Basingstoke Flog It!


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Basingstoke

The team are in Basingstoke where James Lewis takes a look at a truly ancient artefact - a genuine Roman bowl. Catherine Southon falls for a stunning 1920s toy car.


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Today, we're in a town with a troubling case of mistaken identity.

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Often thought of as a new town, it has a colourful, vivid history.

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This is Basingstoke and you're watching Flog It!

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Basingstoke's history stretches back over 1,000 years.

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It has everything any self-respecting British historic town should have.

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It's even named after a fearsome Anglo-Saxon tribe, the Basingas.

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What other historic delights prevail? Well, there's a nice, straight Roman road.

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An Iron Age fort, now protecting a school, was the site of a major battle in the English Civil War.

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Then came the 1960s and with the rapidly growing post-war population,

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out went the old and in came the new. Basingstoke was developed

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into the modern town we know today.

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# Girl, you really got me going

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# You got me so I don't know what I'm doing... #

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And completing your Flog It team today are proficient experts Catherine Southon and James Lewis.

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Today's venue is The Anvil. So let's hope these two have enough mettle to hammer out some cracking items.

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# Oh, yeah, you really got me now

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# You got me so I can't sleep at night, you really got me

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# You really got me, you really got me... #

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-Eileen, I love this piece. Thank you for coming along.

-It's a pleasure.

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Let's open this little wallet here

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and we can see

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that we have a very fragile...

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..and rather nice map.

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Now, it's no ordinary map.

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It's a map by Wallis's

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and it's a map of the post roads of England and Wales.

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All these little roads are the mail routes. Where did you get this from?

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Actually, it belongs to my husband

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and originally, his aunt gave it to him.

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-We've had it round about 39 to 40 years.

-Right.

-Unfortunately, it's just been in a drawer.

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-He was not interested in maps?

-Not really.

-That's such a shame. I love maps and globes.

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They're so interesting. You've got a lot more counties than what we know of today.

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Norfolk looks a different size and shape to what we're familiar with.

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That's what I like about globes and maps.

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As the centuries and decades progress, we find more geographical information.

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Here we've got the "British Ocean". Obviously, now we know it as the North Sea.

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Once upon a time, it was the British Ocean.

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What is a pity about this is that it's not in terribly good condition.

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There are some holes here which has occurred as it's been folded up and popped into the wallet.

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Now, value-wise, I would probably put around £100 to £150 on it.

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-Would you really?

-Yes. What were you hoping for?

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I had no idea at all and that's a little bit of a shock actually.

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I actually hope it would make a bit more than that.

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-Thank you for bringing it along.

-Thank you.

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Ron, of all the things that come to the Flog It tables, boxes and bits of wood like this are my favourite.

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If we look at the wood to start with, this is known as rosewood,

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made from a South American wood that smelled of roses when the tree was cut down, so it's called rosewood.

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Then into that rosewood we have the brass stringing around the outside.

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Then in the centre we've got mother-of-pearl.

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Those are mother-of-pearl diapers and they alternate with abalone.

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So it's quite fussy. It's quite feminine.

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It's got scrolls around the border, so it's a Victorian work box,

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probably made 1840 to 1860, somewhere around there.

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-As long ago as that?

-Yes.

-My goodness me!

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Now, if we open it up... Look at that, fantastic.

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We now know this was a travelling box.

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Here we've got boxes and if you hold the box lid up to the light,

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-you see the holes through it?

-Yes.

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That's so that whatever was inside didn't go mouldy.

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-So we know it was something that would've been wet.

-Yes.

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So that's likely to be for the toothbrush

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and then this one... Holes again.

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-Yes.

-For the soap.

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So, it's a good set. Now, the value...

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-Any ideas?

-I have no ideas at all.

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I didn't know it was that old, to tell you the truth.

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The only history I know about it, I had an elderly cousin or aunt lived on the Isle of Wight.

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And she was engaged to a young soldier

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and unfortunately, he was killed in the First World War.

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And I think she left a photograph in one of these things.

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I noticed something inside the soap...

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"Lieutenant Treharne, Welsh Regiment, died of wounds."

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-Was that him?

-Yes.

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What you should do is write down the history of that box and just put it in the soap box with that.

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It will be lovely to keep that with it and pass the story down generation to generation,

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-so if you wouldn't mind doing that?

-I can do that, yes.

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I think we ought to put an estimate of £220 to £280 on it

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and just in case it's a bad day at the saleroom,

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-let's put a reserve of maybe £200?

