Tenby Flog It!


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We've got sun, sand and sea here in Tenby and hopefully plenty

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of surprises, so welcome to Flog It!

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This pretty little town is in South West Wales and not only is it

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a magnet for the tourists, it also has its own small fishing industry.

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The tourists began to flock here in the early Victorian period,

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when its stunning beaches and invigorating sea air

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were considered the ideal cure for many ailments and diseases.

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Well, I wish I was here to relax, but today's experts,

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Charlie Ross and Philip Serral are probably already dipping the cue

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looking for the best antiques to take off to auction

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and not letting me have a look in.

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I bet, so I think I'd better get over there and join them and start

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looking for some seaside souvenirs of my own before they run out.

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# We want the new traditions

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# Whoa, oh, whoa, oh, oh

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# It's like a revelation

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# Whoa, oh, whoa, oh, oh

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# We live on... #

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And first to the table in the De Valance Pavilion is

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Charlie Ross and it looks as though he's found something rather special.

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Deanne, I think we can undoubtedly give you the prize

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for the oldest thing on Flog It today,

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-if not ever.

-Me or this?

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THEY LAUGH

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Well, not unless you were born in 1648,

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1648 this is, how did you get it?

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I had an elderly neighbour who I used to do her garden for her,

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and she'd owned an antique shop in London.

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-Really?

-In the 1920s.

-Do you know where abouts?

-In St Christopher Place.

-Right.

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And one day she said to me, would you like this?

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So I've had it since then and it's been in a trunk in

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my house for the last 30 years and when I saw you were here today, I thought, I'll take that.

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-A chance to get rid of it. Have you ever read it all?

-I have.

-Yeah, what's it about?

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It's about bronzing a coat of arms for this,

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I think it's Coiland Sinclair.

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I think it's Coland, I've been looking at that. I think it's Coland Sinclair.

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-I think that is a C, although very fancy.

-It is.

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It looks like a curtain doesn't it, coming around here. Coland Sinclair.

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-And it's the granting of a coat of arms to him, that family.

-Yes.

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What I think is really interesting is the date, which is 1648.

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One year,

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in fact it was January 1649, that Charles I lost his head

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because it says in the form of 20th year the reign

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of our Sovereign Lord, King Charles of England.

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I'm absolutely sure it's authentic.

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It's definitely on vellum,

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which is a calf skin, you can feel the texture of it.

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Secondly, the decoration is real.

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I mean, it isn't printed on, any other shape or form.

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It's actually painted on.

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And this, presumably, if we had time to look it up, would be the Sinclair coat of arms.

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-I would have thought so.

-Which would still be going today, no doubt.

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When you dug it out of the box it was in,

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did you have an idea of what it might be worth?

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No, no. Because I've moved house, it's actually in the garage,

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-in the trunk.

-So it's not doing any good in the trunk is it?

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-No it isn't.

-My view is that it is worth 50 to £100,

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but it's a bit of a guess.

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Certainly not worth hundreds of pounds, but it must have a value because of its age

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and its relative quality,

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so 50 to £100 and we'll sell it without reserve?

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I know Paul gets very cross when I sell things without reserve.

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No, I don't want to upset Paul.

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Bother it, we'll upset Paul. Let's sell it without reserve.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-So it's Angharad and Barth, where does that come from, then?

-From Kosovo.

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Kosovo, right. So you've brought Mum along today, have you? Has she behaved herself?

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We think so!

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-So, you brought this along to sell?

-Yes.

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I'm going to need a bit of help here,

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because I'm not sure I can manage this on my own, what is this made of?

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-Leather.

-Leather, and what would you have kept in there?

-A gun.

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Excellent, what a man, what a man.

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We'll go into a bit more detail but leave that to me.

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This is called a leg-o-mutton and it's a leather gun case

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and you would keep a 12-bore shotgun in here and if you

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can imagine a 12-bore shotgun, the bit of wood in front of the

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trigger, called the fore-end, you take that off, then open the gun and take the barrels off.

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The stop part of the trigger would go in this bit

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and the barrels would go in that bit and you would shut it up

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and off you'd go, carrying your gun around and in your leather, leg-o-mutton gun case.

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-Have you had it long?

-No, a few months.

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A few months? Why only a few months?

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Just bought it at a local sale, thought it was nice,

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I liked the leather and condition of it.

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-What did you pay for this?

-Erm, would have worked out at £17, two for 34.

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-Well, I had a word with my colleague earlier, didn't I, and what do we think this is worth?

-50.

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£50, yeah, I think that's probably what we thought.

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-We think this probably worth £50, but we're going to put an estimate on it of 30 to £50.

-Yeah.

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And we'll put a reserve of about £25,

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but I think we'll it'll sell quite well, are you happy with that?

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-Yeah, that'll be great.

-Who gets the money?

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I think Barth can have the money.

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And what will he spend the money on?

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Chocolate probably.

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Fingers crossed, can you do that?

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Well done, matey. Funny man, this television man, isn't he?

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Francis, there's one thing missing.

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-What's that?

-A nice bottle of wine.

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Oh, my goodness!

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THEY LAUGH

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You were thinking, what's dropped off?

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-I feel like a nice peppery Bordeaux right now.

-Do you?

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So, I gather you're a bit of a corkscrew collector?

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I like corkscrews, they've given us a lot of fun, my wife and I have

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been to many, many corkscrew collectors meetings.

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-How many have you got?

-About 100.

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I bow to your knowledge, if you've got over 100 you must have done lots of research?

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Yes, I have and I've enjoyed the whole research on corkscrews, it's been great.

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This is surplus to my requirements, really.

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So you're flogging off something from the lower end of the collection? Always trading upwards.

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-Always trading upwards, that's it.

-You know the score, don't you? Always buy the best you can afford.

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I'm looking for a maker's name, it's not signed.

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-Sadly not, no.

-That's where the value is in a corkscrew.

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It would've been made, probably in Birmingham,

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there were lots of factories in Birmingham in the 1830s, '40s, '50s, making this type of thing.

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As you know, it's a Thomason type, with this mechanical working.

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Yes, invented by Sir Edward Thomason.

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Typical nice steelwork and that does all the work.

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You can see it's survived the years.

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Great quality, Victorian quality at it's best.

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-It looks 1820s or 30s with that handle, which is a detail you will find.

-That's nice, isn't it?

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-It's a nice turned-bone handle.

-Very nice.

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Dusting-off brush which adds a bit of value.

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You can have a drink and a shave at the same time. Why not!

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THEY LAUGH

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It's of brass construction, I like the armorial that's the coat

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of arms of Queen Victoria, so this dates this around about 1840.

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That sort of era, yes.

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It's beautiful, it's a nice thing to hold, it is a gentleman's toy.

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Yeah, it's a very nice thing, this is what first attracted me

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to corkscrews, very nice, tactile things and associated with wine...

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-Which is what you love!

-Exactly!

-THEY LAUGH

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I must admit, I'm with you on that one.

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-Are you?

-Yeah, if we could attribute this to a maker, that's where

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the value is, it'd be worth in the region of two to £300. But we can't.

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I still think it's worth in the region of 130 to £150, somewhere around there.

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But put a reserve on at 100.

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-100, OK, fine.

-Fixed reserve at 100.

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-Happy with that?

-Yes, I'm happy.

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-Brenda, how are you doing?

-Very well, thank you.

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Now, I think this is really, really interesting.

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I've got one of these at home that was my grandfather's.

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They're always known as Queen Mary's gift box, aren't they?

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-Yes.

-But they're not really Queen Mary's cos they are...?

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-Princess Mary.

-Right. And I'm going to let you tell me all about it now,

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so you're going to become the Flog It expert

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-and I'll sit here and listen.

-The ambition of my life!

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-Come on, then.

-Well, this box was given to me by an elderly gentleman

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about 25 years ago, cos he knew I collected tins

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and I've got dozens of them and then I opened it up

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and inside was the original contents with the card from Princess Mary

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to the troops, which said, "With all best wishes

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"for a happy Christmas and a victorious new year."

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And this was in 1914.

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And then there was the original tobacco...

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and the cigarettes...

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..and the badge with "Victory" written on it. Yeah.

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So, let me just take one of these...

