Skegness Flog It!


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Skegness

Paul Martin and experts David Barby and Elizabeth Talbot are in Skegness. David finds a collection of ethnic jewellery which includes an exquisite gold snake bangle.


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MUSIC: "Better On Holiday" by Franz Ferdinand

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Today, Flog It is in the home of the holiday camp.

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Mention Skegness and what springs to mind? Butlins!

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In 1936, Billy Butlin opened his first holiday camp here in Skegness

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on the site of a former turnip field. It provided value for money,

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good accommodation and entertainment for the holidaying masses.

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Clearly, a winning formula!

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And here at the Embassy Theatre,

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I'm hoping for a winning formula with our experts, Elizabeth Talbot

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and David Barby, and it looks like the happy campers

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have turned out in their droves! There are hundreds of people here!

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Bags and boxes full, brimming with antiques.

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Hopefully, they're off to auction.

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Amongst these antiques, David has already made his first find.

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A collection of intriguing, tiny boxes.

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-Daisy, this is a lovely echo from the past.

-Yes?

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Both 18th and 19th century, and all with an element of personal hygiene.

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Do you collect objects of this nature, or did you just acquire these through family inheritance?

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Family inheritance, from an aunt.

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And what was the appeal to you to hang on to them?

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They intrigued me, these little boxes that people put small tablets in, patches and so forth.

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-That's right.

-And if you move, you can take them with you.

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That's true. It's the expertise in construction I find so intriguing.

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-Yes.

-Particularly with this little box here, which is ivory and it has

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-a delicate inlay of gold all the way around.

-Yes, exquisite.

-Absolutely!

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So, when you open this up...

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..you've got an interior where on this little velvet section,

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you would put your toothpick, normally silver.

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-Yes.

-And then this mirror, which is very much, sort of, discoloured now.

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But just enough to show my teeth.

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-Yes.

-So, I'd take the toothpick out and then just clean.

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So, that fogging is actually to one's advantage?

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If you've got filthy teeth, you can't see them very well!

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Well, not really!

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The one I find fascinating is this box here.

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-Yes?

-Because this is a simple little oval box and this velvet lining here

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could have had, sort of, personal implements,

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maybe for nails or teeth or something like that.

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-Yes.

-But what is so intriguing,

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again with this one, you have this gold mount all the way round

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-and it's encasing under glass a little watercolour drawing.

-Yes.

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Of a coastal scene.

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-It would have been lovely if it was Skegness, but it's not.

-No!

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Because this is an estuary and on the other side of the estuary,

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there is a range of hills or mountains.

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-Yes.

-Right in the middle of the scene there's a little frigate,

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which has a steam funnel,

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so you're looking at the, sort of, middle of the 19th century.

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About 1840, 1850, that sort of period.

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This piece, I like immensely, because I love enamel boxes,

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and if we open it,

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it's got a little mirror inside.

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-Yes.

-So, this would be used for patches that you would take out

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and put on all those spots.

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And so easy just to pop in a purse.

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Oh, waistcoat. Waistcoat pocket.

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-Waistcoat. Absolutely.

-Waistcoat pocket. So, this is quite nice.

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And then, the absolute wonder

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of your collection is this little case here

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-which is called an etui.

-Etui?

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And inside...

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..There's a little press catch there.

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-Yeah.

-I can open it and there you have a lady's delightful

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-pair of scissors.

-Tiny!

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If she snagged her sleeve, her lace,

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she would be able to take out these various implements and use them.

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I think it's gilt metal.

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It would be lovely if it were silver or gold, but I don't think it is.

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Very nice indeed. Now, how much are we going to realise for these pieces?

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Well, I think somewhere between £500 and £600.

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How splendid!

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How it is to be sold, well, I'm going to leave that to the auctioneer.

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-Yes?

-Because he may decide to put them in as one collection,

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-or to sell them individually.

-Yes.

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But he knows his market for these.

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-Right.

-So, I'm going to leave it up to him to say how he wants to sell them.

-Excellent.

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-Now, are you agreeable to that?

-Perfectly.

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-Will you be at the auction?

-Of course!

-So shall I!

-Good!

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I'll look forward to seeing you.

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-Thank you very much for bringing these.

-Thank you.

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Sheila, hello. Thanks for bringing

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your Staffordshire flatback figure group. What can you tell me about it?

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Not much, except that it belonged to my parents.

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Now, given the age of it, which I think is probably from about 1880,

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presumably they must have inherited it themselves?

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-Oh, I'd say from their parents.

-OK.

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So, possibly three generations of the family.

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Yes, it's been there as long as me!

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And, so, we come to today and you've decided you want to sell it.

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-I do.

-And why is that?

-Because I don't like it!

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-You don't like it?

-No, I don't like it.

-Oh, dear!

-I know.

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-It's a Staffordshire flatback figure, which will be familiar to a lot of people.

-Yes.

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What I like about it is that it's not the rarest of models,

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but it's slightly unusual and it brought a smile to my face,

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because we have the two figures here on a daybed

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and it's the way the drapes are sagging in the middle, but it just

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looks as though it's straining under the weight of two people.

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-It does.

-I like the lady, the young woman up here.

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A parakeet on her arm, a pretty little tiered skirt and who I take

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to be her suitor, who's taking a break from his lute playing there

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to kneel and have a chat!

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As I say, he's not the rarest of figures and Staffordshire has taken a bit of a tumble over

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the last few years, much as a lot of goods have, but they are picking up slightly.

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It's in good order so I think it still would find a market quite comfortably at the moment.

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You don't like it, but have you any idea of what it might be worth?

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-Have you sort of given it that thought?

-Well, I thought probably 60 to 100, maybe.

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It might be. I think it's more likely to fetch comfortably around 50 to 70.

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I mean, splitting hairs slightly, but I think more like £50 to £70.

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And, if it were about £50 to £70, would you still be happy to sell it?

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-Yes, I would, yeah.

-You would.

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Would you like a reserve on it so it's protected and if it doesn't sell, you have it back?

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Not really, no!

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-Testing you there!

-I know you were!

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No, no. I think it has to go.

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-It has to go. See how the market takes it?

-Yeah.