-That'll be fine.

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I think it'll do jolly well. I'm very pleased you brought this box.

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-June, this catches your eye.

-Yes.

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It's a showy piece. Tell me a bit about how you came by this charger.

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A friend of mine was moving from Oakley down to Torquay and she was moving into a much smaller house.

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-And she was de-sizing...downsizing.

-Downsizing. But I like de-sizing.

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And because I collected brass,

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she gave it to me and it was in pride of place on my sitting room wall.

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-Do you know where she got it from?

-I have no idea, but she originated from Cornwall.

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You've heard about the Newlyn Industrial Class which was started by John Drew MacKenzie in 1890.

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He was an artist and he felt sorry for the plight of the fishermen.

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When the weather was bad, they needed to do something, and rather than fight and get drunk,

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he thought, "I'll teach you some traditional skills.

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"They repair their boats with sheets of copper. They'll be good at working with metal."

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So he got them to hand-hammer lots of objects in copper.

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They made lots of items and supplemented their income,

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but I've looked all over this and I'm not sure if it is from Newlyn.

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After 1915, there was a big Newlyn stamp punched into it,

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and with the Keswick School, a massive stamp shaped like a diamond.

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I tend to think, because there's diamonds stylised on this broad rim,

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-it makes it Keswick School.

-Right.

-That's my theory.

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If it was Newlyn, these would be seaweed-shaped, slightly more biomorphic

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-and maybe little bubbles like fish bubbles.

-Right.

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It is so stylised. It's so of the period. I love it.

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I would say this is definitely 1910, 1920.

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-As early as that?

-Yes. It's English.

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-It's been beautifully hand-hammered and it would look really nice on a table top in a big hotel.

-Yes.

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On the right piece of oak furniture.

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Value, right, OK... I wish it was stamped because then it would be worth £400 to £600.

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It's not stamped.

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I think this is gonna sell in auction for about £80 to £100,

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-but I'd like to put it into auction estimated at 60 to 100. I'm pretty sure you'll get the top end.

-Great.

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-Would you like a reserve on this?

-I don't think so.

-Just let it go?

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-I didn't think it would be as much as that.

-OK.

-About 30, 40, actually.

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It's pretty. I think it's worth a lot more than £40. We're gonna find out, that's for sure.

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Christine, you've brought in something that's probably the oldest thing in the room. Well done.

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-Tell me all about that.

-It's just a family friend who gave it to us.

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We've kept it just in a box really.

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Now and again, I get it out and have a feel because it's so old.

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And to imagine the people before you who had used it is fantastic.

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-Where did your friend find it?

-I haven't any idea at all.

-Really?

-No.

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It's just something that's cropped up.

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What we're looking at there is a wonderful piece of Roman pottery.

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Known as Samian Ware for this very shiny red glaze.

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And this sort of pottery was made throughout the Roman Empire

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in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th century AD.

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Something I find really interesting is this banner mark across the centre of the dish

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that's inscribed "P-R-I-S-C-U-S-E".

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"Priscuse." Strange, really. I wonder why they've put that across the centre of a bowl?

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It reminds me of a Roman oil lamp that I brought back from Turkey.

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Again round one of these brocante type stalls with bric-a-brac and wonderful bits and pieces.

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I got so excited, brought it home and it had across the back "taklit".

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I thought, "I wonder if it's a Roman site or something like that?"

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I looked it up in my Turkish book and it said, "Taklit - Turkish word for 'fake'."

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I thought, "Oh, no!" But I'm just hoping this is...

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No, I'm confident that this is a really good early piece.

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What that means, I don't know. It could be a person's name, a place.

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And all this surface damage here is exactly what you'd expect to see.

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And these chips that you get out of the glaze are typical of the damage you find

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when something has been in the ground, so I am totally convinced that that's right.

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Value? Roman stuff doesn't make a lot of money. It should make so much more than it does.

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It's greatly undervalued. We ought to estimate it at £60 to £100.

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Let's protect it with a reserve of 50. If it doesn't make that, you might as well put your soap in it.

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If it's not worth £50, it's not worth selling. I'd pay £60 to £100.

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We've found some cracking items and right now it's time to put those valuations to the test.

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It's our first visit to the auction room in Winchester. Here's a quick recap of all the items we've found.

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Catherine had a special delivery with that postal road map, but will the bidders be guided to the lot?

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James spotted this fine Victorian travelling box. It should sail out of the auction room.

