Nantwich Flog It!


Nantwich

Paul Martin and experts Kate Bliss and Will Axon visit Nantwich Civic Hall in Cheshire. Paul tries to hit a six with a celebrity-signed cricket bat.


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Transcript


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This is what I love, a town full of character.

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Lots of distinctive old buildings,

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some dating back to the 16th century.

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I'm in south Cheshire, in Nantwich,

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and we're all ready to Flog It!

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Nantwich has managed to preserve many of its fine old buildings

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despite a terrible fire back in 1583.

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That was then, but this is now.

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Here at Nantwich's fine civic hall,

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we've got a couple of intrepid explorers.

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Kate Bliss and Will Axon.

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Their job - to spot the most intriguing items

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brought along for us to see.

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Everybody in this massive queue will have a free valuation.

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But only a few will have the cameras focused on them.

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Who's it gonna be? We'll find out shortly.

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Let's see what the good people of Cheshire have decided to bring to our attention.

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It's great to see a bit of Clarice Cliff. Are you collectors?

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-No.

-No.

-Sadly no.

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-No?

-No, we're not. I'm a Moorcroft collector.

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We've been collecting Moorcroft for four or five years.

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My interest is antique English silver.

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-Right.

-That's what I collect.

-You're a man after my own heart.

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-Is this your only Clarice Cliff vase?

-It is. We bought it on a whim

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-at an antique fair at Bingley Hall in Staffordshire.

-OK.

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At the time when Clarice was really quite a name

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and we thought, "Let's buy a piece of Clarice."

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But it doesn't really go with all the Moorcroft I've got.

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-Time to sell. Time to flog it!

-Time to flog it. Sounds good to me.

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You're right, you've bought when Clarice Cliff was a household name

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and that's what she became, in fact,

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-when she was designing pre-war in the 1920s.

-Yes.

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What we've got here is an example of the "Bizarre" range.

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It should be marked on the bottom here. There we have it.

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"Bizarre. Clarice Cliff."

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I've just noticed that we've got the name of the pattern.

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It's quite unusual to have the pattern name on the bottom there.

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There we have it. Gayday.

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It's not an unusual pattern in her output. It was quite prolific

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but it's these lovely sunny chrysanthemum-like flowers

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clustered around the centre here,

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set off by the familiar banding that you see on the Bizarre range.

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The thing you've got to be careful about pieces like yours

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is that they're not restored.

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You've got to feel around the edges when purchasing a piece like this

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just to check that nothing has been restored

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and often cracks, if they're restored, on the honey glaze show up most easily.

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So look inside. That's quite a good tip. Also when buying Moorcroft!

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Thank you.

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I've had a very good look at this piece

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and I can't see anything so I think you've got a really good buy here.

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Do you mind me asking how much you paid for it all that time ago?

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Well, it was advertised almost £400

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-but it came down to about 300, 310, something like that.

-Right.

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But we appreciate that was when it was at its peak.

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Yes, and you were paying a retail price at a fair

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which is a fair price when it was at its height.

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I think we have to come down quite a bit to sell it at auction.

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We're quite realistic.

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If we put a nice "come and buy me" estimate on it,

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-such as 80 to £120...

-Yes.

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..I think it would generate interest.

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It would be in reach of prospective buyers

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and we might find prices climbing above that to 150 on a good day.

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We would put a reserve on it as well of £80

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so it wouldn't go for less than that, certainly.

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-Happy with that?

-Yes, I think so.

-Yes. The idea is we want to sell it.

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-We'll find something else to replace it.

-Put the money towards silver or Moorcroft.

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-OK. Excellent. Thank you for bringing it.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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-Alan, hello, there.

-Hello.

-Thanks for coming in today.

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Taking "the time", shall we say, to come to Flog It!

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An interesting little group you've brought in today.

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I suppose if I was gonna look at it critically,

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I'd say that we've got one, two, three, four different items here.

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But rolled into one, shall we say.

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Now, it's obviously a pocket watch on a chain.

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Tell me about it. How have you come by this?

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It was originally my granddad's.

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He bought it for his 21st birthday.

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They say that the gifts you buy yourself are the best ones!

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Now, obviously, the watch itself is silver-cased,

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which helps me to identify where and when it was made.

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So if I turn it over here,

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we've got the typical engraved back here,

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a little cartouche where he may have had his initials engraved,

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in this case not.

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We open up and we've got the silver marks there

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for Chester, 1890.

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That's the inside.

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And you've got this nice Roman numeral dial here

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with a subsidiary second dial, which is running.

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-Yes.

-You've got a rather fine 9-carat gold chain here, also.

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Has that always been with the watch or is that a later addition?

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I'm not sure of the history of the chain or the two sovereigns.

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Yes, you've got a full sovereign and a half sovereign

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also mounted onto the chain

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which can sometimes detract. The important thing is they can be taken out of their mounts

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as the collectors like to do.

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Looking at it, I think it's just a simple job of opening that frame

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and that'll soon drop out.

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It's unusual to see a gold chain with a silver pocket watch.

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You'd expect to see the theme of silver running through.

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Now,

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when it comes to value, have you had a think about value?

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-No idea, to be honest.

-No?

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The value for the silver case pocket watch I'd estimate at maybe 30 to 50, 40 to 60. Something like that.

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-Yes.

-Then we move on to the gold chain.

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I popped the chain onto my scales earlier

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and you're looking at about an ounce there.

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-So 9-carat gold, you're looking at just over £200 for the ounce.