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-OK, well, in that case, we'll take it, we'll put it in auction, £50 to £70.

-Yes.

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-See if we can find a nice new home for it.

-OK.

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Susan, you've just put a big smile on my face

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cos you've brought in some furniture which I love.

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-It's a classic low back Windsor stick chair.

-Right.

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So, how long have you had this?

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I've had it for ten years and I was left it from two old ladies.

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I was their domestic for ten years and they left me it in their will.

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And you've used this and sat on it for the last ten years?

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And I've polished it and looked after it, so I'd like

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it to go to somebody who's going to care for it just as much.

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It's a very late Victorian chair.

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We're, sort of, talking about 1890s.

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This is what I would call a local chair to Skegness.

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This is made in that triangle from Lincoln to Nottingham to Newark.

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It's come from that area.

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I can tell it's a Newark chair because of these two ring turnings.

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It's as simple as that. And this particular Christmas tree splat.

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-Oh, that's what you call it, is it?

-Yeah, I can identify this as 20 miles around Newark.

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When these were originally made,

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they would have been made in the forests by travelling workmen

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that would travel around villages. They would set up a pole lathe,

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fell the tree and this would be made while the timber was still very fresh and green.

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Quite a few people were involved in making a chair.

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One person would have used an adze and he would have made this seat.

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This is made of elm.

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His job description was called a bottomer.

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He purely made these seats.

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-Just the end bits.

-The bottoms for your bum! Like a tractor seat.

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-Can you see that?

-Yes, how it's curved, yeah.

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The next guy on the job would have been the turner, the wood turner.

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-Now, he turned the legs and the arm supports, OK?

-Right.

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He also turned the sticks.

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Then, along came the guy who's job description was the assembler.

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-He put the whole thing together, yeah?

-Oh, right.

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-And I think this is a great practical kitchen chair.

-Right.

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If you've got kids and dogs and you're not precious

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and you want to use a chair and make it functional,

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but invest in a piece of history, this is the chair for you.

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-Oh, that's nice, then.

-And I think it will do somewhere in the region of £120 to £150.

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-That's lovely.

-I think we should put a reserve of £80 on this.

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Don't let it go for anything less.

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That's fine. Thank you. Yes, that's it.

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-Let's put it into auction.

-Thank you.

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-Sue, hello.

-Hello.

-Are you having a lovely day?

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-I'm having a lovely day.

-Excellent.

-Very enjoyable.

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Well, I've picked out what you've brought cos I think this is charming.

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Tell me what you have here?

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I don't really know what it is. I know the name

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Vesta has been mentioned.

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-OK.

-Dad died in '96 and we were sorting out the drawers,

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and Mum said, there's a bit of rubbish in there, just clear it out, you can have what you want.

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-OK.

-So, I liked the colour of it.

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And basically, it's been in a drawer for 12 years.

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It caught my eye because of this electric blue.

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-It's a stunning colour.

-Yes.

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You mention the word Vesta and you are quite right.

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What we have here is a late Victorian, Edwardian Vesta case.

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-Right.

-It would have taken a little book of matches that would sit in there quite comfortably

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and on the outside is this stunning...

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-Do you know what this is made of?

-Is it ceramic?

-No, it's not ceramic.

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Good guess. It's enamelled.

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-Oh, enamel, right.

-Now, enamel is, in effect, molten glass.

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-Oh, right, yes.

-So, what they did was they painted

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this wonderful greyhound in a little landscape

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with this wonderful blue surround.

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I think it works beautifully.

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It's amazing that in its history it hasn't come to any grief.

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There's no damage, no crack and that is just lovely. So, that's what I am excited about.

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-I see.

-The box itself is fairly straightforward.

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-The lid is lovely.

-Yes, yes.

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When it comes to assessing it for open market value at the moment,

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because it's not a solid silver or a solid gold case,

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I think the value will be restricted to round about £60 to £80.

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-Right.

-And with that in mind, would you like a reserve on it?

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-Yes and I would value your opinion.

-OK, then.

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Well, I think that if we put a £60 threshold on it, but perhaps asked the auctioneer to use his discretion

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of one bid maybe, so that if it got close enough and there would be one bid difference, he'd sell it.

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If it were any greater discrepancy, it would be saved and kept

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back for you, so it wouldn't be sold for a huge amount less than £60.

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-That's fine.

-But I'm hoping for it to be £80, nearer, so...

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But £60 to £80 with a £60 discretionary reserve.

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That would be lovely, yeah. Thank you.

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The queue is still pouring in through the door,

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so we've got plenty more to see, but right now it's time to take our first lots off to the auction.

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David definitely had a happy start to the day with the discovery of the exquisite boxes.

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I wonder if the auctioneer will sell them as one lot or split them up?

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Good luck to Daisy.

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It's such a shame Sheila doesn't like her Staffordshire flatback, but I think if you inherit things

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which aren't to your taste, it's better to sell them on to someone who will appreciate them.

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What a great little chair! It's the kind of piece with real rustic charm which needs to be used and loved.

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Let's hope we find a good home for it.

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And finally, the enamel Vesta case.

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It's in perfect condition, and I think well worth the £60 to £80 Elizabeth valued it at.

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For today's sale, we've travelled to Golding Young in Grantham.

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It's a wonderful bright, breezy morning.

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People are queuing at the burger van, working up an appetite for the day ahead.

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Fingers crossed we're going to be on the money and I think we're going to be in for a few surprises.

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And the man weaving the magic here today is auctioneer Colin Young

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and the first lot going under his hammer is the Vesta case.

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5 anywhere else now? At 32 bid.

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Last call, then. Going at £32!

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Sue, why are you flogging this? It's a lovely Vesta. Nice box.

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Well, it's been in the family for a while, but it's been in a drawer for

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the past 12 years since Dad died, and I'd like to buy an ornament to remember him by.

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Let's hope we can get you around £100.

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It might be pushing it, that's the top end. We've got £60 to £80 on it.

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I would hope so. It's in good order. The enamelling is very, very nice,

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and I think it's got many positives, so I'm quite optimistic.

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We've got two sets of collectors after this. The little enamel boxes and animal lovers.

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Yes, so that will always help!