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Lord above!

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Look at that, eh?

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There's no health warning on those, is there?

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No, and it's got Princess Mary's stamp on it.

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It's got Princess Mary's monogram just there, hasn't it?

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And let's just see what else it's got in there.

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Have you seen that?

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-Yeah.

-Isn't that just lovely?

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-That's Princess Mary.

-Her photographed seated.

-Yeah.

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Let me just shut the box up so we can just still see this cover.

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What we see in the sale room today is normally just that, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-Cos these contents have long since gone.

-Yes.

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And the thing that I always think is really really sad

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-is they make little or no money.

-No, I know.

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Mind you, there were thousands of them distributed, weren't there?

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-Yeah, but I mean how many Beswick horses were there made?

-Yeah.

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-You know?

-That's true.

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And that, without the contents

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in an auction's probably, what, £5 or £10?

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-Yes. Something like that.

-And no more than that. And for people

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who've lost family in the First World War,

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I think they ought to be worth a whole load more than it is.

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Why are you selling it?

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Well, I've got so many hundreds of tins

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and the house we're in now,

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you can't display them like we used to be able to

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and I saw Flog It was coming and thought I'd find something quirky.

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You'd take it to Flog It and Flog It.

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Yeah. I don't know how many people have seen one with the contents.

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No. And that's the key thing, cos the fact that you've got all of this.

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I just think that's absolutely lovely

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and I think at auction this is going to make between 20 and £40.

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-And I think that you need a reserve on it at £15.

-Yeah.

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I think if someone's got 20 quid at the auction,

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-they've got a real bit of history there, haven't they?

-Yeah.

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And so, well done you, for bringing it in.

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-Some museum might buy it.

-Let's live in hope.

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Richard, I know what should be in there and I'm certain it is,

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because I've lifted it up. I know the weight of it. Where did it come from?

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Well, it was found in my father's house, he died about 10 years ago.

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My wife and I were sorting around his stuff and she found it at the bottom of a cupboard

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under a lot of linen and I had never see it before and we really know nothing about its history.

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Right, well we can tell you all about it. Have you used it all?

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Oh, yes, it works reasonably well.

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I had it on my desk for a couple of years and then it started to lose

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time and I got a bit fed up of it so I put it in its box and hid it away.

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I'm expecting to find a carriage clock in here, I'm sure I will.

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There is a little button that releases the top.

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What you can do is leave it in its case and still have the benefit of the clock itself, carriage clock as

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it is, by just pulling that panel up there

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and a slot in the back to put it in. Isn't that neat?

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-Very nice.

-Let me just pull it out.

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Ah, now this is a very special carriage clock.

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It's got three wonderful panels.

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We'll come to those in a minute.

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Now, the case itself is brass.

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I expect the case is made in England.

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I expect the movement to be French

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and the panels, that I mentioned briefly, are pietra dura,

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hard stone, literally translated from the Italian.

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They are panels from Italy.

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And it's a miniature carriage clock and I think it's absolutely sweet.

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I can see that there is a little bit of damage on the back panel here.

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That is an expensive job to do.

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Somebody doing this will need to repair that, otherwise, bit by bit,

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the pieces of stone will fall out and you'll be left with nothing.

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But, the side panel is absolutely perfect.

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-Did you think about the value of it while you had it tucked away?

-Well, it's a nice looking thing.

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I would say that it has value because it's pretty,

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but I know that it is not in terribly good condition.

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It's just that last panel, that back panel of petra dura.

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I think it's worth, well it would be worth

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three to 500 all day long in perfect condition.

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I really think two to 300 is the right estimate,

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reserve at 200 and the auctioneer should work hard

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on this because I think it will certainly be, even if there's

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six carriage clocks in his sale, it'll be the best carriage clock at his auction.

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When I think of romanticised Wales, I'm imagining rolling green hills

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and wonderful stone built workshops isolated in the countryside,

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with possibly beams of sunlight sort of glittering in

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on a lone artisan working inside there...

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using hand tools, working with his hands, creating something

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and hopefully listening to the sound of a gentle strumming harp.

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However, here in the village of Llandysul, near Carmarthen,

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a mini Industrial Revolution has taken place.

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The old handicrafts have been replaced

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by computers and technology, transforming the art of harpmaking.

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And it's all down to a small community of workers.

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The project is called Telynau Teifi and it's spearheading

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the mechanisation of harpmaking, creating employment

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and harnessing the skills and enthusiasm of young local people.

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The scheme is the brain child of Allan Shiers, who began making harps

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as an artisan, 30 years ago.

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Tell me a little bit about harps. It's such an unusual instrument

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to be involved with. How did that happen?

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I worked for a chap called John Weston Thomas,

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who resurrected the craft of harpmaking in Wales, cos prior to that, it had died out.

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I worked for five years and stayed in contact with him

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when I went to teach at the Welsh Instrument School.

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So, his harps were the ones to have for anybody that was into Celtic music?

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-Yeah.

-What was it like to make your very first complete harp?

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-Can you remember that day?

-Yeah, I can.

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John Thomas and I worked together.

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We said we'd make two halves in parallel,

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so he could keep an eye on me and then at the end,

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the people came to play them and they were just

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equal to each other and that was quite a moment.

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He always said that eventually, the pupil should exceed the master

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or the master has failed, which is daunting cos he was a great chap.

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And then, he's died now, but we've gone on to make concert harps

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which he never did, so we're taking that on to the next generation

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and expanding what we do.

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What's the difference between a concert harp

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and one of the standard harps?

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If you thought of, say, a mode of transport as being a bicycle and a motor car, they're both very...

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-as different as that.

-Appropriate for different needs, but the complexity of parts

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is about 2,000 moving parts in a concert harp,

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but far less in a folk harp or a Celtic harp.

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How long would it take you to normally build a Celtic harp?

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By hand, it would be about six or eight weeks.

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And then a concert harp, about a year.

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I remember thinking "Crumbs, I've spent...

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"however many weeks making that harp and somebody's actually paid for it."

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-And that must be a nice feeling.

-Well, when they play it,

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when the harp sings for the first time,

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it's quite a special moment, really.

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At my age, you start thinking, "Hang on, how can we pass this on

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"to the next generation before I lose my skills."

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The best way to do it, I felt, was to actually make it into

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a community business, if we could, involving the local authority.

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Bought an old school,

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so we built it into a team of people, rather than an individual.

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The question was how you did it,

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how you actually changed from a craft into a community business,

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a one-man band to seven or eight people

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and then the way that you communicated those skills

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using appropriate technology to take away the drudgery,

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and free you up to do the creative stuff. That's the bottom line,

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does it frees you up to be creative? I think that's the best way.

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These youngsters coming in have been brought up with computers

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and they'll be using skills I don't have

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and that's great cos it's a cross-fertilization.

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I need them and they need me and that makes the team more balanced.

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Do you think there might be a danger that

0:18:240:18:27

-all the old ways might be replaced?

-I don't think so.

0:18:270:18:30

I think the quality of the wood and the soundboard

0:18:300:18:32

and the acoustics, are still very human

0:18:320:18:34

and even though we've done something on a machine,

0:18:340:18:37

it still has to be hand finished and toleranced and fitted,

0:18:370:18:40

so all the machines do is break the donkey work down.

0:18:400:18:44

We have people who are a bit like I was when I was 16,

0:18:490:18:51

bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. Anxious to learn

0:18:510:18:54

and get the thrill of actually turning stuff into things.

0:18:540:18:57

-And then when it's played, what a reward!

-Yes.

0:18:570:19:00

I think that's human nature. That doesn't change with age.

0:19:000:19:03

I still get the same buzz, but for me, it's nice to see

0:19:030:19:06

one of the lads who's done something, sit back and I know exactly

0:19:060:19:09

what's going through his mind and that's very creative.

0:19:090:19:12

If a 16 or 20-year-old can do that, there's a chance this will survive.

0:19:120:19:16

Do you think the definitive harp has been made yet?

0:19:240:19:27

No. I wouldn't keep struggling, I think,

0:19:270:19:30

and the harp, to some extent, is still in its infancy.

0:19:300:19:33

Stradivari, Guarneri, Amati violins, that's the absolute,

0:19:330:19:36

I don't think we've got there with the harp and that's exciting.

