Bury St Edmunds Flog It!


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Bury St Edmunds

Flog It! comes from Bury St Edmunds, where David Barby and Adam Partridge offer up their antiques expertise. Paul Martin visits Thorpe Abbots airbase.


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St George is the patron saint of England, but it wasn't always so.

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Once upon a time, the title belonged to another saint who gave his name to today's location.

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Welcome to Bury St Edmunds.

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St Edmund was the king of East Anglia during the 7th century.

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It's believed he was captured by invading Danes and they decapitated him.

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Legend has it, his head was thrown into a nearby wood and was found being guarded by wolves.

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On reuniting his head back with his body, it's said the two joined miraculously together,

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leaving only a thin, faint red mark. The sign of a true saint.

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Hopefully keeping their heads today are our two saints, David Barby and Adam Partridge.

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-Are we ready to go to work?

-BOTH: Yes, we are!

-Good! Let's get inside!

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Adam is first up. Sue and Rosalie have bought in a couple of cuddly characters for him.

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-Welcome to Flog It.

-Thank you.

-These have been well played with. Did you play with them or...?

-No.

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-They came from our charity shop.

-Brilliant. Which charity?

-Salvation Army.

-You both volunteer?

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I work in the shop, and Rosalie is our main person who finds out what things cost.

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-So you're the research person.

-Yes.

-It's very nice to see people from charity shops.

-Thank you.

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So we've got two teddy bears handed in. This one's a Chad Valley.

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-Yes.

-His growler does work.

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-His growler works as well?

-He squeaks.

-It's a squeaker.

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HE SQUEAKS

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And he's got a label somewhere. Half a label.

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Chad Valley Hygienic Toys. Hygienic toys...I'm not sure if they're considered hygienic now

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-or you could call them that.

-I don't think so.

-He's from the '50s.

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His friend here has been equally well loved, if not more so.

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I don't think this one is of any great consequence in terms of value,

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-so they should go in the same lot.

-Right.

-I'd estimate these at £30-£50 for the two.

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-Hopefully, £50 would be nice. More would be even better. Does that sound OK?

-Yes, lovely.

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-They wouldn't make that in the shop.

-They'd sit there and just get dirty.

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-So have you given them names or is that getting too attached?

-This is Sal and this one's Anne.

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-Sal and Anne.

-Yes.

-The Salvation Army. I see!

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I know the auctioneer at this saleroom. She's keen on teddy bears.

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So let's hope she gives a phone call round all the teddy bear people and we get a good result

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-for the Salvation Army.

-Lovely.

-Thank you, ladies.

-Thank you.

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Brian, look at the state of this. You don't use it very often!

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No. I can't remember the last time it was used at all.

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-Right.

-Several years ago.

-Is it a family heirloom?

-Yes.

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-The EM stands for Elizabeth Mortlock.

-Right.

-Which was my late wife's grandmother.

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-She must have inherited it from a previous generation.

-Probably.

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The reason I say this is the marks on the back here,

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a king's head, date it to 1805.

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-Oh, yes, that's...

-It would be her great-great-grandmother.

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We've got the initials of the maker. JW. And that could be John Wray of London.

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-Is there any member of the family that wants it?

-No, it's not something that they would want.

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Basically, what you're telling me is the thing I've heard echoed so many times.

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Young people don't want silver these days.

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-I read recently that dinner parties and dining rooms are a thing of the past.

-Yes.

-I can't believe it.

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-Where do people eat?

-Round the TV, watching Flog It.

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This piece is very nice. It's very plain and simple.

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I think this is the essence of Georgian silver.

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The design itself is what we term fiddle handle.

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If you look at the shape of it, you can trace the outline of a fiddle.

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Very simple, well-balanced, easy to use.

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This would be for serving soup. Very elegant object.

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Collectors of silver, particularly of tableware, would wish to acquire something like this.

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-What about value?

-I really don't know. One of your colleagues said it would be worth £80-£100.

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£80-£100...

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-Yeah, I think that's a reasonable estimate.

-Yes.

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-Possibly a little bit low. I'd expect it to go for 120.

-Right.

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-But we've got to put a reserve on it.

-Yes.

-If you're happy, I think £80 sounds a sensible reserve.

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-That would be fine.

-And I hope for 120.

-Yes, so do I!

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-Colin, are you from Bury St Edmunds?

-No, not from Bury, but neighbouring villages.

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-A local lad, then.

-You can tell that from the way I talk!

-Yes, I can!

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-Proud on it, too!

-Good for you.

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Looking at this really quickly,

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£40-£60. That's foxed you, hasn't it?

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-I'm talking about £40-£60 for the trolley!

