Northampton Flog It!


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Northampton

Flog It's Mark Stacey and James Lewis value family treasures in Northampton, while Paul Martin sprints off to find out about the corset industry.


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LineFromTo

Welcome to the home town of Francis Crick on a rather wet and rainy day.

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But that won't dampen your spirits when you walk through a sculpture like that.

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And it celebrates his incredible genius. Intrigued?

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Well, you should be, so stay tuned and welcome to Flog It!

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from Northampton.

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Some of the antiques that we'll see today

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have been handed down from generation to generation.

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But we all possess one priceless inheritance

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handed down from our ancestors that we cannot see,

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and that is our DNA.

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Northampton's very own Francis Crick, along with James Watson,

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unlocked the future of genetics by cracking the DNA code.

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In 1962, they were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize.

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And on this very rainy day in Northampton,

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investigating some of these treasures that

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have been handed down to you, are our very own prize experts here

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Mark Stacey and James Lewis.

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Looks like you've both been Tangoed by Blackfriars!

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We're at the Guildhall, and the owners of some of the treasures that you can see

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in the queue behind me are getting rather excited.

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Wondering who is going to be first at the blue Flog It! tablecloth.

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Well, let's go inside and find out.

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Annie, it just would not be Flog It! without a bit of Moorcroft.

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You've saved the day and brought a bit along.

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-Is this a family piece?

-No. It's not.

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My brother used to do odd jobs for an elderly couple,

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look after the house while they were on holiday,

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-and they were throwing two vases away.

-Throwing them away?!

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Yes, and he gave them to me, and the first one, I did like.

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This one, I've never liked.

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It was used as a door stop. It's had the odd flowers in.

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-You used it as a doorstop?

-Yes.

-Oh, my goodness.

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In this day and age, if you watch Flog It!

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or Bargain Hunt or any of the other antiques programmes,

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you must know what a bit of Moorcroft looks like.

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I do now, yes. It is only down to Flog It!

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I realised it was a Moorcroft.

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I have had it for about 15, 20 years.

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OK, well, this is a classic piece of Moorcroft.

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It is one of the most popular designs.

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It is the hibiscus pattern.

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And this was produced from the 1930s onwards.

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It came in different coloured variations.

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You had the orange flowers on the green background, which was done later.

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This is a much nicer colour variation.

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Quite subtle reds and pinks on a pale blue ground. Much, much nicer.

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And it has got a good shape, as well.

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The ovoid shape.

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And that's classic 1930s. Is it something you treasure today?

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-No!

-Obviously not, because you want to flog it.

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The shape's and the colours are not too bad,

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but it's just not my cup of tea.

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It's just I don't like...Moorcroft.

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It's a classic piece.

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It's tube lined, a bit like icing a cake.

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So you pipe this decoration on.

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That is the little raised ribs on the outside.

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And you fill the colours in.

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It's a classic, typical 1930s way of decorating.

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If we turn it over, we have seen this many times as well, the Moorcroft mark.

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That would have had a paper label that would have been

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the original paper label when the vase was made.

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-I took the label off.

-Oh, no!

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When I was washing it.

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And this WM is for William Moorcroft.

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That's his signature in green.

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So there we are, a good vase. What's it worth?

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I honestly haven't a clue.

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Would you sell it for £30?

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-Well, a year ago, I would have given it away!

-Yes?

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It'll make more than that.

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-I reckon it is going to make between £80 and £120.

-Really?!

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Yeah. Auctioneers' favourite estimate, but I think that is what it's worth.

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Oh, blimey!

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-Is that all right for you?

-Yeah!

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Let's put a reserve of £80 on it.

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£80 firm, so there is no discretion.

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If it doesn't make 80, take it home and try another day.

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Yes, fine. That is lovely.

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-I hope somebody enjoys it.

-We'll take it along and see how we do.

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-Hi, Linda. How are you?

-I'm fine, thank you.

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Now, you have brought a wily little fox in to show us today.

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-I have, indeed.

-Tell us about the history.

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I have had it around about nine months.

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I bought it at a small antiques fair, locally.

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I bought it because I liked the red glaze. I like flambe glazes.

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And I liked the shape of it.

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It's quite nicely modelled. It is quite stylised, really.

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It is a stylised pose.

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Whereas a lot of foxes are depicted either sitting or standing.

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This is really crouching and stalking something, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-So it has got quite a fierce look to it, particularly with that bright, raw red flambe glaze.

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It is quite effectively done.

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This is made by Royal Doulton.

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And underneath, we have got a full set of marks for Royal Doulton.

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The signature of Noke, which stands for Charles Noke.

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He designed a lot of pieces in the 1920s and '30s for Doulton.

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And we have also got at the end of the toe an impressed number, 298.

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-Yes.

-So all in all, a very nice piece.

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The mark is very faint there.

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We have got the standard mark of a lion above a crown in a circle with the word flambe.

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And that was used, I think, between 1902 and about 1934.

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-Oh, so it is earlier than I thought it might be.

-Yes.

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You do have to be slightly careful with flambe, actually,

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because it was originally brought out in the 1930s.

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But then was brought back again in the 1960s. So you have to be careful about that.

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-Yes.

-But all in all, it is quite a nice figure.

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I think we should try it at maybe 100 to 150.

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-Right.

-With a 100 discretionary reserve, so we'll give the auctioneer 10%.

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So, we can sell it for 90 or so.

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-Yes.

-Are you be happy with that?

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Yes, I'd be fine with that, as long as it's got a reserve on, that would be fine. Perfect.

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Are you prone to breaking them?

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Absolutely. I've not got a good record.

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We don't want that bushy tail breaking off, do we?

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-Certainly not.

-Or the ear chipped.

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-The ears are particularly vulnerable, I think.

-They are very vulnerable.

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Thank you very much, and I look forward so seeing you

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at the auction, let's hope we get a good price.

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Lynn and Chris, good to see you, and thank you for bringing some

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furniture in, we love to see furniture on the show.

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We don't get a lot of it. How long have you had the Davenport?

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I have had it probably about five, six years now.