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Fingers crossed! Straight out of the traps and there we go!

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Lot Number 95 is the late 19th century gilt metal Vesta case

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with a greyhound on grass. Who's going to start me at £50? 50?

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Thank you. £50. 5 bid. 60...

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-We're in! We've done it!

-At £60 I'm bid. 5 now, surely?

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At £60, I'm bid. I'll take 2 if it's going to...

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It does! 62. 65. 5 bid. 65. 68. 68. 70. At 70 bid. 2. 72. 75. 78?

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78 bid. 80 bid. Make it 5? Let's make some progress.

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-85, I see? 85 now.

-Come on, one more!

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I'll take 2, then. No, it doesn't work. £80.

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We're on the market and we're selling. Make no mistake. At £80.

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The top end of our estimate! Well done, Elizabeth!

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A good part of the country for greyhounds!

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Yes. And well done Colin Young.

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So, you've got £80, less a bit of commission.

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-Yes, that's fine.

-That's a good day out.

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That's lovely. Yes, it is, yes.

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A good day at the races!

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55. 55 now. £80 bid. At 110.

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It's my time to be the expert and this little Windsor chair needs a good home. It belongs to Susan.

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-Hi.

-You've had it for 10 years?

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-I have.

-You've enjoyed sitting on it?

-I have.

-Very practical?

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-Yes.

-Had a little chat to Colin about it. He likes it as well.

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So, it's good pedigree, you know?

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It's just lacking colour, and that comes with age, that patina.

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So, give it 100 years and everybody will be going,

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oh, isn't this wonderful!

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It's got a personality, like I said to you at the valuation day.

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But at a reserve of £80, it's got to sell.

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-I hope it goes.

-It's a good, practical chair.

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We're going to find out right now. It's really down to the bidders now.

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Lot Number 600 is a late 19th century

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low back Windsor chair with pierced vase splat.

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Who's going to start me at £100? 100? 80 to go then, surely. 80?

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50? Thank you. £50 I'm bid. 50 bid. 5 do I see now? 55 bid.

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60. At 60 bid. 5 bid. 70 bid.

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5 bid. 80 bid. 5 bid. 90 bid. 5, do I see? At £90 I'm bid. 5?

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At 95. 100. 110 make it? 110. 120.

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130 now? 120.

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Any more bids? At 120 bid. 5? This is cheap.

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At 120. We've done, we're finished and we're going then at £120.

0:16:150:16:20

-Spot on.

-That's good.

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-Pleased it's gone?

-Yeah.

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It'll go to a nice home and it'll have another 200 years of use

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because that chair is built to last.

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Well, next up is Sheila's Staffordshire flatback figure with a value of £50 to £70.

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I like this and Sheila's not keen on it,

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as we found out at the valuation day.

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It took a lot of persuading to look at it!

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Proper, proper country pottery.

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-It looks fantastic on a Welsh dresser.

-And I'm a country girl.

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-A country girl! Why don't you like it?

-I just don't!

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There's plenty of collectors though that love Staffordshire figures.

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It's a big area. And again, it's the condition that's so good.

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A nice, colourful example.

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And it's got the parrot! I like the parrot.

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-There's a home for it in anybody's house.

-I think so.

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-Except mine!

-Except yours!

0:17:060:17:09

Lot Number 265 is a 19th century

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Staffordshire pottery flatback group. It's a courting couple.

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30 to go? 30? 20, then, surely? £20 bid. At £20 bid. 2 do I see now?

0:17:150:17:19

-Come on!

-2 bid. 5? 5 bid.

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28 bid. 30 now. £30 bid. At £30 bid.

0:17:210:17:23

32 do I see? At £30 bid.

0:17:230:17:25

2 anywhere else now, surely? 32 bid?

0:17:250:17:28

-Come on!

-35. 38.

0:17:280:17:30

40, may I say? 40 bid. 2 now, do I see? At £40 bid.

0:17:300:17:33

-A bit more!

-No, at £40 we're on the market.

0:17:330:17:35

We're going to sell, make no mistake.

0:17:350:17:37

Last call, then, all done and finished at £40.

0:17:370:17:40

Well, it found a home.

0:17:400:17:43

-It did.

-That struggled, didn't it?

0:17:430:17:45

-Yes.

-Still, it's gone and you're pleased cos you didn't like it,

0:17:450:17:49

-but we could have done a bit more?

-It could.

-A bit gloomy.

0:17:490:17:53

-Yeah, a bit gloomy.

-It's gone, Sheila. It's gone.

0:17:530:17:56

We did our best!

0:17:560:17:58

80 bid.

0:17:580:18:00

Well, it looks like Daisy's selling part of her collection?

0:18:020:18:06

-Absolutely.

-Yeah?

-A small selection.

0:18:060:18:08

Small. Why did you start with these four items?

0:18:080:18:11

The first one, the enamel one, is my favourite, actually, because it's been much used.

0:18:110:18:18

-And I think there must be so much history with it.

-Yeah.

0:18:180:18:22

And it's sweet and I love enamel,

0:18:220:18:24

but yes, that's the first one to go.

0:18:240:18:26

Well, we're starting off with that one, then there's a couple of ivory

0:18:260:18:30

little cases and that lovely little etui, which I love.

0:18:300:18:33

-You valued all of these, David, £500 to £600 in one lot?

-Yes.

0:18:330:18:36

-Colin's decided to sell them separately.

-Which is sensible.

0:18:360:18:39

Well, you knew he was going to do that.

0:18:390:18:42

-Yeah.

-So, we're going to start with the little enamel box.

0:18:420:18:45

Lot Number 140 is the 19th century

0:18:450:18:47

French enamelled and gilt metal box. 30?

0:18:470:18:50

-30, surely?

-Come on!

-Come on!

-20 to go then, surely? 20 bid.

0:18:500:18:54

22. 25. 28. 30. 2. 35. 38.

0:18:540:18:57

Bid 40. And 2. 42. At 42.

0:18:570:18:59

This is cheap. 45 now, surely. At 42 it's on the market and selling. 45.

0:18:590:19:03

45. 48. 48. Bid 50. And 5. 55.

0:19:030:19:06

Bid 60. And 5.

