Tavistock Flog It!


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Tavistock

The Flog It! team travel to sunny Tavistock. Just down the road in Buckfastleigh, presenter Paul Martin pops into the pub that never called time.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Tavistock. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Today we're in Devon, on the edge of Dartmoor,

0:00:060:00:10

in Sir Francis Drake's home town of Tavistock.

0:00:100:00:14

In 1105, Henry I granted a Royal Charter to Tavistock to hold a weekly pannier market,

0:00:500:00:56

pannier meaning the baskets used to carry the goods.

0:00:560:01:00

Back then it was all vegetables and flowers, but today I hope they'll be brimming full of antiques!

0:01:000:01:08

It's Charlie Ross and Philip Serrell assessing your items today.

0:01:100:01:15

This could be another very interesting programme.

0:01:150:01:21

Already something has caught Philip's eye.

0:01:210:01:24

-How are you, Peggy?

-Very well.

-Fancy a drink?

-A little bit more.

0:01:240:01:29

-More! You're greedy! What's your favourite tipple? Gin?

-I make my own home-made wine.

0:01:290:01:36

-What do you make?

-Everything. Anything I can get hold of.

-Strong stuff.

-Good stuff.

0:01:360:01:43

-Brought a bottle along today?

-If I'd known, I would have done.

0:01:430:01:47

OK, so if you're a wine collector, why get rid of this little glass?

0:01:470:01:52

-I think it's a cordial glass.

-That's what I wanted to know. What it was for.

0:01:520:01:59

-It's an air twist. Do you know how they make these?

-I'd like to.

0:01:590:02:03

Imagine little strands of glass only a hair's breadth in width.

0:02:030:02:09

-They will almost roll it out like a sheet of pastry.

-Yes.

0:02:090:02:14

And roll it round a straw and then they pull the straw and twist it

0:02:140:02:19

and it creates this air twist, which is then put in the column.

0:02:190:02:23

And on the base here, we've got this pontil mark. That's where the glass is blown.

0:02:230:02:29

-That's where it's snapped off.

-Yes.

0:02:290:02:32

-I think this is probably 18th century.

-One of a set or...?

0:02:320:02:37

I don't think so, no. I think it's 18th century. Might be 1780, might be 1820.

0:02:370:02:43

I think it's really lovely. How long have you had it?

0:02:430:02:48

-My father used to collect glasses...

-Did he?

-..so I've had it...

-So this is a hand down.

0:02:480:02:54

-He died when I was eight, so I've had it a long, long while.

-Why do you want to sell it now?

0:02:540:03:00

-Because somebody nearly knocked the whole cabinet over.

-Not after your home-made wine?

-No!

0:03:000:03:06

They weren't the worse for wear?

0:03:060:03:08

-No, they were teetotallers, actually.

-They should have had some!

0:03:080:03:14

-So you thought it was time to move on.

-Yes.

-So we now know what it is and we know how old it is.

0:03:140:03:20

-Do we know what it's worth?

-I'd like to know.

-No idea?

0:03:200:03:25

-Not really, no.

-I think we'll put a very cautious £80-£120 estimate on it.

0:03:260:03:32

I think we'll put a reserve on it of £60.

0:03:320:03:36

If we have a bit of luck, it might make 150, a little more.

0:03:360:03:40

-It's lovely.

-Yes.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

0:03:400:03:44

What's your strongest wine? The most powerful one?

0:03:440:03:48

-Well, I make a blackberry whisky...

-That's the one to bring to auction!

-..that'll blow your head off.

0:03:480:03:55

-How do you make that?

-Em, blackberries,

0:03:550:03:58

-a bottle of whisky...

-A bit like sloe gin?

0:03:580:04:02

-That's right. Very similar.

-That does sound very good.

-It is.

0:04:020:04:07

You bring a sample to the auction.

0:04:070:04:09

John and Hilary, I'll have some fun now. One car works, one doesn't?

0:04:180:04:24

-Which one works?

-Mine.

-The red one?

0:04:240:04:26

Can we set it again? Here goes.

0:04:260:04:29

Fingers crossed. Up or down? Yes!

0:04:290:04:32

You must have hours and hours of fun at home with this.

0:04:340:04:39

-It's never been out.

-Is this the first time it's been set up?

0:04:390:04:43

-No, I used to play with it as a child.

-Did you?

0:04:430:04:47

What intrigues me - it's pretty hopeless, isn't it? It doesn't go up the hill.

0:04:470:04:54

We'll leave it there. It's made by somebody called Louis Marks.

0:04:540:04:58

It's nice to have the box.

0:04:580:05:01

I've done a little bit of research. Their factory was opened in the '30s

0:05:010:05:08

-in Dudley.

-Oh.

-Where did you get it from?

0:05:080:05:12

I'm pretty sure my mother's cousin gave it to me

0:05:120:05:16

-when I was young. I was born in '36.

-Right.

-So it's probably about... It would be wartime.

-Yeah.

0:05:160:05:23

-And she worked at Hamley's.

-Oh, at Hamley's. THE toy shop.

0:05:230:05:28

But what we've got here is the name, Marks, and have you noticed anything about the cars?