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-Did you inherit this?

-It was my grandmother's, and I think it was her mother's.

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Oh, lovely.

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I think it's been in the family probably somewhere about 100 years.

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Are you feeling guilty now you want to flog it?

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No, we can't do it justice where it's sat.

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-Where's it been in the house?

-It is sat in the conservatory.

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That's not good.

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We've kept it covered to stop the sun from getting on it.

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Well, good for you.

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It's out of harm's way.

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We have seen these in oak and mahogany,

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but walnut is the most expensive and the most decorative wood,

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so it has got a bit going for it, anyway.

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Captain Davenport, a sea captain, commissioned Gillow,

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a very famous furniture maker,

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to make him a portable writing desk with a slope

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that he could take on board and off board ship with him.

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Gillow's was so impressed with his drawings that they carried

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on making them, and as a tribute to him, they called them Davenport.

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That was the birth of the Davenport, 1790.

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This particular model is late Victorian.

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We are looking at 1880, somewhere around there.

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Here we have got the faux drawers and they don't open.

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But this side,

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you can see they do. And that is very, very handy.

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And they are all beautifully made as well, all dovetailed and lap-jointed.

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I like that. That is a little drawer stop.

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That tells you when the drawer has reached the back.

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So it finishes flush at the front.

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The keys have gone walkabout over the years.

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Yes, and there is a bit of damage to the veneer.

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It is good quality veneering.

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Moroccan tooled leather, I am a big fan of black rather than...

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That is why, years ago, I actually took a liking to it

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when I was younger and that was the bit that set me off.

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I like the black more than the reds and the greens.

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So, let's have a look inside.

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Another veneer finish inside, which is quite nice, birdseye maple.

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It lightens up the whole thing.

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Pigeonhole sections there for stationery, a couple of little drawers.

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It's really quite cute, actually, isn't it?

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I love that you haven't polished it.

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-We haven't touched it.

-No. This will take a polish, and this will glow.

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-I thought it might, but I wasn't sure.

-This will really glow.

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Wonderful golden variegated hues will just burst out of this.

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Brown furniture has dipped quite a bit.

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And I would like to call my valuation 3 - 5.

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But I'm pretty sure it'll make that £400 mark.

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-Are you happy with £300-500?

-Yes.

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A fixed reserve.

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It is not going to sell for anything less than 300.

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-Is that all right?

-That's fine.

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Stephen, what fantastic fun.

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We have taken a real step back into Georgian England here

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with political and royal caricatures of the period.

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These are all dating to the late 18th and early 19th century.

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And we've got some really fantastic and famous names here.

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They are collected widely, and there is a great market for them in the States.

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And there are also very good collectors for them here in the UK.

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Each individual one takes a little bit of time.

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If you're not a specialist, it takes time to do some research.

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And today here in Northampton, we are not going to have the right time to do it properly.

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So before we go down the line of value, I can tell you now,

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I am not going to put a figure on these.

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Because I want to do the research properly.

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For example, here, we have got this chap hanging.

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It is wonderful, the sentiment.

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People obviously don't like this chap.

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We have got a little voice bubble coming up from here,

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"May our heaven-born minister be supported from above."

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What a wonderful bit of fun that is.

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Not for him, obviously.

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This is dated at the bottom here.

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1797, so we are in late 18th century England.

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That's probably going to be William Pitt the Younger.

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Because he is the main political character of the time, he's looking

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young and unpopular, which he was at this period of time.

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Then we've got others.

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We've got here,

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a cartoon by one of the most famous people of the time, and that's George Cruikshank.

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Now, George Cruikshank took over as being the most popular character in about 1811.

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This one is obviously something to do with the English and the Irish.

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We have got the Irishman here saying shillelaghs, but also offering his shoes to the French.

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Offering anything to the French in the 18th century,

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later 18th, early 19th century, wasn't greatly popular.

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Now, having waffled on and told you very little about values,

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tell me how you've come to have them.

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Well, I picked them up at a car boot sale, a local car boot sale.

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Fantastic!

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In the summertime, for £10.

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I had actually been there for about three hours,

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and it was about quarter past one, and I happened to see the folder.

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It's incredible, isn't it.

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It does just show you that bargains can still be had.

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When it comes to these caricatures, they vary in value.

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Some like this that have been torn and ripped and stuck down, will be worth relatively little.

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So, value. I'm going to, as I say, avoid the subject.

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Because they can be worth as little as £5, and as much as £5,000.

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Now, there is nothing here worth £5,000.

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There is nothing of huge value.

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I will take them away do some research, and between us, we will come up with

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a valuation for you and organise a reserve.

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-Is that all right?

-Yeah, that's great.

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-Keep hunting at the car boots, you've got a good eye.

-I certainly will!

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Let's see what's going to auction.

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Of the kitchen floor and into the saleroom, Anne's Moorcroft vase.

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I'm amazed there's not more damage to it.

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Linda's little glazed fox caught Mark's eye, and he has high hopes for it at the auction.

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How nice to have a piece of furniture on Flog It!, especially a Davenport desk.

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Let's hope that bidders fall in love with it.

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And James eventually decided on a value for Stephen's interesting caricatures.

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And they are off to auction with a fixed reserve of £200.

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We are selling all our family heirlooms

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at Gilding's Auction Rooms in Market Harborough in rural Leicestershire.

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And on the rostrum is Mark Gilding, so let's go inside the sale room and find him.

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Now, this is a useful piece of kit.

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It belongs to Chris and Lynn. It has been in their family for around about 100 years.

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They are now selling it, so I have put a valuation of £300-500 on it.

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It has got everything going for it, and I think it is like a tiny little mobile office.

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-If you live in a small flat, this is ideal.

-Absolutely.

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Very useful bits of furniture, very interesting design, as well.

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In walnut, which is nice.

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Any interest?

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Yes, there has been some interest.

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The condition isn't great. There are a few bits of a veneer,

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and some bits inside that need working on.

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-But it should sell within estimate.

-Three to five is a good price?

-Yes.

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Well, you have now heard everybody's opinion, so I think it is about time we started to flog something.