0:19:060:19:08

Bid 70. 70 bid. 75. Bid 80, now. No?

0:19:080:19:12

75. 78, if it helps, then? At 75. Last call, then.

0:19:120:19:15

All done and finished and selling then, £75.

0:19:150:19:17

That's one gone, 75.

0:19:170:19:19

The next is the tooth pick.

0:19:190:19:21

What shall we say for this one? Start me at £50 for it. 50?

0:19:210:19:25

30 then. 30, Who's first in? Thank you. 30. 35, now.

0:19:250:19:28

35 was on the net. 35. Bid 40. 45.

0:19:280:19:30

Bid 50. And 5. Bid 60. 55 bid.

0:19:300:19:33

60, now, do I see? 60. At 60 bid.

0:19:330:19:35

5 bid. 70 bid. 5 bid.

0:19:350:19:37

80 bid. 5? £80, I'm bid. 5 anywhere else now? £80, I'm bid.

0:19:370:19:40

Any more bids? 5, do I see?

0:19:400:19:42

5 now, surely? Thank you. 85. Bid 90. At 90 bid.

0:19:420:19:44

-95? 95. 100.

-We've got to 100.

0:19:440:19:47

And 10 now? Thank you. 110.

0:19:470:19:49

At 110. 120 now? 110.

0:19:490:19:51

Are we all done and finished, then?

0:19:510:19:52

At £110. Last call.

0:19:520:19:55

I'm selling at £110.

0:19:550:19:57

Well done, that man!

0:19:570:19:59

-Yes! The internet does work.

-Yes, doesn't it?

0:19:590:20:02

The next one is another ivory box. It's the one with the D end.

0:20:020:20:05

Who's going to start me at £50? 50 straight in. 50.

0:20:050:20:08

I'm bid 50. At £50 I'm bid. 5. 55 bid. 60 bid. 65. 70. £70, I'm bid.

0:20:080:20:12

At 70 bid. 5, anywhere else? At £70 bid. 5 anywhere else?

0:20:120:20:15

At 70. Are we all done? At 70. Last call, then. Going at £70.

0:20:150:20:20

That's OK. We're still on track for your £500 to £600.

0:20:200:20:24

Lot Number 155 is an 18th century

0:20:240:20:26

lady's gilt metal and banded agate etui. £100, surely. 100.

0:20:260:20:31

Thank you. Down there at 100. 120 now, may I say? At £100 bid.

0:20:310:20:34

120? 120. 140? 140. 160?

0:20:340:20:37

-160 now. Do I see 160?

-180, come on!

0:20:370:20:38

180. 200. 220 now. £200 I am bid.

0:20:380:20:42

At 200. 220? 220. 240. 260. 280.

0:20:420:20:46

-We've done it.

-300. 320.

0:20:460:20:48

340. 360 now. 340 is all I'm bid.

0:20:480:20:50

-At 340. 360 or not now? 340. Any more bids?

-Thank you!

-At 340.

0:20:500:20:54

At 340. Last call, then. I'm selling, make no mistake, at £340.

0:20:540:20:58

Brilliant! We got your top end, then.

0:20:580:21:00

-Oh, that is good!

-We have gone toppies!

0:21:000:21:03

-We have!

-That is good.

0:21:030:21:04

You were spot on. You said £500 to £600.

0:21:040:21:07

I think we've just topped £600...

0:21:070:21:09

-For once in my life!

-The prayer was answered!

-It was!

0:21:090:21:12

-I am so pleased!

-For once in my life! Bless you!

0:21:120:21:18

Thank you both so much. What fun!

0:21:180:21:21

The great thing about Flog It is that I get the chance to go

0:21:260:21:29

out and about all over the British Isles

0:21:290:21:32

to explore weird and wonderful things which people

0:21:320:21:35

are passionate about and today is certainly no exception.

0:21:350:21:38

The place I'm going to visit is a real gem and you wouldn't

0:21:380:21:41

expect to find this in the heart of Lincolnshire.

0:21:410:21:44

The Parrot Sanctuary was set up in 2003.

0:21:470:21:52

It's home to almost 1,700 birds and is the result of one man's extraordinary passion.

0:21:520:21:59

So, how did it all start, and what drove Steve Nicholls,

0:21:590:22:02

the man behind it all, to set up this national sanctuary here, just outside Skegness?

0:22:020:22:08

Steve, I've met some collectors in my time before on the show, but nothing like this!

0:22:120:22:17

You and your extended family!

0:22:170:22:19

-It is quite big now, yes.

-Where did a passion for parrots start?

0:22:190:22:23

-I've always been an animal oriented person.

-Yeah. Did you have a parrot as a kid?

0:22:230:22:28

We had budgies, we had cockatiels, things like that,

0:22:280:22:32

but then, in my early 20s, I started to become more fascinated.

0:22:320:22:38

And then it developed, and I quickly identified that

0:22:380:22:42

-we didn't have a lot of knowledge of the pet parrot.

-Yeah.

0:22:420:22:45

And no matter how fabulous they are and how nice we are with them,

0:22:450:22:49

there was a big mismatch with parrots and people.

0:22:490:22:53

I wanted to further my studies, so I actually bought one parrot, which was a cockatoo.

0:22:530:22:58

-That's one of those over there.

-That's right, one of the large ones.

0:22:580:23:01

There was a reason for what I was doing. I didn't collect them as pets.

0:23:010:23:05

I wanted to study them and try to help them, and help people that kept them.

0:23:050:23:09

And I realised that there needed to be a place like this.

0:23:090:23:12

So, all of these are unwanted birds that people give you?

0:23:120:23:15

They're unwanted, but loved.

0:23:150:23:17

The people genuinely do love them, but they realise that they can't give them what they need.

0:23:170:23:23

They need things to do.

0:23:230:23:26

It's a case of they're a very social, interactive creature, so all day, they will be playing with each other.

0:23:260:23:33

They will be biting, pinching food. They will be doing things that keeps them preoccupied.

0:23:330:23:37

In a cage, you can only play with that plastic yellow toy so many times before you become demented.

0:23:370:23:43

What state are they in when they arrive?

0:23:430:23:46

That's the main state that they come in. The self-mutilation.