-Not bad.

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So we're probably looking at 200 there for the chain in itself.

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And we haven't even included the sovereigns yet.

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Sovereigns generally make between 80 and £90 for a full sovereign

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and half that for a half sovereign.

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So if we look at valuing the whole lot around the £300 mark,

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I think we stand a chance.

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-How do you feel about that?

-Very good.

-Yes?

-Yes. Surprising.

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250 to 350 as an estimate.

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I'll twist your arm and put £200 on as a reserve. How's that?

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-Fine, thank you.

-Listen,

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we'll see you on the day and hopefully raise some money for you.

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In your grandfather's tradition, you can buy yourself a gift.

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-Not for your 21st, though!

-I'll think of something.

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-See you on the day, Alan.

-Thank you very much.

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-Eric, that is a fine bat, isn't it?

-It is, indeed.

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Made by Duncan Fearnley, one of the best.

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Yes!

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That was a six!

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The thing is, it's a cricket bat

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but it's been signed by the Manchester United squad of 1974.

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-And Stoke City.

-And the Stoke City squad.

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How come all these footballers signed this cricket bat?

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Um, it was in aid of a charity.

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-Yes.

-And it was auctioned off at the Man U supporters' club.

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-I'm a United supporter.

-And you got it?

-I got it, yes.

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-I put the last bid in. £100.

-Wow.

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How long have you had this?

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Um... 1975.

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1975.

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Let's just look at some of the Manchester United players.

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Sammy McIlroy...

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-Lou Macari.

-Yes, he was there.

-He played for Scotland as well.

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I don't know any of the Stoke City footballers

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apart from Sir Stanley Matthews.

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-He played for Stoke in the early days.

-Yes, but this is a bit later.

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-Would you like to sell this?

-Well, yes, I would.

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-I've got two sons and I can't pass it down to one and not the other.

-No.

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-And you can't cut it in half!

-Not at all, no.

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I'll tell you something. I think this is worth between 100 and £150.

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-Ah, yes.

-You can get your money back quite easily.

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I don't want to put a reserve on it

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because if I took it back home, the problem is...

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-You've still got it.

-I've still got the problem at home.

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-No reserve, then.

-No.

-No.

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All right. That's brilliant.

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Well, you've brought in today something that is right up my street.

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A delightful little portrait miniature, pencil drawing.

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Is this a relation of yours?

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Not a relation of mine, it's a relation of a friend of mine,

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who gave the portrait and the daguerreotype to him in 1980.

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The lady married this gentleman.

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Right, so that's the connection between the two.

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And this gentleman was an admiral in the Royal Navy

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at around about the time of Nelson.

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So, just to get it straight,

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-this young lady in this portrait is the wife of this gentleman.

-Yes.

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So he was an admiral in the Royal Navy, obviously very well-to-do.

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-Mm-hm.

-Would have, perhaps, I suspect,

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commissioned this portrait miniature, maybe to take on the ship with him.

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-Probably, yes.

-I mean, it's beautifully drawn.

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The detail is lovely.

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But if we look down at the bottom,

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-it says Miss Wa... And that's where it stops.

-It's a mystery.

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If we look closely at her face, when I first saw it,

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I thought perhaps she had a rather large patch on her nose.

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A little beauty spot, or perhaps, a mole.

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But if we look closer, that is actually a small drop of ink.

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-Ah.

-And I suspect this will be

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late 18th century, from around 1800 is generally

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-where they date from.

-Yes, yes.

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-So, I'm being kind to her.

-Just five years before Trafalgar.

-Exactly.

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-And this is a daguerreotype. You haven't got the original, have you?

-My father has.

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So this is a copy that you have to keep with the portrait,

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to keep the story going. Value wise, have you any idea?

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Well, we have been told about £100.

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I don't disagree with your valuation, I think reserve it at £100

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and I think on the day, with a bit of a write-up

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and a bit of history behind the catalogue description, I'm sure we'll get it away for you.

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-Is this a family piece? Where's it from?

-It was my mother's.

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I think she bought it from a small antique shop at home.

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-That's all I know about it.

-OK.

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You remember her having it as a child?

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I think it was bought in the 1940s, somewhere round about there.

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-When my mother died, I took it, with a lot of others, cos she was very fond of pottery.

-Right.

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I really have got a houseful!

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Well, you've come to the right place!

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That's it. I just thought it was a bit of a different Moorcroft.

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I have other pieces of Moorcroft.

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-I see.

-With it having so much white on it.

-You're absolutely right.

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Are all your other pieces this lovely ivory creamy colour

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-or are they the darker?

-No, darker colours.

-Right.

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I think this is slightly more unusual

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and I'm very glad you brought this piece today to show us.

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Of course, it is distinctly Moorcroft because of the pattern

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but also because of this lovely raised slip decoration on here

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which Moorcroft really helped to develop.

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It was one of the signature characteristics of his art pottery.

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-What age do you think it is?

-What we've got here, if we look at the bottom,

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and you can see that impressed signature,

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we've also got "Made in England" on the bottom here.

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-So we're looking at late '30s, early '40s.

-So I thought.

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In the 1920s and '30s, instead of using very English flowers

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like poppy and cornflower,

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he began incorporating a few exotic flowers.

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This is what we've got here, the lovely orchid.

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That's on the outside. But he also paid attention to botanical accuracy.

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-They're very tactile.

-Tactile.

-It fits in with what he was trying to do.

