautiful little object.

0:38:390:38:41

It's in its original box here, and this label, which says "The Grand Toy Shop"

0:38:410:38:47

is an original box, which is very good. Always toys in original boxes is a bonus.

0:38:470:38:52

I'm just going to take...

0:38:520:38:53

you don't mind...this little girl out so we can have a look at it.

0:38:530:38:58

Not only is it the original costume, but when we look at it, also the hair at the back,

0:38:580:39:03

which is natural hair

0:39:030:39:06

is also dressed in the manner of a young girl round about 1890, 1900.

0:39:060:39:13

The costume is decorated with this machine lace

0:39:130:39:17

and then we have these little buttons added to the front.

0:39:170:39:21

I would imagine her feet were also embellished with the same

0:39:210:39:26

-buttons, because there's one there, but it's lost its colour.

-Yes.

0:39:260:39:29

So that's all she had on her feet.

0:39:290:39:31

-Little buttons.

-That's all we've ever seen on her feet, yes.

0:39:310:39:35

The other detail I like, lovely little glass eyes,

0:39:350:39:38

painted feature, typical of a French doll of the late 19th century.

0:39:380:39:44

This would have been used possibly as a...

0:39:440:39:49

-doll's house occupant.

-I was wondering that.

0:39:490:39:52

-It's the right size to go inside.

-A doll's house. Yes.

0:39:520:39:57

-So she would have had miniature furniture, drinking vessels, and she would have been quite at home.

-Yes.

0:39:570:40:03

But obviously she never got that far, because she was always kept in this little box here.

0:40:030:40:08

Lovely element of social history.

0:40:080:40:10

First of all, how it was acquired by the Jessop family and then passed on to your great aunt.

0:40:100:40:15

-Why are you selling it?

-It's just stuck in a drawer.

0:40:150:40:18

It is a shame and Mum, before she died last year,

0:40:180:40:21

she was actually looking at selling it, so I know that's what she wanted us to do anyway.

0:40:210:40:26

-We'd like it to go to somebody who can actually really appreciate it.

-And collect dolls.

0:40:260:40:30

And who collects dolls, yes.

0:40:300:40:33

I think there's going to be a good market for it. Let me think in terms of price.

0:40:330:40:37

A minimum of 40. Between £40 and £60, I think,

0:40:390:40:43

but you might get a surprise, coming on close to £100,

0:40:430:40:47

-so let's just keep our fingers crossed.

-Lovely. Thank you.

0:40:470:40:51

Now, cast your mind back a few hundred years.

0:40:580:41:01

The year is approximately 1610.

0:41:010:41:03

James I is on the throne and Sir Walter Raleigh is in the Tower of London,

0:41:030:41:06

but here, in Cheshire, work has just finished on the home of one William Moreton III.

0:41:060:41:13

Little Moreton Hall is one of the finest examples of Elizabethan

0:41:180:41:22

timber-framed manor houses in England.

0:41:220:41:25

Work on the house started in the early 16th century

0:41:250:41:29

and extended over future generations.

0:41:290:41:31

It's a stunning display of medieval craftsmanship.

0:41:310:41:35

It's a half-timber-framed house,

0:41:360:41:38

built on a stone foundation, and each storey was built

0:41:380:41:42

at different stages. The infill of the wood is plaster and lath.

0:41:420:41:46

Now, originally this, in Elizabethan times,

0:41:460:41:48

would have been a lovely golden ochre colour, quite vibrant.

0:41:480:41:51

It was the Victorians that painted everything black and white.

0:41:510:41:55

They even painted all the oak beams black! But look at it!

0:41:550:41:57

It really is fantastic.

0:41:570:41:59

The more wood, the more money you had.

0:41:590:42:01

It was something to show off, and all of this is held together

0:42:010:42:05

with wooden pegs, massive great big wooden pegs, driven into the mortice

0:42:050:42:09

to hold it tight when the wood was still green, in its fresh

0:42:090:42:13

state, because all this would have been felled from the local forest.

0:42:130:42:17

Here is a typical example of the pegs, look,

0:42:170:42:19

that hold the whole thing together.

0:42:190:42:22

They're known as "trenails". Treenails.

0:42:220:42:25

And when you get into the cobbled internal courtyard,

0:42:330:42:37

you get greeted with a 360-degree

0:42:370:42:39

panoramic view of architectural delight. Just look at it!

0:42:390:42:43

You get wonderful ornamentation all around the doors and windows.

0:42:430:42:47

It's so typical of a Cheshire build.

0:42:470:42:49

I love the quatrefoils, with hand-carved balustrades.

0:42:490:42:53

It's another detail that just catches your eye.