0:23:460:23:49

They'll sit there, just bored, and pull a feather out.

0:23:490:23:52

It becomes a habit and then they'll turn up to us with no feathers on.

0:23:520:23:57

So, the self-mutilation is the worst, but it is a physical deformity, there's a mental deformity.

0:23:570:24:03

Most of them sadly actually do suffer from mental diseases where it's stereotypical to a human,

0:24:030:24:08

where they rock backwards and forwards, and don't know

0:24:080:24:11

-how to present themselves with other animals.

-Yeah.

0:24:110:24:14

They're beautiful, aren't they? Striking colours.

0:24:140:24:17

Well, that's their downfall.

0:24:170:24:19

If they were just a plain, dull brown, nobody would be interested in having them in.

0:24:190:24:25

What would one of these cost in a pet shop now?

0:24:250:24:27

Between £1,500 and £2,000.

0:24:270:24:29

-It's a lot of money, isn't it?

-It is a big commitment.

0:24:290:24:32

We actually get people that will buy these on Sunday and then phone me on a Monday

0:24:320:24:37

and say, can they eat fruit, and what size cage do they need?

0:24:370:24:40

We have to say, right, let's start it from scratch. Why have you bought one of these?

0:24:400:24:45

-Yes.

-And they saw it because it's sat here and it's fabulous while it's in the shop. Very difficult.

0:24:450:24:50

We don't want to say, yes, we've got nearly 1,700 parrots here

0:24:500:24:53

and we should have them all and nobody else should have any.

0:24:530:24:56

But here are certain birds out there that are far better suited to being with people

0:24:560:25:01

than others that are better off in this kind of environment.

0:25:010:25:04

Name me some of the breeds you've got here.

0:25:040:25:07

Well, we've got 101 species.

0:25:070:25:09

Now, if you imagine there are 334 species of parrot in the world, that means we've got a third of them here.

0:25:090:25:15

-Yeah.

-And we've got all the macaws from South America and the Amazons from South America.

0:25:150:25:21

The cockatoos from Australia, and then, we've got the Indian ringnecks from India.

0:25:210:25:27

We're absolutely surrounded! Shall we take a look at the rest?

0:25:270:25:31

-Yes, certainly.

-I'm absolutely fascinated by them all.

-That's OK.

0:25:310:25:35

PARROTS SQUAWKING LOUDLY

0:25:410:25:43

Gosh!

0:25:430:25:45

These are noisy, aren't they?

0:25:450:25:47

-These are the real noisy ones.

-Look at this one!

0:25:470:25:50

-That's Peter, that!

-Now, he's got more of an Elvis Presley haircut!

0:25:500:25:54

-He has.

-Do you see how gentle he was?

-Oh, they're very dextrous with their beaks.

0:25:560:26:00

It's just they're also very loud.

0:26:000:26:03

-Wow! They're quite aggressive, aren't they?

-They can be, yes.

0:26:030:26:08

They're very, very aggressive.

0:26:080:26:09

-Watch your head as you come in.

-I'm surprised they aren't fluttering everywhere!

0:26:140:26:19

No, these are quite relaxed, steady birds, these.

0:26:190:26:22

This is a lovely big colony, and they get their own nice feeling, being together.

0:26:220:26:27

It's really nice that they can actually fly around and interact with each other.

0:26:270:26:31

-Well, just this is just their play area for them to chew...

-Gosh!

0:26:310:26:35

-This is Rio!

-You know, I felt that! I thought, what the hell was happening there?

0:26:350:26:39

He won't let anybody go on telly without him being there.

0:26:390:26:42

-Do you know the names of all of these birds?

-Only the characters.

0:26:420:26:45

I think you are the most eccentric collector I've ever met, Steve.

0:26:450:26:49

And, you know, I take my hat off to you! I really do.

0:26:490:26:52

You and the family.

0:26:520:26:53

Where does it go from here?

0:26:530:26:55

-Well, all we can do is keep collecting, but on a good side.

-OK.

0:26:550:26:59

Ultimately, we'll be the largest rehabilitation centre

0:26:590:27:02

for parrots in the world, and it'll belong to the UK,

0:27:020:27:05

to all the guys that come to see them, and more than anything, to these lovely birds.

0:27:050:27:09

This fascinating place is a real testament to Steve's passion and drive.

0:27:090:27:14

What an inspirational, unique individual.

0:27:140:27:18

Back at the Embassy Theatre, we've still got a room brimming with people.

0:27:250:27:30

David and Elizabeth have certainly got their work cut out getting through this lot!

0:27:300:27:36

James, are you into the classics?

0:27:360:27:38

Not desperately, no.

0:27:380:27:41

I didn't think you were, otherwise you wouldn't be selling this!

0:27:410:27:45

This is quite a good model, actually. It's hard paste porcelain.

0:27:450:27:49

It's German.

0:27:490:27:51

Dating from the earlier part of the 19th century.

0:27:510:27:54

And you've got this distinctive sort of raised circular plinth

0:27:540:27:57

with the sort of Greek key pattern,

0:27:570:27:59

which was a feature of porcelain produced at that particular time.

0:27:590:28:03

And also, it's part and parcel of the neo-classical movement.

0:28:030:28:06

This is an extremely elegant figure.

0:28:060:28:10

When you look at the detail, the hair, wonderful!

0:28:100:28:14

-And of course, there's his wonderful feet.

-What, those long toes?

0:28:140:28:17

Yes, those long toes.

0:28:170:28:19

James, have you got a foot fetish?

0:28:190:28:21

No, I don't think so!

0:28:210:28:23

-But I think, to a certain extent, there is an element of restoration.

-I think maybe you're right, yes.

0:28:230:28:30

Yeah, and dare I be so bold as to take it up and start passing it through my mouth?

0:28:300:28:38

The reason I do that is to test to see if there's any restoration.

0:28:410:28:45

-You know how you test pearls, whether they're synthetic or cultured?

-Yeah.

0:28:450:28:51

If there's a slight give, it feels plasticky, that's synthetic pearls.

0:28:510:28:56

And exactly the same sensation on this one here.

0:28:560:29:00

I haven't left any indentation there, but I do think that possibly is a restored section.