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He wanted to produce a piece of art and the ivory and cream is much warmer

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-than the dark blue and green glazes.

-Yes.

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What about value? Have you any idea?

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I haven't, really.

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Well, although it is on this lovely cream ground

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some people do prefer the darker glazes. It's not everybody's cup of tea.

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Having said that, it's in lovely condition.

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It's a lovely late '30s, early '40s example of Moorcroft.

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I think at auction you ought to expect somewhere between 150 and £200.

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-Yes, that's fine.

-OK? Does that sound fair to you?

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-It does, yes. Yes.

-OK. Lovely.

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-You ought to put a reserve on around the £150 mark.

-Yes, please.

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We'll make sure that that is the worst scenario, if you like.

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-Yes.

-It can only make that or a little bit more.

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-I would hope the top end of the estimate.

-We'll keep our fingers crossed!

-OK.

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-Lovely. Thank you for bringing it.

-Thank you.

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It's been busy at the civic hall and we've found some great items

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to take off to auction.

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Moorcroft and silver-lovers Janet and Mike are keen

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to clear their collections of a rogue piece of Clarice Cliff.

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-Is this your only Clarice Cliff?

-It is. We bought it on a whim.

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Alan wants to auction his granddad's 21st birthday present

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as it's been in the wardrobe for decades.

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Eric's hoping his celebrity-signed cricket bat will go for a six

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because he can't give it to his children.

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-I've got two sons and I couldn't pass it down to one and not the other.

-No.

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-You can't cut it in half!

-Not at all, no!

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Will the bidders sniff out Morris's miniature portrait of a lady

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with an ink spot on her nose?

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Shirley's cream vase doesn't fit in with the rest of her Moorcroft collection.

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You've seen all our items and now it's time to sell them.

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We've travelled north to Adam Partridge Auctioneers

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just outside Congleton.

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Now our fate is in the hands of this lot, the bidders!

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We always say if you want to invest in antiques,

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put your money into quality, a good maker's name, and condition.

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This lot has the lot. It's Moorcroft and it belongs to Shirley.

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We have a valuation of 150 to £200.

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-I think you'll be flogging this right now.

-Yes.

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-Ceramics are going well here.

-They are.

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There's a lot of Moorcroft in the sale, which brings the buyers in.

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-Why are you flogging this?

-Because I've got other pieces.

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-Are you a collector?

-Sort of.

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Sort of!

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I like that answer. Sort of. It's options open, isn't it?

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Why are you flogging this one?

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It would be nice to get the money and give a present to my new grandson.

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-He'd rather have the money than the Moorcroft.

-When he's older, yes.

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I think he would, don't you?

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Well, good luck. The auction room is absolutely jam-packed.

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-It is.

-Fingers crossed for a good result.

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Lot 183. There we have it.

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Orchid design on a cream ground. Lot 183.

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The Moorcroft pottery vase.

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I'm bid 100 to start. Take ten. £100 I have.

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110, 120, 130.

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-Got some bidders in here!

-160?

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160. 170. 160 over here.

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At 160. 160. Any more now? At £160.

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This will be sold at 160. Are you all finished? At £160.

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This Moorcroft vase at 160. And we're done.

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It's gone. Well done. It's gone.

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-Gone!

-Shirley, say goodbye!

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You could say there's no pressure. We've no reserve on this cricket bat.

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But it would be lovely to see it do the 100 to £150 which it deserves.

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-It would.

-We're bang in the middle of Stoke and Manchester,

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two famous cities, two great football clubs.

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-Ideal situation, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Lot 516, the cricket bat.

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Signed by Man United and Stoke City footballers in 1974 and 1975.

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Some good names on there. What do we say? £100?

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£100 the cricket bat.

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-Come on!

-It's got to be sold. What's it worth? £50?

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Now's the test. £50, surely?

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-30.

-30? Well, we'll start there.

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Take you at 30. Who's going 35?

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30's a start. £30. It's worth a bit more than that, isn't it? £30

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is a start. £30. Take five.

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35. 40?

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45. 50. And five?

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£50 I'm bid. At £50.

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50. Any more, then?

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£50.

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-Gone. But we've sold it.

-We have sold it.

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What I plan to do with the £50

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is I'm gonna treat the family out to a meal.

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-Bless you.

-Everybody will be equal then.

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Even if it's a fish and chip meal and a bottle of champagne.

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Yes, of course. I've a feeling it'll be more than that.

0:18:230:18:26

Bless you, Eric. Thank you for bringing it along.

0:18:260:18:29

Well, I'll take 500 here, take 20 now. That's 500 I'm bid.

0:18:290:18:34

Next up is a lovely miniature, it's an 18th-century pencil drawing and

0:18:340:18:37

it belongs to yacht surveyor Morris here, who looks absolutely dapper.

0:18:370:18:42

-Look at this! Where did you get this jacket from?

-It was a present, actually.

0:18:420:18:46

Tell me more about the pencil drawing.

0:18:460:18:49

We've got £100 on this, can we do any more?

0:18:490:18:51

Hopefully. I've had a look at the sale this morning

0:18:510:18:54

and there's a few other miniatures there, which always helps when you're selling amongst other pieces.

0:18:540:18:59

And it's a lovely pencil drawing, it's gorgeous, it's unfinished and it's a little bit quirky...

0:18:590:19:05

-Why are you selling this?

-It actually belongs to my father.

0:19:050:19:08

He was given it. It's sitting in a drawer, he doesn't like it.

