Whitby 27 Flog It!


Whitby 27

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Today we've headed out to the stunning Yorkshire coastline famous for its fishing heritage.

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Welcome to Flog It from Whitby.

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Whitby is split into two by a swing bridge dividing the town into east and west.

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All over the town are dotted fishermen's cottages,

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narrow cobbled streets and lanes which date back to medieval days.

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Boasting a beautiful harbour, it's a great place to visit.

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Explorer and navigator Captain James Cook

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began his training as a seaman here in Whitby

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and it was also here that his famous ship HM Endeavour was built.

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Cook made three major voyages to the Pacific and en route accurately charted coastlines

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and several islands for the very first time on European maps.

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Later in the show, it's full steam ahead as I take a trip

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on this magnificent railway across the North Yorkshire Moors.

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TOOTS HORN

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And on their own voyage of discovery today are our two experts, Mr Philip Serrell and Kate Bateman.

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They'll look at all items brought along, picking out the best and selling them in auction later on.

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Hopefully, there's going to be one or two big surprises.

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We've got a healthy crowd outside Whitby Pavilion.

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It's time to get them inside because they've got to ask that important question, "What's it worth?"

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What will you do when you find out? Flog it!

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With everyone inside, it's time to start our valuations

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and it looks like Kate has found a rather nice jug with a nautical interest.

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Trevor, you've brought a bit of maritime history.

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Not that I know anything about maritime history, but yeah.

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Right. What do you know about it?

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It originally belonged to my grandparents and it was passed down to my father

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and it was just stuck in a wall unit for a long time.

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My mother wanted to get rid of it, but my father wouldn't let her.

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He was a wise man, but you got it?

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Yeah, cos she doesn't want it. My father's passed away now.

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-She's booted it out of the house and you've got it?

-I've got it, yeah.

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What have we got? It's basically an English Pearlware transfer-printed jug.

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And it's made to commemorate, as we see on here, Horatio Lord Nelson, Vice-Admiral of the White,

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and basically it's all his naval victories, really.

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He was at Copenhagen and Trafalgar.

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And it's got, "England expects every man to do his duty", which is his sort of catchphrase.

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And this is probably about 1810,

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so just made to commemorate after his famous battle, I presume, at Trafalgar.

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So it's quite rare and the condition, surprisingly for something that old, is pretty good.

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There's a little hairline crack here.

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This is an irregularity in the glaze, rather than actual damage.

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And a few little nibbles on the rim, but actually it's really good.

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So what do you think it's worth?

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A few years ago, I did have somebody give me a rough estimate on it

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and said that it might be worth between £300 and £400. What it's worth now, I'm not sure.

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-Your mum would disagree, I suspect.

-It's worth about two and six to her probably!

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It's probably about the right kind of figure.

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I'm happy to put an estimate for an auction at 300 to 400.

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I'd probably put a reserve a little bit lower, maybe at 250, to reflect those little bits of nibbles,

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but it's becoming rarer and rarer to find one in good condition, so it might do even better.

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We'll put a 300 to 400 estimate, 250 reserve, and fingers crossed.

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-England expects it will sell.

-I hope so.

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-Mandy, how are you?

-Fine, thank you.

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This is clearly an Archibald Thorburn.

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If this was an original Thorburn oil painting, we'd be looking at tens of thousands of pounds.

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An original Thorburn watercolour might be anywhere between £5,000 and £15,000.

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And we can see that this is dated "1930",

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and a Thorburn print from the '30s signed in pencil by him down here,

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that in itself can be worth anywhere between £200 and £400,

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-but you and I both know this is not of the period, is it?

-No.

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This has been produced by a gallery who specialise in selling sporting works by artists like Thorburn

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and this would have been produced probably in the mid-1970s.

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One of the reasons why I love it is that I love the Yorkshire Dales,

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I love the Yorkshire Moors, you've got this grouse scene.

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For anybody who has not been up on the moors and seen and heard the grouse, it's really captivating.

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So I love it for that reason. Why did you buy this? What sparked off that Thorburn interest for you?

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When I was at school, the art teacher had a book on Thorburn's animals

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and I was fascinated by the pictures in that.

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I saw this in a saleroom a lot of years later and it caught my attention.

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-Captivated from schooldays?

-Yes.

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I think that you should estimate this at sort of £50 to £80,

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that sort of region, and...

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If the saleroom get this online, on the internet, it could well do very well.

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But I think it's £50 to £80.

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-And I'd put a fixed reserve on it of £40.

-Right.

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-You bought it how long ago, two years ago?

-Yeah.

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Here's the acid test. What did you pay for it?

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-About £48.

-You paid about £48?

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I can't remember if that was plus or including the commission.

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I think we can put at least 50 to 80 on it.

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My only doubt, and I do have a doubt,

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my only doubt about it is that it's really almost just a photographic reproduction.

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It's very, very late. It's mid-1970s and those things are going to hang against it.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes, I'm fine with that, thank you.

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How's that for scary? Guy, it's absolutely lovely. How did you come by this?

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It had been sitting in the porch

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of my 15th century cottage for many generations.

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-When I sold the cottage...

-It came with you.

-It came with me. I couldn't bear to leave him.

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-Do you know much about it?

-Very little. It's just been part of the family.

-It's made of oak.

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It's not 15th or 16th century. It's Victorian. It's Gothic Revival.

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This was always meant to be inside.

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I'm pleased that it's survived the weathering from your porch for a long time,

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-because the elements could have got at it, so it was under a bit of cover.

-Oh, yes.

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And I think the gargoyles would have looked down on you just like this one would have done.

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This is more like a wall boss

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and it would have been mounted to the wall this way on,

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-looking down on you as you passed under.

-That's it.

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Isn't that wonderful? It's chip-carved.

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It's very much like the carving you see on a lot of Black Forest work.

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It's quite crudely done, but at the same time, it's that crudeness that gives it its texture.

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-There's a little bit of damage to the ears.

-There is.

-But you can live with that.

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And there's a tiny bit of woodworm on the breast.

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Have you any idea of value?

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Not really. I would imagine it's quite a hard thing to value, but I really don't know.

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Well...

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Let's put it into auction with a guide of around £120 to £200 and see what happens.

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-Let's put a fixed reserve at £120 if you're happy with that.

-Yeah.

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I'd like to see it do around the 250 mark, but we've got to try and tempt people in,

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to give them the incentive that they're picking up a bargain.

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-Let them get caught bidding against other rivals and, all of a sudden, you've got £250. Happy?

-Very happy.

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-OK, let's sell it.

-That's fine.

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Oh, yes.

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And my mother wouldn't tell me anything about it.

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-I'm not surprised.

-She said one day when you're old enough,

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I'll tell you what it's all about.

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-Gordon, do you know what it's called?

-No, I know nothing about it at all.

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Right. Clearly it's a walking cane, and that's a Stanhope, OK?

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-Right.

-And a Stanhope is like a really small lens

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that's fitted into there.

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And I think Stanhope was a manufacturer of lenses.

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They're normally in little ivory pens, pencils, knives...