-Oh, sorry! That?

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-That blanket came off my bed this morning!

-You liked that, didn't you?

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I think that is great. It's the only way you can get a lead sundial to the valuation day.

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-On one of those.

-Without a doubt.

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And this old antique as well.

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-How heavy is that?

-Eight stone.

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It is solid lead, isn't it? I can't lift that.

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-It's in great demand now, you know, lead is.

-I'm just looking at this for the scrap value.

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You're probably right, actually. It's quite nice.

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A little bit naive. Neo-classical revival.

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-A little cherub. He's got some damage to his ankle. There's a lot of strain.

-No doubt.

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-And there's a big crack there.

-Hairline, I'd say.

-That can be mended.

-Oh, yes!

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So what's its story? Where has it come from? Your garden?

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-I suffer from old timers' disease. I can't remember.

-I know the feeling!

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-I believe I bought it from an antiques dealer.

-How much did you pay?

-No idea.

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-No idea.

-Well, he's a cute little statue, isn't he? Circa 1900. Not any earlier than that.

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About 1910, maybe.

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-Going by the weight and the scrap value, we've got to be looking at around £100-£150.

-Yeah.

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-Happy with that?

-Oh, yes.

-Shall we put this into auction without the trolley?

-Bung me in as well!

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This is going to be really funny watching our stewards cart this off. What's the time?

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-I've got no idea. Time I was home.

-Time you were home? Let's put it into the auction.

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-Very kind of you.

-Thank you.

-A great pleasure.

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So, John, what is a man like you doing with a trench periscope?

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I've got all kinds of stuff. I've got so much in the shed, there will be a row one day

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-if I don't get rid of some of it!

-Ever used it?

-Yes, I have.

-When have you had the chance to use it?

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If you're a little fella and you want to watch a football match, that's what you need.

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-A trench periscope, French...

-And proper prisms in there.

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-Proper prisms. And it's French manufacture.

-Yes.

-Is it WWI?

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-Yes, definitely.

-With a very nice leather protective case.

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-There's a little scratch on there.

-That doesn't matter too much.

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-So where did you get this from?

-In Bury St Edmunds, just a local shop that had army stuff.

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-I had a swap.

-You did a deal. You're not from Bury St Edmunds.

-Liverpool.

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-I thought so. You didn't lose your accent.

-No.

-Or your humour.

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-You mustn't do that.

-So why are you selling it?

-Forced into it, I think.

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-Forced into it? Who by?

-My wife. "Get rid of your junk."

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-How will you watch the footie now?

-Well, I'll watch the telly.

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-It's been in that shed for seven years.

-OK, well, it's probably quite an interesting item now.

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-I think it would make about £50.

-Should do, I hope. Not more?

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-Well, I think £50 or £60. Not much more. Do you want to put a reserve on it?

-No, it's gotta go.

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-Even if it makes 20 quid?

-No.

-There you go.

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-Put a reserve on at 40.

-Estimate £50-£60.

-Yes.

-And hopefully it'll do well.

-Maybe more.

-Yeah.

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-Thank you.

-I hope the auctioneer can spy a few bidders.

-Tell him he can see the top shelf with that!

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We've found our first items to take off to auction.

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The teddies will hopefully sell well and the cash goes straight back to the charity.

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The silver ladle is lovely and should easily make £80.

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What a great local character! I can't wait to see Colin again with his sundial.

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And it's been a long time in the shed for John's periscope.

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Today's sale comes from TW Gaze Auction Rooms in Diss in Norfolk.

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What a lovely sunny day we've got.

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Before the auction gets under way, I'll have a quick chat with Elizabeth Talbot,

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to see what she thinks of some of our valuations.

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I like this. A WWI periscope.

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Obviously used in the trenches. It's in very good condition. John's had it about seven years.

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He got it in some kind of deal he did in Bury St Edmunds. It's been in his shed ever since.

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He's now been forced to sell it. Adam has put a valuation of £50-£60 on this.

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Sounds fair. I mean, there are, like any main field of collectability,

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some people always on the lookout.

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If I were a collector, I'd be quite pleased to see this one.

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-Despite its age, the condition is lovely.

-Yes.

-So the shed must be nice and dry and warm.

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Prior to that, it obviously had a fairly comfortable life. It's obviously seen some service.

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-But not too much.

-Probably as good as one could expect from the period.

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So it should make its money fine.

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Something to set your sights on.

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You get worse, Paul!

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A little teddy bear, Chad Valley, walked into the Salvation Army shop.

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-Rosie and Sue, good to see you.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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-Did you spot what it was straight away?

-No, the lady who sorts things, she spotted it.