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Next up was this magnificent copper plate. I'm confident someone will fall in love with its rustic charm.

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And finally, it was James with a genuine Roman bowl. Let's hope there's a legion of bidders.

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Our auctioneers for the day are Andrew Smith & Son.

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On the rostrum today will be the man himself, Mr Andrew Smith, and his colleague, Nick Jarrett.

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This is where we put our experts' valuations to the test.

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It's a packed room full of bidders.

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Our owners are here and our antiques are ready to go under the hammer.

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One of our experts is missing. Catherine is here, but James cannot make it. He's in Derby.

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We've got a camera on him and a phone link to get his reaction.

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Watch this. We're gonna sell some antiques.

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First up, Christine with that Roman bowl.

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It's unbelievable really, Roman pottery and artefacts, 200 to 400 years Anno Domini,

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and they're worth a lot less than antiques that are 100 years old.

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-Can you imagine the people that have handled it?

-Yes, the stories it could tell!

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If only this saucer could speak. That's why James loved it.

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-It is very tactile.

-As you know, I love this Roman stuff.

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I hope it'll do well and somebody will love it as much as I do.

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This is a fantastic lot.

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Lot 460, this is the Anglo-Roman bowl.

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Start me at £60?

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£60 bid, thank you, and 5.

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65. 70?

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At £65 then. Any more? At £65, are you all done?

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With you, sir, at £65... 70 down here.

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And 5. 80. And 5. 90.

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And 5. 100. And 10.

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Good. This is more like it.

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£120 seated. I'm selling... 130 at the back. 140...?

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Oh, they love it, they love it.

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At £130 with you, sir. £130. Is there any more?

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Last time then...?

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-Good. Wow!

-£130!

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-Isn't that incredible?

-It is, actually.

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-James, what a surprise!

-£130, great price, I'm so pleased with that.

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People loved it and that's gonna go to a good home.

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-I hope they enjoy it.

-What are you gonna put that money towards?

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I think I'll donate it to a charity.

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-Because it was a gift to me, that's what I'm gonna do.

-Good idea.

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I like this next lot. It's a little post map of England and Wales.

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Right now, all roads lead to Itchen Stoke near Winchester where we've been joined by Elaine and Catherine.

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-Can we get £100 for this today?

-I hope so.

-I think we should. It's very tactile.

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-You want to pick this up, study it and not put it down.

-It's great. It's got a bit of wear to it.

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-Any regrets I'm thinking?

-No.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

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-It's here to sell?

-Yes.

-Happy with the valuation?

-Yes. Very much so.

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Let's hope we flog it. We'll find out right now. Here we go.

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Lot 101 is the late 18th century map by John Wallis.

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Start me at £100? £100? £100?

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80 then? £80? 60 if you like?

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£60. £60 bid, thank you. And 5.

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At £60. 65. 70.

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And 5. 80. And 5.

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-At £80 and we're selling.

-Come on.

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All done at £80? Last time then at £80...?

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-It was nearly 100, wasn't it?

-I'm happy.

-£80, we're all happy.

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I would've liked a bit more. I'm a bit disappointed. I'm greedy.

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-You would've bought that.

-Yes.

-You're not allowed to. Happy?

-Yes.

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-I think that's lunch out.

-We're going on holiday.

-Where to?

-Crete.

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So we'll have a meal when we're out and say thank you to Aunt Nell.

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Aunt Nell who gave it to you. And escape this rotten British weather!

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-Enjoy your holiday.

-Thank you very much.

-Well done, Catherine.

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I've been looking forward to this. It's been a long wait since the valuation. Lovely copper charger.

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It's not too big and it's got the look. Any second thoughts?

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-Oh, yes.

-Do you want to take it back home now?

-No, I want to put a reserve on it.

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We'll be all right. Let's put it under the hammer. Here we go.

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Lot 720 is a large hammered and pressed copper charger.

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Let's start at £60. £60? 40 if you like? £40?

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30 then to get going? £30? Up at the top there at £30. 32. 35.

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37. 40. 42. 45.

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47. 50. And 5.

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60? 55 here. Is there 60?

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At £55. At £55 then if you're all done? Last time?

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-Hammer's gone down. 55.

-Could have been better.

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-Yes. We did say 60 at the bottom end.

-Not bad.

-It's gone though.

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Ronald, it's good to see you. We're just a few lots away from selling that lovely rosewood box.

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-James put a value on it of £220 to £280. I know it means a lot to the missus.