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Not seen one in a walking cane before.

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Normally you'd have a view of Whitby, or a view of Scarborough.

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In this instance... I'm just going to check this out.

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Well, for the benefit of the viewers at home,

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-she's about, what, 5'8"?

-That's about right.

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-Long, cascading brunette hair.

-Yes.

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Erm...

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-Basically, she's got nothing on.

-That's right.

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And she's... Actually, I'm just going to check this out again.

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She's a very shapely girl, isn't she?

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No wonder your grandmother wouldn't let you see this.

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-I think it's a real good bit of fun.

-It is.

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I should think it's probably...1890-1900?

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-Yes.

-I think it's interesting actually,

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because there we've got a cane that's, like, worth a fiver.

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-Yes.

-And then we put a Stanhope in there, and if the Stanhope has got a view of Whitby

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or a view of Scarborough, it might be worth £20.

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But, you know, it's a sad indictment of us old blokes, really.

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Put a naked girl in there and all of a sudden everybody wants to buy it.

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-I think at auction, you can put a very conservative estimate on it of £40-£60.

-Right.

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Fixed reserve of £40, and I think if you have a real good result,

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-it could go and make £100-£150.

-Fine.

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-Are you happy?

-I'm certainly happy.

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Purely for research, I just need to check it out one more time.

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Hellfire!

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Lilian, welcome to Flog It. You've got two different bits of pottery.

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What can you tell me about them?

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Well, I had them both given 28 year ago.

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-Right.

-They've been on top of the wardrobe, never been used.

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-So you're not a big fan?

-No.

-Do you know about the makers of them?

-Yes.

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-Moorcroft.

-Yeah.

-Clarice Cliff.

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You know your stuff. You just don't like 'em.

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-I wouldn't say I don't like them, but I have things I like better.

-Right, OK.

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This is a really nice one. This is the one I like best of the two.

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Again Moorcroft marks on the bottom, "WM" initials.

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It's really quite unusual, like a deep red flambe kind of glaze,

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and sort of autumn leaves and berries on that one.

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-The condition is really good.

-Yes.

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This one is Clarice Cliff. We've got the mark on the bottom, Bizarre, and the shape number.

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It's not one of her most funky ones. I think the design is called Rodanthe.

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This is in the blue and green. They do it in other colours as well like brown and pink.

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It's not the coolest of designs with little houses or interesting stuff, so it's quite a late piece.

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The ribbed pieces do less well than the others, but the condition is really good.

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You've brought them both in. Usually, I'd split them up into two separate lots.

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But because you want to get rid of them both, you might as well put them together in one lot.

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It's a classic dealer's lot. Both of them are really saleable pieces.

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-Any idea what you want to get for it? If I said £50, would you sell them?

-No.

-No?

-No, no, no.

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OK. What about 150?

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-Doubtful.

-OK.

-Maybe, maybe.

-I think they're worth probably about £100 each.

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This one maybe a bit more, this one maybe a bit less,

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so if you put the two together and put a £200 to £250 estimate on it,

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but maybe a reserve of 150 or 180...

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-180, I should say.

-So just below low estimate. That's got a good chance.

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If they don't sell, you could maybe ask the auctioneer at a second sale to split them up.

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-But I think they've got a good chance together. Are you ready to try them in the sale?

-Yes.

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-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

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Who's the older?

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So that's our first batch of valuations.

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The crowds are still coming in and there's plenty more to come later on.

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In Victorian times, the remote fishing port of Whitby came to be known

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as the photographer's Mecca and this was due to one man, Frank Meadow Sutcliffe.

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He was born in Yorkshire in 1853,

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just 14 years after the advent of photography, and as a young man

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he embraced this new art form to become one of the most prolific photographers of his time.

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It was here in his beloved Whitby and the surrounding areas

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that Sutcliffe used his skill to document a way of life,

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which was changing rapidly under the pace of industrialisation,

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and the subjects of his study were local farmhands and fisherman.

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Strangely enough, Whitby today hasn't really changed that much

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from the time Sutcliffe was looking through his lens.

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I've come to meet Mike Shaw from the Sutcliffe Gallery,

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who's talking to me about Sutcliffe's photographs, methods

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and the place he carved himself in the history of photography.

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Mike, thank you for meeting up with me and showing me around Whitby on such a beautiful day.

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You're welcome. It's fantastic, it couldn't be better.

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What brought Sutcliffe to Whitby in the first place?

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Well, Frank Sutcliffe was born near Leeds from an artistic background.

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-Frank Sutcliffe's father was a talented watercolour artist.

-Yes.

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And the Sutcliffe family holidayed in Whitby when Frank was young, for quite a number of years,

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and they moved to Whitby when Frank was 17.

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-So they all loved it here, it was a calling anyway.

-That's right.

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Sadly the year after they moved here, Sutcliffe's father died on the cliffs with pneumonia, painting.

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So Frank was thrust to the head of the family as breadwinner,

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and he chose photography as his career.

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He opened a portrait studio in a disused jet workshop, actually, and never looked back.

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He was probably one of the only photographers in Whitby,

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taking photographs for the tourists.

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-Yes.

-The well-off people, he made his living from that,

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-but his passion was documenting the people of Whitby and the real town.

-The social history side.

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That's right, which in those days was very unusual, it set him apart from other photographers.

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Real characters, real expressions.

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I guess maybe he got that from his father being an artist, did he?

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Yeah, and probably his sense of composition as well,

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which is something that you can't necessarily learn, it's in you.

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So were they staged or were they spontaneous?

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They have a spontaneous look to them,

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-but they didn't have that luxury that we have of taking a candid photograph.

-Yes.

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So he had to get people to pose, arrange them, and get them in general

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not to look at the camera, which again was an unusual technique really because Victorian photography

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is people looking straight at the camera.

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Almost ghostlike, never smiling or anything, it's straight there, isn't it?

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That's right, yes.

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It's a sign really that he had a good rapport with his subjects.

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He must have got to know them quite well for busy working people

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to stop what they're doing and be arranged maybe a quarter of an hour, half an hour, into a group.

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The exposures were for maybe a second or two seconds,

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so that it wasn't a massive exposure time but still long enough that if anybody moved, they blurred.

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Photography was a very different world compared to nowadays.

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Very basic equipment, and yet technically very complex

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-to accomplish a perfect photograph, really.

-Yes.

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You had to be a technician, a chemist, almost.

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He would be working on a tripod,

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whereas now we just hold a camera.

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-It's just point and shoot, isn't it, really?

-That's right.

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In his early days, he would take out the darkroom with him

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to process his glass negatives as soon as he'd taken the photograph, so it's just a different world.

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-It is, isn't it? He certainly earned his money.

-Yes.

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Was he well off at that stage?

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With his becoming famous with his exhibition work,

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he made a name for himself and people who were holidaying would flock

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to have their photograph to have their photograph taken by him.

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-So he would be the David Bailey of the day?

-That's right, exactly.

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Incredible. So what were the social conditions like back then for a working person?

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When you take a look at Frank Sutcliffe's photographs, you can tell that it was a physically hard life.