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And she gave it to me. I took it to an antique fair or collectors' fair.

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-A lady told me it was worth about £50, but to put it in auction, so here we are.

-Hey, presto.

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-We thought we might do better in auction.

-We've seen them do a lot more than £50.

-Sometimes.

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-I put £30-£50 on this one.

-"Come and buy me".

-I'd love it to make a lot more.

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Elizabeth is pretty good on teddies so let's hope.

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And it's being sold with a little friend as well. He's got some company.

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A 1950s Chad Valley teddy bear, together with his friend. Doesn't it pull the heart strings?

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What am I say for these two? Start me at 30.

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Come on, £30. Chad Valley.

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It's no good smiling at them. 20 I'll take to start. 20 bid.

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22. 25. 28.

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28 with the lady. 30, new bidder. 32. 35.

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38. 40. 42. 45. 48.

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48 to my left. At 48 with the lady. 48 now. Where's 50?

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Are you all done at 48?

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-Two bidders there. £48.

-Thank you very much.

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-Going to the Salvation Army.

-Yes, wonderful.

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-More than in the shop?

-Oh, yes. We'd be lucky to get £5.

-And somebody else makes the profit.

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Brian, at £80-£120 this is bound to sell.

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-That lovely silver ladle. 1805.

-Yes.

-Quality.

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-It shouts quality.

-It does indeed.

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And also the fiddle pattern is a standard design. It could fit any cutlery service.

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-And it's fresh to the market. It's a family heirloom.

-Yes, it is.

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-You've had it a long, long time.

-Yes, it was my late wife's family more than my own.

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It's something you never really use, but I'm sure the collectors and silver dealers will like this.

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Hopefully, it'll find a new buyer. Good luck.

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Lot 170. We have the silver fiddle pattern ladle.

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London, 1805. A super piece here.

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Interest on the sheets and I start at £55.

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£55 is bid. 60. 5.

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70. 5. 80. I'm out.

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80 down below. I'll take 5. A lovely ladle.

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85. 85 in the corner. 90, sir?

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It's at 85 now. Where's 90?

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At 85. To the lady. Make no mistake.

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It's gone. Within estimate. Just crept in.

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-Someone's very happy today. But you're happy as well.

-Yes.

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Somebody will get the use of it where it's only been in a drawer.

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-You've got more drawer space now.

-Yes. Not a lot more!

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-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

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-John, that WWI periscope is a lovely little item.

-It is.

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Real quality. I had a chat with the auctioneer.

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Elizabeth said we should get you your money no problem.

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-And a beautiful leather case. Not a lot of use.

-It's just a bit different.

-Yeah.

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-We had good fun filming it.

-Look!

-Look at the family over there!

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Aw, look at that! That's a cracking family.

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-Lots of moral support.

-They're good.

-We're going to sell this, definitely. Then treat that lot

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to a bit of a lunch. Good luck. It's now going under the hammer.

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Lot 130 now. We have the WWI hand-held periscope there with its fitted leather case.

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I start at £30. 32. 35. 38. And 40.

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42. 45. 48.

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50 at the back. 55. 60. 5.

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70. 5. 80. 5.

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90. 90 at the back. 90 at the back.

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I'll take 5 again. At 90, by the door. At 90.

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-Any advance on £90?

-Yes!

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-£90?

-You've got to be happy.

-Oh, yes, yes.

-That's a result.

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-That'll be tea and cakes.

-Tea and cakes for the family.

-For the rest of my life!

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Remember that sundial? It's just about to go under the hammer.

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It couldn't be a dull day with Colin here! Great to catch up with you.

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-You're an ex-Guardsman.

-Grenadier.

-A proud man. I can see you've got a good, proper straight back there.

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-Ever had a backache?

-Never, no.

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-I've been in the asphalt business for 45 years.

-I've never seen a pair of hands like this before.

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You could drive nails in with those. You've done a lot of hard work.

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I shook a man's hand once. He said it was like shaking a brick.

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-That is as tough as leather.

-Yeah. Has to be to lift that sundial!

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-It weighs eight stone!

-I just hope it sells well.

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Good luck. There's no reserve. Let's just hope it gets around £100.

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On to Lot 10 now. It's the 20th-century heavy lead figure and sundial there.

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What can I say for this? Ideal for the garden. £100? £100, surely. Come on.

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-£50 I'll take.

-They're a little bit reticent. All the hands are down.

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Thank you. 50 bid. 5. 60.

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-5. 70.

-We're in.

-Above at 75.

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At 75. Where's 80?

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At 75. 80's bid. 85.

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-This is good.

-90. 5.

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Are you sure, sir? Round it up. It's in the gallery at 95.