-It does.

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-She doesn't want it to go for anything less than £200.

-That's right.

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-The pressure is on James. What do you think of the room?

-It's massive.

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There's antiques everywhere, but right now there's only one place to look and that is the rostrum.

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Lot 240, the dressing case.

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A handsome case with all its fittings. 1852.

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I'm starting you here with a clear bid

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-at one hundred and...fifty.

-Fifty, right.

-150 I have. 160.

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170. 180. 190. 200.

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-And 10.

-The wife's happy. That's the main thing.

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250. 260. 270. 280.

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290. 300?

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At 290. 300, is it?

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And 10. 320. 330. 340.

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350. 360. 360 down here.

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-Come on, let's hope for 400.

-370?

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At £360 sitting here. At 360, are you done...?

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-Yes! Three hundred and sixty pounds!

-Wonderful.

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-You're happy, aren't you?

-Well, I'm in two minds.

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I've loved it for so long. I've had it for over 40 years myself

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as a centrepiece on the sideboard.

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James, we got £100 more than your top end.

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That is fantastic. They've been hard to sell recently,

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but that is a really good price.

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Well done, both of you. £360 - that's a good result.

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There can only be a few places in the world

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where a global sport and an institution can be traced back hundreds of years

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to the very place where a simple country pursuit evolved into the game we know and love today.

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For a golden period during the 18th century,

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this unlikely looking spot was the epicentre of the cricketing world.

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This is Broadhalfpenny Down near the village of Hambledon in Hampshire.

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It was here between the years of 1756 and 1796

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that the Hambledon club dominated both game and the stewardship of cricket.

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Although cricket was played in the 16th century, it was only in the 18th that it grew and developed

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and the first universal rules were established.

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Much of that momentum of change flowed from this very ground.

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Bob Beagley is an Honorary Vice President of the present-day club.

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Since a young man, he's taken a keen interest in the club's colourful history.

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So, Bob, put the Hambledon era into context.

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What was cricket like when the club was first established?

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Well, it was a game very much as it is now.

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The equipment has changed. The bat was more of a club.

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They often say it was evolved from a shepherd's crook.

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The wicket was two stumps, not three.

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-Cricket originated with two stumps?

-Yes, which was called the wicket.

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-Could you get somebody out if it went through?

-No.

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-You could be in all day long.

-You could. You had to hit the stumps to get them out.

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-You gonna bowl me a couple?

-Yeah, come on.

-Underarm, of course!

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Of course. They were all underarm.

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OK, Bob.

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-That was a stroke of luck, really!

-Beginner's luck!

-Beginner's luck. Let's go to the pavilion.

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Looks like there's a few guys about to have a practice.

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Tell me more history of the club.

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Well, the club came into existence somewhere about 1750.

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The club at that point was mainly concerned with drinking and eating, I think.

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Like cricketers today!

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Exactly the same, yeah! And a lot of gambling took place.

0:23:320:23:37

They gambled vast sums of money on the outcome of a cricket match.

0:23:370:23:42

They were playing a match for £500 in which John Small,

0:23:440:23:49

supposed to be the best batsman in the country at the time,

0:23:490:23:54

came to bat with five runs to win.

0:23:540:23:57

And he was bowled three times through the middle of the stumps.

0:23:570:24:02

So after the game they decided that it was best that we had a third stump.

0:24:020:24:10

On a match soon after, they were playing Sussex.

0:24:100:24:14

-And one of the characters from Sussex came out with a bat as wide as the stumps.

-Ha!

0:24:140:24:21

So Hambledon Club said, "We can't have this," so they forthwith

0:24:220:24:28

decided a bat must not exceed four and a quarter inches.

0:24:280:24:33

It puts a smile on your face, looking out over this ground thinking this is the very first time

0:24:330:24:40

-that three stumps were used.

-Incredible.

-It's quite powerful.

0:24:400:24:45

The history of the game played today started here on this piece of turf.

0:24:450:24:50

-And I've had a go today!

-You've had a go.

-Albeit with this bat!

0:24:500:24:56

It's brilliant, really, isn't it?

0:24:560:24:59

-Oh, lovely shot.

-Yeah.

-Sliced that one.

0:24:590:25:02

What about the batting order? Always the same?

0:25:020:25:06

No. Then, if you look at the old school sheets,

0:25:060:25:10

the batting order was the Duke of So-and-so versus Lord Somebody.

0:25:100:25:15

They were at the top of the order with the paid players below it.