0:19:080:19:14

It doesn't have any family connections.

0:19:140:19:16

My father, I think, would like to buy some more antiques.

0:19:160:19:19

OK, well, let's send him on his journey.

0:19:190:19:21

Let's hope we get more than £100.

0:19:210:19:23

Good luck! Here we go. It's going under the hammer now.

0:19:230:19:26

Margareta Waddington. Here we are,I'm bid £100, take 10.

0:19:260:19:30

£100 is bid on this, is there 10 now?

0:19:300:19:33

At 100, 110, 120, 120 here.

0:19:330:19:36

-120, any more, now?

-Let's see some hands going up!

0:19:360:19:40

I'm selling at... 140, online at 140 now.

0:19:400:19:43

140, we've got an online bidder here at 140. All done?

0:19:430:19:47

-Online bidder.

-Online here at £140.

0:19:470:19:51

-Yes!

-Excellent.

-Brilliant, £140.

0:19:510:19:53

-Happy with that?

-Wonderful, wonderful.

0:19:530:19:57

What will your dad invest in? What will he go out and buy?

0:19:570:20:00

First of all, I think we'll buy

0:20:000:20:02

all our friends at the Black Horse a drink.

0:20:020:20:04

Right, OK.

0:20:040:20:05

And if there is any money left, I think either a piece of glass,

0:20:050:20:08

he loves glass.

0:20:080:20:10

-He likes glass, does he?

-He does. And also...

0:20:100:20:12

Snuff boxes, things like that? That's quite affordable, £100.

0:20:120:20:15

-Snuff boxes, old cameras...

-Old cameras?

0:20:150:20:19

-An eclectic mix!

-Absolutely.

0:20:190:20:21

45 bid, is there 50 now? 45, seated down here. 45, any more now?

0:20:210:20:26

Well, it wouldn't be Flog It without Clarice Cliff

0:20:260:20:29

and here's Janet and Mike.

0:20:290:20:31

We've got a lovely bit of Clarice. 80 to £100 Kate's put on this.

0:20:310:20:35

The bad news is, you paid £300 on the day.

0:20:350:20:40

-That wasn't a good day's buying, was it?

-No, it wasn't.

0:20:400:20:44

Well, unless we can get £300 back?

0:20:440:20:47

-Slim chance, I think.

-Is there?

0:20:470:20:50

But in fairness, you paid a retail price.

0:20:500:20:53

And at that time in the market, that was a fairytale price.

0:20:530:20:56

We're selling it at auction, which is lower than retail.

0:20:560:21:00

Why have you decided to flog it now?

0:21:000:21:02

-We're both collectors. I collect Moorcroft.

-OK.

-I've got quite a lot.

0:21:020:21:06

-Mike?

-I collect antique silver.

0:21:060:21:09

You're gonna split the money. You buy silver, you buy Moorcroft.

0:21:090:21:12

No? It's all going to Moorcroft. I get the picture!

0:21:120:21:16

Good luck, both. Good luck, Kate.

0:21:160:21:18

Let's hope we can get you as much back as possible.

0:21:180:21:22

Lot 213, a Clarice Cliff Gayday vase. There we are.

0:21:220:21:26

-I can come straight in at £160 bid.

-Great!

-Excellent!

0:21:260:21:31

160 bid. 170. 180. 190 and 200.

0:21:310:21:33

£200, then.

0:21:330:21:35

All done at 200? Anyone else?

0:21:350:21:37

At 200. All done. Selling now.

0:21:370:21:40

£200 and we're finished.

0:21:400:21:41

-We'll take that! We'll take that!

-More than happy. Great.

0:21:430:21:46

This is a great lot. A lovely pocket watch with chain. Time's up, Alan!

0:21:530:21:58

-It was Granddad's?

-It was, yes.

0:21:580:22:01

250 to £300. It's still working. It's absolute quality.

0:22:010:22:05

I have to say, I wouldn't sell this if this had come from my family.

0:22:050:22:10

-I love it to bits.

-Yes. It's nice when you have a family tradition

0:22:100:22:13

-that it's been used through the generations.

-It's working well.

0:22:130:22:17

I'd sell the sovereigns, but I'd keep that watch.

0:22:170:22:20

And the chain is included, where a lot of the value is also.

0:22:200:22:24

Can I ask why you're selling?

0:22:240:22:26

It's been in the wardrobe for the last 30 years.

0:22:260:22:29

-I'm never going to use it, so...

-You don't fancy a waistcoat one day?

0:22:290:22:33

-It's not my style.

-Not your style.

0:22:330:22:35

710 is a Victorian hallmarked silver pocket watch.

0:22:350:22:38

It has a 9-carat chain with a Victorian sovereign

0:22:380:22:41

and Edward VII sovereign.

0:22:410:22:42

-I can come straight in at £400. And 20 as well?

-It's on!

0:22:420:22:47

420. 440. 460. 480.

0:22:470:22:50

In the room now. 480. Is there 500? 480.

0:22:500:22:53

480 bid. At 480. Any more?

0:22:530:22:56

480. All done.

0:22:560:22:59

-Fantastic!

-Brilliant.

-Excellent!

0:22:590:23:01

-Better than that 200!

-I'm just covering myself there!

0:23:010:23:05

-That's exciting news.

-That's very good, yes.

0:23:050:23:08

-Quality always sells.

-Yeah.

-It always does.

0:23:080:23:12

Now, how about this for the perfect gentleman's residence?