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Lots of work, but probably compared to nowadays it was a more contented life, more neighbourly,

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-and you could go out and not lock your door and things like that.

-Yes.

-A nicer place to live, probably.

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Yes. You're painting a nice picture. I wish we could all go back in time,

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-don't you?

-Probably not, not knowing what we know now, no.

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Let's talk about some of his other subject matter.

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He was really busy in the summer, so the majority of his photographs are actually taken in winter.

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So there's some lovely snow scenes as well, rough seas,

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ones of boats with children, and also when he goes out

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into the country, farming scenes,

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ploughing, and just some lovely rural landscapes that he's taken.

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There are so many facets to his work, it's not just like a one-trick pony.

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No. It's documenting social history, which is the brilliant thing.

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-Yes. Even in their own day when they were contemporary photographs, they were acknowledged as fantastic.

-Yes.

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-Nowadays they've got that added bonus of being social documents as well.

-Exactly, historical.

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-That's right.

-He was a true artist and a pioneer in his day -

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how does he fit into the history of photography moving forward?

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Well, he did see a lot of changes in photography.

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Obviously when he first started, he was coating his negatives

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with the wet chemicals first of all and then moved on to dry plates.

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Then really when he was thinking about retiring from photography,

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Kodak brought out the Box Brownie, which was a hand-held camera,

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and Kodak asked a few prominent photographers

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of the day to endorse their new camera and gave Frank Sutcliffe

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a camera and some film to try out.

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The results from those, which we have, are OK but they don't quite have the same quality

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from his glass plate work where I think he had to think more about the results that he was producing.

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-But he certainly earned his place in history.

-Absolutely. He was well respected in photographic history

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and just general history of this country, really.

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We're making our way to auction. Here's a reminder of all the items coming with us.

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This Pearlware Nelson commemorative jug once belonged to Trevor's grandfather,

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but no-one in the family has liked it.

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My mother wanted to get rid of it, but my father wouldn't let her.

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A great fan of the artist Archibald Thorburn, Mandy has decided to sell her grouse print,

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hoping someone will hunt it out in the saleroom.

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Will Guy's Victorian wooden carving, found in the porch of his old cottage,

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carve out a good price at auction?

0:21:370:21:39

Gordon's Stanhope has a saucy secret.

0:21:390:21:42

She's about, what, 5'8", long, cascading brunette hair.

0:21:440:21:47

-Yes.

-Basically she's got nothing on.

0:21:470:21:49

That's right.

0:21:490:21:51

Let's hope she will also attract the bidders.

0:21:510:21:54

And two classic Flog It favourites - Moorcroft and Clarice Cliff.

0:21:540:21:59

They've sat on Lillian's wardrobe for nearly 30 years, but she's decided to let them go.

0:21:590:22:05

I wouldn't say I don't like them, but I have things I like better.

0:22:050:22:10

This is where it gets exciting. We're going to put our experts' valuations to the test.

0:22:120:22:18

Somebody today will go home with a lot of money.

0:22:180:22:21

That's all down to Thomas Watson Auctioneers here in Darlington, County Durham,

0:22:210:22:26

so let's get inside and find out.

0:22:260:22:29

And in a packed auction house today,

0:22:310:22:34

the all-important man wielding the gavel is auctioneer Peter Robinson.

0:22:340:22:39

First up is Mandy with her Archibald Thorburn print.

0:22:390:22:43

-I hope we get the top end for this Thorburn print.

-It would be very nice.

-It's lovely.

0:22:430:22:48

-All the money is going towards...?

-Camera equipment.

0:22:480:22:52

-You're a bit of an amateur photographer?

-I am.

0:22:520:22:55

-I've managed to win third prize in a national magazine.

-Have you?

-Yes.

0:22:550:23:00

-Fantastic.

-Last year.

0:23:000:23:02

-Do you do landscapes and portraits or just anything?

-Landscape, wildlife and macro-photography.

0:23:020:23:08

-Is that why you've got the Thorburn, is it, because it's wildlife?

-Yes, wildlife, yes.

0:23:080:23:14

-Great book illustrator. What have we got, £50 to £80 on this?

-Fixed reserve, 40.

-OK.

0:23:140:23:19

-A reprint of an early original, but we're in the right country to sell it.

-Exactly.

0:23:190:23:25

-Let's hope we get the top end.

-It would be nice.

0:23:250:23:28

390, showing here,

0:23:280:23:30

the Archibald Thorburn, very nice limited edition print

0:23:300:23:35

from a London Tryon Gallery.

0:23:350:23:37

Lot number 390. £50?

0:23:370:23:40

30 bid. At £30.

0:23:400:23:42

At £30 for the Thorburn print. At £30.

0:23:420:23:45

At £30. 40 bid. At £40.

0:23:450:23:48

Are we all finished then at £40?

0:23:480:23:51

Being sold at £40. Here to be sold at £40. All finished then at £40...?

0:23:510:23:56

-It's gone. £40, Mandy, that's OK.

-It saves me carrying it home.

0:23:570:24:01

-It's a few pounds less than you paid for it.

-Yeah.

0:24:020:24:06

-That's a gamble you take.

-It is, yeah. Good luck with the photography.

-Thank you.

0:24:060:24:11

Something for the boys! It's a walking cane

0:24:170:24:20

and it has a cheeky little picture, a Stanhope, of a lady inside.

0:24:200:24:25

Gordon's had lots of fun with this, I would imagine!

0:24:250:24:28

-Yes.

-£40-£60, it's a snip at that sort of price.

0:24:280:24:32

It keeps a dinner party going!

0:24:320:24:33

Why are you selling? It's such a good laugh.

0:24:330:24:36

I'm downsizing, and I have that much rubbish.

0:24:360:24:38

-This came over from Canada?

-Yes, and my mother never would show me it.

0:24:380:24:42

I was nearly 20 when she said, "One of these days I will actually show you what it is."

0:24:420:24:47

But unfortunately she died, and it was only by chance

0:24:470:24:50

-that I actually saw the pinhole and I looked through it.

-And?

0:24:500:24:53

And I looked through it again.

0:24:530:24:55

-And?

-I looked through it again and again!

0:24:550:24:57

I couldn't believe my eyes. It was only by accident I found it.

0:24:570:25:01

Lovely talking point, get any dinner party going.

0:25:010:25:04

-Here we go.

-Stanhope cane, this time a wooden cane with a small

0:25:040:25:08

peephole photographic image, at £30 to start. At £30, 40.

0:25:080:25:13

50, 60. At £60 bid, at £60.

0:25:130:25:17

All done at £60, 70 anywhere?

0:25:170:25:21

At £60, it's near me, gentleman's bid at £60.

0:25:210:25:24

-Oh, come on, a bit more.

-Selling now at £60.

-It's gone.

0:25:240:25:27

You'll note it was a gentleman's bid and not a lady's bid!

0:25:270:25:32

-Who bought it?!

-Shout his name out. THEY LAUGH

0:25:320:25:36

# We know what you're doing! #

0:25:360:25:38

Next under the hammer we've got some Moorcroft and Clarice Cliff.