0:25:150:25:20

The best players were last.

0:25:200:25:23

So you'll see somebody scored a century at number nine!

0:25:230:25:27

Were there many spectators?

0:25:290:25:31

Gosh, yes. It was estimated in 1777 when Hambledon played All England

0:25:310:25:36

-22,000 people crowded round.

-How fantastic.

-But there were no boundaries in those days.

-No.

0:25:360:25:43

If somebody hit a ball into the crowd, there it stayed until it was found by a cricketer.

0:25:430:25:50

-What if you lost the ball?

-Six runs were added when the fielder called, "Lost ball!"

0:25:500:25:57

And six runs were added, too, if somebody stopped the ball with their top hat

0:25:570:26:03

or their headgear. Sort of an obstruction.

0:26:030:26:07

-I love that sound.

-Yeah, lovely.

0:26:070:26:10

So what happened in the end? Why the demise of the club here?

0:26:100:26:14

Really because of its locality. The Hambledon Club at that point had no facilities to offer

0:26:140:26:20

and so a meeting was held in London and it was decided that the authority, the rules,

0:26:200:26:28

would all be covered from London and the MCC, Marylebone Cricket Club, was formed

0:26:280:26:35

and Lord's was chosen as its headquarters.

0:26:350:26:40

Hambledon became less important and so that was the end, really.

0:26:400:26:46

I guess it was important for the future of cricket, but a sad day for the local community.

0:26:460:26:52

Many of the local men played for Hambledon and were employed.

0:26:520:26:56

-Did you ever play cricket professionally?

-No.

-Would you have liked to?

-I'd have loved to!

0:26:560:27:02

We'd all love to have played cricket professionally. What a life.

0:27:020:27:07

-Were you a good cricketer?

-No, I made a number up!

0:27:070:27:11

-But it is a passion, isn't it?

-Yes! Lovely.

0:27:110:27:15

-What better sport and what better place to play?

-Exactly! No better place than this.

0:27:150:27:22

We're back in Basingstoke now and it's over to Catherine for our next valuation.

0:27:360:27:42

Duncan, I think we're going to swap around positions here. You're the expert on this.

0:27:420:27:49

You've done a lot of research.

0:27:490:27:51

All I can tell you is that this is a super piece, something that I would love to own,

0:27:510:27:57

a lovely tin-plate model of an Alfa Romeo.

0:27:570:28:01

A stunning piece. Tell me where you got it from.

0:28:010:28:05

It was my father's. I suspect he got it new.

0:28:050:28:09

-He was born in 1913 and this is a 1924-25 car.

-Right.

0:28:090:28:14

-I suspect as a young teenager he was given it by my grandfather.

-Right.

0:28:140:28:20

And then I remember it, as a child, being in the house, although I didn't play with it a great deal.

0:28:200:28:26

I preferred Dinky toys. Then, when my father died, it came to me.

0:28:260:28:30

I always thought about restoring it, but now being the proud grandfather of a new baby girl,

0:28:300:28:38

I thought if we can flog it and perhaps use the money towards something for her

0:28:380:28:44

-as she'll not play with it.

-She'll certainly not.

0:28:440:28:48

What do you know about the actual car? It's a beautiful model and a lovely shape as well.

0:28:480:28:55

It was the epitome of racing in the '20s.

0:28:550:28:59

The P2, which is what this is, came out in 1924.

0:28:590:29:04

It was a brilliant car, developed with 145,000-150,000 brake horse power in those days,

0:29:040:29:10

which gave it a top speed of 140 miles an hour. Not bad going.

0:29:100:29:15

It is actually a clockwork toy. If we turn it over here,

0:29:150:29:19

we see where you put the key in.

0:29:190:29:22

-And then, presumably, press something...

-I think that switched it on or off.

0:29:220:29:28

That lever goes to the motor.

0:29:280:29:30

-So you've never known it in working condition?

-No.

-Always like this.

0:29:300:29:35

So you never got to play with it.

0:29:350:29:37

Apart from pushing it around, no. I never wound it up.

0:29:370:29:43

It is in a very poor state, but I quite like that.

0:29:430:29:47

You thought about restoring it and I am so glad that you haven't.

0:29:470:29:51

It shows that somebody's loved this and had a great time with it.

0:29:510:29:56

What I really like is the detail.

0:29:560:29:59

-I love this simulated leather seats.

-The crinkled effect.

-Exactly.

0:29:590:30:03

Lovely crinkled, crackled finish.