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Good to see you again. Who have you brought?

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-James, my husband.

-Hi, hello there.

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You don't like Moorcroft.

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-No.

-You've been using it as a doorstop?

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-That's right.

-We've heard some odd things on our time in Flog it!

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but I think Moorcroft for a door stop is the first! Well look, good luck.

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I think it's here to sell. We've got a full house.

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Moorcroft is a cracking name.

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-And there are lots of other pieces of Moorcroft in this

-sale.

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If it doesn't sell, it's my fault!

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-I hope so!

-It's going under the hammer.

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Good luck, both of you.

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Lot number 20. A Moorcroft pottery ovoid vase.

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Commissions start here at £85.

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On commission. 85 I'm bid.

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At 85 here. At 85. At £85. 95.

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You are both out. 100. 10.

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120. 30. 140. 150, if you like.

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Anyone else at 140? 140, it will be sold. At £140.

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-It's a good result.

-Brilliant.

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We head 80 - 120 on that, you've got to be pleased with that.

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It's really good.

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£140. And that was going in the skip, wasn't it?

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A friend gave it to you.

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What do you prop the door open with now?

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We'll have to find something else now!

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Now, remember that flambe - that lovely red fox?

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We've got that little critter, but we don't have Lynda.

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-She can't make it today.

-Oh, what a shame.

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-But we have Mark!

-I'll have to make up for her!

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-I tell you what, we are in hunting territory here.

-We are.

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We are surrounded by...

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Hunting and horse-y things.

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-Should this do well, this little red fox?

-It should.

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Flambe is an interesting market.

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It's by Noke, of course, and it's a lovely little model.

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I think it's captured that sort of fox mid-run.

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-The tail is out, the face is there...

-It's alert.

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And the colour really matches that mood, I think. So, fingers crossed.

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320, then. It's a Royal Doulton flambe model of a fox.

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Signed as Noke. Commission bids start at £100.

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-We're in at 100.

-110.

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120. 130. 140. 150. 155, on commission. 160,

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and I'm out.

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Oh, 160 - perfect.

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£160.

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£160! She will be so excited.

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Get her on the phone.

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I've been joined by Lynn and Chris. And it's my turn to be the expert.

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We've got that fantastic Davenport desk.

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What's going through your mind? "Oh, I'm not sure. Will it sell?"

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I think it will, you know. I had a chat to the auctioneer.

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Three to five - sensible money on that.

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That's a come and buy me at 300. Its quality brown - that's walnut.

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That's not the run-of-the-mill Edwardian mahogany.

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-So...

-Wait and see..

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-It's going to sell! The auctioneer thinks so.

-Does he?

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Yeah. That's just winding you up! But how much for?

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Well, we're going to find out.

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Nice little Davenport there. Some bits. Start me here at £250.

0:17:260:17:30

250 I'm bid. 250, you are all out?

0:17:300:17:32

£250. 250. 260. 270. 280. 290.

0:17:320:17:36

£300. At £300. £300 bid. At £300. 300 now. In the room at £300.

0:17:360:17:39

300 with the lady. 300, and selling now

0:17:390:17:43

at £300.

0:17:430:17:44

It went. They weren't fighting over it.

0:17:440:17:50

Right on the reserve.

0:17:500:17:51

Well, it's gone.

0:17:510:17:52

We said three to five. We're going to stick to our guns.

0:17:520:17:55

-We're happy we got rid of it!

-You got rid of it.

0:17:550:17:58

We've got a car boot sale lot here which is valued at what, £10?

0:18:030:18:07

You got it for 10 quid.

0:18:070:18:08

It's good to see you. You brought along a mate with you?

0:18:080:18:11

My friend David.

0:18:110:18:12

Hi, David. It's so good to see young guys interested in antiques.

0:18:120:18:16

It's about getting in the game at a young age and learning and knowledge.

0:18:160:18:20

Because there is money to be made, as we're going to prove right now.

0:18:200:18:23

Because James, you put £200 - £300 on this folio of caricatures.

0:18:230:18:27

Not many people would buy them, but I think they are great.

0:18:270:18:30

I really do. Good for you for picking them up.

0:18:300:18:34

It's one of the most difficult things I've valued on Flog It!

0:18:340:18:37

And really, one or two of these are worth 1,000 individually

0:18:370:18:41

if they had been crisp, perfect, with the margins.

0:18:410:18:45

But there are sections missing. They are faded, they are cut.

0:18:450:18:48

So, fingers crossed.

0:18:480:18:50

I don't care - if they go wildly over my estimate, I'm pleased.

0:18:500:18:54

I'll be more pleased to be wrong.

0:18:540:18:56

-I hope they do sell.

-Good. We find out right now.

0:18:560:18:59

-Good luck, guys.

-A collection of 18th and 19th century caricatures.

0:18:590:19:03

Bids start with me here, I'll say £130.

0:19:030:19:07

130 I'm bid. 140.

0:19:070:19:08

-150. 160. 170.

-That's good. There's interest in the room.

0:19:080:19:12

200. 210. 220.

0:19:120:19:14

-Come on, keep going!

-230. 240.

0:19:140:19:16

250.

0:19:160:19:20

260. 270.

0:19:200:19:24

280.

0:19:240:19:26

290.

0:19:260:19:27

-300.

-Come on!

0:19:290:19:31

This is good news Stephen, isn't it?

0:19:310:19:33

320 on the telephone.

0:19:340:19:36

£320. 340, back in at 340.

0:19:360:19:39

Telephone too, then, at 340.

0:19:390:19:41

360 on the telephone. At 360.

0:19:410:19:44

360, at 360. Looking round the room again. At 360.

0:19:440:19:47

360 and selling at £360.

0:19:470:19:50

The hammer's going down. £360.

0:19:500:19:54

-Thank you very much.

-That's great.

0:19:540:19:55

-Brilliant.

-Well done.

-Brilliant.

0:19:550:19:58

What will you put that towards?

0:19:580:19:59

Perhaps put it towards a holiday in the summertime.