0:05:280:05:34

-They appear to be Citroens.

-I'm sure. That's a Citroen front.

0:05:340:05:39

-If you look at that...

-They're definitely Citroens.

0:05:390:05:43

So we've got a German name, English company and, for some reason, they're Citroen cars.

0:05:430:05:50

I can't possibly understand why. What made you bring them along?

0:05:500:05:55

-Mainly because it's just up in the loft doing nothing.

-Yeah.

0:05:550:05:59

-Did you hope it might be worth something?

-Yes.

-What sort of money?

-No idea!

0:05:590:06:05

The condition's good, the box.

0:06:050:06:08

It would be dead easy to make that go again.

0:06:080:06:12

I think you're looking at £40-£60, £40-£80. I don't know.

0:06:120:06:18

You don't want it back, do you?

0:06:180:06:20

-Hmm, that's got you thinking.

-It has.

0:06:200:06:25

-A reserve of £30?

-Yes.

-£40 reserve, estimate £40-£60.

0:06:250:06:31

-You're still happy to sell it?

-Yes, definitely.

-Sure?

-Yes.

0:06:310:06:35

-It doesn't want to go back in the loft.

-No, it's cold up there.

0:06:350:06:40

Doreen, what a beautiful tobacco container.

0:06:480:06:52

Absolutely stunning. Very good condition.

0:06:520:06:56

-Are you hoping to sell this today?

-Yes.

-Who's that? Your granddaughter?

0:06:560:07:00

-What's her name?

-Emma Kate.

-Hello, Emma Kate.

0:07:000:07:04

-Are you shy? How old are you?

-Three.

-Three? Oh, bless you.

0:07:040:07:11

-How long have you had this?

-It must be 20, 30 years.

0:07:110:07:16

Shag is a brand of tobacco. Or it was.

0:07:160:07:20

-This would have been in a tobacconist.

-My mother-in-law had a tobacconist shop.

0:07:200:07:27

-She did?

-Very old-fashioned one.

0:07:270:07:30

You wouldn't find this in a house.

0:07:300:07:32

-This was used for selling tobacco.

-From the jar, yes.

0:07:320:07:36

And everybody in Victorian England smoked.

0:07:360:07:41

I'd put this around... On the cusp of the early 1900s.

0:07:410:07:46

-Yes?

-It was a wonderful thing to do. You went in to the tobacconist and you either got ground tobacco,

0:07:460:07:53

which was snuff, or you bought loose tobacco.

0:07:530:07:57

Oh, it's marked underneath.

0:07:570:08:00

-It's made in Stoke On Trent.

-Is it?

-There's no maker's name.

0:08:000:08:04

-See where it says London? That's just, basically, the outlet, the shop that sold these.

-I see.

0:08:040:08:12

To put them on display to sell tobacco from. Got many more?

0:08:120:08:17

-Two more.

-Have you?

0:08:170:08:19

-Oh, brilliant. If they're as good as this one...

-One is as good. One looks dirtier.

-That's fine.

0:08:190:08:26

It's got character. This is very clean. Why do you want to sell them?

0:08:260:08:32

-Repairs to the house.

-What have you got to do?

0:08:320:08:36

-The ceiling!

-OK. Let's put them into auction

0:08:360:08:40

with an estimate of £250-£350. Fix the reserve at £250.

0:08:400:08:45

-Yes.

-So they won't go for under.

0:08:450:08:48

I think it will encourage bidders. They'll think they've got a bargain.

0:08:480:08:53

-And I can see these going for 400 on a good day.

-Let's hope so.

0:08:530:08:57

Terry and Ann, I can see why that ring is on the table. You've got no room for any more!

0:09:030:09:10

-No!

-How many rings are you wearing?

-Um...

0:09:100:09:14

Two, four, five... six, seven, eight. Ten.

0:09:140:09:17

-Is that a normal, everyday occurrence?

-I normally wear them.

0:09:170:09:22

Oh, fantastic.

0:09:220:09:24

May I say, there are some beautiful rings there?

0:09:240:09:29

This is also a beautiful stone. Where did it come from?

0:09:290:09:34

It belonged to Terry's gran. When she died, it went to his mother.

0:09:340:09:39

-And she left it to me.

-Right. Did she use it as an engagement ring?

0:09:390:09:44

-No, Grandmother did.

-Yes.

-Mother wore it as a normal ring.

0:09:440:09:50

-Grandmother got married in 1914.

-Yeah.

-So it was dated prior to that.

0:09:500:09:55

It's got chips on the shoulders, but by and large it's a single-stone ring.

0:09:550:10:02

And I think with regard to valuing a ring, the simpler, the better.

0:10:020:10:10

The great beauty of this ring is its simplicity and therefore it will appeal to more people.

0:10:100:10:16

-If it's in a fancy setting, it's never quite right.

-Over-elaborate.

0:10:160:10:22

Never right for the next person.

0:10:220:10:26

And it's a jolly good stone. And it's a good carat, a little bit more.

0:10:260:10:32

It's a brilliant cut.