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I'll take 100. At £95. All done?

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-Not bad at all.

-Not bad.

-I'm happy.

-Even for scrap, I couldn't have got that sort of money.

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-What are you going to do with it?

-I'll make people smile.

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I'll most probably give it to the wife and she'll waste it on food.

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No, that's an essential, food! we all need food to survive.

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-She'll just waste it on food!

-Thank you so much for coming.

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-Let me shake that rough hand.

-Paul, it's been a pleasure.

-Thank you, Colin.

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60 years ago, this airfield in Norfolk was a totally different place.

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During WWII, well over 3,000 American airmen were stationed here.

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It was a handful, when you think about it, considering there were over 100 other air bases

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scattered across eastern England, each home to thousands of GIs.

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The arrival of so many Americans was to have an everlasting effect.

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The lives of many local men, women and children were changed forever.

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I've come to meet two such people here at Thorpe Abbotts, the air base for the 100th Bomb Group,

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to find out what life was like back then.

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Sam Hurry was a boy during the war and has many fond memories here.

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So much so, he's still involved with the restoration and upkeep of the base.

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Sam, you spend a lot of time here as a kid. What was it like before the Americans arrived?

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Very peaceful. It was absolute quietness.

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-We used to come up here to gather acorns for the local pigs.

-Keeping out of trouble!

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Well, I don't know about keeping out of trouble!

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-Did the Americans just arrive overnight?

-No, there were some here.

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We never took much notice of them until the aeroplanes came in.

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We'd come out of school and come up here and the planes came in.

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We were not only excited, but frightened.

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We hadn't seen things that big.

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And as they came round the bend on the runway, the taxi track, it was a bit frightening to see them.

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So we actually ran away, eventually.

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-How old were you?

-I'd be 10, nearly 11.

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There was some animosity towards the Americans,

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originally, but as time went on they all became very friendly and played baseball with the locals.

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-Did you come up here and do odd jobs?

-Yeah. I used to help out, running errands, various little jobs,

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cleaning out aircraft.

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All sorts of things. And they were always taking chewing gum out,

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giving us cigarettes to smoke. They'd just pick you up and throw you on the mess wagon

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-and away you'd go to the mess hall.

-So how much time did you spend up here with the servicemen?

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We should ask how much time did I spend at home? Very little!

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Sometimes we never went to school for weeks. We had a trick.

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-We'd sign in at school, go out to the toilet and clear off.

-Up here.

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-To come up here.

-Were the GIs in good spirits?

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They were always in good spirits. The only time I can recollect when they were in bad spirits

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was when the Munster raids took place and one aircraft out of 13 came back.

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-There was utter...

-Devastation.

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I have seen death from aeroplanes.

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There have been some very bad things.

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Sometimes you get a slight flashback of seeing

0:23:110:23:16

the crumpled up bodies in the aeroplanes, yes, you do.

0:23:160:23:22

During the two years the American airmen were based at Thorpe Abbotts, 753 men lost their lives.

0:23:230:23:32

-What was it like after the war when they left?

-After the war, we were devastated.

0:23:320:23:38

We could not settle. Our whole life had gone.

0:23:380:23:43

We came up day after day, searching, looking for the Americans.

0:23:430:23:48

We were hoping and praying they'd return, but they never did.

0:23:480:23:52

The things were still in situ, the buildings,

0:23:520:23:56

-the beds were still there, the mess hall.

-It must have been quite eerie.

-It was.

0:23:560:24:02

The windows were banging in the wind. They never came back.

0:24:020:24:08

It just deteriorated, returned to agricultural, became part of history.

0:24:080:24:13

-Thank goodness you've restored some of these buildings. It keeps the spirit alive.

-Thank you.

0:24:130:24:20

We owe them a debt, a big debt, and we shall never repay them.

0:24:200:24:25

Sam wasn't the only one affected by the presence of the GIs.

0:24:250:24:29

Helen Anderson was only a young girl during the war, but the Americans shaped her life forever.

0:24:290:24:37

-Helen, how do you do?

-How do you do, Paul?

-I've just chatted to Sam.

0:24:370:24:42

-I know you didn't have a lot to do with this air base, did you?

-No, I'm afraid not.

0:24:420:24:49

-But you lived not far from here.

-In Norwich.

-And met plenty of GIs!

0:24:490:24:54

-Plenty!

-Can you remember the Americans arriving?

-Yes, very clearly.

0:24:540:25:00

All of a sudden, Norwich was alive with men!

0:25:000:25:04

-Walking around, chatting girls up.

-Chatting your mum up probably, as well.

-Yes, I'm afraid they did!