0:29:000:29:06

But it's such an exquisite figure, I can understand why somebody went to great expense in having it restored.

0:29:060:29:13

-With the restoration, it does affect the value.

-I'm sure it does.

0:29:130:29:17

-And I think the auctioneer will be happy to put it up for sale with a guide round about 80 to 120.

-Right.

0:29:170:29:23

-If it goes for more, I shall be delighted.

-So will I!

0:29:230:29:27

Do you want to place a reserve on it, or just want it to ride in the sale room?

0:29:270:29:31

-No, I think...

-Is it something that you want to get rid of?

-I don't...

0:29:310:29:34

Not for nothing, no. I mean, you know, maybe it's £80 or something.

0:29:340:29:38

-OK, let's put a reserve of £80. I think that's sensible.

-OK, thank you very much.

0:29:380:29:42

And if it doesn't go, you can put it back on the mantelpiece!

0:29:420:29:45

-Mary, hello.

-Hello, Elizabeth.

0:29:540:29:57

I've been sitting, drooling over this lovely - what is called an object of virtue -

0:29:570:30:02

this lovely gem of craftsmanship, and I'd like to hear your story about it, because I think it's lovely.

0:30:020:30:07

Well, I bought it in the 1960s, the mid 1960s,

0:30:070:30:12

from an antiques fair in Chichester, and it just caught my eye.

0:30:120:30:18

I love its sort of tactile shape, you know, and it sits in the palm of my hand.

0:30:180:30:24

I used to use it when I put my make-up on before I went out.

0:30:240:30:30

-I used to go round the folk clubs, singing.

-Really?

0:30:300:30:32

I was very much part of that scene in those days.

0:30:320:30:35

And yes, I've always loved it.

0:30:350:30:38

You must have been the best equipped folk singer in the time, then, because what we have here,

0:30:380:30:42

which isn't obvious from just looking from the outside,

0:30:420:30:45

is a little vanity mirror, and I think that is just charming. Do you know what it's made from?

0:30:450:30:50

Well, I know it's tortoiseshell, and I understand it's not really tortoiseshell, but turtle shell.

0:30:500:30:56

That's one thing I have learned from Flog It!

0:30:560:30:58

And I presume it's inlaid with silver.

0:30:580:31:02

Absolutely. The silver is so fine, that it is impossible for it

0:31:020:31:06

-ever to have been assayed, so you cannot look for a mark to date it.

-I see.

0:31:060:31:10

The silver is inlaid, and then it's chased, so the bird, which I think is...

0:31:100:31:15

I don't know what kind of bird you thought it was?

0:31:150:31:18

I don't know. I think it looks like an imaginary bird.

0:31:180:31:22

It's kind of part eagle, I think.

0:31:220:31:24

Part ho-ho bird, part lots of...

0:31:240:31:26

-I know!

-But the silver is then chased to give the detail of the feathers,

0:31:260:31:30

just to give it that three-dimensional appeal.

0:31:300:31:33

-Yes.

-Absolute charming thing. So, you used to use it, does that mean you don't use it anymore?

0:31:330:31:39

I like having it, but at a certain age, you don't look in mirrors so often.

0:31:390:31:43

Oh, get away! I can't believe that at all.

0:31:430:31:47

-But you're thinking of selling it now?

-I think so, yes.

-It is very much a collector's piece.

0:31:470:31:52

It is, as I said at the beginning, classed as an object of virtue,

0:31:520:31:56

and I think that it would go to a specialist collector,

0:31:560:31:59

-who would, at the moment, be prepared to pay somewhere between £70 and £100 for it.

-Right.

0:31:590:32:07

Would you like a reserve on it?

0:32:070:32:09

-I'm not really bothered, I'd leave that to the auctioneer.

-I think that's a good idea.

0:32:090:32:14

He will monitor it and we can have a chat nearer the time and he'll look after it for you,

0:32:140:32:19

but £70 to £100, and we'll see what response we get.

0:32:190:32:22

-Splendid!

-See you at the auction.

-Thank you.

0:32:220:32:24

Well, Dee,

0:32:310:32:34

you've travelled the world, haven't you?

0:32:340:32:36

-No, not me.

-Oh, not you?

0:32:360:32:38

No, my grandmother.

0:32:380:32:40

-Well, she travelled the world, didn't she?

-No, she was born in India.

0:32:400:32:46

Her parents lived in India.

0:32:460:32:49

Her father owned a tea plantation,

0:32:490:32:53

and she was born and brought up out in Lahore, Bangladesh.

0:32:530:33:00

Well, why I say travelled the world is because this is quite a sort of eclectic selection of objects,

0:33:000:33:06

and I can see that she may have travelled to India,

0:33:060:33:10

in this little bracelet here with lacquer detail.

0:33:100:33:14

This little necklace with the carved flowers, this may be Indian.

0:33:140:33:19

This certainly is Indian. Extraordinary little thing.

0:33:190:33:22

It's like a little mace, it's got holes at the end and you put your pins in there.

0:33:220:33:27

Oh!

0:33:270:33:28

This is a buckle and a brooch

0:33:280:33:31

with a red lacquer centre, and that was produced in China.

0:33:310:33:36

I never heard of her going to China.

0:33:360:33:38

And these lovely carved ivory pieces,

0:33:380:33:43

which include a little mirror, a shoehorn,

0:33:430:33:47

and then these exquisite buttons,

0:33:470:33:49

but rather frightening, because each is a carved baboon head!

0:33:490:33:54

So, can you remember those as a child?

0:33:540:33:56

Yes, I can, and they were sewn on to a cardigan that my mother had made for me.

0:33:560:34:01

-Really?

-And my grandmother used to cut them off every time the cardigan went for washing,

0:34:010:34:08

and then sew them back on again.

0:34:080:34:10

-Goodness me!

-And I was never frightened by them!

0:34:100:34:13

You probably just thought they were pretty buttons.

0:34:130:34:16

Yes, they're lovely.

0:34:160:34:18

Well, that really is quite a lovely collection,

0:34:180:34:20

but the most amazing piece is this bangle here,

0:34:200:34:26

which, although it's not marked gold, I think is gold,

0:34:260:34:31

and it's set with turquoise and ruby.