0:10:320:10:34

We have had a look at it under a glass and it has a little blemish,

0:10:360:10:40

which is what happens to diamonds. They're forced up by volcanic pressure

0:10:400:10:46

and as they come to the top, the odd fissure happens.

0:10:460:10:50

Other than that, the colour is really jolly good.

0:10:500:10:54

It's set in 18-carat gold with a platinum setting here.

0:10:540:10:59

It couldn't be better than that. It's not an old nine-carat.

0:10:590:11:04

-With regard to valuation, a sensible saleroom estimate would be £800-£1,200.

-Yes.

0:11:040:11:10

I think we should put a reserve on it. Tuck it in just below the reserve, 700?

0:11:100:11:16

-That's fine.

-So fixed, no auctioneer's discretion, to make sure no one steals it.

0:11:160:11:22

I would like to see it make the best part of £1,000.

0:11:220:11:26

I think it's a delightful stone.

0:11:260:11:29

What a great start to the day. All manner of items are turning up from rock and roll memorabilia

0:11:330:11:40

to antiques and fine art... on the horizon.

0:11:400:11:44

It's time for our first visit to the auction room. Here's a quick recap of all the items.

0:11:440:11:50

Before it gets broken, I hope Peggy's beautiful cordial glass will give her cause to celebrate.

0:11:520:12:00

Racing out of a chilly loft and into a warm, welcoming saleroom is John and Hilary's race track.

0:12:000:12:06

I've a feeling that Doreen's three tobacco jars might do rather well.

0:12:070:12:11

I wonder if there will be any romantics ready to brandish their wallets for this splendid ring?

0:12:110:12:19

This is where we put all our experts' valuations to the test.

0:12:290:12:34

We're selling our heirlooms today at Eldreds, just outside Plymouth.

0:12:340:12:39

And on the rostrum today is auctioneer Anthony Eldred.

0:12:390:12:43

Peggy, I think you're doing the right thing. Somebody nearly knocked over Peggy's display cabinet,

0:12:470:12:53

so all the china and glass must go, including this cordial glass.

0:12:530:12:58

We've got £80-£120 put on by Philip. It's a nice thing.

0:12:580:13:03

-A proper old antique.

-Something for the purists from the late 18th century.

0:13:030:13:09

-You don't find kit like that about much now.

-I know. I'm hopeful it does well,

0:13:090:13:15

although they aren't flavour of the month. People don't collect them in the way they used to.

0:13:150:13:21

-Fingers crossed, good crowd.

-We're going to find out, Peggy. Good luck.

-I think I need it!

0:13:210:13:27

-What will the money go towards?

-Well, I've always wanted one of these hammocks for the garden.

0:13:270:13:35

-Oh, really?

-When I retire.

-Read a book, get some sunshine, laze about in the hammock.

0:13:350:13:42

-What a nice feeling, eh? He does it all the time!

-Between two very sturdy trees!

0:13:420:13:49

Next is Lot 233. It's a late-19th century cordial glass. There it is.

0:13:490:13:56

Several bidders for it. I'm bid £130.

0:13:560:14:00

Yes! Straight in! How lovely.

0:14:000:14:03

40 if you want it. At 130, then.

0:14:030:14:06

Quite sure? 130. 140. 150.

0:14:060:14:09

160. 170. We're at 170 now.

0:14:090:14:13

All done at £170?

0:14:130:14:15

-Great result!

-It's really nice to see that make money.

0:14:170:14:22

It's a lovely thing. Well done, you. Well done.

0:14:220:14:26

-Thank you.

-Looks like you will be having that hammock.

-Yes!

0:14:260:14:31

-Hilary and John, I loved the toy racing car, but are we on the right track at £40-£80?

-Spot on!

0:14:390:14:45

I think we are! Great little Citroens.

0:14:450:14:50

-Wish it was a real one.

-We do!

0:14:500:14:53

Why are you flogging this? Surely it's a bit of fun to keep.

0:14:530:14:58

-He doesn't use it.

-I've had it since I was a boy. It's probably time to go.

0:14:580:15:04

-And the boys have never been allowed to play with it.

-It caught your eye, Charlie.

0:15:040:15:09

It did, but it's not a great thing to keep.

0:15:090:15:13

You can't have a race - only one car works!

0:15:130:15:17

So what you can is bet your neighbour a fiver and give him the car that won't go!

0:15:190:15:25

The next lot is Lot 349. It's a Louis Marks Streamline Speedway set.

0:15:250:15:32

And I'm bid £30 for it. 2. 5. 8. 40.

0:15:320:15:38

In front here at 42.

0:15:380:15:40

At £42, then. All done at 42?

0:15:400:15:44

-Well, it's a bit of lunch.

-It's another bit of stuff gone. Another bit gone.

0:15:450:15:52

Ann and Terry, there's a lot of money riding on this. It's that gorgeous diamond ring.

0:15:580:16:04

£800-£1,200. It's 1.1 carat. I think you're about right.

0:16:040:16:09

-You can't give away diamonds.

-You can't, no.

0:16:090:16:13

-And there's lots of memories here.

-It was my grandmother's engagement ring from just before WWI.