0:25:040:25:12

They talked to all the girls, with husbands or not.

0:25:120:25:16

The boys would always come in on a Saturday in their big trucks

0:25:160:25:22

from all the air bases and they would invade Norwich and come to the dances.

0:25:220:25:28

They were young and fancy-free and not realising the severity of what war really was.

0:25:330:25:40

I can't help but notice you've got a slight American accent.

0:25:400:25:44

-Yes, I'm afraid I'm one of those girls...

-A GI bride.

-I was a GI bride! Government Issue!

0:25:440:25:51

But I was a little bit later. That was at the Korean War time.

0:25:540:25:59

-How did you meet your husband?

-At the Samson Hercules.

-What's that?

-It's a dance hall in Norwich.

0:25:590:26:05

He asked me to dance and, for an American, he could dance pretty well!

0:26:050:26:10

-How long before you got married?

-I met him August '52 and we married in August 1953.

0:26:100:26:16

They were married within 2 or 3 weeks, some of them! "I'm going abroad next week. Let's get married!"

0:26:160:26:23

So off you went. What was life like in America?

0:26:240:26:28

Very different.

0:26:280:26:30

They had so much food, I couldn't believe it. And they thought they were hard done by.

0:26:300:26:37

They thought they were on rations. I said, "You have no idea!"

0:26:370:26:42

And they all had cars, which we didn't have, and refrigerators and washing machines

0:26:420:26:48

-and vacuum cleaners. Like so many girls, you think this is paradise.

-Yes, I bet.

0:26:480:26:55

-You've got a lovely accent. It slips into a bit of Norwich!

-I'm a little bit mixed up!

0:26:550:27:02

The presence of the American airmen certainly had a lasting impact.

0:27:080:27:13

Air bases like Thorpe Abbotts are a lasting testament to thousands of men that lived and worked here.

0:27:130:27:20

-What am I to call you this morning?

-Pat.

-Is that not too familiar for a young imp like me?

0:27:350:27:41

-No, no.

-I can call you Pat? And you've brought along this delightful tea service.

-Yeah.

0:27:410:27:48

Really nice. Have you had it long?

0:27:480:27:51

-I've had it since 1977 when my mother died.

-Right.

0:27:510:27:56

But she had it for... Oh, in the Fifties. No, could be the Thirties.

0:27:560:28:01

-That sounds about right. It dates from the Thirties.

-Yes.

0:28:010:28:05

-Very flowery pattern might make you think it was Victorian.

-I was told it was Victorian

0:28:050:28:12

-by somebody who came...

-Oh, really?

-An auctioneer who came to the WI,

0:28:120:28:18

-to give a talk, and I just took a cup.

-I'm afraid he was wrong. It's 1930s.

0:28:180:28:24

-Yes.

-And this is a giveaway. Look at this triangle here.

-Oh, yes.

0:28:240:28:28

-Art Nouveau?

-Art Deco. They wouldn't have done that in Victorian times.

-No.

0:28:280:28:35

-This is by Shelley. Marked on the bottom for those of you at home.

-Melody.

-The pattern.

0:28:350:28:41

Very popular pattern. They made other things in this design.

0:28:410:28:46

They did it in vases and planters and all sorts of things.

0:28:460:28:51

-Still very pleasing to the eye.

-It is. It's very delicate.

-Do you ever use it?

0:28:510:28:57

I did at one time. I used to think, "Why have things and not use them?"

0:28:570:29:03

-Until I saw this auctioneer man.

-Right.

0:29:030:29:07

He said, "Put it in a cabinet and buy another china set!"

0:29:070:29:12

-Well, that was good advice.

-So I did buy another set.

0:29:120:29:18

-I'm glad you still use cups and saucers.

-I use mugs mainly now.

0:29:180:29:23

-A lot of people do.

-Patricia!

0:29:230:29:26

-I'm sorry.

-It's all right. So do I, but don't tell anyone.

0:29:260:29:31

-But I do use china ones.

-Good!

0:29:310:29:33

So you've got six of everything, a complete set, so 21 pieces?

0:29:330:29:39

No, 18 pieces.

0:29:390:29:41

-3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21.

-Oh!

-I hate to be right(!)

0:29:410:29:46

-Why did I think it was 18, then?

-Cos there's six cups, saucers and plates.

-Yes.

0:29:460:29:53

-That's OK. It's a bonus.

-Definitely.

-You've looked after it well.

-Yes.

0:29:530:29:58

-Only one bit of damage I can see.

-Yes, that tiny little chip.

-And that handle's been off.

0:29:580:30:04

-It's all on one.

-Oh, yes.