0:30:030:30:06

We think 1920s in date, probably 1925, around that.

0:30:060:30:10

In perfect condition, with its box, we'd probably be looking at a couple of thousand pounds.

0:30:100:30:16

Collectors always want these in perfect order.

0:30:160:30:21

If we move away from toy collectors and think of people who might be interested in it as a charming piece

0:30:210:30:28

-we're probably looking at £300-£500.

-OK.

-And hope it makes more the top end of the estimate.

0:30:280:30:34

-Then you can buy something more girlie.

-That would be nice.

0:30:340:30:38

Mary, thank you so much for bringing this in. It really is a classic antique.

0:30:500:30:56

We often see bits of 20th-century ceramics

0:30:560:31:00

and 1960s bits of Beswick and that sort of thing,

0:31:000:31:05

but this is something that I love. A true antique, 200 years old.

0:31:050:31:09

-Yes.

-And in brilliant condition. Tell me about it. Where did you find it?

0:31:090:31:15

-I can't remember. My husband and I were always out buying things, every Wednesday and Saturday.

-Right.

0:31:150:31:22

If we had enough money, that was it.

0:31:220:31:25

Where it actually came from, I can't remember.

0:31:250:31:29

-He did a lot of work on Wellington's Stratfield Saye House.

-Your husband?

0:31:290:31:34

Yes, so we got quite a lot of Wellington memorabilia.

0:31:340:31:39

This is really interesting. As you know, it's inscribed

0:31:390:31:44

"Lord Wellington", before he was made a duke.

0:31:440:31:48

And it is inscribed, "Lord Wellington entering Paris".

0:31:480:31:52

Lord Wellington became the Duke of Wellington in May, 1814,

0:31:520:31:57

-but Lord Wellington entered Paris in March, 1814.

-Oh, really?

-Two months before he became a duke.

0:31:570:32:06

So I think this is Wellington leading his army in the Napoleonic Wars.

0:32:060:32:12

This really is a historical tray. The quality of the painting is nothing great, just an amateur hand,

0:32:120:32:18

but it really tells a story of British and French history in the early 19th century.

0:32:180:32:26

-Why aren't you keeping it?

-Well, I moved house after I don't know how many years

0:32:260:32:34

and my son had a lot of the things in his home,

0:32:340:32:38

-and whereas I had five downstair rooms, I've now got a room and a kitchen.

-Ah, OK.

0:32:380:32:45

So I've got things stashed away.

0:32:450:32:48

That was over the fireplace and I thought, as it's local, it might be interesting.

0:32:480:32:55

OK, value. If by a good artist, it would be worth a lot.

0:32:550:32:59

-Can't we pretend?

-We could try!

0:32:590:33:03

But...it's an early tray and it's early image.

0:33:030:33:08

-I think an auction estimate of £100-£150, with a reserve of 100.

-OK.

-How's that?

-That's fine.

0:33:080:33:15

-Sure?

-Positive.

-Let's take it and flog it.

-Right.

0:33:150:33:19

Anne, welcome to Flog It. You've brought these rather interesting scientific instruments.

0:33:260:33:33

Tell me about this microscope. Where did you get this from?

0:33:330:33:37

It's been in the family. My father brought it back from WWII when he came back,

0:33:370:33:43

-but I'm not quite sure where from.

-Right. You don't know what country?

0:33:430:33:48

-I'm not sure about that.

-Right, OK.

0:33:480:33:51

When I saw this first of all, I thought it was by someone called Nachet, a French maker,

0:33:510:33:57

working in the late 19th century, around 1890. But I can see that it is signed on the body tube

0:33:570:34:03

by Hartnack and Praznowski.

0:34:030:34:07

They were working before Nachet. They were working between 1860 and 1870 together.

0:34:070:34:13

And Nachet then took over this company.

0:34:130:34:18

It's a rather nice piece. Not particularly early, quite simple

0:34:180:34:22

and it's known as a compound microscope, rather than a binocular one.

0:34:220:34:28

A nice compound microscope. Did you ever use this?

0:34:280:34:33

Oh, yes, but under supervision from my father as a youngster.

0:34:330:34:38

We'd have a look at slides and put sugar under it!

0:34:380:34:43

I like it because it's slightly earlier than I originally thought.

0:34:430:34:48

I would probably think it would be worth around £150, around that sort of price.

0:34:480:34:54

This is more interesting. Let's move on to this piece here.