0:16:130:16:21

-Wow. Gosh.

-Long ago.

-Look, it's going, anyway. OK?

0:16:220:16:27

It's here to sell, so good luck.

0:16:270:16:30

Next is Lot 470. It's a solitaire diamond ring. Just over a carat. Several bidders.

0:16:300:16:37

-I'm bid £850.

-It's gone, it's gone.

-Good Lord!

0:16:370:16:42

At 950, then. Still against you all at 950.

0:16:420:16:46

At £950. All done at 950?

0:16:460:16:50

-Great. £950.

-Well done.

-We'll settle for that. Interestingly, he had several bidders.

0:16:520:16:58

They all must have left around £800 or £900.

0:16:580:17:02

-Pleased, Ann?

-Definitely.

0:17:020:17:05

Doreen, it's great to see you. You've brought Darren, your son, and I remember you, Emma Kate.

0:17:110:17:17

-Yes.

-I'm getting slightly worried. It's my turn to be the expert.

0:17:170:17:22

This... It's not a novelty lot. It's a purists' lot.

0:17:220:17:26

Tobacco collectors, there's not many around. Thank you for picking up the extra two.

0:17:260:17:33

One's slightly discoloured, but it's not going to devalue the group of three as one lot.

0:17:330:17:39

We've put a value of £250-£350. Look at your face! Who's going to have all the money?

0:17:390:17:46

-Good luck, everybody.

-Thank you.

-Going under the hammer right now.

0:17:470:17:52

Next is Lot 188, which is three glazed stoneware shop display tobacco jars.

0:17:520:17:59

Several bidders. I'm bid...£280. Against you all at 280.

0:17:590:18:05

-We're straight in!

-290.

0:18:050:18:08

300. And 10. 320. 330. 340. 350.

0:18:080:18:14

At 350 now on my left.

0:18:140:18:16

At £350. All done at £350, then?

0:18:160:18:21

-Oh, yes! That's a nice feeling. I was slightly worried.

-Lovely!

0:18:230:18:27

-Top end of the estimate.

-Good.

0:18:270:18:30

Now we're going to travel over hill and dale to Buckfastleigh,

0:18:400:18:45

a sleepy village that boasts a museum with a difference.

0:18:450:18:50

Today on Flog It we're off down the pub.

0:18:500:18:54

If you think you're in for a tipple in this watering hole, you haven't got a ghost of a chance.

0:18:540:19:00

Intrigued? Let's go inside this weird and wonderful watering hole and find out why, shall we?

0:19:000:19:07

Welcome to The Valiant Soldier in Buckfastleigh, South Devon, the pub that never called time.

0:19:100:19:16

Ever since the last pint was pulled here in 1965, time has stood still.

0:19:200:19:25

The brewery decided the pub was no longer viable, so publicans Mark and Alice downed tea towels

0:19:260:19:32

for the last time and locked the doors forever.

0:19:320:19:36

Alice continued to live here without changing a thing until 1996.

0:19:360:19:41

Now open as a museum, you can step in here and drink in five decades of social history.

0:19:410:19:48

Now The Valiant Soldier is not so much a tavern, more of a time warp. Look at it!

0:20:010:20:08

We've got whiskies and gins. There's an old price list.

0:20:080:20:14

Now what does it say? Draught beer, one shilling and five pence. That's about 5p.

0:20:140:20:22

At that rate, the drinks are on me! There's a till full of old coppers, threepenny bits, sixpences.

0:20:220:20:30

Over there is a darts game. Looks like it was in progress and suddenly stopped.

0:20:300:20:37

The only thing that's missing are the locals. Where are the regulars?

0:20:370:20:42

Mark and Alice Roberts took on the tenancy of The Valiant Soldier in January, 1938.

0:20:450:20:51

During WWII, the place was packed, including American GIs in the run up to D-Day,

0:20:510:20:58

and the interior never really changed.

0:20:580:21:01

It was only when Alice was moved into a home that some light could be shone on the secrets of her pub.

0:21:010:21:07

She clearly didn't throw anything away. She hoarded things.

0:21:070:21:12

And up here in this attic room I can point a few things out.

0:21:120:21:17

There's some old newspapers,

0:21:170:21:20

a box that says "Stiff and Starch" with a gas mask popping out of it,

0:21:200:21:26

lots of crockery and china, stuffed badgers,

0:21:260:21:30

a brass bed stead, headboard and toe board, a Union Jack on the wall.

0:21:300:21:35

Incredible, really. So much stuff. All clutter, really.

0:21:350:21:39

40 years ago it was just commonplace things, but to a youngster today half of this wouldn't mean a thing.

0:21:390:21:45

Alice Roberts' sitting room looks like she's just popped downstairs to make a cup of tea.

0:21:500:21:57

The radio is still on, a newspaper on the table, slippers by the chair.

0:21:570:22:02

It's easy to feel as if we're just intruding on her everyday life.

0:22:020:22:07

This is Alice's bedroom. All her clothes are laid out for her.

0:22:090:22:14

Maybe she's gone to take a bath and will be back in a moment.

0:22:140:22:19

The locals say that this place is haunted and this room, in particular, has a cold feel.