0:19:590:20:04

I think you should buy James a big drink for that!

0:20:040:20:07

That's fantastic, I'm very pleased. Well done.

0:20:070:20:10

He's done a lot of research to find the buyers for this one.

0:20:100:20:13

Stick half of that into car boot money and invest it.

0:20:130:20:16

-I will do over the summer time.

-Brilliant. Well done.

0:20:160:20:20

It's all out there if you to get up early in the morning to find it.

0:20:200:20:24

Some great results. We are coming back here later on in the show.

0:20:250:20:29

I'm going to take a quick break.

0:20:290:20:31

I'm going to go round the corner and find out what used to be

0:20:310:20:34

the industrial mainstay of Market Harborough back in the 1800s.

0:20:340:20:38

Christian Dior once said, without proper foundations, there can be no fashion.

0:20:440:20:49

That red brick building in the heart of Market Harborough -

0:20:490:20:52

once housed the market leaders in women's foundation garments.

0:20:520:20:57

And they were called R and WH Symingtons.

0:20:570:21:00

In 1835, James and Sarah Symington set up a workshop to make corsets

0:21:020:21:07

for the wealthy women in the area.

0:21:070:21:09

The business grew, particularly with the introduction of the new-fangled sewing machine.

0:21:090:21:14

This magnificent staircase is all that remains of the original building.

0:21:180:21:23

Now, Philip Warren, who now looks after the Symingtons corset collection, is going to show me

0:21:230:21:28

a few examples of what would have run off the production line in the late 19th century.

0:21:280:21:33

What an incredible collection!

0:21:370:21:39

-Philip, there you are.

-Hi.

0:21:390:21:41

Thanks so much for putting this together for us today.

0:21:410:21:44

They look so splendid!

0:21:440:21:46

But my first impressions are -

0:21:460:21:48

very tiny! Is that the standard size?

0:21:480:21:51

-Well, they do appear tiny, don't they?

-Yes!

0:21:510:21:53

For the purposes of the displays, we have to actually have them so that

0:21:530:21:57

the corsets are closed at the back, so laced up very tightly.

0:21:570:22:00

But most women were perfectly sensible about their corset.

0:22:000:22:04

They tended to leave them open slightly at the back.

0:22:040:22:06

Partly because it gave you air to breathe.

0:22:060:22:09

-A bit more breathing space.

-A bit more movement, at least!

0:22:090:22:11

And I think also, there's a little bit about buying a small size

0:22:110:22:15

and then leaving it slightly open at the back, as well.

0:22:150:22:17

Just to make you feel a bit better in the morning!

0:22:170:22:20

They are incredible. They are beautifully made.

0:22:200:22:23

There are amazing. Not just as garments, just as pieces of design,

0:22:230:22:27

but also as feats of engineering, because they are very complicated.

0:22:270:22:31

Lots of different pattern pieces and, obviously, the way that the boning works

0:22:310:22:35

dictates exactly how the finished corset is going to alter and change your body.

0:22:350:22:40

And I guess women would take pride in choosing the right corset?

0:22:400:22:42

It had to look right. It was a fashion statement

0:22:420:22:45

Absolutely. Most people were sensible.

0:22:450:22:47

You know, they chose the one that was comfortable.

0:22:470:22:49

They chose the one that was obviously going to be beautiful, because, you know, sometimes they were seen.

0:22:490:22:55

And you had to be comfortable.

0:22:550:22:57

There are lots of stories about people who would over lace their corsets

0:22:570:23:00

and that they would pass out or that they'd distort the organs in their body.

0:23:000:23:04

But I think most people were actually quite sort of pragmatic about it.

0:23:040:23:08

And you couldn't actually get dressed without one.

0:23:080:23:11

A dress like this, from the 1890s,

0:23:110:23:13

without a corset underneath it,

0:23:130:23:15

you couldn't have possibly hoped to achieve the shape that you needed to have.

0:23:150:23:21

But these were all corsets that you would buy off the peg.

0:23:210:23:24

These different styles all really relate to the different needs of individuals.

0:23:240:23:30

This American corset, because the Symington collection

0:23:300:23:33

includes different corsets from all over the world.

0:23:330:23:36

They were buying in competitors work and we presume,

0:23:360:23:38

looking at how they were made and how they could make them cheaply.

0:23:380:23:41

-OK.

-Nothing changes!

0:23:410:23:44

So, this one is actually made... it's supported with preformed steel.

0:23:440:23:48

So were the Symingtons making their corsets with whalebone, or were they using steel?

0:23:480:23:52

Whalebone I think was the ultimate,

0:23:520:23:54

although it was becoming increasingly hard to find and more ,and more expensive.

0:23:540:23:59

And they liked it because it had that flexibility and give.

0:23:590:24:02

And if you did need to actually launder your corset, which was quite unusual,

0:24:020:24:06

then it didn't rust, obviously.

0:24:060:24:08

Whereas the steels did. So that was one of the major drawbacks.

0:24:080:24:13

There's one hiding behind this. Should I bring this forward?

0:24:130:24:16

Now, this looks slightly simpler.

0:24:160:24:18

Well, I think it's one of the most fascinating garments that's in the Symington collection.

0:24:180:24:23

It's one of their speciality corsets called the "Pretty Housemaid".

0:24:230:24:26

And it evolves in the 1890s.

0:24:260:24:28

As a direct response, really, to Symingtons recognising

0:24:280:24:32

that there's a massive market out there,

0:24:320:24:34

which is working class women who want to have,

0:24:340:24:37

not just a supporting garment that helps keep their body upright

0:24:370:24:41

during incredibly hard and really dull domestic work,

0:24:410:24:44

but also, you know, they want to have a fashionable figure as well.

0:24:440:24:48

And feel more feminine and sexy?

0:24:480:24:50

Absolutely! You know, it's about having a real pride in your appearance,

0:24:500:24:55

as well as doing that whole thing which is to support your body.

0:24:550:24:58

And instead of just saying to the customer, "Here's our cheapest corset,"

0:24:580:25:02

they actually engaged with the customer by saying, we've got something specially for you.