0:25:460:25:50

Should the lots have been split? I don't know.

0:25:500:25:53

They belong to Lilian, but she can't be here today. We do have Kate, our expert.

0:25:530:25:58

The auctioneer didn't split them, so I think he agrees with you.

0:25:580:26:03

Stick them in as one lot, a "come and buy me" maybe?

0:26:030:26:06

You don't often get people collecting both. It's a risky strategy, but it might work.

0:26:060:26:12

-If you're starting a collection of good ceramics, it's a great place to start. £100 each?

-That's not bad.

0:26:120:26:18

-The Moorcroft is yummy.

-I think the Moorcroft is good.

-It's lovely, mellow colours. It's beautiful.

0:26:180:26:24

150 is the... Two lots in the lot here,

0:26:240:26:27

the Moorcroft and the Clarice Cliff,

0:26:270:26:30

two good examples of the two respective factories,

0:26:300:26:33

but being sold together for a collector.

0:26:330:26:36

Opening at £100. At £100 for the two together.

0:26:360:26:41

-120. 140. 160.

-This is good.

-180.

0:26:410:26:44

200. 220. 240?

0:26:440:26:47

-No sweat!

-240. 260. 280?

0:26:470:26:50

260 in the balcony. 280.

0:26:500:26:54

300? 280 downstairs on my left now. 300.

0:26:540:26:57

320. 340. 360.

0:26:570:27:00

380. 400. 420. 440?

0:27:000:27:04

-420!

-At £420.

0:27:040:27:07

The bid's in the balcony at £420. Being sold now at £420.

0:27:070:27:11

Are we all finished at 420?

0:27:110:27:13

Fantastic! That's what you get when you put two good names together.

0:27:130:27:19

-"Should they have been split? I don't know."

-We'll never know.

0:27:190:27:23

-I'm very happy with that and Lilian will be as well.

-She'll be thrilled.

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:27:230:27:29

Next up, Guy's wooden carving.

0:27:340:27:37

It's been viewed, it's been handled, caressed.

0:27:380:27:41

And enjoyed. I think it's going to find a new home today. That's for sure.

0:27:410:27:47

-I would hope so.

-So do I.

0:27:470:27:49

Lot number 345, unusual lot,

0:27:490:27:53

the lion carving, obviously 18th century or early 19th century.

0:27:530:27:58

But a nice carving. Lot 345.

0:27:580:28:01

At £70.

0:28:010:28:03

At £70. 80 bid.

0:28:030:28:06

At £80. At £80. 90. 100.

0:28:060:28:09

120. 140? At 120 on my right, the bid. At £120.

0:28:090:28:14

Come on, a bit more!

0:28:140:28:17

The bid's on my right, gentleman's bid of £120.

0:28:170:28:20

Being sold at 120...

0:28:200:28:23

It's gone right on the bottom end of the estimate, but it's gone.

0:28:230:28:27

I don't think there was anybody here to bid against him, but nevertheless, I'm happy with that.

0:28:270:28:34

It is a cracking lot, Trevor, and it's about to go under the hammer.

0:28:410:28:46

We're talking about the Pearlware jug. You're not a big fan of it?

0:28:460:28:50

It was stuck in a wall cabinet for years and my mother hated it

0:28:500:28:54

and said, "Can we put it in a boot sale or dump it?"

0:28:540:28:58

It's got to go in a fine art antiques sale.

0:28:580:29:01

My father for years said, "Just hang on to it. It's Nelson, it could be worth something."

0:29:010:29:07

And it is. If it hadn't got the crack, what would it be worth?

0:29:070:29:11

Condition is really important, so it would add a couple of hundred pounds on to whatever it makes today.

0:29:110:29:17

-Yeah.

-But they are rare survivors, so it's in pretty good condition for what it is.

0:29:170:29:22

-Not many people would have kept them. Your dad was clever.

-He was.

0:29:220:29:27

-Let's hope we get the top end of the valuation.

-I hope so.

-This is it.

0:29:270:29:31

Lot 120, the Pearlware Nelson, blue-and-white printed jug.

0:29:310:29:35

In nice order, this lot. Lot number 120.

0:29:350:29:38

At 150. At 150.

0:29:380:29:41

At 150. At 150. 180 I'm bid.

0:29:410:29:45

180. 200. 220.

0:29:450:29:47

250. 280. 300?

0:29:470:29:50

280 in the balcony. At 280 I'm bid in the balcony.

0:29:500:29:54

-At £280. Being sold here at £280...

-Spot-on.

0:29:540:29:57

300. 320. 350.

0:29:570:30:00

-This is good.

-350. 380. 400?

0:30:000:30:04

380. Still in the balcony at £380.

0:30:040:30:06

Being sold now at £380. Are we all finished at £380?

0:30:060:30:11

All done?

0:30:110:30:13

That was brilliant, the last flurry just there!

0:30:130:30:16

-I thought it was stopping at 250.

-So did I.

-It was good.

-£380!

0:30:160:30:20

-That's good.

-All credit to you for hanging on to that.

-My mother's got to take the credit for that.

0:30:200:30:26

-It's a really nice item.

-A "Victory"!

-It's a victory.

-Sorry, couldn't resist.

0:30:260:30:31

We're doing pretty well so far. Coming up later, all will be revealed.

0:30:320:30:37

-Can I have a look inside?

-Yes, you may.

-I was hoping that might be the case!

0:30:370:30:42

We'll be selling more items later on in the show,

0:30:480:30:51

but now I'm heading out on my travels to Whitby railway station.

0:30:510:30:55

The station here in Whitby is the end of the line for the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

0:30:580:31:04

It's a 24-mile stretch of track which runs from here to Pickering

0:31:040:31:08

and it's one of the most beautiful railways in the country as it cuts right through the national park.

0:31:080:31:14

It's a wonderful way to see the moorland, so today I'll let the train take the strain.

0:31:140:31:20

The people of Whitby needed a railway

0:31:380:31:41

to transport goods like coal and timber from the harbour out to towns inland

0:31:410:31:47

and bring produce back to the ships at port.

0:31:470:31:50

The Whitby to Pickering railway took more than five years to build

0:31:500:31:55

and was opened with great celebration on May 26th 1836,

0:31:550:31:59

although for nearly ten years, the trains back then used to be pulled by horses.

0:31:590:32:04

The railway has seen many changes over the years.

0:32:040:32:08

Now this is a fully operational heritage railway with big, powerful steam engines, charming carriages

0:32:080:32:14

and delightful period stations.

0:32:140:32:16

And, of course, ever-changing scenery. But it hasn't always been like that.

0:32:160:32:21

'Joining me in the Western Saloon carriage is Philip Benham,

0:32:210:32:26

'manager of the railway.'

0:32:260:32:28

So tell me a little bit more about this incredible line.

0:32:280:32:32

One of the first railways built in Britain, it started up in 1835 and it was horse-drawn.

0:32:320:32:37

It was designed by George Stephenson who is known as the "Father of Railways".

0:32:370:32:42

-It was a horse-drawn railway from Whitby to Pickering through the North York Moors.