0:22:190:22:25

I think I'm in the need of human company.

0:22:250:22:29

Thankfully, downstairs some locals have arrived to keep me company

0:22:290:22:34

and fill me in on the good old days. And the beers are on me!

0:22:340:22:39

-Hi, guys. Mind if I join you?

-No, come and sit down.

0:22:390:22:43

-A couple of locals to talk to. Pleased to meet you.

-John.

-And another John.

-OK!

0:22:430:22:50

-Both born and bred in the village?

-Yes.

-What was Alice like? Can you remember?

0:22:500:22:55

Always rolling around, collecting wood and stuff.

0:22:550:22:59

She'd pass the time of day with you, but she was a bit of a recluse.

0:22:590:23:04

-When her husband died, did she just shut the pub?

-No, I don't know what really happened.

0:23:040:23:10

-I think the brewery said enough was enough.

-Right.

0:23:100:23:16

But she stayed here. It was an old ale house.

0:23:160:23:21

-A proper inn.

-That's right. The ladies used to have to go in the lounge.

0:23:210:23:26

-They weren't allowed in the bar.

-Not very gentlemanly.

0:23:260:23:31

-That's how it used to be.

-This pub was thriving during the war when the Yanks were here.

0:23:310:23:37

-Can you remember them?

-Oh, yeah.

0:23:370:23:39

But after they left, it just died a death.

0:23:390:23:44

It was like a ghost town when the Americans left.

0:23:440:23:48

-I bet those GIs invited some local girls in.

-I bet they did!

0:23:480:23:53

They'll be in the lounge.

0:23:530:23:55

Here we go. The lounge, also known as the snug.

0:23:550:23:59

Hello, ladies. Do you mind me joining you?

0:24:000:24:05

-I've just been having a chat to John and John.

-I was in the same class as one of them!

0:24:050:24:12

-What are your names? I'm Paul.

-I'm Pat.

-I'm Marjorie.

-Hello.

0:24:120:24:17

I want to know all about Alice and the snug here.

0:24:170:24:21

There used to be a cinema down here.

0:24:210:24:24

And when we were young, we used to go to the pictures.

0:24:240:24:29

On the way home, we'd come in here for a drink. A gin and orange.

0:24:290:24:34

-You came in here?

-He'd go in there for a drink and then he would come in here after a while.

0:24:340:24:40

You could have a kiss and cuddle. You weren't allowed to at home!

0:24:400:24:45

-My mum wouldn't let us.

-Does this bring back lots of memories?

0:24:450:24:50

-It does.

-Dance days.

-Dance days.

-With the dances.

0:24:500:24:54

We used to come down at half time from the town hall

0:24:540:24:58

-and there were all the American troops.

-Did you go out with a GI?

0:24:580:25:02

No, I was too young, but I used to get well supplied with sweets and chewing gum.

0:25:020:25:08

We done very well with them.

0:25:080:25:10

-Tell me about Alice. Can you remember her behind the bar?

-It was mostly Mark.

0:25:100:25:17

-She was in the kitchen.

-Yeah.

-Was it sad when it shut down?

0:25:170:25:22

-It was for the locals. One of the main local pubs.

-Lost your snug.

0:25:220:25:27

-They say it's haunted.

-If we don't see you again, a ghost got you!

0:25:290:25:34

-OK(!) Cheerio! Thank you very much.

-Bye!

-Bye!

0:25:340:25:39

We've got to bid a fond farewell to The Valiant Soldier,

0:25:430:25:47

a pub that can't offer you any booze, but can give you fond memories of drinking days of yore

0:25:470:25:53

and conjure up a few spirits!

0:25:530:25:56

So, bottoms up, back to the valuation day.

0:25:560:25:59

It still looks very busy and Philip is playing house.

0:26:070:26:12

I'm a bit overwhelmed, Jackie. I've never been one for playing with dolls, you'll be pleased to hear.

0:26:120:26:19

I can remember being really pleased with this lot when I was a kid.

0:26:190:26:23

-So is all this yours?

-It is, yes.

0:26:230:26:26

This is really bizarre. This is like utility furniture.

0:26:260:26:32

-Yes, 1950s.

-1950s. Just after the war, and we've got 1950s utility doll's house furniture.

0:26:320:26:38

-What I think are absolutely brilliant... Look at this little hoover.

-It's lovely.

0:26:380:26:46

And a little single-bar electric fire.

0:26:460:26:50

A washing machine. And look at this - a television.

0:26:500:26:54

-I didn't have a television in those days.

-Didn't you? Great fun.

0:26:540:26:58

Look at this three-piece suite. Five and threepence the set!

0:26:580:27:03

How much is that? Five bob is 25p, isn't it?

0:27:030:27:08

-I can't remember.

-Five bob's 25p and threepence is about a halfpenny.

0:27:080:27:12

So it's about 25 and a half pence. New pence.

0:27:120:27:16

-Incredible.

-Wouldn't get much today.

0:27:160:27:19

Look at the iron as well.

0:27:190:27:22

-A little black cat, and a toaster!

-And the bread.