0:25:020:25:08

We called it the "Pretty Housemaid" corset.

0:25:080:25:10

It's got the most beautiful box top.

0:25:100:25:12

-Good branding there.

-Absolutely!

0:25:120:25:15

-And there she is.

-Admiring herself in a mirror with a pinny on!

0:25:150:25:18

Absolutely! She's just stood at the mirror and now she can see herself in all her glory!

0:25:180:25:24

So it wasn't just the wealthy women that wore the corsets.

0:25:250:25:28

There was something for everyone.

0:25:280:25:30

Hard to believe that some of the wealthy women would have changed up to three times a day,

0:25:300:25:35

with different corsets for each outfit.

0:25:350:25:37

What a relief it must have been to take them off at the end of the day.

0:25:370:25:40

These look incredible.

0:25:420:25:44

Obviously, marketing and advertising was quite important.

0:25:440:25:47

Absolutely. They were in competition with every other retailer

0:25:470:25:51

that would have put their goods into a large store, a department store.

0:25:510:25:55

And so it was about capturing the imagination.

0:25:550:25:57

-It was about establishing brand loyalty and it was about handing over that hard earned money.

-Yes!

0:25:570:26:03

A really kind of special moment.

0:26:030:26:04

And I think they were as brand conscious and as image conscious as we are today.

0:26:040:26:09

I think the advertising was just as sensitive and I think it was certainly just as clever.

0:26:090:26:13

They did do one corset where they actually sprayed it with rose water

0:26:130:26:18

before it actually went into its box,

0:26:180:26:20

so there was that whole different sort of senses that came into play when you were buying it as well.

0:26:200:26:25

Not just, did it fit, did it work, but actually, it smelt beautiful too!

0:26:250:26:29

That's a nice touch actually, isn't it? These looks likely different, Philip.

0:26:290:26:33

Can you talk me through these corsets?

0:26:330:26:35

Well, we talked a little bit earlier about each individual woman

0:26:350:26:38

requiring something particular from the corset of her choice.

0:26:380:26:42

So, these two are sports corsets.

0:26:420:26:44

And that was really because at the end of the 1890s,

0:26:440:26:48

you've got a whole mass of women who are wealthy enough

0:26:480:26:52

to have the leisure time, to start playing active sports.

0:26:520:26:56

So you've got the riding hunting, cycling.

0:26:560:26:58

So, you can see that these are designed to fit lower underneath the arm.

0:26:580:27:02

-They fit higher over the hip.

-There's more freedom, isn't there?

0:27:020:27:05

More freedom of movement and also, there are elements of change in the front of them as well.

0:27:050:27:10

So, you can actually unlace these two sides around the bust.

0:27:100:27:13

So, you can actually get a bit more movement in there.

0:27:130:27:17

And these have got early elasticated panels inset into various different parts of it.

0:27:170:27:22

Unfortunately, the rubber in the elastic has started to degrade and they've gone saggy.

0:27:220:27:27

But it would have meant that your diaphragm could actually expand

0:27:270:27:31

and you could take deep breaths as you were doing exercise.

0:27:310:27:34

So, the average woman would have four or five different types of corset, then?

0:27:340:27:38

Absolutely. You know, if you were wealthy enough to have that sort of lifestyle,

0:27:380:27:41

then certainly, you would have had a corset for the daytime.

0:27:410:27:44

You would have had a corset for the evening, a sports corset,

0:27:440:27:48

and obviously, as we know, in the Victorian period

0:27:480:27:50

you are looking at women having a large number of children,

0:27:500:27:54

you would have had a special corset made for the period that you were pregnant and nursing.

0:27:540:27:58

And that's what this next corset over here is.

0:27:580:28:03

They are all so tiny!

0:28:030:28:05

It seems very strange to us, doesn't it? That idea of wearing a corset when you're pregnant.

0:28:050:28:10

But you can see that the design of it,

0:28:100:28:12

it has these little elasticated lacing sections here.

0:28:120:28:15

Which would allow the corset to open slightly

0:28:150:28:19

and to grow as your pregnancy was developing.

0:28:190:28:23

And of course, it did support your back.

0:28:230:28:25

But it's clever, again, in that it gets women to buy another corset.

0:28:250:28:29

Absolutely.

0:28:290:28:30

And I think it shows the brilliance of the design and manufacturing skills of the Symington factory.

0:28:300:28:35

Well, it's back to the valuation day

0:28:400:28:42

and Mark has found something rather intriguing!

0:28:420:28:45

-Marion, you have brought in at the most fascinating object today.

-Thank you.

0:28:450:28:49

But before we have a jolly good look at it,

0:28:490:28:52

give us a little bit of the history.

0:28:520:28:54

Well, it was found in my mother-in-law's drawer after my father-in-law died.

0:28:540:28:59

We were searching through, just sorting things out,

0:28:590:29:01

and came across it along with lots of other bits and pieces.

0:29:010:29:04

And I didn't think much of it.

0:29:040:29:06

I thought, perhaps it's gold, and it's sat in the drawer ever since.

0:29:060:29:09

I haven't done anything with it. We opened it up, we know what's inside it.

0:29:090:29:13

So, have you ever had it tested to see if its gold?

0:29:130:29:16

No, we've never had it tested.

0:29:160:29:18

And it's got no marks as far as I can see on it.

0:29:180:29:20

No. Well, it's intriguing.

0:29:200:29:21

Because when you look at it like this, it looks like a locket.

0:29:210:29:25

And indeed, that's what it is. If we look at it here, we can open it up.

0:29:250:29:28

We've got a lovely little interior cover as well,

0:29:280:29:32

with a little dove of peace engraved on it.

0:29:320:29:35

And when you open that up,

0:29:350:29:37

there is a tiny little photograph inside it, which is wonderful.

0:29:370:29:41

But intriguingly, on the other side, when we open that up,

0:29:430:29:47

we've got this lovely little pierced top here for a vinaigrette.

0:29:470:29:51

But, of course, two explanations.