0:19:360:19:40

The work of Allan Shiers' Telynau Teifi community

0:19:490:19:52

is certainly ongoing.

0:19:520:19:53

Not only are they embracing new technology to improve the instrument,

0:19:530:19:57

but they're also closely working with Cardiff University

0:19:570:20:00

to improve the instrument's sound.

0:20:000:20:02

You can definitely say the future of this stunning instrument

0:20:020:20:05

is in safe hands.

0:20:050:20:07

And before we head off to auction, it's time for a little reminder

0:20:180:20:21

of what we are taking with us.

0:20:210:20:22

Starting with Phillip's find,

0:20:220:20:23

Princess Mary's gift box with all its original contents.

0:20:230:20:27

It's a real little time capsule.

0:20:270:20:29

The document is certainly old,

0:20:300:20:31

but will its age be reflected in the price?

0:20:310:20:34

I hope the gun case makes the £50 Barth has predicted.

0:20:350:20:39

He could be an auctioneer of the future.

0:20:390:20:42

The corkscrew is a lovely item, so let's hope

0:20:420:20:45

someone in the saleroom agrees and wants to add it to their collection.

0:20:450:20:48

I've got high hopes for Richard's carriage clock,

0:20:480:20:52

at 200 to £300, this could be the time to buy it.

0:20:520:20:54

We've left sunny Tenby behind and we've come here,

0:21:000:21:03

to Carmarthen to Peter Francis Auctioneers,

0:21:030:21:07

where I hope the sun is still shining on our experts' valuations

0:21:070:21:11

and our owners' items, as they go under the hammer.

0:21:110:21:14

We have two auctioneers taking the rostrum for us today, Nigel Hodgson and Jeff Thomas.

0:21:200:21:26

Something for the purists. This is the oldest thing in the show.

0:21:260:21:29

Possibly one of the oldest things we've ever had.

0:21:290:21:32

Dated 1648, the King Charles I parchment

0:21:320:21:35

and it belongs to Deanne here, and hopefully for not much longer.

0:21:350:21:39

-Well, it's going to sell, there is no reserve on this.

-That's true.

0:21:390:21:43

And guess who got that in?

0:21:430:21:45

-I can't possibly imagine.

-THEY LAUGH

0:21:450:21:47

Who likes sneaking those in?

0:21:470:21:49

Lot 659 is the 17th Century parchment

0:21:490:21:53

or perhaps vellum document, dated 4th July 1648.

0:21:530:21:58

-Some interest here.

-Oh, good.

0:21:580:22:00

I have two bidders which start me at 160.

0:22:000:22:04

Wow! That's good.

0:22:040:22:06

£200 I'm bid, £200 I'm bid with me,

0:22:060:22:09

at 200, can I say 220 anywhere else?

0:22:090:22:12

Selling it then, all happy?

0:22:120:22:14

-Selling at £200!

-Yay!

-Wow!

-Extraordinary!

0:22:140:22:17

I didn't think it would sell.

0:22:170:22:20

-That was short and sweet, wasn't it?

-I know, but even so...

0:22:200:22:24

No reserve you see, so it kind of puts you in a down mood to start with.

0:22:240:22:28

-He said you'd be annoyed if he put no reserve on it.

-Yeah.

-I said I don't want to annoy you!

-Oh, oh!

0:22:280:22:35

It's now time to introduce you to Angharad and Barth. Hi, there.

0:22:440:22:47

He is our youngest valuer on the show.

0:22:470:22:50

You know what, I think he's going to be good when he grows up.

0:22:500:22:53

-How much is this going for?

-£50.

0:22:530:22:56

£50!

0:22:560:22:58

Well, it's leather gun case, the leg-o-mutton, isn't really, by virtue of its shape?

0:22:580:23:03

We did a valuation of around 30-£50.

0:23:030:23:06

That's what Barth told me and I think he's probably right. I think it'll do very well.

0:23:060:23:10

-Do you?

-He's promised me a high five at the end.

0:23:100:23:12

Has he? Well, let's hope we get a big high five £50 for this.

0:23:120:23:17

It's now all down to the auctioneer and he's over there on the rostrum.

0:23:170:23:21

43 is a mid 20th century, leather, leg-o-mutton gun case.

0:23:210:23:26

£50 start me, 50?

0:23:260:23:29

50, 30, £30,

0:23:290:23:31

20 to go, no-one wants it, surely. £20, 20 I have.

0:23:310:23:34

At £20, I bid 30, at 30, £30, 40,

0:23:340:23:39

at 30 then, goes then at £30.

0:23:390:23:43

-Yes! Well done, spot on, Philip.

-It's five, but not a high five.

-Yeah. A high 30.

0:23:430:23:48

OK, now it's my turn to be the expert.

0:23:580:24:00

Remember that lovely little corkscrew? The Victorian one.

0:24:000:24:04

Well, it's going under the hammer. I've been joined by Francis, its owner.

0:24:040:24:07

-Thank you, Paul.

-Hopefully we'll get the top end of the estimate.

0:24:070:24:10

-I hope so.

-There are a couple of other corkscrews here.

-I know.

0:24:100:24:14

-Competition.

-But that's good because it brings in the dealers. There is a few for them to choose from.

0:24:140:24:20

-Good, good.

-And obviously if we get that top end, then you are going home with a bottle of wine.

0:24:200:24:25

I would hope so. I'm going to trade wine for wine on this occasion. THEY LAUGH

0:24:250:24:29

458, an early 19th century, Thomason patented,

0:24:290:24:32

telescopic brass and steel corkscrew.

0:24:320:24:36

-9 inch, fully extended.

-It's a nice thing, it's a gentleman's toy, this.

0:24:360:24:40

-Indeed.

-And very practical as well.

0:24:400:24:42

And it could tell a few stories I suspect.

0:24:420:24:44

100 to start me, 100? 80?

0:24:440:24:46

-£80, £50, £50. As low as that?

-Come on.

0:24:460:24:51

At 50, £50, 60 surely now, at 50, £50 I bid, 60, £60.

0:24:510:24:57

-Struggling, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:24:570:25:00

£70 bid, at 70, 80, do I hear now?

0:25:000:25:04

-At 70, £70, are you all done then?

-Oh, dear, never mind.

0:25:040:25:06

At 70, bit disappointing. At 70, you all done?

0:25:060:25:09

At £70, well I'm very sorry, we have to pass it.

0:25:090:25:12

-Oh, well.

-There we are.

-We got all excited for nothing.

-Yes.

-Oh, dear.

0:25:120:25:16

That's unusual because I had a chat to the auctioneer and he said

0:25:160:25:19

no problem because they normally mention things if there's a problem.

0:25:190:25:22

If he thinks they're not going to sell, he knows the market,

0:25:220:25:25

he'll say, "Paul, I think it's going to struggle."

0:25:250:25:27

-Right.

-But he didn't say anything.

0:25:270:25:29

He agreed with the valuation, I guess.

0:25:290:25:31

-Fair enough.

-There were no wine lovers here, like us!

-No.

0:25:310:25:35

Next up, I've been joined by Brenda

0:25:410:25:42

and Phillip, our expert, and we've got the Princess Mary 1914

0:25:420:25:46

commemoration gift to the soldiers in the First World War,

0:25:460:25:50

with a cheeky little valuation by Phillip. 30, 40, hopefully £50?

0:25:500:25:55

It had, though, to be fair, it had some damage to the tin, didn't it?

0:25:550:25:59

-It was cracked.

-You look too close, your eye's too good!

0:25:590:26:02

I didn't spot that. Nigel spotted that.

0:26:020:26:04

Don't go telling all these other people here about it now.

0:26:040:26:07

-Dear me!

-But we think it could do the top end of the estimate.

-Good.

0:26:070:26:11

-40, 50, £60. That's what we want.

-We do.

-Up there. 60 odd.

0:26:110:26:14

-It's going under the hammer now. Good luck, Brenda.

-Thank you.

0:26:140:26:18

This is one of the First World War period gilded brass tobacco boxes

0:26:180:26:23

that you come across quite regularly in sales, but unusually

0:26:230:26:27

with this one, it contains the block of tobacco and the cigarettes,

0:26:270:26:32

which originally came with it.