-That's wonderful!

0:27:220:27:27

-Hours of fun here.

-I loved it.

0:27:270:27:30

Absolutely wicked. Why sell it?

0:27:300:27:34

-I don't play with it any more!

-I'm pleased to hear it!

0:27:340:27:38

-It's just been up in the loft.

-So Flog It has come to town and you thought, "I'll flog it!"

0:27:380:27:44

-Do you want to sell it all?

-Yes.

-What's it worth?

-I just don't have any idea.

0:27:440:27:50

You might be in good company.

0:27:500:27:53

I think...that we could put...

0:27:560:28:01

£60-£90 estimate on it. We'll put a £50 reserve.

0:28:010:28:06

And it really wouldn't surprise me if it did a lot better than that.

0:28:060:28:12

I can see that being worth £10 or £15. It could make £100, £200.

0:28:120:28:17

It's such a great thing. What I love is that when you had it it was so contemporary.

0:28:170:28:23

-It was, yes.

-And now it's retro. It's like the wheel's turned full circle.

0:28:230:28:28

So we'll get it sold. What would you do with £200?

0:28:280:28:33

I'll probably put it towards having my furniture recovered. My old suite needs re-upholstering.

0:28:330:28:40

-That'll be more than five and threepence. Let's hope it does well.

-Thank you.

0:28:400:28:45

A wonderful mixture here. Before we come on to the slides, which we will talk about,

0:28:510:28:57

I love the microscope.

0:28:570:29:00

I have never seen a microscope that is actually formed as part of the box it comes in.

0:29:000:29:06

Normally you take it out, put it together and it free stands on the table.

0:29:060:29:12

On this, the base is formed by the box, isn't it?

0:29:120:29:16

-Has it got a name on it?

-Yes. Dunn of Edinburgh.

0:29:160:29:21

-And it's got some slides with it.

-Yes, and various lenses as well.

0:29:210:29:26

Oh, different lenses. How did you get hold of it?

0:29:260:29:31

It's been in the family as long as I can remember. My mother used to go to auction sales

0:29:310:29:38

and whether she bought it in a job lot... I don't think she would have bought that.

0:29:380:29:44

It's quite possible in the good old days when people sold job lots that somebody bought that

0:29:440:29:50

without actually looking inside it.

0:29:500:29:52

And it's possible the auctioneers didn't do their job properly

0:29:520:29:57

and put that in without realising what it was.

0:29:570:30:01

-She must have got quite a shock when she opened it!

-I think she did!

0:30:010:30:06

-Ever tried using it?

-I have. It does work, but it's very fiddly.

0:30:060:30:11

I'm sure it is. The slides are beautiful. They're actually ivory-mounted.

0:30:110:30:17

-And specimens of...I don't know.

-I think there's flies' legs and flies' wings.

0:30:170:30:23

A bit of everything, really.

0:30:230:30:27

It's not worth hundreds of pounds. Valuation is an inexact science at the best of times,

0:30:270:30:33

-but it's a beautiful thing for a collector. £60-£80?

-Yeah.

0:30:330:30:38

£120?

0:30:380:30:40

These are fabulous. The real problem is the condition of them.

0:30:400:30:45

They're magic lantern slides, but they're early 19th century.

0:30:450:30:49

Most of the ones we see are 1880, 1890.

0:30:490:30:54

I think you can put these back another 50 years, nearer 1800 than 1900.

0:30:540:31:00

We've got all sorts of cartoons. I've pulled out three examples,

0:31:000:31:05

one of which is mechanical and I'm sure you've seen this, but wind the handle,

0:31:050:31:13

and it gives the most wonderful patterns.

0:31:130:31:18

And here...we've got a boxing fight.

0:31:200:31:23

The trouble is that the arms are fixed at an angle to the body!

0:31:250:31:30

It's quite difficult to land a blow. And it's a lot of fun, but it's not wildly practical.

0:31:300:31:38

-Wouldn't keep children amused today.

-Well, they wouldn't be amused for long with that.

0:31:380:31:44

It's a bit too simplistic. Whether it looks better with a light projecting it onto the wall

0:31:440:31:51

and they become life-sized, it'll be a lot more fun.

0:31:510:31:55

-Yes.

-And another one we've pulled out here is or are some caricatures.

0:31:550:32:01

The thing about these early magic lantern slides is they're hand-painted.

0:32:010:32:07

We've seen quite a few today and they are a transfer print,

0:32:070:32:12

and the early ones, early 19th century, they had a way of outlining

0:32:120:32:18

onto the glass so that it made it easier once the outlines had been sketched

0:32:180:32:24

to then fill in with hand paint.

0:32:240:32:26

And you can feel, if you run your hand along the back, the texture of the paint.

0:32:260:32:32

And it's smooth on the other side.

0:32:320:32:35

But they are from a Punch and Judy show

0:32:350:32:39

and I think great, great fun and something people will collect.

0:32:390:32:45

Unfortunately, we've got some bad condition ones and that happens more with these

0:32:450:32:51

than with transfer-printed ones.

0:32:510:32:54

If we put the whole lot together, you're looking at £100-£200 worth, which is not bad.