0:42:530:42:55

Moving right up, you've got the leaded windows

0:42:550:42:58

and these windows must have been so expensive in their day.

0:42:580:43:01

It's another way of showing off extreme wealth,

0:43:010:43:04

and that takes you up to the eaves, where you

0:43:040:43:06

see these great big bulbous drop pendants, all hand-carved again.

0:43:060:43:09

Wonderful!

0:43:090:43:11

And here, look, the carpenter has even put his name,

0:43:110:43:14

"Rycharde Dale, carpeder, made thies windovs by the grac of God,"

0:43:140:43:18

and the date was 1559, and it's still standing!

0:43:180:43:22

They really did know their trade.

0:43:220:43:25

The house was acquired by the National Trust in 1938,

0:43:280:43:32

and David Watts is the property manager.

0:43:320:43:34

He's the chap we need to find to have a quick chat to

0:43:340:43:37

about the history of this magnificent house and its lucky owner.

0:43:370:43:41

-Hello.

-Hi, Paul.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:43:500:43:53

I've gotta say, absolutely mind-blowing, isn't it?

0:43:530:43:56

And I know it sounds corny, but who would live in a house like this?

0:43:560:44:00

Well, the Moretons were wealthy landowners

0:44:000:44:02

who came into the area, we think, around the 13th century.

0:44:020:44:06

The family itself had wealth through corn mills,

0:44:060:44:10

ironworks, timberworks, and primarily the land itself,

0:44:100:44:16

and they wanted to show their wealth to everybody else,

0:44:160:44:20

and each generation wanted to add their special part to the hall.

0:44:200:44:23

Fantastic bay windows, magnificent ranges of glass.

0:44:230:44:28

It's one of the best examples I think I've ever seen.

0:44:280:44:31

It's a beautiful house.

0:44:310:44:32

I want to show you another room, with fantastic decoration.

0:44:320:44:36

OK, after you.

0:44:360:44:37

Take a look at this, Paul.

0:44:410:44:43

Gosh, look at that? Tudor wallpaper.

0:44:430:44:46

-It's fantastic, isn't it?

-Yeah!

0:44:460:44:48

It was fashionable in the 1570s

0:44:480:44:51

to about 1600 to use painted panels, and here we've got the Moretons, who

0:44:510:44:56

really are into fashion and wealth and wanted to express that wealth,

0:44:560:45:00

and John Moreton got the panels painted. We think that you'd probably

0:45:000:45:06

get travelling craftsmen who would come round and paint the stories

0:45:060:45:11

onto the paper, and then, of course, it's pasted onto the wall itself.

0:45:110:45:15

Incredible! Have you depicted what the stories are telling?

0:45:150:45:18

Is there enough there?

0:45:180:45:19

It's the story of Susannah And The Elders.

0:45:190:45:22

So, come on, tell me about that.

0:45:220:45:25

Susannah was the beautiful wife of a businessman and she was admired,

0:45:250:45:31

shall we say, by a couple of elders in the town,

0:45:310:45:34

and they went into her garden

0:45:340:45:37

and she refused their advances.

0:45:370:45:39

She is then actually put on trial and is about to be stoned to death for adultery,

0:45:390:45:44

but our hero, who is Daniel,

0:45:440:45:45

-who was actually in the far corner...

-The chap up there?

0:45:450:45:48

That's the chap - steps in and asks them to look again at the evidence,

0:45:480:45:54

-and, in fact, it's the two elders who are then put to death.

-Wow!

0:45:540:45:57

-Look at that!

-But it's a fantastic piece of historic wallpaper,

0:45:570:46:00

and you get little details, like the wolf's head on the frieze.

0:46:000:46:05

That's the Moreton coat of arms.

0:46:050:46:09

Now, interestingly, of course, the fashions change.

0:46:090:46:12

The fashion becomes, let's put wooden panelling on instead.

0:46:120:46:15

And what do the Moretons do? They replace it with that.

0:46:150:46:18

By virtue of putting the panelling over that, it has protected it.

0:46:180:46:21

-Of course.

-Obviously, the condition of that, it's been saved by the panelling,

0:46:210:46:25

but, overall, the house is in remarkable condition.

0:46:250:46:28

It's a very solid structure.

0:46:280:46:31

-It's a wonderful house.

-And I like the fact that you've kept it

0:46:310:46:34

quite sparse inside because the space has the beauty as well.

0:46:340:46:38

It makes you appreciate the architecture.

0:46:380:46:40

In many ways, our collection is the building itself.

0:46:400:46:44

-Yeah, it's one big antique, isn't it?

-It is, it's wonderful.