0:23:180:23:22

Sure to impress the visitors and the neighbours!

0:23:220:23:25

'This is Arley in north Cheshire, a big estate with a wonderful house in the middle of it.'

0:23:260:23:32

OK. So what period does the architecture suggest?

0:23:320:23:36

You're probably thinking it's got an Elizabethan feel about it.

0:23:360:23:40

You're right - in appearance it has.

0:23:400:23:43

But in fact, this dates from Victorian times.

0:23:430:23:45

Managing an estate like this can be a huge responsibility.

0:23:470:23:51

While there are inevitable financial demands,

0:23:510:23:53

many owners feel a strong duty to preserve their inheritance for the nation.

0:23:530:23:59

The man who shoulders this responsibility is Lord Ashbrook.

0:24:020:24:06

He's keen to maintain his family heritage

0:24:060:24:08

and share it with the public.

0:24:080:24:10

He's offered Flog It a guided tour. How could I resist?

0:24:100:24:14

There has been a house on this site since the 15th century

0:24:160:24:20

but the present structure dates from 1832

0:24:200:24:23

when Lord Ashbrook's ancestor, Rowland Egerton-Warburton and his wife Mary

0:24:230:24:27

commissioned a home by local architect George Latham in the popular Elizabethan style.

0:24:270:24:32

Lord Ashbrook, many thanks for the privileged tour. We're starting here

0:24:360:24:40

in this wonderful drawing room. Why here?

0:24:400:24:43

This room's interesting because it's very much Rowland and Mary's room.

0:24:430:24:48

That is Rowland Egerton-Warburton

0:24:480:24:50

who is my great-great-grandfather

0:24:500:24:52

and his beautiful wife, Mary.

0:24:520:24:54

She was Mary Brooke from Norton Priory, another house in Cheshire.

0:24:540:24:59

Rowland and Mary made an enormous impact

0:24:590:25:02

here at Arley in so many different ways.

0:25:020:25:05

The architectural detail is absolutely fantastic.

0:25:050:25:09

You can't help but gravitate towards the heavens in this room.

0:25:090:25:13

We're talking about a period, sort of 1840,

0:25:130:25:16

which was the high point of high Victoriana

0:25:160:25:20

-when they were copying...

-Gothic revival.

-Elizabethan and Jacobean.

0:25:200:25:25

It's quite interesting, if you look at a Jacobean house or Elizabethan house,

0:25:250:25:30

you can absolutely see what the Victorians were driving at.

0:25:300:25:34

They went a bit over the top, some of the decoration.

0:25:340:25:37

-It's very fanciful.

-It is fanciful.

0:25:370:25:39

When I was a child, this sort of architecture wasn't greatly admired.

0:25:390:25:44

Now, this is very much admired.

0:25:440:25:48

Local architect George Latham estimated the cost, the whole undertaking,

0:25:540:25:59

to be around £6,000.

0:25:590:26:00

The entire build, at the end, cost nearly £30,000.

0:26:000:26:05

That's builders' estimates for you!

0:26:050:26:07

In today's money, that's equivalent to eight million pounds.

0:26:070:26:11

And once the house was built, it needed furnishing

0:26:110:26:14

with appropriate contents.

0:26:140:26:16

Things like this wonderful inlaid ebonised cabinet on a stand.

0:26:160:26:22

This was brought back from Italy on the Grand Tour

0:26:220:26:25

and was an acquisition which every wealthy young man would want to bring home

0:26:250:26:30

to show off to friends.

0:26:300:26:31

If you look closely at the face side,

0:26:310:26:34

all these fitted drawers have been inlaid with an image, and that image

0:26:340:26:39

is made from very finely sliced pieces of marble of different colours.

0:26:390:26:45

Superb detail. That technique was developed in Florence.

0:26:450:26:49

Little images like this alone, on a panel, that size,

0:26:490:26:53

today would cost around £600 in auction.

0:26:530:26:56

So work the price out for yourself.

0:26:560:26:59

A lot of money.

0:26:590:27:01

To have a staircase this grand in a provincial house built in the 1840s

0:27:090:27:15

is very unusual.

0:27:150:27:17

The problem is supporting the very high walls when you look at the height of this.

0:27:170:27:22

And of course the roof on top of it. Almost impossible.

0:27:220:27:25

But architect Latham was an early exponent of iron girders.

0:27:250:27:29

So he was able to create this internal bracing

0:27:290:27:33

so that this stairwell, this beautiful carved feature,

0:27:330:27:36

could sit in.

0:27:360:27:39

And it's lit by daylight from the most wonderful dome. Look at that!

0:27:390:27:44

As well as housing stunning pieces of furniture,

0:27:460:27:49

Arley has also had its fair share of famous guests.

0:27:490:27:53

As a young prince, Napoleon III of France stayed here.

0:27:530:27:56

But for the present Viscount Ashbrook, it's the memories of his own upbringing at Arley

0:27:560:28:01

which are most poignant.

0:28:010:28:03

This is a magnificent library.

0:28:040:28:07

It's the room that when my parents lived here all the time, which they did until 1981,

0:28:070:28:12

this was the room we used to use as a sitting room a great deal.

0:28:120:28:16

-Lots of memories.

-A lot of memories.

0:28:160:28:18

-Wonderful fireplace. Nice centrepiece.

-Yes.

0:28:180:28:21

Of course this very intricate carving and woodwork

0:28:210:28:24

is very much a characteristic of the house.