0:26:320:26:33

This is one, he obviously wasn't a smoker, so very politically correct.

0:26:330:26:37

Nice for the collector to have all the bits and pieces inside. Lot 425.

0:26:370:26:41

Some interest from collectors with me and I can start the bidding...

0:26:410:26:45

two bids very close together, in fact,

0:26:450:26:47

I can start the bidding at 50.

0:26:470:26:49

-Fantastic.

-That's a real good price, isn't it?

0:26:490:26:52

60 in the room now. At £55 I'm bid. With me at £55.

0:26:520:26:57

Against you all, then. At £55. Is there 60 in the room?

0:26:570:27:00

Are you done then? To sell? Against you all, then. At £55.

0:27:000:27:04

Yes. That hammer's gone down. That's good.

0:27:040:27:07

Do you know, I mean, buying into a piece of social history for £55

0:27:070:27:10

and you get something like that, I think that's really special.

0:27:100:27:14

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you so much, as well.

0:27:140:27:16

This lot has got a strong continental flavour. It belongs to Richard.

0:27:220:27:26

A small carriage clock that packs a big price.

0:27:260:27:29

We've got £200-300 put on this by our expert, Charles, here.

0:27:290:27:33

-Spot on.

-Yes, and we're all hoping for that top end, £300.

0:27:330:27:38

-I could see it creeping over the top, actually.

-Yes, so can I.

-He said, hopefully.

0:27:380:27:42

Well, this is what it's all about. This is where the excitement is! Pressure building right now.

0:27:420:27:47

We're bigging this up but you never know what's gonna happen,

0:27:470:27:51

so watch this, because it's going under the hammer now.

0:27:510:27:53

And lot 291, which is the pretty little late 19th century

0:27:530:27:57

gilt brass carriage clock.

0:27:570:27:59

-Absolutely stunning.

-Very pretty little clock and significant interest with me here.

0:27:590:28:04

-Well, good.

-Great.

0:28:040:28:06

The lowest commission bid is £500.

0:28:060:28:08

-What?

-500, 600, 700.

0:28:080:28:12

£750 is what I have with me.

0:28:120:28:14

May I say £800?

0:28:140:28:16

Is there 800 in the room? Any more?

0:28:160:28:19

With me and to be sold, then, happy at £750.

0:28:190:28:23

Straight in and straight out. Blink and you'll miss it.

0:28:230:28:26

-£750, Richard.

-I can't believe it!

0:28:260:28:30

Well, do you know, it just goes to show how individual that little clock was.

0:28:300:28:35

-There's tears in your eyes, nearly.

-I know. I want it back!

-THEY LAUGH

0:28:350:28:40

One of my great passions in life is wood.

0:28:560:28:58

I love it in the sort of living, organic form.

0:28:580:29:01

But also in its cut and felled form.

0:29:010:29:04

It's incredibly versatile.

0:29:040:29:05

It's beautiful to look at and also wonderfully tactile.

0:29:050:29:09

Not only is it useful for making practical items like tables and chairs,

0:29:090:29:13

you can also make wonderful sentimental items

0:29:130:29:16

like this love spoon which was made right here, just outside Tenby.

0:29:160:29:21

The tradition of making love spoons is believed to have originated in Wales

0:29:280:29:32

and dates as far back as the 17th century.

0:29:320:29:35

Spoons were given as a token of engagement or betrothal.

0:29:350:29:38

And the tradition has lived on.

0:29:380:29:40

And the man who's keeping the tradition very much alive is Kerry Thomas.

0:29:470:29:51

Kerry, thank you very much for meeting up with us today

0:29:510:29:54

and obviously letting me have a go.

0:29:540:29:56

How did you get into this?

0:29:560:29:58

I first heard about the tradition back in 1969 when I was courting.

0:29:580:30:03

I'd heard about the tradition of the love spoon, that it was a token of an engagement.

0:30:030:30:07

And I thought it would be a good idea to make a love spoon to save myself having to buy an engagement ring.

0:30:070:30:13

-Simple as that.

-As simple as that.

0:30:130:30:15

So in fact, the first spoon I ever made was this simple one here,

0:30:150:30:21

and once I carved the spoon, offered it to my girlfriend,

0:30:210:30:25

she accepted it, and that became our first engagement spoon. 1969.

0:30:250:30:29

Your workshop here, it's just wonderful.

0:30:290:30:32

It's good being surrounded by items of folk art.

0:30:320:30:35

I think it's good for your soul.

0:30:350:30:37

It's a lovely material.

0:30:370:30:39

Wood is such a lovely material to work with and I'm privileged, really,

0:30:390:30:43

to be able to make my living from such a lovely material.

0:30:430:30:48

-You've made hundreds of thousands, which I want to talk to you about a little later on.

-OK.

0:30:480:30:53

But can I have a go?

0:30:530:30:54

Can you talk me through it, because I want to make one for my wife,

0:30:540:30:58

so I think this would be a good opportunity to try my skills out.

0:30:580:31:02

-Yes, yes. Let's start.

-With your expert advice.

0:31:020:31:05

I really like that kind of love spoon, which...

0:31:050:31:08

It almost reads like a love letter for the intended.

0:31:080:31:12

-Oh, yes, there's a message.

-There's a message in there.

0:31:120:31:15

We want to try to get a little bit of a message in your spoon, if we can.

0:31:150:31:18

Every spoon is unique.

0:31:180:31:21

The symbols carved on them have specific meanings.

0:31:210:31:23

Often the interpretation and the message

0:31:230:31:26

are relevant only to the recipient.

0:31:260:31:28

Well, it looks a bit rough.

0:31:360:31:39

I've drawn it straight out on a blank of oak here.

0:31:390:31:42

-I hope you approve of this, Kerry.

-Oh, it's excellent.

0:31:420:31:45

I've got nice raised back panel,

0:31:450:31:47

which for me, looks like a piece of furniture.

0:31:470:31:49

There's my hole, I want to hang this on the wall, because I'm very proud of this.

0:31:490:31:53

Well, hopefully I'll be proud of it!

0:31:530:31:56

That's my initial, "P" for Paul, "C" for Charlotte.

0:31:560:31:59

I've used this motif, I'm going to obviously put a hole in there

0:31:590:32:02

and cut this out with a fretsaw.

0:32:020:32:06

Now that's a soul motif that the ancient Egyptians used.

0:32:060:32:09

I've got keys, that's the key to my heart and also the key to my house.

0:32:090:32:13

I've put an escutcheon so hopefully we can live together

0:32:130:32:17

and hopefully she'll fall in love with that and cherish it.

0:32:170:32:21

I'm sure she will, I'm sure she will.

0:32:210:32:23

-It did the trick for you, didn't it?

-Yeah.

0:32:230:32:25

There, now this hopefully should look something like it. Ah!

0:32:420:32:48

-I'm happy with that. Are you happy?

-Yeah, definitely.

-Is that OK?

0:32:480:32:51

-So far so good, almost there.

-Humble origins. It's getting there.

0:32:510:32:55

It just needs a bit more love and a couple more stages.

0:32:550:32:58

Obviously a smoothing plane on that and lots of sanding.

0:32:580:33:01

You make a spoon every year which is very personal to you.

0:33:010:33:05

It not only records events that are going on in your life

0:33:050:33:08

but also world events.

0:33:080:33:10

-That's correct.

-Can you show me some examples?

0:33:100:33:12

Yes. I obviously started with out engagement spoon

0:33:120:33:16

and from there, we went on to our wedding spoon,

0:33:160:33:19

-and from there we go to 1977.

-Children.

0:33:190:33:21

Various ways to record the birth of a child on a love spoon.

0:33:210:33:24

-With the little balls.

-You can have a link, the name, the seed.

0:33:240:33:28

This is very clever because this is made out of one piece of wood.

0:33:280:33:31

How long did that take you to do?

0:33:310:33:33

Guessing about 60 hours, maybe, at the time.

0:33:330:33:35

-That's a lot of work.

-Yes, at that time.

0:33:350:33:38

1984, this one here records a little bit of what was happening in '84.

0:33:380:33:43

Now that's different.