0:34:310:34:35

-And the most wonderful sort of snarling snake's head.

-Now, that's horrifying!

0:34:350:34:40

-It is horrifying, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:34:400:34:42

But this was a sort of fashionable bracelet to be worn by Victorian ladies. A lovely collection.

0:34:420:34:49

Why do you want to sell them?

0:34:490:34:53

It lives in a little wicker basket box, and that's just where it is.

0:34:530:34:59

I don't do anything with it, and I thought, what's the point of it being there?

0:34:590:35:05

-The bracelet is too small.

-Was that worn by any member of your family?

0:35:050:35:10

-My grandmother.

-Oh, right! You remember that, can you?

-Yes, but she was very small.

0:35:100:35:14

I think with the jewellery, it ought to be sold, maybe,

0:35:140:35:19

-as one lot of ethnic jewellery, and this bangle probably sold separately.

-Mmm-hmm.

0:35:190:35:25

OK. So, when I say ethnic jewellery, obviously, the Indian pieces and the ivory sections here,

0:35:250:35:30

and these pieces, I think they'll realise something in the region of about £60 to £100.

0:35:300:35:38

Well, there's a thing!

0:35:380:35:41

-When we come to this snake bracelet, not everybody's choice.

-No.

0:35:410:35:45

But I think it's fantastic.

0:35:450:35:47

I think this is probably going to sell for 80 to 160 on its own.

0:35:470:35:50

-Oh, lovely.

-So, you'll be happy at that?

-Mmm.

0:35:500:35:53

I would suggest that the ivory jewellery has a reserve, let's say,

0:35:530:35:59

-round about £50.

-Mmm-hmm.

0:35:590:36:02

Your snake bracelet, we'll put a reserve, a definite reserve, fixed at £80.

0:36:020:36:07

Oh, lovely.

0:36:070:36:09

-Don't forget, this is all part of your history going.

-I know, I know. I've got other stuff, as well.

0:36:090:36:14

Have you really?

0:36:140:36:16

Well, let's get to the auction room and see how this next selection of items goes down with the bidders.

0:36:160:36:22

This porcelain figure is really a beautiful thing,

0:36:220:36:25

but I wonder if its restoration will hold it back

0:36:250:36:27

when it goes under the hammer.

0:36:270:36:29

Mary's vanity mirror was used a lot during her career

0:36:290:36:32

as a folk singer in the 1960s, but now it's time to sell it on.

0:36:320:36:37

And this selection of ethnic jewellery

0:36:370:36:39

and this striking snake bracelet belonged to Dee's grandmother, and they've certainly had a history.

0:36:390:36:45

I hope Dee doesn't regret letting them go.

0:36:450:36:48

James, you're selling some inheritance. Your aunt gave you this Meissen figure.

0:36:480:36:52

-David has put £80 to £120 on it.

-Yeah.

-Why do you want to get rid of this?

0:36:520:36:56

-Not particularly fond of it.

-No?

0:36:560:36:58

No, it's not really something I would, you know, miss.

0:36:580:37:01

-Have on display, or...

-I've had it on display, but I won't miss it.

0:37:010:37:05

Well, plenty of people out there will love this, and at £80 to £120, it's going to sell.

0:37:050:37:10

Lot number 245 is a 19th century Meissen figure of Apollo.

0:37:100:37:15

Who's going to start me at 100 for this little beauty? 100.

0:37:150:37:18

-100 on the internet. Straight in at 100.

-Oh, wow!

0:37:180:37:22

-In at the top end!

-110. 120 now?

0:37:220:37:23

120 bid. 130 anywhere else now?

0:37:230:37:26

At 120 is all I'm bid. At 120. 130 now, do I see anywhere else?

0:37:260:37:30

At 120. It's an internet bid, then. You're all out in the room, then?

0:37:300:37:34

Selling, make no mistake, at £120.

0:37:340:37:36

Yes! Fantastic! The top end of the estimate.

0:37:360:37:39

Straight in and straight out. Blink and you'll miss that one!

0:37:390:37:42

Quickly! 12 bid. 12 in the room. And 15 now.

0:37:420:37:45

This item is absolutely gorgeous.

0:37:460:37:48

We all love it. Mary loves it, myself and Elizabeth.

0:37:480:37:51

It's a 19th century vanity mirror.

0:37:510:37:54

Why are you selling this, Mary?

0:37:540:37:56

It's been on the road with you, you've loved this and cherished it.

0:37:560:38:00

Well, I think it deserves a new face. Mine is completely worn out!

0:38:000:38:04

Nothing wrong with your face!

0:38:050:38:08

Lot Number 125 is the 19th century tortoiseshell

0:38:080:38:11

and silver pique work vanity mirror.

0:38:110:38:14

A very pretty little lot.

0:38:140:38:16

Who's going to start me at £50 for it? 50?

0:38:160:38:18

Straight in, 50? Thank you, 50. 60?

0:38:180:38:20

We've sold it. Straight in!

0:38:200:38:22

55. 60. And five now. 65. 70.

0:38:220:38:26

Five, surely? 75?

0:38:260:38:28

75 bid. 80 bid. Five. 90.

0:38:280:38:31

Five. 100. Ten now. 110 bid.

0:38:310:38:35

20 or not, now? 120, surely?

0:38:350:38:37

110 at the back of the room. 120.

0:38:370:38:39

130. At 135.

0:38:390:38:41

We may have an internet bidder. We do!

0:38:410:38:43

135, 140, thank you, sir. At 140. 145?

0:38:430:38:47

145. 50 now? 150.

0:38:470:38:50

155. 160. Thank you. 170.

0:38:500:38:53

180 now in the room? 180. 190? 190.

0:38:530:38:56

200. 20 anywhere else, now?

0:38:560:38:59

220, it's the last call.

0:38:590:39:01

At 200, my bid's in the room, then.

0:39:010:39:04

At £200. All done. Selling then, in the room.

0:39:040:39:06

And definitely selling at £200.

0:39:060:39:09

-Thank you very much.

-£200!

0:39:090:39:10

Now that's a real, true reflection of its value.

0:39:100:39:13

I think someone is buying all the love that little piece contains, you know?