0:32:540:33:01

-Would that be satisfactory for you to sell?

-Yes.

-And put a reserve of £80 on.

0:33:010:33:08

-That'll be fine.

-I think we should put a reserve on.

0:33:080:33:13

It would be shame to see them blown away for £20 or £30. It's not going to be earth-changing!

0:33:130:33:20

Then you could go on a world cruise, but it won't quite do that for you. Thank you for bringing them.

0:33:200:33:25

They're fascinating, and early.

0:33:250:33:28

-Maria, how are you?

-I'm fine, thank you.

-Who's this? Not granny?

-No, Granny's frame.

0:33:370:33:44

-Let's have a look at it. That is absolutely lovely.

-I think it's beautiful, yes.

0:33:440:33:50

-Tell me about this lady.

-It's my paternal grandmother.

0:33:500:33:54

She lived to be about 98

0:33:560:33:58

and before that, about 5 or 7 years before that, she had her leg off, amputated

0:33:580:34:03

-because she had gangrene.

-Oh, dear.

0:34:030:34:06

And her hair was so wiry that my father, her son, he used to make model boats

0:34:060:34:15

-and he used to use her hair as the rigging.

-Really?

0:34:150:34:19

So this is a silver and tortoiseshell photograph frame.

0:34:190:34:25

If you just look on the side here, we've got the hallmarks for 1920.

0:34:250:34:31

Assayed in London,

0:34:320:34:35

and the maker's mark on the side is CAR and C.

0:34:350:34:41

If you looked up in the appropriate books, you could find out who produced this.

0:34:410:34:47

-It's a glorious thing. Why do you want to sell it?

-I'm getting older. Bits and pieces have to go somewhere.

0:34:470:34:54

-They'll only fight over it, so sell it!

-What do you think Granny's frame is worth?

0:34:540:35:00

Again, I really don't know the values of them.

0:35:000:35:04

I think we could put an estimate on this in auction of £300-£500.

0:35:040:35:09

-And I think a fixed reserve of £250.

-Yes, right.

-I think it will do really well.

0:35:090:35:15

-Happy with that?

-Yes, fine.

-One thing first. We can't send Granny to the saleroom, can we?

0:35:150:35:22

-So I'm going to take out Granny for you.

-Never sell your grandmother.

-Never sell granny.

0:35:220:35:28

-Rule number one.

-Never sell her short.

0:35:280:35:31

-Let's just take that out. There's Granny for you.

-Thank you.

0:35:310:35:35

Hang on to Granny.

0:35:350:35:38

-Do you know? It's lost a bit of its attraction now.

-Yes.

0:35:380:35:43

-Yes.

-It will still do well.

0:35:430:35:46

And before we go off to auction, let's remind ourselves of what we're selling.

0:35:460:35:52

Jackie's retro set of doll's house furniture will fit very nicely into any modern dwelling.

0:35:520:35:58

I'm hoping it finds a new home.

0:35:580:36:01

It's quite unusual to find a portable microscope in its own box

0:36:010:36:06

and these slides are hand-painted. If the collectors are out in force, Derek and Ruth should do well.

0:36:060:36:12

And I'm relieved that Maria has decided not to sell her grandmother

0:36:120:36:17

along with this beautiful silver and tortoiseshell photo frame.

0:36:170:36:22

Back at Eldreds, Anthony is showing an interest in Maria's beautiful photo frame.

0:36:270:36:33

I absolutely love this. I really do. It belongs to Maria.

0:36:330:36:37

When she brought it in, a picture of her grandmother was in this. Absolutely stunning.

0:36:370:36:44

It made it look worth ten times more, but you can see the value.

0:36:440:36:49

It is very plain without a photo in it, but the quality is there.

0:36:490:36:54

It's typical of the 1920s. Plain, understated.

0:36:540:36:58

And it's in good condition. The tortoiseshell hasn't been discoloured by perfume and things.

0:36:580:37:04

-It's just in nice condition.

-And I think Philip is spot on with his valuation - £300-£500.

0:37:040:37:11

I would love to get it in at £300, but I do think he's right and it may go to the upper estimate.

0:37:110:37:18

Very fashionable in its day. And hopefully when it goes under the hammer.

0:37:180:37:24

Jackie, you're going from 1950s doll's house furniture

0:37:300:37:34

to real furniture that grown-ups can sit on because with the money you're doing some upholstering.

0:37:340:37:40

-Yes, yes.

-That's a fair exchange, don't you think?

-Yeah, but this lot makes me smile.

0:37:400:37:47

In a way it's quite amateur, I think,

0:37:470:37:51

and it's of an age that 10 or 15 years ago you'd have dismissed,

0:37:510:37:56

but you've got those lovely utility wardrobes. It's brilliant.

0:37:560:38:00

Sort of kitsch '50s. There's definitely a market for it.

0:38:000:38:04

We've got £60-£90 riding on this. Let's hope we get the top end.

0:38:040:38:09

-Upholstering is an expensive business.

-Very!

0:38:090:38:13

On next to Lot 165, which is a quantity of doll's house furniture.