0:28:240:28:26

Most of the materials are local

0:28:260:28:28

but that was made in London because of the craftsmen

0:28:280:28:32

and it's amazing, really, the detail that they achieved.

0:28:320:28:35

Generally, the house is in very good condition.

0:28:350:28:39

-You've maintained it beautifully.

-I've been lucky in a sense.

0:28:390:28:42

There was a very big restoration done about 20 years ago.

0:28:420:28:46

A lot of money was spent. It needed to be because we had outbreaks of dry rot and so on.

0:28:460:28:52

But you're right, it is in good condition now

0:28:520:28:55

but it's no good being complacent

0:28:550:28:58

because every now and then you have to erect scaffolding and replace things.

0:28:580:29:02

But the sheer size of it means that the upkeep challenge is quite great.

0:29:020:29:06

Yes. And it must be really rewarding for you being here.

0:29:060:29:12

-It's got to be, surely.

-Of course it is.

0:29:120:29:14

I get a kick out of the fact that an awful lot of people come here and enjoy themselves.

0:29:140:29:19

So you feel the place is earning its keep, not necessarily in the financial sense,

0:29:190:29:24

-but it's earning its keep in the social sense.

-Yes.

0:29:240:29:28

The visitors get something as well cos they can take away a sense of history,

0:29:280:29:32

a sense of connection. I can vouch for that cos it's been a great day out for me as well.

0:29:320:29:38

-It's been a real pleasure to meet you.

-Very nice to see you.

0:29:380:29:41

Thank you very much indeed.

0:29:410:29:42

After that wonderful trip to Arley, we're now back at the valuation day in Nantwich.

0:29:470:29:51

Well, I can see from what you're wearing that you like wearing gold.

0:29:530:29:56

-Yes.

-Is this a piece that you've worn quite a bit?

0:29:560:29:58

Not a great deal, no, because it's a bit heavy.

0:29:580:30:02

So that's why I've brought it today.

0:30:020:30:05

I thought I'd see what it was worth, being as gold was good.

0:30:050:30:08

So where did it come from?

0:30:080:30:10

I think, originally, I bought it in this hall at an antique fair.

0:30:100:30:14

-Actually here?

-Yes.

-That's interesting.

0:30:140:30:16

-So how long ago was that?

-About 30 years, I think. A long time.

0:30:160:30:21

-Originally, I think it was a watch albert.

-Yes.

0:30:210:30:24

A gentleman would have worn it on his waistcoat,

0:30:240:30:28

with, perhaps, a watch on one side

0:30:280:30:31

and often a little vesta case, to hold matches, on the other side.

0:30:310:30:35

But here we have it, still got the little fob on the end,

0:30:350:30:39

and that's marked clearly 9C, for nine carat,

0:30:390:30:42

as opposed to 18 or even purer gold, 22 carat.

0:30:420:30:46

I love these sort of rectangular links

0:30:460:30:48

that are interspersed within the design,

0:30:480:30:51

-which are almost art deco in style.

-A bit different.

-They are.

0:30:510:30:56

So did you have it transformed into a bracelet?

0:30:560:30:59

Yes, I thought I might wear it a bit more often.

0:30:590:31:04

-But I haven't, really.

-Right.

0:31:040:31:06

Gold is selling very well at the moment

0:31:060:31:08

so I think you've actually bought a very commercial piece,

0:31:080:31:12

and very commercial in that somebody would wear it

0:31:120:31:16

as a bracelet. Twice over, like that.

0:31:160:31:19

-And the weight of it, of course. It's pretty heavy, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:31:190:31:23

There's quite a bit of gold in there.

0:31:230:31:25

Well, I haven't weighed it exactly but I would think, at auction,

0:31:250:31:29

that's going to fetch you between £300 and £500.

0:31:290:31:33

-How does that sound?

-That sounds fine.

0:31:330:31:35

Can you remember what you paid for it all that time ago?

0:31:350:31:38

200 or something like that, so it was quite expensive at the time,

0:31:380:31:43

but because it was so heavy, we thought, "Well, maybe an investment."

0:31:430:31:47

Well, I think you'll find it's been quite a good investment,

0:31:470:31:51

-and how funny that it's come back to where you originally purchased it.

-That's what I thought.

0:31:510:31:56

Barbara, you've brought Ellie, your niece, with you today.

0:31:580:32:01

-Who does this belong to? Is it yours?

-It's mine, yes.

0:32:010:32:05

I think personally it's great. It's a wonderful piece of fun.

0:32:050:32:09

How have you come by it? Is it something you've kept your pennies in?

0:32:090:32:14

Not really. I used to work with a lady that became a good friend of mine.

0:32:140:32:20

She asked if my husband would like to buy it. I've had it ever since.

0:32:200:32:25

-These are cast iron American money boxes.

-Yes.

0:32:250:32:32

What's fun is when they're these mechanical money boxes.

0:32:320:32:37

You've got moving parts. This one here is just as fun in my opinion.

0:32:370:32:42

We've got the soldier who's aiming his rifle at this tree stump

0:32:420:32:46

-with this aperture in the tree stump to take the coins.

-Yes.

0:32:460:32:52

Are you not tempted to use this to keep your pound coins in?

0:32:520:32:56

Well, she needs more money than I need it.

0:32:560:32:58

Ooh, imagine that! "She needs more money than I do"! How kind of her!

0:32:580:33:03

-Why don't we have a look and see how it works, shall we?

-Yes.

0:33:030:33:07

I've got some 1ps there. So...