-How long did that take?

0:32:420:32:48

A long time. It also involved going up a rope-hauled incline through the village of Goathland,

0:32:480:32:54

so it was quite rough and ready.

0:32:540:32:56

-How did it progress?

-It became a very important railway.

0:32:560:33:00

You could get trains from London to Whitby up to the 1960s and it helped develop Whitby as a holiday resort.

0:33:000:33:07

The Beeching Plan came along. Tell me more about that and Dr Beeching.

0:33:070:33:12

Dr Richard Beeching was appointed Chairman of British Railways in the early 1960s

0:33:120:33:17

and his remit was to make the railways pay.

0:33:170:33:20

He came up with this reshaping plan that would close large parts of the network,

0:33:200:33:25

mainly branch lines, but also busier routes, including the line to Whitby.

0:33:250:33:29

-What happened after the Beeching Plan?

-The closure was very controversial.

0:33:290:33:34

Within a couple of years, a group formed to try to re-open the railway.

0:33:340:33:38

The founder Tom Salmon is still a supporter of the railway to this day

0:33:380:33:42

and he and a number of people in the community started a society to see if they could get the railway re-opened,

0:33:420:33:49

initially just between Grosmont and Goathland, about three miles,

0:33:490:33:53

but in the end, through the help of North Riding County Council and the new national park in the Moors,

0:33:530:33:59

the line was opened through to Pickering in one go by the Duchess of Kent.

0:33:590:34:04

1st of May 1973 was the official re-opening train and it's gone from strength to strength since then.

0:34:040:34:10

-It's wonderful and extremely popular.

-It's very popular.

0:34:100:34:14

We carry over 300,000 passengers a year which is a lot of people.

0:34:140:34:18

It's run largely by volunteers. A few people like me get paid.

0:34:180:34:22

But it was started by volunteers and that's the unique essence of a line like this.

0:34:220:34:27

It's the people who own it who run it and they have great love for the railway and everything on it.

0:34:270:34:34

The stations along the line are themed from different periods.

0:34:400:34:44

Pulling into Grosmont station is like stepping back into the 1950s.

0:34:440:34:49

I'm here to catch up with the driver.

0:34:490:34:52

-Jerry, how long have you been driving trains?

-About ten years on this railway.

0:35:030:35:09

And about...

0:35:090:35:11

about eight or nine years on BR.

0:35:110:35:14

-How old is the engine?

-About 1925. They worked on the Somerset and Dorset.

0:35:140:35:19

They were built for that railway.

0:35:190:35:21

They were built at Darlington and they worked on the Somerset and Dorset.

0:35:210:35:26

What speed can she do?

0:35:260:35:28

We can do about 35 flat out,

0:35:280:35:31

maybe 40, but up here, 25.

0:35:310:35:34

Do you want to push the regulator a bit more? Push it up a little bit more.

0:35:340:35:39

That's it, that's it. That's it.

0:35:390:35:42

-Do you want to put a bit on?

-I'll put a bit on.

0:35:420:35:45

Don't throw my shovel in! LAUGHTER

0:35:450:35:48

A little bit more.

0:35:480:35:50

Cor, that's so hot! That's really, really hot, isn't it?

0:35:570:36:01

3,000 degrees.

0:36:010:36:03

3,000 degrees?

0:36:030:36:05

Does it get through a lot of coal?

0:36:080:36:10

About a ton, a ton and a half.

0:36:100:36:12

-Just from Pickering to Whitby, a ton and a half?

-Grosmont to Pickering and back here again.

0:36:120:36:19

-I think this has got to be the best scenery in the world.

-I were born up here.

0:36:190:36:24

-You were born here?

-Esk Valley, yes. I'm back home.

-You're back home.

0:36:240:36:29

TOOTS HORN

0:36:420:36:44

The next stop on the journey is Goathland.

0:36:460:36:49

This is the most recent station on the railway

0:36:490:36:53

and was built as accommodation for the stationmaster and his family.

0:36:530:36:57

This charming station has somewhat of a celebrity status.

0:36:570:37:01

It's also been known as Aidensfield in ITV's Heartbeat

0:37:010:37:04

and as the spectacular Hogsmeade in the first Harry Potter film.

0:37:040:37:09

Sadly, this is where my trip ends.

0:37:170:37:19

The train is going onward now to Pickering, but I've got to get back to Whitby.

0:37:190:37:24

It's been an incredible day out.

0:37:240:37:27

If you're ever up here on holiday, climb aboard and experience the golden age of steam!

0:37:270:37:32

Brilliant. Absolutely brilliant!

0:37:320:37:35

Big step!

0:37:350:37:37

Back now to our valuation day in Whitby and it looks like someone has beamed Philip into space!

0:37:480:37:54

-Doreen, how are you?

-All right, thank you.

0:37:580:38:01

-Aren't you a bit old for this sort of thing?

-Yes, I am.

0:38:010:38:06

-Second childhood.

-I haven't got out of my first yet!

0:38:060:38:09

Let's have a look at it. On the front we've got a "non-fall moon rocket".

0:38:090:38:15

-"Made in Japan."

-Mm-hm.

0:38:150:38:17

What can you tell me about it?

0:38:170:38:20

I bought it in about 1960.

0:38:200:38:24

And I had my son with us then. He was only six.

0:38:240:38:29

-He'll be pleased. You've just told everybody how old he is!

-I know.

0:38:290:38:33

He will be, yes. So I asked him if he liked it and he said yes, so I went in and I bought it.

0:38:330:38:39

-How much did you pay for it? Do you remember that?

-I think it was about 42 shilling.

0:38:390:38:44

-42 shilling is...

-£2, isn't it?

0:38:440:38:47

£2.10 or... It's £2.10, isn't it?

0:38:470:38:51

-Yes.

-This is lovely. Does it work?

0:38:510:38:55

-Yes. It won't drop off the table, but everybody goes like that in case it does.

-Does it not?

-No.

0:38:550:39:01

-Are you sure?

-Yes, yes.

-Let's give it a go, shall we?

-Right.

0:39:010:39:05

There's the driver. Are you ready for this?

0:39:050:39:09

-Are you sure it won't go off the edge?

-No.

-Whoa...

0:39:100:39:14

-Are you sure about this?

-Yes.

-I don't believe you. Doreen!

0:39:160:39:20

Get ready to catch it.

0:39:200:39:23

Oh, my life!

0:39:230:39:25

This is making me... I'm not doing this any more. This is silly. You're giving me ulcers, you are!

0:39:250:39:32

So your son never played it?

0:39:340:39:37

-He did play with it, but not very much.

-Not very roughly either.

0:39:370:39:41

No, he took good care of it.

0:39:410:39:43

I think...

0:39:430:39:45

that we can put an estimate on it of £50 to £80.

0:39:450:39:49

-Never?

-Yeah.

-Can you?

-Yeah. Is that all right?

-Yeah, fine.

0:39:490:39:54

We'll put an estimate on it of £50 to £80 and we'll put a reserve on it of £50 with 10% discretion,

0:39:540:40:01

so if the auctioneer gets to 40, 45, it'll be all right for it to go.