0:30:040:30:07

OK, well, as we've discussed, tea sets aren't particularly popular

0:30:070:30:12

-unless they're a specific manufacturer like Shelley. Any idea what this one's worth?

-No idea.

0:30:120:30:19

-OK, well, I would say £100-£150 estimate.

-That would be lovely.

0:30:190:30:25

-OK. So in order to protect you, we'll put a reserve on it.

-Yeah.

0:30:250:30:30

-I reckon £100.

-Yes.

-If it doesn't make £100, it'll have to go back in the cabinet.

-Oh!

0:30:300:30:36

Bit of a rude question, but if it did make £200, is there any way you'd specifically spend it?

0:30:360:30:42

-I think the garden shed. Ours is falling to pieces.

-Is it? How bad is it?

0:30:420:30:48

Even the mice are falling through the holes!

0:30:480:30:53

-It's been lovely to meet you. Thank you for bringing this delightful tea service.

-Thank you.

0:30:530:31:01

Christine, what's attracted me to this little lot is not the silver card case. It's the spurs.

0:31:110:31:17

-I love anything equine.

-So do I.

-What's the attraction of the spurs?

0:31:170:31:23

Well, I was a horse-crazy little girl, like many others.

0:31:230:31:27

I saw them in an old-fashioned junk shop. I went in there one day,

0:31:270:31:32

that was about 1958, and bought them for 5 shillings.

0:31:320:31:37

-Gosh. Mind you, that was quite a bit.

-A lot of pocket money!

0:31:370:31:42

A hell of a lot! They're beautiful. Absolutely beautiful. There's the lion passant,

0:31:420:31:49

which tells us they're silver. There's an anchor for Birmingham.

0:31:490:31:53

-Have you done any research on it?

-No. I wondered how old they are.

0:31:530:31:57

OK, there's a letter K, which is 1854.

0:31:570:32:01

-Quite old, then.

-Quite old. And they are real quality.

0:32:010:32:05

I think they were made for an officer, for dress or ceremonial use.

0:32:050:32:11

-You've never polished them.

-Well, on rare occasions, but not recently, no!

0:32:110:32:17

Well, I think if you put those into auction, they should realise about £150-£175.

0:32:170:32:24

-All right.

-We've got to tempt people in. Can I put the spurs into auction

0:32:240:32:29

with a valuation of £125-£175 on them? Or do you want your £150?

0:32:290:32:37

I'd prefer that, if it's possible.

0:32:370:32:40

-All right. Twist my arm!

-Thank you.

0:32:400:32:43

-I think they are rare and will sell for £150-£200.

-That's lovely.

0:32:430:32:48

-What else have you got? This is lovely.

-Thank you.

0:32:480:32:52

-When did you get this?

-Oh, gosh. That would be about six years ago.

0:32:520:32:56

-From an auction or a dealer or were you collecting these?

-We were up at an auction house,

0:32:560:33:03

-and it just took our eye.

-It's rather nice. I love the Moroccan tooled leather interior.

0:33:030:33:10

That's quite unusual. Very good condition. Again, sterling silver with a lovely scalloped edge.

0:33:100:33:17

-Can you see that? Lots of foliage work. It's got a nice feel to it.

-Yes. Substantial.

0:33:170:33:24

Again, this is Birmingham. And with a corresponding date stamp, a capital C in a little shield.

0:33:240:33:31

That's 1902. It's very nice, but it is late.

0:33:310:33:35

-Yes.

-OK, I'd like to see it do 150, but I think we've got to get it into auction at £120-£180.

0:33:350:33:43

-Fixed reserve of £120.

-I paid a lot more for it.

-Did you?

-I paid £165 for it.

0:33:430:33:48

-Oh, did you? You didn't tell me that!

-Sorry.

0:33:480:33:52

-Ideally, you want your money back.

-And that was at auction.

-Well, fingers crossed, OK?

0:33:520:33:58

-Could we put it on at 150?

-Both going in at 150?

-Yes, please.

0:33:580:34:04

-OK. I guess you've got to be quite strong.

-If people don't want it, I'd rather take them home.

0:34:040:34:11

That's fair enough. OK, so we've got a joint valuation now of £150-£200 on the spurs

0:34:110:34:17

-and £150-£200 on the case.

-Lovely. Thank you.

0:34:170:34:21

-Remind me never to do any business with you!

-OK!

0:34:210:34:25

I want to know, Sue, why you're getting rid of this wonderful cat.

0:34:340:34:39

-Because I no longer need it. It's just gathering dust.

-Have you got a live one?

-Yes.

0:34:390:34:45

-What's he called?

-Monty.

-Monty.

0:34:450:34:48

Well, this Beswick figure is called a Swiss roll figure.