0:46:440:46:48

Well, not only is it a delight to look at, but Little Moreton Hall

0:46:580:47:02

is a masterclass in Tudor woodwork and carpentry,

0:47:020:47:06

a perfectly preserved piece of medieval history.

0:47:060:47:10

It's now that time in the show where we head off to the sale room

0:47:140:47:19

and here's what's coming with us.

0:47:190:47:22

David loved this pair of Worcester vases.

0:47:220:47:23

The fine quality and the pretty hand-painting is bound to catch the eye of a discerning bidder.

0:47:230:47:30

Liz is hoping the bidders will stand and deliver a good price when her pistols go up for sale.

0:47:300:47:35

This doll has been left in a drawer for years and now it's finally out in the light of day.

0:47:370:47:43

I think it could do well for owner, Pam.

0:47:430:47:46

And, finally, there's something for everyone with Bill and Lillian's

0:47:460:47:49

collection of Worcester. Let's hope the collectors are out in force!

0:47:490:47:54

I've been joined by Bill and Lillian.

0:48:020:48:04

Now, we've got three lots, haven't we? The first lot,

0:48:040:48:07

the smallest one, is £80, the second lot is about £120 and £200.

0:48:070:48:10

-£200 to £300 for the pedestal cup.

-That's right.

0:48:100:48:14

And we've got a total valuation of about £400 to £500 here.

0:48:140:48:18

We are selling them separately, but all the money, I just read in

0:48:180:48:21

my notes, is going towards the model railway, is it?

0:48:210:48:24

-Well, not...

-I think he's had second thoughts about that.

0:48:240:48:27

Second thoughts!

0:48:270:48:29

-You mean you have?

-I had a subtle

0:48:290:48:31

reminder that it is our 25th wedding anniversary this year.

0:48:310:48:34

That's more important than a model railway!

0:48:340:48:36

-I think so.

-Cracking items these, James?

0:48:360:48:38

Yeah, great.

0:48:380:48:40

When we took them in on the valuation day we talked about splitting them up

0:48:400:48:43

-or putting them together.

-We did.

0:48:430:48:45

And I thought Adam would split them up.

0:48:450:48:46

It's the right thing to do, I think, but, you know, there are

0:48:460:48:49

-lots of people here today and they're gonna do very, very well.

-Good.

0:48:490:48:53

Well, fingers crossed and here's the first going under the hammer.

0:48:530:48:56

367 is Royal Worcester bowl painted

0:48:560:48:58

with fruits, by Albert Shuck, lot 367, little footed bowl there. £80.

0:48:580:49:04

£80. 50, 50 bid, 5 now.

0:49:040:49:08

At £50, 5, 60, 5, 65 bid.

0:49:080:49:11

Any more now? 65.

0:49:110:49:14

70, 5, 80 now, 80 bid. 85.

0:49:140:49:19

85 online. Any more on this lot?

0:49:190:49:22

85. Any further? The bid's online this time at £85 on the first.

0:49:220:49:28

£85. That's good, that's good.

0:49:280:49:32

First one down. Here's the next.

0:49:320:49:34

Worcester bowl painted by Albert Shuck again.

0:49:340:49:36

Lovely bowl, 368. Start me at £100.

0:49:360:49:38

80 bid, 5, 90, 5, £95, any more?

0:49:380:49:43

£95, 100 bid, 10, 110, take 120 now.

0:49:430:49:47

120, online at 120, any more? 130?

0:49:470:49:52

-140. At 140.

-It's good.

-It is.

0:49:520:49:55

Are you all done at 140? 150.

0:49:550:49:58

Any more at 150? All done?

0:49:580:50:00

160, 160, keep going, 160, any more now at 160?

0:50:000:50:06

Hammer's up then at 160, we'll sell at 160. 170...

0:50:060:50:09

Gosh, that was late in!

0:50:090:50:11

-170 bid.

-We like it, though!

0:50:110:50:14

-We do!

-Any more now at 170? 180?

0:50:140:50:16

At 180. Last chance. It's now at 180, we're gonna sell...

0:50:160:50:19

190. At 190.

0:50:190:50:22

Any more at 190?

0:50:220:50:24

At 190, 200. 200, any more now?

0:50:240:50:27

-Good heavens!

-At 200. 210.

0:50:270:50:31

LAUGHTER

0:50:340:50:36

-210. Are we done at 210?

-I think so.

0:50:360:50:39

I think we're done at 210. All done at 210 and we sell this one at £210.

0:50:390:50:43

How super! Second one down.

0:50:450:50:47

That's good news. Here's the last one.