0:40:010:40:05

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

0:40:050:40:08

Maureen, it's great to see you. And I wish I lived in this area because just driving

0:40:150:40:20

-from Pickering this morning, it's stunning, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:40:200:40:24

-Do you know what you've got here?

-Not really, no.

0:40:240:40:27

It's been lying around the house.

0:40:270:40:29

-Was it your parents'?

-No, my in-laws'.

0:40:290:40:33

Your in-laws, OK. What do you think it's for?

0:40:330:40:36

-I thought probably it was for wool or string.

-I can see

0:40:360:40:41

where you're coming from because you could put a ball of string in there and have the thread coming out,

0:40:410:40:46

and cut it off at the right lengths, but do you know...

0:40:460:40:50

it is in fact a tea caddy.

0:40:500:40:52

-Oh.

-It's from the Georgian period, the Hanover period.

0:40:520:40:56

You have to be careful when you say the Georgian period because there were three King Georges.

0:40:560:41:00

This is George III so we're looking at the late 1700s right up to 1820,

0:41:000:41:05

George III period, and it is a pear wood, fruitwood, tea caddy,

0:41:050:41:10

-shaped like a pear.

-Oh, I see, yes.

0:41:100:41:13

Lots of caddies appeared in different shapes and sizes,

0:41:130:41:16

you could have larger ones, you could have smaller single cube ones.

0:41:160:41:20

Tea was very popular to drink, it became fashionable with royalty and

0:41:200:41:23

the well-to-do in the late 1600s. It was a valuable commodity.

0:41:230:41:28

Poor people couldn't afford to drink tea, hence it was kept under lock and key.

0:41:280:41:32

These caddies had

0:41:320:41:35

little locks on so the servants couldn't pilfer the tea.

0:41:350:41:38

Oh, I see, yes.

0:41:380:41:40

This is stunning though, and it basically is a single blend tea.

0:41:400:41:44

You could either have green tea or black tea, and if you look inside you can

0:41:440:41:49

see there are traces of tinfoil.

0:41:490:41:51

-Uh-huh.

-That lined this little caddy, it kept the tea fresh.

0:41:510:41:55

And that's really nice, you see, the traces of that just tells me that it's so right.

0:41:550:42:00

That's got its original hinge, its original lock and escutcheon, and

0:42:000:42:05

that's more than likely silver but it's blackened off over the years.

0:42:050:42:10

It would have had a tiny little stalk coming out of there,

0:42:120:42:15

just put in afterwards,

0:42:150:42:17

but it's absolutely stunning, it's a lovely shape.

0:42:170:42:20

The collectors really go for these.

0:42:200:42:22

-Oh, good.

-Have you any idea of the value?

0:42:220:42:26

No, not really. £30?

0:42:260:42:30

£30, right, OK.

0:42:300:42:32

Well, the only thing that lets it down, the stalk's missing,

0:42:320:42:35

that can be sorted out, and the colour can be brought back.

0:42:350:42:39

I'm going to say to you...

0:42:390:42:40

You think this is worth £30?

0:42:400:42:43

Well, on a very good day in auction,

0:42:430:42:45

you might get £500.

0:42:450:42:47

-Never.

-Yes.

-Gosh.

0:42:490:42:52

Yes, even without the work.

0:42:520:42:55

I'd like to put this into auction with a value of £300-£500,

0:42:550:43:00

have the reserve at £300,

0:43:000:43:02

but on a good day in this condition, that's going to do £500.

0:43:020:43:07

-Gosh, that's really...

-Better than a string box, isn't it?

-Yes, absolutely.

0:43:070:43:12

Barney and Laura, you've brought in this bizarre piece of silver plate. What do you know about it?

0:43:210:43:28

-It's a cocktail shaker, I think. It was my nan's.

-She hasn't told you the history of it?

0:43:280:43:33

-She has, but I haven't listened.

-Barney doesn't listen.

0:43:330:43:37

-You're boyfriend and girlfriend?

-Yeah.

-Has she told you?

-Yes.

0:43:370:43:41

-There we go.

-It was given to her as a present off an old friend.

0:43:410:43:45

She's just had it sat in a cupboard and never used it or anything.

0:43:450:43:50

-Not every weekend making gin slings and stuff?

-No.

-That's a bit sad.

0:43:500:43:54

-You're more of a lager drinker, I guess?

-Yeah. Not cocktails.

0:43:540:43:59

Let's have a look. It's got "A & Co" on the bottom which is a good sign

0:43:590:44:03

because it's Asprey & Co who are royal jewellers and silversmiths and make very good quality items.

0:44:030:44:09

As you say, it's a cocktail shaker, so if we open it up,

0:44:090:44:13

this is where you put your ice and gin and bitter lemon, stick the lid on,

0:44:130:44:18

then this bit unscrews.

0:44:180:44:20

What you've got in here is a cork and that should pull out,

0:44:200:44:24

but this one is a bit stuck.

0:44:240:44:26

You'd give it a shake and there'll be a strainer in here, you'd pour it out and that's your gin sling.

0:44:260:44:32

You're not tempted to keep it and have a bit of a cocktail at home?

0:44:320:44:36

-Not really. I don't think we use it now.

-That's why she's getting rid of it. She's never used it.

0:44:360:44:42

They're not very practical. It's a kind of Roaring Twenties... It's very sort of Jeeves and Wooster.

0:44:420:44:48

You can see Bertie Wooster having one of these.

0:44:480:44:52

So there's not a huge market for it and because the cork's stuck, it's a bit difficult to sell.

0:44:520:44:58

Price-wise, even though it's not silver, it's silver plate, it's still quite collectable

0:44:580:45:03

and between £50 and £80 at auction would be about right.

0:45:030:45:07

There are issues of condition, so you'd put a lower estimate, maybe a 40 reserve and a 50 to 80 estimate.

0:45:070:45:13

Is that the sort of thing you'd go for?

0:45:130:45:17

-Yeah.

-That's fine, yeah.

-You should listen to your grandma more, see what else she's got in the cupboard!

0:45:170:45:23

-But we'll send it to sell and see how it goes.

-Yeah.

0:45:230:45:26

I'm trying to think up a bad pun on cocktails and bells, but I'm going to resist the temptation.

0:45:260:45:32

-So let's send it to sale and see how it goes. Thanks very much.

-Thanks.

0:45:320:45:37

-Coleen and Cliff, how are you both?

-Fine.

-You've brought me an envelope.

0:45:440:45:48

-I have, yes.

-Can I have a look inside?

-You may.

0:45:480:45:52

Do you know, I was hoping that might be the case.

0:45:520:45:55

I'm a huge Stones fan.

0:45:550:45:58

-This is the original line-up.

-It is.

0:45:580:46:02

We've got Charlie Watts in his Star Trek uniform,

0:46:020:46:05

Bill Wyman, who, I have to say, still looks years older than everybody else on that postcard,

0:46:050:46:11

Brian Jones, who sadly died in the late '60s in a swimming pool, didn't he?