0:34:480:34:53

It comes in a combination of colours and this one here

0:34:530:34:57

is beige and black stripes, one of the more rare.

0:34:570:35:02

It reminds me very much of my own cat, Algernon, who has this sort of colouring.

0:35:020:35:08

This is a Persian cat. Rather superior, but lovely features with those luminous eyes.

0:35:080:35:14

-Where did you get it from?

-It came from my mother-in-law.

0:35:140:35:20

-I've been looking after that now for the last 30 years.

-30.

-30 years.

0:35:200:35:25

-With great affection...?

-Oh, yes. It has been an ornament.

0:35:250:35:30

-This model, if it was retail, would be about £200.

-Right.

-A lot.

0:35:300:35:35

And it just steps it out of the vin ordinaire Beswick figures, if you can call them that.

0:35:350:35:43

And I would put this for auction somewhere between £60 to £80.

0:35:430:35:49

-Right.

-If it goes above, I shall be delighted.

0:35:490:35:53

I think the auctioneers may say, "We'll put a reserve of £60 on it."

0:35:530:35:58

-Would you be happy selling that for £60?

-Oh, yes.

-Will you buy cat food?

0:35:580:36:03

-I'll give the money to my son.

-Right, right, OK.

0:36:030:36:08

I think the last time you see this will be in the auction room.

0:36:080:36:13

-Let's hope for Beswick lovers or cat lovers.

-OK, thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:36:130:36:20

Another three valuations under our belts and items ready for auction.

0:36:210:36:26

Patricia's pretty tea set is complete with only small damage.

0:36:260:36:31

They should do well in a saleroom.

0:36:310:36:34

Christine struck a hard bargain. I hope she gets what she wants when these go under the hammer.

0:36:340:36:40

And this cute cat is certainly to David's liking. Fingers crossed he's not the only cat lover there.

0:36:400:36:47

Back at the auction, Elizabeth is taking a break,

0:36:470:36:52

so stepping in for these lots is Steve Stockton.

0:36:520:36:56

Next up is the Beswick cat. We don't have Sue with us, but we do have another cat lover.

0:36:560:37:02

Mr Barby, our expert. £60-£80.

0:37:020:37:05

Yes. It's a thing I'd like myself. It's almost a portrait of Algy.

0:37:050:37:10

-Algy.

-Yes. He's a nice little cat.

-You're not allowed to buy him.

0:37:100:37:15

Oh, no, no. We've got enough, anyway. 50 on a bathroom shelf!

0:37:150:37:21

50?! Oh, wow!

0:37:210:37:23

Right. Well, unfortunately, Sue can't be with us today,

0:37:230:37:27

but we'll call her after the auction with the good news. So let's hope we get a purrfect result.

0:37:270:37:34

And Lot 430. We have the Beswick figurine of a seated tabby cat.

0:37:340:37:40

-This is Beswick.

-With green eyes.

0:37:400:37:44

I have two interested bids. I've got to start with me at £40.

0:37:440:37:48

Where is 2? 42, straight away. 45.

0:37:480:37:53

48. And 50. 55. 60.

0:37:530:37:56

65 and commission is out. Are you all out at 65?

0:37:560:38:00

Don't want to miss you at £65.

0:38:000:38:04

-Yes! £65. That's good.

-Pleased about that.

0:38:040:38:08

-Exactly what we wanted. Must get on the phone.

-She'll be delighted.

0:38:080:38:13

Now it's time for tea! It's time to flog Patricia's Shelley tea service.

0:38:180:38:24

-And this is quite something. From the 1930s.

-Yes.

0:38:240:38:29

We've seen these on the show before. I know you kind of like the Art Deco period.

0:38:290:38:35

It's very in vogue at the moment. One likes to sell what's selling well.

0:38:350:38:40

And we've got £100-£150.

0:38:400:38:43

-Happy with that?

-Yes, yes.

-A bit more, the better.

0:38:430:38:47

We have the 1930s Shelley tea set. Melody pattern, 21 pieces in total

0:38:470:38:54

and I'm going to start at £55.

0:38:540:38:57

Do I see 60? £60. 65.

0:38:570:38:59

-70. 75. Back with me at 75. Do I see 80.

-Come on, that's cheap.

0:38:590:39:05

With me now at £75. Do I see 80?

0:39:050:39:08

Are you all out at 75? Any advance? 80. Just in time. 85. 90. 95.

0:39:080:39:15

£100, sir? With me now at 95, then.

0:39:150:39:20

Any advance on £95?

0:39:200:39:23

-£95. We've got a fixed reserve of 100, haven't we?

-Yes.