0:50:470:50:49

This is the third one, 369, by William Bagnall, painted

0:50:490:50:53

with fruits. I'm bid 110. Take 20.

0:50:530:50:56

110 only, 120 now, 120.

0:50:560:51:00

130, 140, 140.

0:51:000:51:03

150, 160, 170. 170 bid.

0:51:030:51:05

Any more now? 180.

0:51:050:51:07

180 now, 180. 190... We've got the same thing happening again. 190?

0:51:070:51:13

-Got a bid.

-200?

0:51:130:51:15

At 200. Any further now at 200?

0:51:150:51:17

Are you all done now? £200, we sell this one...

0:51:170:51:19

-210.

-210.

0:51:190:51:23

All done and selling at 210?

0:51:230:51:25

Last chance at £210.

0:51:250:51:28

-Yes!

-Yes, very good, very good.

-Fantastic! That's all three

0:51:280:51:33

-sold, that's £505.

-Yes, very good, very good.

0:51:330:51:38

Well, they were spot on, really, with the £400 to £500, weren't they?

0:51:380:51:42

Got the top end of the estimate.

0:51:420:51:43

-Yeah.

-Very good, James.

-And it just shows you, doesn't it,

0:51:430:51:46

by varying how people can bid, there's bidding in the room,

0:51:460:51:49

there's bidding on the phone andbidding against each other on the internet - fantastic!

0:51:490:51:54

-You were dead right, dead right.

-Absolutely spot on.

0:51:540:51:57

Congratulations to James, and enjoy the wedding anniversary.

0:51:570:52:01

-Yes, yes.

-I'm sure we will, sure we will.

0:52:010:52:03

Well, Sheila is downsizing so they've got to go.

0:52:110:52:15

These two Worcester Edwardian vases valued at £240 to £300 are up for sale right now.

0:52:150:52:20

David, you did the valuation, you like these.

0:52:200:52:23

Yes. They're glamorous, blowsy pieces. I think they're good.

0:52:230:52:27

They're the epitome of the Edwardian period.

0:52:270:52:30

-Yes, they're very pretty.

-Rather beautiful.

0:52:300:52:33

Let's hope we get you the top end, because I know you're moving to a smaller place.

0:52:330:52:38

It just sort of haemorrhages money, moving. It really does, doesn't it?

0:52:380:52:42

-Yes.

-Oh, I've just moved. Yes. We downsized.

0:52:420:52:46

I might say we've got 40 packing cases still to unpack after a year.

0:52:460:52:50

Yes. I've got some boxes from six years ago.

0:52:500:52:54

Living in mayhem, I don't know.

0:52:540:52:56

Fingers crossed. Let's hope we get 300.

0:52:560:53:00

Pair of Royal Worcester quarter length vases.

0:53:000:53:03

Painted with roses by Gertie Taunt.

0:53:030:53:05

What a lovely name. Gertie Taunt.

0:53:050:53:07

I can start with interest at a 200 and 210 bid. Is there 220?

0:53:070:53:11

210 is bid. 210 bid. 220, 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, no...

0:53:110:53:17

270. Any more now? 270. Any more now?

0:53:170:53:19

270. Are you all done?

0:53:190:53:23

280, 290. 300.

0:53:230:53:25

At 290, 290. Any more now?

0:53:250:53:30

At £290.

0:53:300:53:32

We're going to settle for that.

0:53:320:53:34

Very nice.

0:53:340:53:36

-That'll come in very handy.

-Lovely, thank you.

0:53:360:53:39

-Oh, bless.

-What about Paul?

-Aw.

0:53:400:53:44

We're in for an interesting duel right now,

0:53:510:53:54

because it's the pair of little hand pistols belonging to Liz. You brought your mum along.

0:53:540:53:59

Hello, Betty, are you OK? You've been looking forward to this?

0:53:590:54:03

-Yeah.

-Let's hope we can get the top end of James's estimate.

0:54:030:54:06

You've got £1,500 to £2,500 riding on this.

0:54:060:54:11

This is going to solve the problem, isn't it? With the two boys. Yeah?

0:54:110:54:16

-What did you say, Betty?

-I'll be glad to get rid of them.

0:54:160:54:19

You'll be glad to get rid of them. Do your sons keep saying, "Can I have them, Mum, can I have them?"

0:54:190:54:24

-Badgering you.

-Lots of banter.

-Is there? Are they all happy, though, it's going into auction?

0:54:240:54:30

-Yes.

-Well, let's hope we get the best price. Shall we?

0:54:300:54:34

Fingers crossed. Here we go.

0:54:340:54:36

204. Fine pair of pistols

0:54:360:54:41

by Ulrich in Bern. Swiss pistols here.