0:46:110:46:17

Then the real wild child, Mr Jagger.

0:46:170:46:20

-And then Keith Richards. So have you got this signed?

-Yes.

0:46:200:46:24

Look at that. That's brilliant. I just think... They are iconic.

0:46:240:46:28

-When does this date... What's the postmark on here?

-1964, I think.

0:46:280:46:32

The first issue is, how do you know they were genuine?

0:46:320:46:36

Because authenticity is absolutely everything.

0:46:360:46:40

And secondly, The Beatles, for example, were well known

0:46:400:46:45

for their roadie to sign their signatures

0:46:450:46:48

and also for them to sign one another's signatures.

0:46:480:46:52

And I think The Stones signed one another's signatures.

0:46:520:46:56

So the first issue is, are they all genuine?

0:46:560:46:59

And the second issue is, have you got five Rolling Stones on there

0:46:590:47:03

and not Mick Jagger doing three of them?

0:47:030:47:06

-How did you come by it?

-I used to work with Charlie Watts's mother.

0:47:060:47:10

-Charlie Watts's mum?

-Yes. In 1964.

0:47:100:47:14

That was before they were famous and that's when she gave the pictures to me.

0:47:140:47:20

So, I think, what we've got to do is this.

0:47:200:47:24

We've got to catalogue this.

0:47:240:47:26

We'll ask the auctioneers to check the provenance. Not the provenance, but the authenticity of these.

0:47:260:47:33

But what we'll ask the auctioneers to do is to say in the catalogue

0:47:330:47:37

that it's a signed photograph of The Rolling Stones -

0:47:370:47:42

Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Bill Wyman, Charlie Watts and Brian Jones,

0:47:420:47:47

and that the photograph was given to you by Charlie Watts' mother.

0:47:470:47:54

It really is important that we put that in the catalogue and on the internet

0:47:540:47:59

because, with this envelope, it will give the buyer more confidence that they are absolutely genuine.

0:47:590:48:06

I'm going to be really mean here.

0:48:060:48:09

I'm going to suggest that you put a £200 to £400 estimate on it.

0:48:090:48:13

I think, if you strike lucky,

0:48:130:48:18

it wouldn't surprise me if they made three to five times that.

0:48:180:48:22

If you're really lucky, they could make £600 to £900,

0:48:220:48:27

perhaps even £1,000.

0:48:270:48:29

But you need to put them at a sensible estimate

0:48:290:48:32

and the fact that it'll be on the internet and properly advertised, that'll flush the buyers out.

0:48:320:48:38

If I was allowed to bid, I'd be one of them.

0:48:380:48:41

So for the final time today,

0:48:420:48:45

let's see what we're taking off to auction.

0:48:450:48:48

Belonging to her son in the 1960s,

0:48:480:48:51

Doreen is taking his Moon Rocket toy to the dizzy heights of the saleroom.

0:48:510:48:56

Coleen and Cliff want her autographs of The Rolling Stones to top the bidding charts.

0:48:560:49:02

And finally my favourite item of the day, Maureen's pear-shaped pearwood tea caddy,

0:49:020:49:07

which I think should do well over my top end of the estimate of £300-£500.

0:49:070:49:13

And finally, Barney's grandmother has let him sell this rather nice cocktail shaker

0:49:150:49:19

as cocktails leave him unshaken.

0:49:190:49:22

-You're more of a lager drinker, I guess?

-Yeah. Not cocktails.

0:49:220:49:26

But before the cocktail shaker goes under the hammer, first up on the auction launch pad - Doreen.

0:49:280:49:35

The sky's the limit for this one, Doreen, the little Moon Rocket,

0:49:350:49:39

-bought in the 1960s for only two pounds and ten pence.

-Right.

0:49:390:49:43

-We've got a valuation of £50 to £80 put on by Philip, our expert here.

-Yes, good.

0:49:430:49:49

-So, lots of fun you had at the valuation day.

-Yes, we did.

0:49:490:49:53

It went whizzing round the table and kept coming back. It frightened me to death.

0:49:530:49:58

-You had to keep on your toes.

-You had to keep me on my toes all the time!

0:49:580:50:01

Lots of people have been musing over this. It's still got its original box.

0:50:010:50:05

-It's a lot of fun.

-It's great.

0:50:050:50:08

It's a nice-looking toy and it is a lot of fun.

0:50:080:50:11

Hopefully, somebody else is going to have a lot of fun with it.

0:50:110:50:15

Yes, it would be nice. I hope somebody enjoys it as much as we did.

0:50:150:50:19

It's ready to go and it's going right now under the hammer.

0:50:190:50:24

Lot number 60, the '60s Moon Rocket this time.

0:50:240:50:28

-Nice lot in its original box.

-Let's hope it takes off!

0:50:280:50:32

I have interest here. 40. At £40 to start.

0:50:320:50:35

50 bid. At £50. 60. 70. 80.

0:50:350:50:39

90. 100? At £90 with me, the bid.

0:50:390:50:42

100 now. At the back of the room at £100.

0:50:420:50:45

Not a bad return on 42 shillings!

0:50:450:50:48

All finished now at £100...

0:50:480:50:51

-Spot-on! Well done, Philip. £100!

-Good.

0:50:510:50:55

-Unbelievable, isn't it?

-It proved to be a really good investment.

0:50:550:50:59

-It is, but it wasn't an investment when you bought it. It was just a toy.

-It was just a toy.

0:50:590:51:05

-You had the foresight to keep it and look after it. Well done, you!

-I always thought it was special.

0:51:050:51:11

I've just been joined by Barney and Laura.

0:51:180:51:21

This is the silver-plate cocktail shaker in the form of a bell.

0:51:210:51:25

Let's hope it rings in some changes. £50 to £80 we're hoping for. What do you think of it?

0:51:250:51:30

-It's quite different.

-You're being polite - "quite different".

0:51:300:51:34

I had a chat to Peter the auctioneer and he said, "I wouldn't want it in my house."

0:51:340:51:40

I wouldn't either, but there's plenty of people out there that would love this.

0:51:400:51:45

It's slightly kitsch, it's a bit over the top, but a great maker's name.

0:51:450:51:50

Asprey. I'd have this in my house.

0:51:500:51:52

If I were allowed to bid, this would be coming home with me.

0:51:520:51:56

-Do you love cocktails?

-I don't mind them.

0:51:560:51:59

Here we go. It's going under the hammer.

0:51:590:52:02

Lot 180, the cocktail shaker.

0:52:020:52:05

The Asprey's bell-shaped cocktail shaker here.

0:52:050:52:09

At £30 to start. At £30. At £30.

0:52:090:52:12

-Unusual lot.

-Come on!

-Asprey's cocktail shaker.

0:52:120:52:15

40 bid. 5. 50.

0:52:150:52:17

5? At £50. On my right, the gentleman's bid at £50.

0:52:170:52:21

On my right at £50. 55 anywhere?

0:52:210:52:25

At £50. Being sold at £50 for the lot. Are we all finished?

0:52:250:52:29

The bid's on my right at £50, all done.

0:52:290:52:32

-That's good, £50.