0:34:540:34:59

Now this here is a rather interesting microscope.

0:34:590:35:04

This is a travelling microscope.

0:35:040:35:07

You would have screwed this onto the case here and put this together

0:35:070:35:15

by sliding this in here. That's actually your stage, where the stage clips on.

0:35:150:35:21

You put your slide in here.

0:35:210:35:24

And then this mirror would go into here. This is slightly earlier in date.

0:35:240:35:30

I'd probably say around 1840. So this one didn't come back...?

0:35:300:35:35

No, that was bought for my father when he was a little boy.

0:35:350:35:39

-Was your father interested in...?

-Yes, with nature.

-Wonderful.

0:35:390:35:44

-A lot of the slides have got fly wings and all sorts on them.

-Let's look at the pieces inside.

0:35:440:35:51

Oh, I can see here. How lovely. He's labelled these all up. "Wing of greenfly".

0:35:510:35:57

Interesting.

0:35:570:35:59

"Wing of common housefly".

0:35:590:36:02

You're happy to get rid of them?

0:36:020:36:05

-I've got three sons and you can't really split them.

-You can't. You could give each a specimen!

0:36:050:36:12

Not quite the same!

0:36:120:36:14

You're probably doing the right thing. They don't command as high prices as they used to.

0:36:140:36:20

They have dropped slightly.

0:36:200:36:23

What I would suggest is putting the two in together

0:36:230:36:27

-and sell them both with an estimate of £400-£600.

-Wonderful, yeah.

0:36:270:36:33

-And reserve them around 350. How does that sound?

-Fine.

-Happy to sell?

-Fine.

0:36:330:36:39

-Hope they find a good home.

-Thanks.

0:36:390:36:41

That's another three items in the bag and off to auction.

0:36:410:36:46

Duncan made Catherine's day with this classic toy car.

0:36:460:36:50

With so much style and character, it'll drive up the price.

0:36:500:36:54

Mary's tray showed Lord Wellington marching into Paris. Let's see if it attracts an army of bidders.

0:36:540:37:02

And Anne's microscope made a great double act - twice the attraction for all those collectors.

0:37:020:37:08

Welcome back to the auction room, just down the road from Basingstoke, near Winchester,

0:37:080:37:14

where the auction is underway.

0:37:140:37:18

We've got two microscopes up for grabs with a value of £400-£600.

0:37:210:37:26

-They belong to Anne and were your father's.

-Yes.

-You've cherished these.

-For a long while!

0:37:260:37:32

-Time to let go now. Happy with the valuation?

-Yes.

0:37:320:37:36

You came to the right expert. Catherine is our science buff.

0:37:360:37:40

Well, I'm just a little concerned. I'm used to putting estimates on things for specialist auctions.

0:37:400:37:48

I think they might be a little bit lost here.

0:37:480:37:53

-Fingers crossed that the buyers found them on the internet.

-I hope so.

-It's been well catalogued.

0:37:530:37:59

Good luck, both of you.

0:37:590:38:01

Lot 735 is the Victorian brass microscope.

0:38:010:38:07

-A number of commission bids. So we'll start the bidding at 300.

-Great.

-I'm so pleased.

0:38:070:38:15

We're going to sell.

0:38:150:38:17

Is that 320? At £300. Any more?

0:38:170:38:21

-At £300. All done at £300?

-No!

0:38:210:38:25

At £300. Tantalisingly close.

0:38:250:38:28

I can't sell at that price.

0:38:280:38:31

How confident were we? "Bidding starting at 300."

0:38:310:38:35

-Bidding stopped at 300.

-No...

-Well done with the reserve.

0:38:350:38:40

-They are worth that. If you are going to sell, put the same estimate on.

-They're quality.

0:38:400:38:47

Back in the cupboard!

0:38:470:38:50

It just wasn't quite there. Almost. So near, yet so far.

0:38:500:38:55

Expert James Lewis can't be with us today, but he's on standby down the line from Derby.

0:38:550:39:03

Mary, fingers crossed. Let's hope we get that £150.

0:39:030:39:08

Remember the tray with Lord Wellington and Paris.

0:39:080:39:13

We've got £100-£150 on it. It is protected. You've put a reserve on it.

0:39:130:39:20

-We don't want to give Wellington the boot.

-Very clever.

0:39:200:39:25

Lot 675, this is the Regency tray. Interest in this.

0:39:250:39:30

We have a commission bid. I'll start at £90. Is there 5?

0:39:300:39:36

£90. 95. 100?