0:33:430:33:45

You have a picture of a sun, a picture of the rain, on a balance.

0:33:450:33:49

Because in 1984, Bob Geldof started BandAid and LiveAid the following year.

0:33:490:33:53

What we were saying is how fortunate we are, in our country to have a balance of sun and rain.

0:33:530:33:57

Does this open up?

0:33:570:33:59

The word "Grace" interprets God's riches.

0:33:590:34:02

How do you receive God's riches?

0:34:020:34:04

You simply open your heart.

0:34:040:34:08

Isn't that lovely?

0:34:080:34:10

It plays Amazing Grace. You have the dove of peace set inside.

0:34:100:34:13

Well, that's so sweet.

0:34:130:34:16

Shall we have a look at some more you've made over there?

0:34:160:34:20

Yes, fine.

0:34:200:34:21

These caught my eye. The keys.

0:34:230:34:25

That's one of my favourites, actually.

0:34:250:34:27

My wife actually designed this one.

0:34:270:34:30

-Did she?

-And it goes back to 1986.

0:34:300:34:33

The space shuttle Challenger, unfortunately, exploded,

0:34:330:34:37

so the design is, "What is the key to life?"

0:34:370:34:39

Does the answer lie in space? Is that where the key to life is?

0:34:390:34:42

Is it your hobby?

0:34:420:34:44

Is it money? Is it stardom?

0:34:440:34:47

Being famous. Being on TV.

0:34:470:34:51

Or is it music, being a pop idol, maybe? Is that...

0:34:510:34:54

Is it your family? Children?

0:34:540:34:56

Before we get to the last one, Is it self?

0:34:560:35:00

Is that the key to life, self? Or is it the cross?

0:35:000:35:03

We're fortunate we have the freedom in our country

0:35:030:35:05

to choose the key to life.

0:35:050:35:07

That's what that spoon is all about.

0:35:070:35:09

That's really incredible. A work of art. Do you know what?

0:35:090:35:12

Talking about works of art, I can't wait to finish my little love spoon.

0:35:120:35:16

Have you noticed, I haven't put it down? It's...

0:35:160:35:19

This is really dear to me.

0:35:190:35:20

Can we go and finish it off, sand it off,

0:35:200:35:22

put a smoothing plane there and finish the bowl.

0:35:220:35:25

Yeah, yeah. That's the next job.

0:35:250:35:27

I've thoroughly enjoyed my visit here with Kerry.

0:35:390:35:42

It's been so inspirational.

0:35:420:35:44

He is a craftsman, keeping a tradition and a spirit well alive here in Wales.

0:35:440:35:49

And if you get a chance to pay him a visit, please do.

0:35:490:35:52

You'll get a one-off spoon made for you.

0:35:520:35:55

And I was lucky enough to make my own with his expert guidance.

0:35:550:35:58

It's my design... it only took three hours.

0:35:580:36:01

It's slightly naive, but there's a lot of heart and soul and integrity

0:36:010:36:04

and that's what it's all about with folk art.

0:36:040:36:07

I absolutely love this and I hope my wife does too.

0:36:070:36:10

Back at the valuation day, Philip's found a couple of fellow dog lovers.

0:36:200:36:25

Steve and Kathy. The Deerhound Club.

0:36:250:36:28

-That's correct.

-You're dog mad.

0:36:280:36:30

Absolutely.

0:36:300:36:32

-I've got a lurcher.

-Have you?

0:36:320:36:34

Mad as a March hare.

0:36:340:36:35

-They're lovely.

-How long have you been in deerhounds?

0:36:350:36:38

Been in deerhounds 18 years.

0:36:380:36:39

-18 years.

-And we show them, breed them and I judge.

-Really?

0:36:390:36:43

-Yes.

-So do you do Crufts, and...

0:36:430:36:45

We do. We got a first at Crufts this year.

0:36:450:36:47

Really? My dog's more scruffs rather than Crufts.

0:36:470:36:50

-They're all wonderful.

-Yeah, how many have you got?

-Four.

0:36:500:36:53

Four. There is a nice link here, isn't there?

0:36:530:36:56

Because we've been talking about dogs and we've got Rover. You like that?

0:36:560:37:00

-It's lovely.

-Just seamlessly, you moved to it, seamlessly.

0:37:000:37:04

This is a car mascot that I think came off a Rover motor car,

0:37:040:37:09

but if you look there we can just see, this is the radiator cap.

0:37:090:37:14

And so that would have just screwed on

0:37:140:37:16

to the front of our radiator... a bit like a car that Siegfried Farnon has

0:37:160:37:20

on All Creatures Great and Small. Did he have a Rover?

0:37:200:37:23

-Yes, I believe so.

-I think so.

0:37:230:37:26

-And it's all elegance of an age gone by, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:37:260:37:30

It's a load different from the plastic badges we get now, isn't it?

0:37:300:37:33

-Is this something you picked up at a car boot, or...?

-No, through the family.

0:37:330:37:37

It was my grandfather's,

0:37:370:37:39

and I believe it had been his father's before that.

0:37:390:37:42

As I understand it, between the two wars and we had the car as well,

0:37:420:37:46

-when the Rover was a prestigious car.

-You're absolutely right, yes.

0:37:460:37:50

And they kept the radiator cap when the car went.

0:37:500:37:53

This has come down the family since 1920-something.

0:37:530:37:56

-Yes, I believe so.

-Now you want to sell it.

0:37:560:37:59

-We do.

-Why?

0:37:590:38:01

We're not collectors of car memorabilia.

0:38:010:38:03

We don't really display it and I believe someone that does have an interest in automobiles

0:38:030:38:08

would have a great deal of joy out of it.

0:38:080:38:11

-That's a real good reason for selling something.

-I think they would.

0:38:110:38:14

A real good reason. You're passing this on so someone else can enjoy it.

0:38:140:38:18

-Can appreciate it, yes.

-You haven't asked what it's worth yet.

-Not yet.

0:38:180:38:22

It's not worth a fortune. It's probably going to make, at auction,

0:38:220:38:26

in the order of £30 to £50.

0:38:260:38:28

I think you need to put a £20 reserve on it that's fixed.

0:38:280:38:31

And people... there are avid collectors of car mascots,

0:38:310:38:36

indeed some of them can make thousands,

0:38:360:38:38

or tens of thousands of pounds.

0:38:380:38:40

Good luck with the dogs. What's the... Do you have a kennel name?

0:38:400:38:43

-Gazeawhile.

-Gazeawhile.

-Yes.

0:38:430:38:46

Your dogs are Gazeawhile something.

0:38:460:38:48

That's correct. Gazeawhile Lyric is the name of one of our dogs

0:38:480:38:52

and Gazeawhile Song is another name.

0:38:520:38:54

-Where does that come from?

-"Gaze awhile" is from the Fields of Gold song by Sting.

0:38:540:38:58

-Oh, right.

-And gaze also because they're gazehounds.

0:38:580:39:01

They're sight hounds, so all linked together.

0:39:010:39:04

I'm going to put in a special request now.

0:39:040:39:06

-Yes.

-A real special request. You're going to sell this for £20 or £30.

0:39:060:39:10

-Yes.

-Hopefully.

0:39:100:39:11

Let's put this towards a collar or something for your new puppy,

0:39:110:39:15

and let's call it Gazeawhile Flog It.

0:39:150:39:17

So everybody at home, when they watch Crufts in, what, three years' time?

0:39:170:39:21

-Indeed.

-They can see Gazeawhile Flog It as supreme champion.

0:39:210:39:24

That would be good, wouldn't it?

0:39:240:39:26

Agreed. It's a done deal.

0:39:260:39:27

Thank you.

0:39:270:39:29

Before we talk about the plates, I have to tell you that my director

0:39:390:39:43

thinks that you remind her of Robert De Niro.

0:39:430:39:47

-Jolly good.

-That's a good start, isn't it?

0:39:470:39:49

It's a good start if I had his bank balance.

0:39:490:39:52

Perhaps that's why your wife married you.

0:39:520:39:54

Not for the bank balance, so she tells me.

0:39:540:39:57

Right. What can you tell me about these plates?

0:40:000:40:03

I only know that I bought them about 40, say 40 some odd years ago.