0:54:410:54:43

Lot 204. They're lovely.

0:54:430:54:45

Who'll start with £1,500?

0:54:450:54:48

I'm bid 1,000 and I'll take 50.

0:54:480:54:51

£1,000, take 50.

0:54:510:54:52

All done then at £1,050. 1,150. 1,250. 1,350.

0:54:520:55:00

£1,350, now. 1,450. 1,550.

0:55:000:55:04

Your bid of 1,550. I'll take 1,600.

0:55:040:55:06

At 1,550 the bid. 1,550.

0:55:060:55:10

1,600 and 50?

0:55:100:55:11

1,600 in the room now. £1,600 - any more on these?

0:55:110:55:15

Any advance now on £1,600?

0:55:150:55:18

-Gone. Wow.

-Just got away, didn't we? Just over the bottom end.

0:55:210:55:26

-Brilliant, thank you.

-You're pleased with that?

-Yeah. They're gone.

0:55:260:55:30

Betty, you've got to treat yourself to a bit of lunch.

0:55:300:55:34

-We're going on the Orient Express.

-Are you?

-Yes.

-Oh, that's brilliant!

0:55:340:55:39

-Just for a day.

-Oh, how lovely.

0:55:390:55:41

Next up, we've got a cute little doll with original box and original clothes.

0:55:470:55:53

We're looking for around £50 to £60.

0:55:530:55:55

It belongs to Pam. Never been played with.

0:55:550:55:57

-No. Absolutely not.

-The condition is superb.

0:55:570:56:00

-It was a gift, wasn't it?

-It was.

-Why do you want to sell this?

-She's sitting in a box, doing nothing.

0:56:000:56:07

The box is actually getting crumpled so we thought it was time to sell.

0:56:070:56:11

That's what caught David's eye. Is the condition of the box, the original clothes. It sets it apart.

0:56:110:56:16

Even down to the hat. Immaculate condition, and the way the hair is dressed is all original.

0:56:160:56:21

That'll boost the price. I've confident that the price should exceed what we put on it.

0:56:210:56:26

Let's hope we're in for a surprise. Good luck.

0:56:260:56:29

155. The French bisque-headed doll with blonde hair.

0:56:290:56:32

A small one there.

0:56:320:56:33

All bisque in original box.

0:56:330:56:35

Let's start with a bid of £50, shall we? £50 is bid. Take 5.

0:56:350:56:39

Are you all done at £50?

0:56:390:56:41

5, 60, 5, 70, 5, 80. 5.

0:56:410:56:45

90. 5, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150,

0:56:450:56:48

160, 170, 180, 170... Who's going on?

0:56:480:56:52

-170!

-180, 190, 200, 210, 220,

0:56:520:56:58

230, 240.

0:56:580:57:00

Ooh, this was a "come and buy me", David.

0:57:000:57:03

260, 270, 280, 290, 300, 320, 340,

0:57:030:57:10

360, 380,

0:57:100:57:12

400, 420, 440, 460.

0:57:120:57:16

460 on this phone. Is there 480 now?

0:57:160:57:19

-Goodness me!

-480, 500, 520.

0:57:190:57:23

What is so special about this? It's not just the condition.

0:57:230:57:27

-French doll, perfect condition.

-560, 580,

0:57:270:57:32

600, 620.

0:57:320:57:35

600 on this phone...any further now?

0:57:350:57:37

At £600. At 600...any more?

0:57:370:57:40

Are you all done then? At £600.

0:57:400:57:44

-I feel like applauding.

-Fantastic.

0:57:460:57:50

£600. What a wonderful surprise!

0:57:500:57:53

-Cute little doll we thought would go for 60.

-Yes, that's right.

0:57:530:57:58

Condition, condition, condition, that's what it's all about.

0:57:580:58:02

Bit of commission to pay, but what will you put nearly £600 on.

0:58:020:58:06

Well, the doll belonged to my great auntie and she needs

0:58:060:58:09

a new memorial stone now, so we always said we'd put the money towards a new one,

0:58:090:58:13

so we're very, very pleased at that amount of money.

0:58:130:58:16

-Oh, bless you Pam. David, what a special day.

-It really is.

0:58:160:58:22

Tears in Pam's eyes! She's obviously so happy. That's all for today's show.

0:58:220:58:26

We've thoroughly enjoyed being here in Knutsford.

0:58:260:58:29

So, until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:58:290:58:32

Subtitling by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:400:58:43

Paul Martin invites experts David Barby and Mark Stacey to advise more hopeful antiques owners about selling their objects. They are in Stoke-on-Trent, heart of the British pottery industry.


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