0:39:360:39:39

At £95. 100 in the corner there.

0:39:390:39:43

And 10? At £100 and selling. Is there 10?

0:39:430:39:47

At £100, then. At £100 for the very last time.

0:39:470:39:53

-It's sold.

-Surprise, surprise.

-Sold at £100.

0:39:530:39:57

Bottom end of the estimate. Got it right, James.

0:39:570:40:01

-What do you think?

-Very good.

0:40:010:40:04

-Catherine seemed very disappointed that the microscope didn't sell.

-No!

0:40:060:40:12

It's another of her lots next. Could it be double trouble?

0:40:120:40:16

I'm feeling quite excited. It's our favourite thing in the sale.

0:40:170:40:22

It's the gorgeous 1920s tin-plate car. It belongs to Duncan, who's taking it in his stride.

0:40:220:40:28

-You're really confident and cool. We've fallen in love with this.

-It's a cracker.

0:40:280:40:34

One of the nicest things I've seen on the show. I had a chat to Andrew the auctioneer.

0:40:340:40:40

He said the condition lets it down, but it has been used a bit.

0:40:400:40:44

And it's of a certain age, so it's rough round the edges, like all of us!

0:40:440:40:50

-I wouldn't be selling this.

-No way. It's wonderful.

0:40:500:40:55

-Any second thoughts?

-No, as I said, it doesn't have all those memories for me.

0:40:550:41:01

I've got things of my father's that I remember very well.

0:41:010:41:05

-But we never played with it.

-And you can cherish those.

0:41:050:41:09

And this has been in a box. At least it's got four spare tyres!

0:41:090:41:14

It's got the look. It's a good gentleman's toy.

0:41:140:41:18

Lot 660. I'm going to start the commission bids at £800. Is there 50 in the room?

0:41:180:41:25

At £800. At £800.

0:41:260:41:28

850. 900.

0:41:280:41:31

And 50? 1,000.

0:41:310:41:33

-And 50.

-Doing battle on the phones now. We've done it.

-Wow!

0:41:330:41:38

1,150?

0:41:380:41:40

At £1,100 commission bid. Is there 50? At £1,100.

0:41:400:41:45

And 50. Commission bid is out. 1,200.

0:41:450:41:49

And 50. 1,300.

0:41:490:41:52

And 50. 1,400.

0:41:520:41:55

And 50. 1,500.

0:41:550:41:57

And 50. 1,600. And 50. 1,700.

0:41:570:42:02

And 50. 1,800.

0:42:020:42:04

And 50. 1,900.

0:42:040:42:07

-And 50.

-Yes! Duncan!

-2,100.

0:42:070:42:12

-2,200. 2,300.

-Wow!

0:42:120:42:15

2,400. 2,500.

0:42:160:42:19

2,600?

0:42:200:42:22

-£2,500. On the telephone at £2,500.

-Wow. I'm tingling.

0:42:220:42:28

At £2,500. For the very last time.

0:42:280:42:33

-Sold.

-That's sold!

0:42:330:42:35

Thank you very much indeed.

0:42:350:42:37

-Thank you for bringing it in. That's made your day.

-It has.

0:42:370:42:42

-What will you put that towards?

-As I said to Catherine, we've just had a granddaughter.

0:42:420:42:48

-Right.

-So it will go into a fund. Can't get a better start.

0:42:480:42:53

-What a great start. What's her name?

-Kerensa.

0:42:530:42:57

-Lovely name!

-Cornish for love.

0:42:570:43:00

-Proper job.

-Yes.

-That's beautiful.

0:43:000:43:03

-I didn't realise it was that much of a corker!

-What a corker!

0:43:030:43:08

That's brought the show to a wonderful climax.

0:43:080:43:12

If you've got anything like that, bring it along. We'd love to see you.

0:43:120:43:18

Join us next time for many more surprises on Flog It.

0:43:180:43:22

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2008

0:43:320:43:36

Email [email protected]

0:43:370:43:39

Paul Martin is joined by antique experts James Lewis and Catherine Southon as the Flog It! team descend on Basingstoke.

Amongst many fascinating items discovered, James takes a look at a truly ancient artefact - a genuine Roman bowl. Catherine falls for a stunning 1920s toy car, and Paul unearths a large copper plate with an intriguing decorative pattern.

Paul also takes a trip to Hambledon, a sleepy village in rural Hampshire, which for a period in the 18th century was the very epicentre of the cricketing world.