0:29:510:29:54

One explanation is that when you were walking around

0:29:540:29:58

the streets of London 100-200 years ago, the place stank.

0:29:580:30:02

So, of course, sometimes it was so obnoxious

0:30:020:30:04

that you kept a little bit of smelling salts in there

0:30:040:30:07

to keep your pecker up, as it were.

0:30:070:30:09

The other explanation, particularly as this is a ladies' one,

0:30:090:30:12

is that during the Victorian period they wore those really, really tight corsets.

0:30:120:30:17

Oh right, yes.

0:30:170:30:19

And people often fainted because it constricted you so much,

0:30:190:30:22

so this was a way of bringing you back round, as it were.

0:30:220:30:25

And what's very nice about it,

0:30:250:30:28

is if we open the vinaigrette up,

0:30:280:30:30

we've got this lovely little lock of hair

0:30:300:30:33

which I think belongs to the person in the picture.

0:30:330:30:37

Well, the unusual part about it is,

0:30:370:30:39

we don't know who this person in the photograph is,

0:30:390:30:43

or who the lock of hair belonged to.

0:30:430:30:45

It's a lovely little intriguing object.

0:30:450:30:48

I think it's fair to say that it's had a hard life.

0:30:480:30:51

I think it's been well worn, don't you?

0:30:510:30:54

It's been well worn. A lot of the pattern is a bit rubbed and it's had some reinforcement on it.

0:30:540:30:59

But I've never seen the combination of a love token

0:30:590:31:02

in the form of a locket and the little vinaigrette.

0:31:020:31:06

I don't think this is the original chain, of course.

0:31:060:31:09

-No, no.

-But a lovely little object.

0:31:090:31:12

-Would it be First World War?

-Oh, even earlier than that.

-Really?

0:31:120:31:15

Certainly this is a Victorian locket.

0:31:150:31:18

We could be looking as far back as the Crimean War, I suppose.

0:31:180:31:22

-But, of course, coming to harsh practicalities that you've never had it valued before.

-No.

0:31:220:31:28

But I think I'm going to plump for the auctioneer's cliche.

0:31:280:31:31

-Can you guess what it is?

-80 to 120!

0:31:310:31:34

-You've got it. You've got it. With an 80 reserve.

-Yes, definitely.

0:31:340:31:38

And then just see where it turns up. Would you be happy with that?

0:31:380:31:42

Very happy. As I say, just sits in the drawer,

0:31:420:31:44

got no interest in it at all as an object.

0:31:440:31:46

Well, let's leave it to a collector, shall we?

0:31:460:31:48

I'm sure somebody would enjoy it.

0:31:480:31:50

Donald, do you often come out on a Sunday

0:31:540:31:56

with a pocket pistol with you?

0:31:560:31:58

-Not really.

-It's a special Flog It! occasion, is it?

-It is, yes.

0:31:580:32:02

What we have in front of us here are true antiques.

0:32:020:32:06

-These are both what we call percussion pistols.

-I see.

0:32:060:32:10

And this one is a little box lock

0:32:100:32:12

because the lock is in the form of a box.

0:32:120:32:16

And we have a detachable barrel that is a rusted solid.

0:32:160:32:19

-It is, that's right.

-We can't see the proof marks there

0:32:190:32:23

but they're likely to be Liege in Belgium.

0:32:230:32:27

Most of these little pocket pistols were made around 1840, 1850.

0:32:270:32:32

-That's a standard little one with a slab-sided grip that we see a lot of.

-Oh, I see.

0:32:320:32:37

It's a nice example but lots of them about.

0:32:370:32:40

-I see.

-This is the one.

0:32:400:32:42

-That's one, is it?

-Yeah.

0:32:420:32:44

If we pull the trigger back like that,

0:32:440:32:47

there's a little piece there that you push,

0:32:470:32:50

push in, and that's a lock so you can't pull the trigger.

0:32:500:32:54

I see.

0:32:540:32:55

But this is what we call an Over And Under Pistol,

0:32:550:32:58

so you can turn the barrels like that,

0:32:580:33:01

so you can prime both barrels.

0:33:010:33:03

As soon as you've fired one, you pull it back to half-cock again,

0:33:030:33:06

turn it, and you have a second option.

0:33:060:33:10

Now, this would have been carried by a gentleman in a waistcoat pocket

0:33:100:33:14

or maybe a lady while travelling on a stage coach or something like that.

0:33:140:33:18

And they were personal protection pistols rather than something from military issue.

0:33:180:33:22

You can see the name "Pinches" - P-I-N-C-H-E-S.

0:33:220:33:26

And this manufacturer was working in London,

0:33:260:33:30

in Westminster between about 1825 and 1835.

0:33:300:33:35

That is the date of this pistol.

0:33:350:33:37

-Oh, I see.

-Walnut grip and this is chequered so you didn't slip.

-I see.

0:33:370:33:42

And the nice thing about it - fold away trigger.

0:33:420:33:45

Look at that.

0:33:450:33:46

Folds completely flush but then you pull the hammer back

0:33:460:33:51

one little bit and you can see a little bit there,

0:33:510:33:54

all the way and your trigger folds out. Clever, isn't it?

0:33:540:33:57

It is clever.

0:33:570:33:59

So there we are. That is a little work of art, really.

0:33:590:34:03

-That would be quite sought-after.

-I see, yeah.

0:34:030:34:06

And then we've got two powder flasks here

0:34:060:34:08

but we're in trouble with these.

0:34:080:34:10

Are we? Oh dear.

0:34:100:34:12

-Because this contains gunpowder.

-Yeah, black powder.

0:34:120:34:16

-And this contains shot.

-Lead shot.

0:34:160:34:18

Yeah. And what I will always do is hand them over to the local police.

0:34:180:34:22

So, I reckon that these two are worth fairly little,

0:34:220:34:27

probably about £25-30, something like that.

0:34:270:34:31

This one, probably worth again £30, £30-40.

0:34:310:34:36

So, we've got about 70 there.

0:34:360:34:38

This is a good one. This is worth about 150.

0:34:380:34:42

-I see, yeah.

-How do you feel?