0:40:030:40:08

-Did you?

-In an auction.

-And what took your eye?

0:40:080:40:11

-I thought they were marvellous.

-Yeah.

0:40:110:40:13

-My wife is not that keen.

-She's not that keen?

-No.

0:40:130:40:16

But she'll have the money.

0:40:160:40:17

Most of it.

0:40:170:40:19

-Twas ever thus, Gerald, twas ever thus.

-Yes.

0:40:210:40:24

What struck me, and before we turn them over,

0:40:240:40:28

I sure you know who they're by.

0:40:280:40:30

Yes, yes, they're Worcester.

0:40:300:40:32

Yes, they're Royal Worcester.

0:40:320:40:33

They're a bit of an anathema.

0:40:330:40:36

They are hand decorated, very well hand decorated.

0:40:360:40:40

-Very clever.

-Yes.

-Whoever had a brush there, did a marvellous job.

0:40:400:40:44

-The brush strokes are tremendous.

-Lovely.

0:40:440:40:46

They are. Aesthetic movement, typically Worcester,

0:40:460:40:49

bold brush strokes onto a bit Japanesey background,

0:40:490:40:53

sort of peony background.

0:40:530:40:55

I personally don't think that they particularly go well together

0:40:550:40:59

and I think that's going to affect them commercially.

0:40:590:41:02

-Yes.

-We'll turn one over.

0:41:020:41:04

-You can't get better marks.

-No.

0:41:040:41:07

-They are as crisp as you like.

-It's very clear, isn't it? Yes.

0:41:070:41:10

Absolutely crisp Worcester mark and the kite mark which will date them.

0:41:100:41:14

They're certainly pre-1882, so they're 120, 130 years old.

0:41:140:41:19

Yes.

0:41:190:41:21

-And what about value?

-I don't know. I'm going to leave that to you.

0:41:210:41:25

I'll tell you what I think they should be worth,

0:41:250:41:27

which will be be rather different to their commercial value.

0:41:270:41:31

You'd think any hand-painted Worcester plate must be worth

0:41:310:41:34

-£20 or £30, wouldn't you?

-Yes.

0:41:340:41:37

Which would put the six of them at £120-£180.

0:41:370:41:41

I don't think they're worth anything like that. Sadly, they're just not very commercial.

0:41:410:41:46

I'd like to put £100-150 on them.

0:41:460:41:50

Perhaps the old Flog It! adage of £80-120 would be better.

0:41:500:41:55

If you start reserving them with much more than £60 or £70, we could have a struggle on our hands.

0:41:550:42:00

I would have like to sort of thought about something like £70.

0:42:000:42:03

Tell you what, we'll settle at £70.

0:42:030:42:06

-£70.

-Sold to the man in the corner.

-Sold, right.

-Right.

0:42:060:42:09

You might well find two people really like them.

0:42:090:42:12

I think the different styles possibly will put people off.

0:42:120:42:16

I can't wait to be proved wrong. Thank you for bringing them in.

0:42:160:42:19

So we have got Lisa and Selina. How are you?

0:42:280:42:31

-OK.

-Good. Come far?

0:42:310:42:34

Yeah, about an hour and a half.

0:42:340:42:36

Do you often take you mother out with you, or not very often?

0:42:360:42:40

-Yeah.

-When she's well behaved.

-Yeah.

0:42:400:42:42

-What time do you have to get home? Early?

-Any time.

0:42:420:42:44

Yes, we have to look after her.

0:42:440:42:46

-Difficult thing with elderly parents, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-I know.

0:42:460:42:49

I know just how you feel. Who's is this?

0:42:490:42:52

-Is this yours or mother's?

-Mother's.

0:42:520:42:54

-Mother's.

-It is. Yeah.

-Lisa, this is just absolutely lovely.

0:42:540:42:58

-I've always liked it.

-Do you know what it is?

0:42:580:43:00

No, I'm afraid there's not much history on it at all.

0:43:000:43:03

-Where does it come from?

-From my grandfather.

0:43:030:43:06

It was left to him in a will from a lady that he used to board with before and during the war.

0:43:060:43:12

He looked after her a bit as well and always admired the picture.

0:43:120:43:15

This is what my mother told me. When she died, she left it to him in her will.

0:43:150:43:19

This is a painting.

0:43:190:43:21

-I think so, yes.

-It is and it isn't.

0:43:210:43:25

-Right.

-Right, because it's a porcelain plaque.

0:43:250:43:28

-Right.

-The best porcelain plaque manufacturer is KPM,

0:43:280:43:34

which is something like Konigliche Porzellan, whatever.

0:43:340:43:38

-Yes, right.

-But it's the king's porcelain manufacturer in Berlin.

0:43:380:43:42

OK? So let's move it over then.

0:43:420:43:43

So now,

0:43:430:43:45

we have here this really wonderful 19th century painting on a porcelain panel,

0:43:450:43:52

and it's of a sort of young girl looking quite wistful

0:43:520:43:55

with this landscape beyond and it's...

0:43:550:43:58

The detail is glorious. You can just see a little ring on her finger here.

0:43:580:44:02

-Her eyes are stunning.

-Yes. That's always drawn me to it.

0:44:020:44:05

-Almost like she's looking at you.

-Yes.

0:44:050:44:07

This sort of veil here is wonderful.

0:44:070:44:10

The mark that we're looking for,

0:44:100:44:12

and I know is there, because I looked earlier, is KPM.

0:44:120:44:15

-That's the sceptre mark, you can see in the porcelain.

-Right.

0:44:150:44:19

And that is the best.

0:44:190:44:22

We're going to turn to you now, Selina. Do you like it?

0:44:220:44:25

-It's very pretty, isn't it?

-If she was yours, would you sell her?

0:44:250:44:28

-Yes.

-You would?

0:44:280:44:30

-All about money, yes? If she made lots of money, you'd sell her.

-Yes.

0:44:300:44:33

Good stuff. Good on you, girl.

0:44:330:44:35

What's your view, Mum. Is yours the same?

0:44:350:44:37

Well, I'm torn really. You know, because it is a family heirloom.

0:44:370:44:41

I remember this at my grandfather's house when I was a child, so...

0:44:410:44:44

And I know he always liked it and cherished it, but...

0:44:440:44:47

-Have you had it valued?

-No, not at all before.

0:44:470:44:50

I've always thought about it, and never done anything until...

0:44:500:44:54

If this were to make £100 to £200 at auction, that would be good.

0:44:540:44:57

I wouldn't sell it for that. I'd rather keep it,

0:44:570:45:00

because it's more sentimental value.

0:45:000:45:02

-What about sort of £300-£500. Is that sort of...?

-No, no.

0:45:020:45:07

So £600-£900, is that getting closer to it?

0:45:070:45:09

-No, I'd still keep it for that.

-You're absolutely right.

0:45:090:45:12

You're absolutely right. I think at auction that you could estimate it

0:45:120:45:17

at probably £1,200-£1,800.

0:45:170:45:19

Yes, I think it's worth that because she's so nice.

0:45:190:45:21

I have to tell you that if she went and made 2,500 or £3,000,

0:45:210:45:26

it wouldn't overly surprise me.

0:45:260:45:28

So what I want to know is, if this makes £2,000,

0:45:280:45:34

Selina, what are you going to spend the money on?

0:45:340:45:37

A horse.

0:45:370:45:38

A horse. Is that a definite horse?

0:45:380:45:40

Or a maid or a day out shopping in New York.

0:45:400:45:45

A day out shopping in New York?

0:45:450:45:47

-Yeah, so you don't want much, really, do you(?)

-No.

0:45:470:45:50

If it goes really well, you could have a maid and a horse and a day out shopping.

0:45:500:45:54

Let's keep our fingers crossed.

0:45:540:45:56

Carol, I spotted this across the room.

0:46:010:46:04

You were sitting there holding this and I almost ran over to see you

0:46:040:46:08

because I got so excited about it. I think it's a splendid object,

0:46:080:46:12

-rather wacky and wonderful.

-Strange looking.

0:46:120:46:14

-How did you come by it?

-Well, my mum bought it.

0:46:140:46:17

-It must have been a jumble sale, or some kind of sale.