0:39:230:39:27

-He didn't sell it.

-Oh, dear.

0:39:270:39:30

I won't get my shed, then!

0:39:300:39:33

Do you wish he'd used his discretion?

0:39:330:39:37

Paul, it was worth 100 plus. Perhaps it's best not to sell it.

0:39:370:39:42

But I'm very sorry about that. I thought it would do better.

0:39:420:39:46

-So did I.

-That's auctions for you. It really can make your day or it can spoil it.

0:39:460:39:54

It's the first time I've been to one. It's an experience.

0:39:540:39:58

Elizabeth is now back on the rostrum and it's time for me to be put on the spot with this next lot.

0:39:580:40:04

I think this lot is divine. A cracking silver card case and some silver spurs.

0:40:040:40:11

-I've never seen them before.

-They're lovely.

-Divine. I just hope they've been well spotted here

0:40:110:40:17

and there are a few phone bids. They're quality and Elizabeth said she's never seen that before.

0:40:170:40:25

-We've got a valuation of £150-£200, fixed reserve at 150.

-Sorry, Paul. It's gone up - 200.

0:40:250:40:32

-When did you do that?!

-This morning.

-You had a word with Elizabeth?

-Yes.

0:40:320:40:36

-I'm sorry.

-Oh, dear. Pressure's on. Right.

0:40:360:40:40

We did say they are worth £200, anyway, but we do need to tempt people in and it might not.

0:40:400:40:48

We'll find out in a moment. First, the silver card case. Fixed reserve of £150.

0:40:480:40:54

-We're hoping for 200.

-Yes.

0:40:540:40:56

Lot 65 now. We have a silver card and stamp case.

0:40:560:41:01

It's engraved with folic design. I have interest on the sheet.

0:41:010:41:05

Starting at £100. £100 is bid on this. 110.

0:41:050:41:09

120. 130. 140. 150. 160.

0:41:090:41:13

170 now in the gallery. At 170 and selling...

0:41:130:41:18

-Yes! £170!

-Oh, lovely.

-I'm ever so pleased with that.

-Thank you.

0:41:180:41:24

Right, we've got a bit of work now. I don't blame you with the reserve. They are really special.

0:41:240:41:30

Lot 70. We have the fine pair of Victorian silver spurs. I have interest on these.

0:41:300:41:37

Good, collectable items. I start here at £80.

0:41:370:41:41

90. 100. 110. 120.

0:41:410:41:45

130. 140. 150.

0:41:450:41:48

160. 170. 180. 190.

0:41:480:41:51

-200.

-Got it.

-210. 220.

0:41:510:41:55

230. The gallery at 230 now. 240, new bidder. 250.

0:41:550:42:00

260. 270.

0:42:000:42:03

It's above at 270. At 270 now, Where's 80?

0:42:030:42:08

Above at 270. Are you all done?

0:42:080:42:12

-£270.

-That's wonderful, isn't it?

-Fantastic!

0:42:120:42:17

You've sold them both - 170 and 270.

0:42:170:42:19

-There was no need to panic.

-No, I was overreacting, wasn't I?

0:42:190:42:25

No, you were just being cautious. And fair play to you.

0:42:250:42:29

It's hard to part with things you really like.

0:42:290:42:33

I make that nearly £440, less a bit of auctioneer's commission. That's how they earn their wages.

0:42:330:42:39

What is all that dosh going towards?

0:42:390:42:42

-It's going in my bucket fund.

-What's a bucket fund?

0:42:420:42:46

-All the things you want to do before you kick the bucket.

-How funny! What's on the list?

0:42:460:42:51

I'd love to go to China and see the terracotta army.

0:42:510:42:55

And I'd love to go to St Petersburg to see the wonderful museums and treasures over there.

0:42:550:43:02

-Thank you so much. I hope you get to St Petersburg and to China.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:020:43:08

That's the end of the auction for our owners. And, boy, was that a tough one!

0:43:130:43:19

You can't win them all. Auctions keep you on your toes and you never know what'll happen.

0:43:190:43:25

Sadly, we've come to the end of the show. Until the next time, cheerio.

0:43:250:43:30

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2008

0:43:400:43:44

Email [email protected]

0:43:450:43:48

Flog It comes from Bury St Edmunds, where David Barby and Adam Partridge offer up their antiques expertise. We meet some real local characters and Mr Barby even rekindles an old friendship. Presenter Paul Martin takes a trip down memory lane and visits Thorpe Abbots airbase to find out more about the American airmen who were based in Norfolk. He meets locals Helen Anderson and Sam Hurry, who were children during WWII and whose lives were shaped forever by the arrival of the Americans.