0:33:070:33:10

we need to cock the soldier's rifle, as it were.

0:33:100:33:13

So we push this back and his head comes down, doesn't it?

0:33:130:33:17

Looking down the barrel.

0:33:170:33:19

We'll load him up with one of my precious one p's.

0:33:190:33:23

And to fire it, why don't you press that... Good shot!

0:33:230:33:27

Look at that! Annie get your gun! Well,

0:33:270:33:30

-it's a great bit of fun. A real conversation piece.

-It is.

0:33:300:33:34

Now, as far as the market for these is concerned,

0:33:340:33:38

-in about the 1980s, a lot of these were reproduced.

-Yes.

0:33:380:33:43

In quite large numbers and imported from the Far East, India.

0:33:430:33:47

Now that had the effect, I'm afraid, of really diluting the market

0:33:470:33:51

because buyers lose confidence, you see.

0:33:510:33:54

Now, we've had a closer look at it.

0:33:540:33:58

It's got plus points that are erring us towards

0:33:580:34:02

the fact that it is late 19th century rather than 20th century.

0:34:020:34:06

The market is still a little cautious, so we have to reflect that in the estimate.

0:34:060:34:11

I'm looking to maybe get it in the sale at 80 to 120.

0:34:110:34:15

Now, if it's not right, I think it's nice enough to sell at that.

0:34:150:34:20

-If it is right, it'll make more than that.

-Yes.

0:34:200:34:23

-You're not going to put a last-ditch claim on this, are you?

-No.

0:34:230:34:27

Auntie needs the money!

0:34:270:34:29

So, 80 to 120.

0:34:290:34:31

Before we say goodbye to him why don't we one more time fire off another shot.

0:34:310:34:36

-I'll donate another one of my precious pennies.

-OK.

0:34:360:34:39

Barbara, you do the honours this time.

0:34:390:34:42

Ooh! Good shot. Well done.

0:34:440:34:46

-I'll see you on the day.

-Thank you very much.

0:34:460:34:49

I haven't seen a honey pot like this for quite a long time.

0:34:570:35:01

-Do you like it?

-I love it, but it's never used.

0:35:010:35:04

It's been in a cupboard for 60 years!

0:35:040:35:07

60?! That's a long time to be in a cupboard!

0:35:070:35:10

Yes, but it's untouched, it's unbroken.

0:35:100:35:13

-Where did it come from?

-It was my grandmother's.

0:35:130:35:16

-It was passed down through the family.

-And come to you.

-Yes.

0:35:160:35:20

Why do you want to sell it now?

0:35:200:35:22

I'm moving to a smaller house. Down-sizing.

0:35:220:35:25

People don't use these sort of things these days, do they?

0:35:250:35:29

They don't, you know.

0:35:290:35:30

Honey pots, I suppose, are viewed as being a bit old-fashioned nowadays, and jam pots.

0:35:300:35:36

Now we just spread it straight from the jar!

0:35:360:35:39

-Or squeeze the honey from the tube!

-Even that!

0:35:390:35:42

What do you know about this type of porcelain?

0:35:420:35:45

-I know it's Belleek. I've no idea of the age of it.

-Right.

0:35:450:35:49

Belleek, of course, is perhaps the most famous factory in Ireland producing pottery and porcelain.

0:35:490:35:55

What we have here is typical Belleek porcelain.

0:35:550:35:59

Quite thin porcelain and the porcelain was poured into the mould and poured out very quickly.

0:35:590:36:06

So you'd almost get a sort of eggshell-like depth to it.

0:36:060:36:10

And the basketwork moulding is typical of this type of porcelain.

0:36:100:36:17

It is quite robust as a piece of Belleek goes.

0:36:170:36:19

The later works were very intricate, almost rope-twist pierced work.

0:36:190:36:25

Marine motifs were incorporated in the decorative designs.

0:36:250:36:30

-This one is quite...

-Robust.

-..a solid design by comparison.

0:36:300:36:34

I love the rustic base it's on

0:36:340:36:36

and these three little supports.

0:36:360:36:38

It's beautifully moulded to give every detail.

0:36:380:36:42

So let's tip it up

0:36:420:36:44

and see how old it is.

0:36:440:36:46

There we go, we've got the black printed mark here.

0:36:460:36:49

Now, the history of the factory is divided into periods.

0:36:490:36:53

This mark dates from the third period

0:36:530:36:56

where this Celtic knot motif was added to the main mark.

0:36:560:37:01

That tells me exactly that this was made between 1926 and 1946.

0:37:010:37:05

-That would fit in.

-That would fit in with its history?

0:37:050:37:08

-I thought about 1920s, yes.

-There we go. OK.

0:37:080:37:12

So, what about value? Any ideas what that might make at auction?

0:37:120:37:15

I don't know. I really honestly don't know.

0:37:150:37:18

-I'm going to say two to three hundred.

-Wow.

0:37:180:37:21

-I'm amazed.

-It's a nice thing.

0:37:210:37:23

I hope it certainly makes the top end of that

0:37:230:37:26

-if not a bit more for you. Would you like to put a reserve on it?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:37:260:37:30

-What, for 200?

-Yes, I think so.

0:37:300:37:33

-I'm glad you've unearthed it and brought it along.

-Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:37:330:37:37

-Now, Olive.

-Yes.

-I must admit, when I first saw the box

0:37:440:37:48

that you brought out of your bag, I thought, "Here we go again!

0:37:480:37:52

-"Bog-standard service medals." But no, I was wrong.