-A drinker?

-I was getting worried.

0:52:320:52:36

-I thought maybe they all like their pints up here, but a few people like their cocktails.

-The odd Mai Tai.

0:52:360:52:42

Well done. Hopefully, you can go home now and tell Nan, can't you?

0:52:420:52:47

-Yes.

-She'll be pleased. What will she do with the money?

0:52:470:52:51

-Take us out for a meal, I think.

-And have a cocktail, presumably.

0:52:510:52:55

-In the spirit of the whole thing.

-In spirit!

0:52:550:52:58

Unintentional pun there.

0:52:580:53:00

Moving on swiftly, as they say, a rolling stone gathers no moss, and there's a clue to what's next.

0:53:090:53:15

We've been joined by Cliff and Coleen with the wonderful signed photograph

0:53:150:53:20

-of my favourite rock band, and Philip's, I think.

-Absolutely right.

0:53:200:53:24

-That is just so evocative. They were the bad boys of rock.

-Yeah.

0:53:240:53:28

But hopefully, hopefully, this should shoot through the roof.

0:53:290:53:34

-Good.

-Do you think so?

-Well sought after.

0:53:340:53:37

If people think it's right, it'll just...

0:53:370:53:40

It could stagger you.

0:53:400:53:42

Let's hope it's a big hit here. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:53:420:53:47

The Rolling Stones postcard photograph this time.

0:53:470:53:50

Let's start at £100. At £100.

0:53:500:53:53

At £100. 120 bid.

0:53:530:53:56

At 120 bid. At 120 bid.

0:53:560:53:58

140. 160.

0:53:580:54:01

180. 200.

0:54:010:54:03

220. 240.

0:54:030:54:05

260? 240 in the balcony.

0:54:050:54:08

260. 280. 300.

0:54:080:54:11

320. 340? 340.

0:54:110:54:14

360. 380. 400.

0:54:140:54:17

420. 440.

0:54:170:54:20

460. 480?

0:54:200:54:22

Yeah? 500. 520.

0:54:220:54:24

520 in the balcony.

0:54:240:54:27

At £520. The bid's in the balcony at £520.

0:54:270:54:30

Selling in the balcony at £520...

0:54:300:54:33

£520 - it was a smash hit!

0:54:330:54:36

-£520.

-Very good.

-That is brilliant, isn't it?

0:54:360:54:40

-That is a Honky Tonk Woman, isn't it?

-That's a Honky Tonk... Yeah.

0:54:400:54:44

-I think we got the Satisfaction.

-How many more can we do?

0:54:440:54:48

-You've got to be happy with that.

-Very happy.

0:54:480:54:51

You've got commission to pay here, that's 15%, but what will you put the money towards?

0:54:510:54:57

-I hadn't thought of this yet.

-Put it in the bank, save it for a rainy day.

0:54:570:55:02

-We'll go for a nice meal somewhere to celebrate.

-That'll be a very nice meal. I'm really pleased with that.

0:55:020:55:08

It's never too late to go and see The Rolling Stones. I don't think they'll ever give up.

0:55:080:55:14

-No.

-They'll be touring well into their 80s.

-You might just be able to afford two tickets with that!

0:55:140:55:19

OK, it's my turn to be the expert now, and it's that gorgeous pearwood tea caddy

0:55:270:55:32

and it belongs to Maureen here, and she's brought her husband along.

0:55:320:55:35

-Hi, Tony, is it?

-Hello. That's correct.

-This was your mum's, wasn't it?

-That's right, yes, it was.

0:55:350:55:39

So when Maureen got home from the valuation day, she said, "They've taken in the tea caddy."

0:55:390:55:44

-She actually rang us on the mobile phone before she even got home anyway.

-Very excited.

0:55:440:55:48

£300-£500 we're looking at on an average day if this was

0:55:480:55:52

in great condition, it needs a bit of TLC, but it'd be up there in the £800-£1,200 bracket, it's that good.

0:55:520:55:59

-We'll see, with the defects, isn't it?

-Have a chat to the auctioneer,

0:55:590:56:02

he agrees with the valuation and he said there's been lots of interest, so that's good.

0:56:020:56:07

-Fingers crossed. Good on your mum, she had a good eye.

-Yes.

-Excellent, yes.

-Here we go.

0:56:070:56:11

300, here we are, the pear-shaped

0:56:110:56:14

tea caddy this time, lot number 300, and open the bidding at £300.

0:56:140:56:21

-Straight in.

-At £300...

0:56:210:56:23

350, at £300... 350 bid, £400...

0:56:230:56:28

£450, £500...

0:56:280:56:30

£550, at £550 dead ahead, at 550...

0:56:300:56:34

At 550. 600. 650, 700... 750.

0:56:340:56:39

800...

0:56:390:56:41

850, 900...

0:56:410:56:43

and 50, 1,000...

0:56:430:56:47

and 50, 1,100...

0:56:470:56:50

and 50, 1,200...

0:56:500:56:54

-and 50.

-They like it.

-1,300.

0:56:540:56:56

-They like it.

-And 50...

0:56:560:56:58

-1,400.

-Two got stuck in, they're bidding against each other.

0:56:580:57:02

And 50, 1,500...

0:57:020:57:05

and 50, 1,600...

0:57:050:57:08

..and 50, 1,700...

0:57:090:57:13

and 50, 1,800...

0:57:130:57:16

..and 50, 1,900...

0:57:180:57:21

You're out?

0:57:210:57:23

1,900...and 50, 2,000.

0:57:230:57:28

-That's a lot of money.

-2,100...

0:57:280:57:31

2,200, 2,300... 2,400,

0:57:310:57:36

2,300 in front of me now, at 2,300. It's in the room at 2,300, all done.

0:57:360:57:44

-£2,300! Put it there.

-Amazing.

0:57:440:57:48

-Yes.

-Two people really wanted that,

0:57:480:57:51

that's all I can say, and they bid each other right to the bitter end.

0:57:510:57:55

Yes, I never imagined that.

0:57:550:57:57

Oh, gosh. Well, look, there's 15% commission to pay today.

0:57:570:58:01

-But

-don't that's a lot of money to be going home with.

-Very nice, isn't it?

-Absolutely.

0:58:010:58:05

-That's going to come in handy, isn't it?

-Yes.

-We haven't decided what for yet.

0:58:050:58:09

You're shaking. I think Maureen's had the best day of her life here in the auction room in Darlington.

0:58:090:58:15

-Thank you very much.

-Good job she started out on a day out with her sister in Whitby, that's all it was.

0:58:150:58:19

-Yes.

-Thank you so much for coming in.

-Thank you.

0:58:190:58:22

And thank you for watching. We've had a cracking day, I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:58:220:58:26

There's plenty more surprises to come next time on Flog It.

0:58:260:58:29

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:350:58:39

The Flog It! team heads to the coastal town of Whitby where Paul Martin and experts Kate Bateman and Philip Serrell uncover a variety of local treasures. One of the more unusual discoveries is an ironstone china jug.

Paul also gets to experience the great days of steam with a trip on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.


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