-Yeah.

0:46:170:46:20

And then, when she passed away, my son had it...

0:46:200:46:23

but he's a bit of a coward, so...

0:46:230:46:27

-he sent mother today.

-Did he come with you?

0:46:270:46:29

-He's outside, I think.

-But he wants to sell it?

0:46:290:46:32

-Yes.

-Do you know anything about it other than what you see?

0:46:320:46:35

No, nothing at all. We didn't even know what it was used for,

0:46:350:46:38

-or anything.

-No.

0:46:380:46:40

It's a French word. It's an epergne.

0:46:400:46:42

French word for a central table display. Normally, they're glass.

0:46:420:46:48

You see trumpet shaped vases,

0:46:480:46:53

in a holder and they're quite often cranberry glass, Vaseline glass.

0:46:530:46:57

This - I have never seen a combination of

0:46:570:47:01

death and flowers!

0:47:010:47:02

This is, after all, a fighter plane,

0:47:020:47:05

from obviously the First World War and it's even got some working parts.

0:47:050:47:09

-That goes round. And the rudder works, as well.

-Yeah.

0:47:090:47:14

And it's dated 1919, so we know when it was made.

0:47:140:47:18

-Yeah.

-Right at the end of the war.

0:47:180:47:20

The vases come out

0:47:200:47:24

and you see it's got that sort of yellowy look, brass look...

0:47:240:47:28

-I think, originally, it was silver plated.

-It's been well brassoed.

0:47:280:47:31

It's been well cleaned to such an extent

0:47:310:47:34

that there is no silver plate left on that, whatsoever.

0:47:340:47:37

But I think it's beautifully modelled

0:47:370:47:40

and I think it would be hugely collectable for the right person.

0:47:400:47:45

-Why does he want to sell it?

-It's just stuck in the cupboard.

0:47:450:47:48

It's no good in the cupboard. He doesn't like it, presumably.

0:47:480:47:51

My mum had it out when she had it.

0:47:510:47:52

-You've no idea what it might be worth.

-Nothing at all.

0:47:520:47:55

But, on the other hand, if I told you it was worth £3,

0:47:550:47:58

-you probably wouldn't want to sell it.

-No.

0:47:580:48:00

Did he say, "Mum, I'll sell this provided it makes so much?"

0:48:000:48:03

-Yes. Yes.

-Did he?

0:48:030:48:05

-Yeah.

-And what did he say?

0:48:050:48:07

-Well, will it be worth us going to the auction?

-Which is what?

0:48:070:48:12

-30, we'd say it would cost.

-30?

-Yeah.

0:48:120:48:14

I think it's worth £200 or £300.

0:48:140:48:17

Oh, I think he'd sell it for that. Definitely.

0:48:170:48:20

-I think we ought to put a reserve on it.

-Right.

0:48:200:48:23

If we say £200 to 300 and put a fixed reserve of £100 on it,

0:48:230:48:28

so the auctioneer mustn't sell it, under any circumstances, below that.

0:48:280:48:32

-Right.

-And hopefully I'm proved right and it is worth £200 to 300.

0:48:320:48:35

-Right. That's fine.

-Do you think that's fair enough?

-Yeah.

0:48:350:48:38

I think a collector's going to have to have this.

0:48:380:48:42

-I have never seen anything like it before.

-I haven't.

0:48:420:48:44

It's now time to head off to the auction,

0:48:450:48:47

so let's hope the beautiful plaque sells at the top end of its estimate

0:48:470:48:52

so Selina can get her horse, a maid and a shopping trip to New York.

0:48:520:48:56

The silver biplane epergne is yet another reminder of a bygone era.

0:48:570:49:02

Hopefully, the overzealous cleaning

0:49:020:49:04

won't have rubbed off too much of its value.

0:49:040:49:06

Kathy and Steve unfortunately don't have the car, just the mascot.

0:49:070:49:10

I wonder if the two will ever meet again once it goes under the hammer.

0:49:100:49:14

Finally, Gerald's plates aren't the typical Worcester we usually see,

0:49:140:49:18

so I hope there's a market out there for these.

0:49:180:49:21

Back to the auction, but before we get selling again,

0:49:240:49:26

I'll have a quick chat with auctioneer, Nigel Hodson, about Lisa's porcelain plaque.

0:49:260:49:31

Now this is real quality, I think.

0:49:310:49:35

-That's what you expect from a Berlin plaque.

-Yeah.

-Stunning.

0:49:350:49:39

It's got everything about it and I think the price is spot on, £1,200-1,800.

0:49:390:49:44

It is a very beautiful thing, and these are always exquisitely painted

0:49:440:49:49

and the expression on this young woman's face is just something to behold.

0:49:490:49:53

-Angelic.

-Stunning. Angelic is a great word.

0:49:530:49:56

Could it break through the £2,000 barrier?

0:49:560:50:00

It's got to be thereabouts. £1,200 to 1,800.

0:50:000:50:02

It's certainly worth more than £1,000, let's see what happens.

0:50:020:50:05

Is it the sort of thing you'd love to have on your wall?

0:50:050:50:08

I think it is, but I don't think I can afford it, to be honest!

0:50:080:50:12

Carol, we've got this gorgeous little epergne of yours and

0:50:210:50:24

I totally agree with Charlie on the valuation of £200 to £300, you know.

0:50:240:50:28

I think it's a hugely collectable item, in the right hands.

0:50:280:50:32

Whether the right people will be here today... fingers crossed.

0:50:320:50:35

That's what auctions are about.

0:50:350:50:38

-They are a bit scary, aren't they?

-Yeah.

0:50:380:50:41

It's time to batten down the hatches and weather the storm here.

0:50:410:50:44

We're going to put this under the hammer now.

0:50:440:50:48

I think this is great and if it doesn't sell,

0:50:480:50:50

it's the wrong auction, the wrong day. There's another auction, OK?

0:50:500:50:54

-This is it.

-A very unusual epergne which is a first for me.

0:50:540:50:58

I've never seen an epergne modelled as a biplane.

0:50:580:51:01

This is such fun.

0:51:010:51:03

First World War biplane with trumpets coming out the fuselage.

0:51:030:51:06

-How mad is that?

-What do I say for it?

0:51:060:51:08

In your hands, it's an unusual thing.

0:51:080:51:10

Never seen the like. What's it worth? £200 away to put me in.

0:51:100:51:13

-200 to put me in.

-He's got no bids on the book.

0:51:130:51:16

100 to start me. For the epergne.

0:51:160:51:18

-100 to start me.

-Oh, come on.

0:51:180:51:21

50 for it. 50, the lady in the corner. At 50.

0:51:210:51:25

Can't believe this.

0:51:250:51:27

At 60 here. 60. 70. 80.

0:51:270:51:30

At 80. 90. At 90. The lady in the corner at £90.

0:51:300:51:33

Oh, have we got a discretion on this?

0:51:330:51:35

Do I see 100 now? In your hands at £90.

0:51:350:51:38

A lady's bid in the room. All done.

0:51:380:51:40

In the corner then, at £90 only.

0:51:400:51:43

-He has.

-We sold it at £90.

0:51:430:51:46

100 reserve on it.

0:51:460:51:48

He used a bit of discretion.

0:51:480:51:51

I think that's not enough.

0:51:510:51:54

-It wasn't exactly chocks away, was it?

-No. It wasn't exactly.

0:51:540:51:57

-It didn't fly, did it?

-No.

0:51:570:51:59

No. Do you know, for me, it just put a smile on your face

0:51:590:52:03

and they're the kind of things you should invest in.

0:52:030:52:06

It reminds me of The Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machine,

0:52:060:52:09

that wonderful wacky movie. It's gone. OK. It's gone. We've got £90.

0:52:090:52:13

Well, you know what they say, if you want to travel in style, get yourself a car mascot.

0:52:180:52:21

We've got one right here, right now, up for sale, belonging to Kathy and Steve. I love it. I love it.

0:52:210:52:27

It's a Viking, it belongs at the head of the car, as a radiator cap.

0:52:270:52:30

There you go, you know, so individual,

0:52:300:52:32

and this had been on the family car for a long time, hasn't it?

0:52:320:52:35

It was my great grandfather's.