0:39:130:39:17

-The feelgood factor is there.

-Yeah, it's a charming thing.

0:39:170:39:20

-Well, Mary, that was a nice encore, wasn't it?

-It certainly was.

0:39:200:39:24

Next up, some ethnic jewellery belonging to Dee here.

0:39:300:39:33

-They were your grandmother's?

-Yes.

0:39:330:39:35

She was born in India, and this is where they originate.

0:39:350:39:38

Been in the family a long time, but Dee's flogging them.

0:39:380:39:41

We've got the little snake bracelet which is, oh, I think, a come and get me at £80 to £160.

0:39:410:39:47

It's lovely. Typical Victorian.

0:39:470:39:49

-They loved these snake bracelets.

-Talk me through the next lot.

0:39:490:39:52

The other item that's coming up, these are a miscellaneous collection of ivory.

0:39:520:39:57

Some buttons with monkey heads, and some other bits and pieces

0:39:570:40:00

that were collected from, I suppose, the Far East when your...

0:40:000:40:04

That's it. My grandmother got given them as presents from the local Raj,

0:40:040:40:09

because she used to go to school with his family.

0:40:090:40:12

Let's hope they create an awful lot of interest here in Grantham.

0:40:120:40:16

Ethnic art is something to invest in right now.

0:40:160:40:18

-It's hard to put a price on.

-Absolutely.

-So, well done, David.

0:40:180:40:22

The snake's coming up first.

0:40:220:40:23

Lot number 45 is a Victorian hinged snake bangle this time.

0:40:230:40:27

No hallmarks, but a fabulous looking item. £50, surely?

0:40:270:40:30

Thank you. £50 bid. At 55. 60.

0:40:300:40:32

At 60 bid. Five?

0:40:320:40:34

Bid 70, do I see? 70? 70. Five. 80.

0:40:340:40:37

Five. 90. Five.

0:40:370:40:40

100. And ten on the book. 120. 130.

0:40:400:40:44

140. 150. 160 in the room.

0:40:440:40:47

-160! That's good!

-170 now?

0:40:470:40:49

Surely 170? Thank you, 170. 180.

0:40:490:40:51

190. 190, do I see?

0:40:510:40:54

190 on the net. Two, now?

0:40:540:40:56

-Two? 220 now?

-This is very good.

0:40:560:41:00

-They like it.

-Yes, they love it.

0:41:000:41:01

It's beautiful, actually.

0:41:010:41:03

Another bidder. 240. 260. 280, now?

0:41:030:41:06

280. 300. 320, now?

0:41:060:41:10

320. 340. 360, now?

0:41:100:41:13

360, do I see? I have 340 here.

0:41:130:41:16

-360!

-We're at 340. 340 here.

0:41:160:41:20

-360, now.

-360!

-380, now? 380. 400?

0:41:200:41:23

400. 420? 420. 440. 460.

0:41:230:41:28

480. 500.

0:41:280:41:30

-550.

-I don't think it's that ethnic!

0:41:300:41:33

600. 650, now? At 600, I'm bid.

0:41:330:41:35

At 600. Are there any more bids? 50 anywhere else, now?

0:41:350:41:39

Either net or room? At 600 in the middle of the room, then.

0:41:390:41:42

Last call, then. Going at £600.

0:41:420:41:45

-Oh!

-Oh, wow! Wow!

0:41:450:41:47

Would you like a seat?

0:41:470:41:48

-No, no!

-And well done that man, Colin Young, as well.

0:41:480:41:51

He really teased that bit out of people.

0:41:510:41:53

£600 for the first item, for which we were hoping to get

0:41:530:41:57

around about 80 to 100, and now we have, we're hoping for £60 to £80 for the next of the lots.

0:41:570:42:01

What shall we say for this one? Starting me at £50 for it. 50?

0:42:010:42:05

30, then. 30? Who's first in? Thank you. 30. 35 now?

0:42:050:42:08

35 was on the net. 35. Bid 40. 45.

0:42:080:42:11

-Anything now is a bonus, isn't it, really?

-Yes.

0:42:110:42:13

55 bid. 60, now, do I see? 60? At 60 bid. Five bid. 70 bid.

0:42:130:42:17

Five bid. 80 bid.

0:42:170:42:19

Five, now, surely? Thank you.

0:42:190:42:20

-85.

-Ooh! It's topping now!

-You are topping it up now, Dee!

0:42:200:42:24

100. Ten, now, do I see? Thank you. 110. 120. 140? 140.

0:42:240:42:27

160? 160, now? Do I see 160?

0:42:270:42:30

At 140. Last call, then. I'm selling, make no mistake, at 140.

0:42:300:42:34

-Wow!

-Gosh!

-Thank you.

0:42:340:42:37

Those are the moments we love, actually.

0:42:370:42:40

I told you were going to be in for a few surprises today, didn't I?

0:42:400:42:43

-I think it's made Dee's day here, don't you?

-It certainly has!

0:42:430:42:46

It's made your year! What are you going to put all that money towards?

0:42:460:42:50

-I've no idea, but I'll spend it!

-£740!

0:42:500:42:56

If you've got anything like that at home, please bring it along to one of our valuation days.

0:42:560:43:01

You never know, you could end up in the auction room,

0:43:010:43:04

just like Dee here, with a wonderful surprise. £740!

0:43:040:43:07

We've had a great day in Grantham, I hope you've enjoyed the show. We certainly have.

0:43:070:43:12

Until the next time, it's goodbye.

0:43:120:43:14

-Thank you.

-So good!

0:43:140:43:16

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made,

0:43:160:43:20

visit the website at bbc.co.uk

0:43:200:43:22

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:340:43:37

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:370:43:40

Paul Martin and antique experts David Barby and Elizabeth Talbot are in Skegness, searching for a selection of special items to take to auction.

Paul values a Windsor chair with real rustic charm, David finds a collection of ethnic jewellery which includes an exquisite gold snake bangle, and Elizabeth uncovers a beautiful tortoiseshell vanity mirror inlaid with silver.

Paul also meets Steve Nichols who runs the National Parrot Sanctuary, home to almost 1,700 rescued birds.