0:34:420:34:44

They've just been lying about for such a long time,

0:34:440:34:46

my father had them, grandfather before then.

0:34:460:34:49

Really? Where have you had them, lying in a drawer somewhere?

0:34:490:34:52

They've just been in the cupboard.

0:34:520:34:54

The good thing is, if you've got guns at home,

0:34:540:34:56

it is very, very important to make sure you know what you've got

0:34:560:35:00

because really they're not things to be lying around in drawers

0:35:000:35:03

but this one doesn't need a licence.

0:35:030:35:06

-Oh, I see.

-It is important that if you do have a hand gun lying around

0:35:060:35:09

to get it checked out. But with these, you're fine.

0:35:090:35:11

-Hello, Alan.

-Hello, Mark.

0:35:160:35:18

Now, this is a fascinating item you've brought in to show us, it's really charming, actually.

0:35:180:35:22

I know what it is but I've never handled one before.

0:35:220:35:25

Tell us about the history, where did you get it from?

0:35:250:35:28

-It's from a local Kettering factory that made children's clothes.

-Right.

0:35:280:35:32

The factory's sadly closed down and now's apartments,

0:35:320:35:36

and this is part of the clearance from it.

0:35:360:35:38

-Did you work at the factory?

-No, no, I had a cousin who worked there.

0:35:380:35:42

And they were throwing it out, were they?

0:35:420:35:45

-They were just clearing it out, yes.

-What a shame.

0:35:450:35:47

And what sort of attracted you to it?

0:35:470:35:49

I suppose because it is a nice item but, you know...

0:35:490:35:55

-What do you do with it?

-Exactly.

0:35:550:35:57

Now, I like it because if we look at it now straightaway

0:35:570:36:01

we've got this nice ebonised wooden base with a tripod base,

0:36:010:36:04

the legs are a little bit heavy, but there's some nice turning here.

0:36:040:36:08

Nice turning up here. Nice little fill-in for the arms there.

0:36:080:36:12

So, I guess looking at the type of work on it we're looking at 1900-1910 as a date.

0:36:120:36:18

Then we've got this nice Parisian maker on the front.

0:36:180:36:22

I think it's just a charming item.

0:36:220:36:24

I think if somebody's collecting dolls

0:36:240:36:26

or is interested in collecting period children's clothes,

0:36:260:36:30

or something like this, or just as a nice object

0:36:300:36:33

as a piece of work of art if you like,

0:36:330:36:35

it's nice just sitting in the corner of a room.

0:36:350:36:37

I think it's rather charming.

0:36:370:36:39

So what have you done with it since you acquired it?

0:36:390:36:42

It's been in the attic for many years. So, that's it really.

0:36:420:36:45

That's the reason for bringing it.

0:36:450:36:47

"It's surplus to requirements" as they say,

0:36:470:36:49

like the factory unfortunately.

0:36:490:36:50

-Yes.

-It's a very difficult thing to value

0:36:500:36:53

because it could be something nobody wants at all on the day.

0:36:530:36:57

On the other hand, it could be several interested parties who just like it as an aesthetic object.

0:36:570:37:03

-Yes.

-So I think if we're going to put a value on it, I suppose

0:37:030:37:06

-my gut feeling is maybe £80-100, something like that.

-Right.

0:37:060:37:10

-Are you happy with that?

-More than happy, yes.

0:37:100:37:13

Wonderful. It's difficult with something like this whether to put a reserve or not.

0:37:130:37:17

It depends how much you want it back.

0:37:170:37:19

No, I mean I'm happy to run with it with no reserve.

0:37:190:37:21

You know there's an inherent risk with that

0:37:210:37:24

because if the highest bid on the day is 20 quid,

0:37:240:37:27

it'll go for 20 quid.

0:37:270:37:28

But it's a bit of fun, isn't it?

0:37:280:37:30

So ,I suppose we take a gamble. Dare I ask if we get £80 for it,

0:37:300:37:33

would you go out and buy another one?

0:37:330:37:35

No.

0:37:350:37:37

That's it for the valuation day

0:37:370:37:40

but before we go to the auction, let's have a quick recap.

0:37:400:37:43

Marion's locket isn't hallmarked

0:37:450:37:47

but it's usual but I think it may attract the bidders.

0:37:470:37:50

Let's hope Donald's percussion pistols fire up some interest in the sale room.

0:37:510:37:57

And well done Alan for rescuing this pretty mannequin

0:37:570:38:00

from a lonely life in the attic.

0:38:000:38:02

First under the hammer is Marion's locket.

0:38:020:38:05

This is quite unusual cos it's a vinaigrette, it's a locket,

0:38:050:38:09

not sure if it's gold though.

0:38:090:38:11

Well, we couldn't quite tell on the day.

0:38:110:38:15

It's a very unusual object, to have the combination of both.

0:38:150:38:20

With the locket of hair as well and the photograph.

0:38:200:38:22

-Exactly. It's quite an interesting item, who knows what it'll make?

-Oh. Fingers crossed.

0:38:220:38:27

We're just about find out. Why are you flogging this?

0:38:270:38:30

Well, it was found in a drawer

0:38:300:38:33

when we sorted out my husband's mother's effects.

0:38:330:38:37

Didn't mean anything to us

0:38:370:38:38

so we thought we'd come and see what it was worth and have a go.

0:38:380:38:42

Hey presto, here we are on Flog It!. Right, let's do our best for you.

0:38:420:38:46

Vinaigrette with hinged covers, unmarked.

0:38:460:38:48

-I bid here £65. 65.

-Come on.

0:38:480:38:52

75. 80. And I'm out at £80.

0:38:520:38:54

-5.

-90.

0:38:540:38:56

Come on, we need to double that 60, don't we?

0:38:560:38:59

-120.

-Yes.

-130. 140.

0:38:590:39:01

150. 160.

0:39:010:39:03

You're right, Mark, it's so unusual.

0:39:030:39:06

190. 200. And 10.

0:39:060:39:08

-220.

-Very keen bidders.

0:39:080:39:10

Seated at 220 and selling at £220.