0:38:130:38:18

There it is. £40 for that. At 40. 2. 5. 8. 50. 2.

0:38:180:38:24

Look at that hand just held up.

0:38:240:38:27

At 52 here in front. All done at £52? Sell at 52, then.

0:38:270:38:31

That person was really keen.

0:38:330:38:36

It's an instance where you've got one bidder going to buy it.

0:38:360:38:41

It's almost about where you've pitched your reserve. We got it to where it's worth,

0:38:410:38:47

-but that person would have paid more.

-But no one pushed them.

0:38:470:38:52

-Well, we flogged it. We didn't get that top end, but it's gone.

-I'm quite happy with that, yes.

0:38:520:38:58

I wouldn't play with it again!

0:38:580:39:01

-This magic lantern was your mother's.

-The slides were, yes.

0:39:060:39:10

I think she probably bought them as a job lot and I don't think she bought them intentionally.

0:39:100:39:16

-Well, let's hope we get that magic £200.

-There are some wonderful images there.

0:39:160:39:22

-And a couple of mechanical ones. There's a boxing one.

-A bit of fun.

0:39:220:39:27

And a kaleidoscopic one, which is rather fun. It should do all right.

0:39:270:39:32

They've ended up back in a general auction! What goes around comes around! It's going right now.

0:39:320:39:40

Next is Lot 124. It's 12 magic lantern slides.

0:39:400:39:44

There they are. And a little brass microscope. All in one lot, several bidders.

0:39:440:39:50

I'm bid...£120.

0:39:500:39:54

Oh, we'll get that 200.

0:39:540:39:57

150. 160. 170. 180.

0:39:570:40:00

190. 200. And 20. 240.

0:40:000:40:03

-What? Ooh!

-260. 300.

-We must have missed something.

-340.

0:40:030:40:08

At £340 here.

0:40:080:40:10

At 340. Take 10?

0:40:100:40:12

All done then at £340? Quite sure at 340?

0:40:120:40:17

-£340!

-Lovely. Proper job.

-Proper job! That's what they say.

0:40:170:40:22

That's a fantastic result. You'd have settled for 100 quid.

0:40:220:40:27

-Well, yes.

-We had 80 quid discretion!

-I wouldn't have minded 80!

0:40:270:40:31

Next up, Maria's silver and tortoiseshell photo frame. Real quality. It's got to do £500!

0:40:380:40:46

-It's absolute quality.

-I only do quality.

-And you look quality as well.

0:40:460:40:52

-A quality lady. This will sell.

-Let's find out right now.

0:40:520:40:57

Next is Lot 420. An Edwardian tortoiseshell and silver photograph frame.

0:40:570:41:03

I'm bid £210. Against you all. 210. 220. 230.

0:41:030:41:09

240. 250. 260.

0:41:090:41:12

At 270 now. 280.

0:41:120:41:14

-290. 300.

-Great.

0:41:140:41:17

-At 320, then. 330.

-Yes! Someone on the phone.

0:41:170:41:21

-360. 370.

-They're really keen.

-380. 390.

0:41:220:41:27

400. And 20. 440. 460.

0:41:280:41:32

480. 500.

0:41:340:41:37

And 20. 540.

0:41:370:41:39

560. 580. 600. And 20.

0:41:410:41:45

640.

0:41:450:41:47

660. 680.

0:41:470:41:50

700. And 50.

0:41:500:41:53

At £750. 800 now.

0:41:530:41:56

-And 50. 900.

-Yes!

-And 50.

0:41:560:42:01

At £950, then. Bidding's on the telephone at £950.

0:42:010:42:06

Last chance. At £950 here.

0:42:060:42:09

Quite sure, then, at 950?

0:42:090:42:12

Bash! £950! Quality, quality, quality, all the way through!

0:42:140:42:21

Maria, thank you so much for bringing such a stunning item in. Philip, you loved it.

0:42:210:42:27

-Yeah, nice thing.

-What are you going to do with £950?

0:42:270:42:32

I don't know what I'll do with all of it, but my mother was brought up in Dr Barnardo's homes

0:42:320:42:38

and my youngest sister is trying to get the records plus photographs, so they'll have to pay for it.

0:42:380:42:45

-Something will go...

-Towards that. Some archive research.

0:42:450:42:50

-Well done.

-A stunning item. That's quality.

0:42:500:42:54

How about that? One minute the saleroom is jam-packed and the next it's empty. Just me left!

0:43:040:43:10

Sale's over, everyone's gone home happy, especially our owners.

0:43:100:43:15

We sold everything today. A credit to our experts and Anthony Eldred.

0:43:150:43:20

It was really nice to see Maria's wonderful smile when she made a staggering £950

0:43:200:43:26

for the Edwardian photo frame. That's quality. That's what we love selling.

0:43:260:43:31

Join us the next time on Flog It.

0:43:310:43:34

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2008

0:43:420:43:47

Email [email protected]

0:43:480:43:51

The Flog It team travel to sunny Tavistock where Phillip Serrell and Charlie Ross scrutinise family treasures. Just down the road in Buckfastleigh, presenter Paul Martin pops into the pub that never called time.