0:52:350:52:37

Why are you selling this?

0:52:370:52:39

We don't collect, it's something we don't display.

0:52:390:52:42

We're hoping someone who appreciates motoring memorabilia would enjoy it.

0:52:420:52:46

Yeah, I'm pretty sure they will enjoy it, because they are quite rare.

0:52:460:52:50

Let's hope we get the top end anyway. This is it, going under the hammer!

0:52:500:52:53

Lot 452 is the Rover car radiator mascot,

0:52:530:52:57

the form of a bearded Viking warrior, as you'd expect.

0:52:570:53:00

There we are, what do you say for that? In your hands entirely.

0:53:000:53:04

Little bit of interest. What can I start at?

0:53:040:53:07

£50 away on that? For the car radiator mascot.

0:53:070:53:09

50, 30...

0:53:090:53:11

30, 40 at the back.

0:53:120:53:15

40, 50, at 50, 60, at 60.

0:53:150:53:19

-Very good.

-65 is with me, in fact. At 65, 70 at the back of the room.

0:53:190:53:23

At 70 now, at 70 at the back of the room. In the room at £70. All done?

0:53:230:53:27

-£70.

-Good.

0:53:270:53:30

-70 quid. Fabulous!

-Wonderful.

0:53:320:53:35

Fantastic. Thank you very much.

0:53:350:53:37

Six Worcester plates up for grabs.

0:53:440:53:46

They belong to Gerald, with a valuation of £80-120

0:53:460:53:50

according to our expert, Charlie here.

0:53:500:53:52

The classic cliche. Well, good luck, both of you.

0:53:520:53:56

They're going under the hammer right now. This is it.

0:53:560:53:58

Lot 593 is a set of six Royal Worcester porcelain tea plates.

0:53:580:54:04

Hand painted with autumn leaves.

0:54:040:54:06

What do you say there? About £100 away.

0:54:060:54:08

I would have thought so.

0:54:080:54:10

50's all I'm bid.

0:54:100:54:12

At 50, 60 do you want now? At 50 only. At 50 only.

0:54:120:54:15

60 may I say? At 50 on the Worcester tea plates there at 50 only.

0:54:150:54:19

-We're not getting any action.

-At 50.

0:54:190:54:21

At 50 only. No interest further?

0:54:210:54:23

Not to be sold, I'm afraid.

0:54:230:54:25

So sorry. We gave it our best shot.

0:54:250:54:27

It just wasn't really your day.

0:54:270:54:29

-Never mind.

-In another sale room on another day, I'm sure they'll reach their price.

0:54:290:54:33

The buyers weren't here today, it's as simple as that.

0:54:330:54:36

You win some, you lose some.

0:54:360:54:38

Well, it's got the impressed marks of KPM, which means quality.

0:54:450:54:48

We've all seen this at the valuation day, that Berlin plaque belonging to Lisa and Selina here.

0:54:480:54:54

I must say you both look fantastic.

0:54:540:54:56

Lovely pinks going on here.

0:54:560:54:58

It's all colour-coordinated.

0:54:580:54:59

That little plaque was so beautiful.

0:54:590:55:01

We've seen them on the show before.

0:55:010:55:04

Philip's seen them as well,

0:55:040:55:05

but not with such an angelic face as this woman's, captured so perfectly.

0:55:050:55:11

-They are normally older ladies and older men.

-Yes.

0:55:110:55:13

Older men and older ladies ain't quite so commercial.

0:55:130:55:16

Not so good to look at, are they?

0:55:160:55:18

Full of character, but not so good.

0:55:180:55:20

Yeah. You liked this so much you actually put the reserve up.

0:55:200:55:24

We had a fixed reserve at 1,200.

0:55:240:55:26

It's now been put up to £1,400. Yes. I don't blame you.

0:55:260:55:30

Had a chat to the auctioneer just before the sale started.

0:55:300:55:33

-We all think it's going to sell for around £1,800-£2,000.

-Hopefully.

0:55:330:55:37

I mean, a lovely fairy tale ending would be sort of plus 2,000.

0:55:370:55:41

We'd all like that, wouldn't we?

0:55:410:55:44

Yes, what would the money go towards, eh?

0:55:440:55:46

-A horse.

-A horse!

0:55:460:55:48

And you wanted to do something as well, didn't you?

0:55:480:55:52

Go shopping to New York.

0:55:520:55:54

Oh, wow. Oh gosh, what a thing to do at your age,

0:55:540:55:56

it would be absolutely wonderful if you could do that.

0:55:560:55:59

I seem to remember there was a maid involved somewhere.

0:55:590:56:02

Yeah, what's the maid?

0:56:020:56:03

A maid round the house.

0:56:030:56:05

A maid for around the house. Get the horse. Get the horse.

0:56:050:56:09

The horse will love you and you'll love the horse and you'll grow with it,

0:56:090:56:12

especially if it's a little pony to start with.

0:56:120:56:15

-Yeah.

-You could love the maid.

0:56:150:56:17

No, no, no! Don't go that way!

0:56:170:56:18

Lot 566 is the very beautiful 19th century KPM porcelain plaque.

0:56:200:56:27

What may I say for that to start me?

0:56:270:56:29

What do we say, about £1,500 to start me?

0:56:290:56:31

£1,500 to put me in? £1,000 somewhere then.

0:56:310:56:34

To get on, £500 at the back, at £500, the lady's bid.

0:56:340:56:38

At 500, may I say 600 now? At £500, £600, £700,

0:56:380:56:43

£800, £900, £1,000.

0:56:430:56:46

1,100 the lady, 1,200 all in the room. 1,300, 1,400.

0:56:460:56:52

1,400 the gentleman's bid.

0:56:520:56:54

-It's sold, isn't it?

-1,400, 1,500.

0:56:540:56:57

1,500 may I say? 1,500 with Mervyn.

0:56:570:57:00

1,600 at the back.

0:57:000:57:02

1,700 you want now. 1,700 with Mervyn.

0:57:020:57:05

1,800 in the room. £1,800, 1,900.

0:57:050:57:10

Oh, Selina, oh yes!

0:57:100:57:12

2,100 now? 2,100 with Mervyn.

0:57:120:57:16

I think we'll have the maid and the horse!

0:57:160:57:18

2,300, 2,400, 2,500?

0:57:180:57:24

2,500, 2,600 in the room.

0:57:240:57:28

2,700 on the phone? 2,700.

0:57:280:57:30

2,800. Still there in the room.

0:57:300:57:33

-This is great. This is great. They absolutely love it.

-2,900.

0:57:330:57:37

3,000 bid. 3,100?

0:57:370:57:40

At £3,000 in the room.

0:57:400:57:42

Against you, Mervyn, at £3,000.

0:57:420:57:45

You can buy a thoroughbred now.

0:57:450:57:46

Last call against you. Selling at £3,000 then.

0:57:460:57:50

Bang! That hammer has gone down!

0:57:500:57:53

£3,000!

0:57:530:57:55

Philip, that was real quality.

0:57:550:57:57

What a wonderful moment. We've got tears.

0:57:570:58:00

Because it was my grandfather's.

0:58:000:58:02

Oh, dear, I thought I was going to take it home.

0:58:020:58:04

We're selling your inheritance.

0:58:040:58:06

Putting your money towards a horse, a shopping trip in New York

0:58:060:58:09

and possibly, well, a maid, maybe, for the odd weekend.

0:58:090:58:13

-Sorry, sorry.

-What a wonderful moment.

0:58:130:58:16

Congratulations to both of you.

0:58:160:58:18

We've all enjoyed watching that being sold under the hammer.

0:58:180:58:22

We've loved talking about it, it's real quality.

0:58:220:58:24

Selina gets a horse, we've all had a great day.

0:58:240:58:27

Wonderful surprises on Flog It!.

0:58:270:58:28

Join us for many more to come.

0:58:280:58:30

So until the next time, cheerio.

0:58:300:58:33

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:500:58:53

While experts Charlie Ross and Philip Serrell trawl through the locals' possessions, presenter Paul Martin finds out about the age-old Welsh tradition of making lovespoons. He even attempts to make a spoon for his wife. At the auction there are definitely some timely suprises.


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