0:39:100:39:14

Yes! Fantastic.

0:39:140:39:16

-That was quite hair-raising.

-It must have been gold.

0:39:160:39:19

That was really good. Really, really good.

0:39:190:39:22

What are you going to do with the money?

0:39:220:39:24

We've got some antique fob watches

0:39:240:39:27

and we thought we might get them restored.

0:39:270:39:30

So, it's going to pay for the restoration?

0:39:300:39:33

I think so. You can always have a holiday another day, can't you?

0:39:330:39:37

Take aim, we're just about to fire off Donald's pistol.

0:39:430:39:46

Not literally! But I think the auctioneer will soon!

0:39:460:39:49

And you've bought along Dorothy.

0:39:490:39:51

-My neighbour.

-The auctioneer has decided to split the lots.

0:39:510:39:54

We talked about it, didn't we?

0:39:540:39:56

I wasn't 100% sure whether to put them together or split them up.

0:39:560:40:00

Perhaps, 150 to 200 on them.

0:40:000:40:03

It still adds up to James' original valuation of 260-odd pounds. Fingers crossed.

0:40:030:40:08

19th century pistol, percussion cap,

0:40:080:40:10

with a swivel breach, over and under barrels, marked "Pinches, London".

0:40:100:40:14

-Commission bid starting me here at £150.

-Yes! yes, yes, yes.

0:40:140:40:18

160. 170. 180. 190. 200. 210.

0:40:180:40:22

220. 230. 240. 250.

0:40:220:40:25

260. Will be sold at £260.

0:40:250:40:28

Telephone's out. 260. Sold at 260.

0:40:280:40:32

That's excellent. £260.

0:40:320:40:35

Let's see if we can double up on the £30 for this one.

0:40:350:40:39

19th century pistol, percussion cap, plain handle.

0:40:390:40:43

Bids start here at £45. On commission at 45.

0:40:430:40:45

50's in the room, £50.

0:40:450:40:48

55. 60.

0:40:480:40:51

Your turn. 65. 70, you're bidding.

0:40:510:40:54

-Oh, good.

-Right at the end £70.

0:40:540:40:56

Selling then, fresh bidder, at £70.

0:40:560:40:59

-That's very good.

-That's a good price.

0:40:590:41:01

-Totally different buyer.

-Absolutely.

0:41:010:41:04

One more to go.

0:41:040:41:05

260 is 19th century shot flask,

0:41:050:41:07

embossed with stars and a leather shot flask.

0:41:070:41:10

Have to start here at £30.

0:41:100:41:13

-5, 40 now, £40

-. We're hoping for 60.

0:41:130:41:15

With me at £40. Here at £40. I'll take five if you like?

0:41:150:41:18

And away at £40.

0:41:180:41:20

I'm afraid the powder flasks didn't sell

0:41:220:41:24

but that's not going to dampen our spirits, is it?

0:41:240:41:27

We sold the other two lots.

0:41:270:41:30

-Yes.

-We got £310.

-Yeah.

0:41:300:41:33

-It's quite a bit of money.

-Yeah.

-What are you going to do with that?

0:41:330:41:37

Treat the neighbours?

0:41:370:41:39

Eventually we'll go and see my son in Australia.

0:41:390:41:42

-Oh, brilliant.

-Extra spending money.

0:41:420:41:44

-How long's he been in Australia?

-Just seven months.

0:41:440:41:47

-Has he emigrated then?

-Yes, he has.

-I bet you miss him already.

-I do, yeah.

-Oh!

0:41:470:41:52

Next up, a decorator's dream,

0:41:540:41:56

and it belongs to Alan here, who's brought along Rose.

0:41:560:41:59

I tell you why it's a decorator's dream because if you've got a space that's slightly awkward

0:41:590:42:03

and you can't fill with anything, put one of these little mannequins in it

0:42:030:42:07

and shove a top hat on it or a scarf around it, and you've created a bit of theatre.

0:42:070:42:11

I tell you what, this will sell,

0:42:110:42:13

especially as you've only put £100 on it, £80-100.

0:42:130:42:16

You're quite right about the decorative feature.

0:42:160:42:19

We haven't put in reserve on it

0:42:190:42:20

-so I hope that we get a decent price for it.

-It just looks great.

0:42:200:42:23

It's a charming object. Better then the full-size.

0:42:230:42:26

I think so. You can do more with the child's version.

0:42:260:42:29

Child-size mannequin by Stockman.

0:42:290:42:32

Have to start on commission at £100.

0:42:320:42:35

-Oh.

-On commission here at £100. 110. 120. 130 and I'm out.

0:42:350:42:39

-140. 150.

-The telephone bidder.

0:42:390:42:42

160. 170.

0:42:420:42:44

-I told you it would do well on the day, didn't I?

-Yes, you did.

0:42:440:42:47

200. And 10. 210 in the room.

0:42:470:42:50

-210!

-At £210...

-Yes!

0:42:500:42:55

I honestly thought it wouldn't make your reserve.

0:42:550:43:00

There was no reserve, was there?

0:43:000:43:02

Mark said to me at the valuation day, "Paul, what do you think?"

0:43:020:43:05

And I said, "Decorator's dream." Size, she's beautiful.

0:43:050:43:08

-I had an antiques shop and I'd have paid 150 for that.

-Would you?

0:43:080:43:11

-Yes.

-There was nothing small about that price, was there?

-No, no.

0:43:110:43:14

-Excellent.

-Wonderful.

-Excellent. Thank you very much.

0:43:140:43:17

It's all over, we've come to the end of the show.

0:43:190:43:22

The auction is just about to end.

0:43:220:43:24

We've had a fantastic day here.

0:43:240:43:26

Wonderful contributors and, as you can see, a superb crowd.

0:43:260:43:29

So, join me next time on Flog It! for many more surprises.

0:43:290:43:33

So, until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:330:43:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:420:43:45

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:450:43:48

Flog It's Mark Stacey and James Lewis value family treasures in Northampton, while Paul Martin sprints off to Market Harborough to find out about the foundations of the corset industry.