-Yeah.

0:37:520:37:55

When I opened it, the first thing that struck me was a good-sized silver medal

0:37:550:38:03

with the all-important words, "For courage".

0:38:030:38:05

What can you tell me about this medal? How's it come to be in your family?

0:38:050:38:10

A friend of the family gave it to me

0:38:100:38:13

about 20, 25 years ago

0:38:130:38:15

and he was very proud of his brother. It belonged to his brother.

0:38:150:38:20

-So it was...

-He gave it to me cos he knew I would look after it.

0:38:200:38:24

You have. It's in very good condition.

0:38:240:38:26

Before we get into the detail I noticed there was a repair to the top

0:38:260:38:33

which has a bearing on the value.

0:38:330:38:35

Let's look at the medal itself.

0:38:350:38:37

It's a medal that was first issued in 1918.

0:38:370:38:40

-Right.

-It's for dedication or bravery or devotion in duty.

0:38:400:38:46

-It was awarded to the RAF.

-To pilots.

-To those in the RAF. Pilots.

0:38:460:38:52

-Because I understand he was a pilot?

-He was a Spitfire pilot.

-Really?

0:38:520:38:56

-And did he survive the war?

-No, he was shot down over Germany.

0:38:560:39:00

-I think about 1941.

-Right. Cos I see you've also brought in

0:39:000:39:03

some interesting paperwork here as well.

0:39:030:39:06

We've got the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

0:39:060:39:09

-who have provided you with a photograph of his grave.

-His grave, yes.

0:39:090:39:15

-So we've got Squadron Leader Farmery.

-Farmery.

0:39:150:39:19

Squadron Leader Farmery with the DFM after his name,

0:39:190:39:23

which is the Distinguished Flying Medal that we see here.

0:39:230:39:26

-He's buried in a Berlin cemetery, I see.

-Yes.

0:39:260:39:31

So we've got that, again a nice tie-in when dealing with medals,

0:39:310:39:34

it's all about history. That's what the buyers are buying into,

0:39:340:39:39

-the history surrounding this medal. We don't know why he was awarded this.

-No.

0:39:390:39:44

But somewhere that will be recorded. And that is probably what the buyer

0:39:440:39:48

will be doing after this.

0:39:480:39:50

He'll look into the history and research of it.

0:39:500:39:53

-Where does it live now? Is it...

-It's just in a drawer at home.

0:39:530:39:58

-Is it?

-It's sad, really.

0:39:580:40:00

If you sell medals like these, they go to specialist buyers who are interested

0:40:000:40:05

-and they're going to...

-They're going to look after it.

-Exactly.

0:40:050:40:08

Any idea of value? Have you ever...

0:40:080:40:10

No, I didn't really think it would be worth anything, really, no.

0:40:100:40:15

-You almost didn't bring it in.

-I thought there'd be loads of them. I nearly didn't bring it.

0:40:150:40:20

I would say that at auction, a sensible estimate for a medal of this type,

0:40:200:40:25

-put it in with an estimate of 400 to 600...

-Gosh!

0:40:250:40:28

-400 to £600.

-Right!

-Not bad for something languishing in the drawer.

0:40:280:40:33

Now, I'm quietly confident that it will make more than that.

0:40:330:40:36

Shall we put a reserve on it at the bottom figure of 400?

0:40:360:40:39

I'd hate for it, on the day, to go for any less than that.

0:40:390:40:43

I think you should be looking forward to it almost having a new lease of life.

0:40:430:40:48

-Yes.

-In a fresh pair of hands.

-Yes. Somebody to love it.

0:40:480:40:52

That's the end of our valuations at Nantwich.

0:40:520:40:55

We've got some interesting items going off to auction.

0:40:550:40:58

Today, Knutsford is a busy, modern, bustling town

0:41:060:41:10

which has many upmarket bars, restaurants and shops,

0:41:100:41:13

but it still retains much of the charm and architectural features

0:41:130:41:17

it boasted nearly 200 years ago,

0:41:170:41:20

when it was home to the town's favourite daughter.

0:41:200:41:23

I am, of course, talking about Elizabeth Gaskell,

0:41:250:41:28

the Victorian authoress - a contemporary of Charles Dickens

0:41:280:41:32

and a great friend and biographer of Charlotte Bronte,

0:41:320:41:35

whose works have survived today to give us hours of reading pleasure,

0:41:350:41:40

and it's clear to see the people of Knutsford had a soft spot

0:41:400:41:43

for Elizabeth Gaskell, because her name has been immortalised in stone

0:41:430:41:47

in this tower, which was built in 1907,

0:41:470:41:50

and it's aptly named the Gaskell Memorial Tower.

0:41:500:41:53

Mrs Gaskell was born Elizabeth Stevenson on 29th September 1810,

0:41:540:41:59

in Chelsea, London.

0:41:590:42:01

She was the daughter of William Stevenson,

0:42:010:42:03

a Unitarian minister, and his wife Elizabeth,

0:42:030:42:06

whose father farmed at Sandle Bridge, near Knutsford.

0:42:060:42:09

Tragedy struck young Elizabeth's life at the tender age of 13 months,

0:42:090:42:14

when her mother died.

0:42:140:42:16

Her father was left bewildered and unable to cope

0:42:160:42:18

and young Elizabeth was sent to live with her mother's sister,

0:42:180:42:21

Mrs Hannah Lumb, in the town of Knutsford.

0:42:210:42:25

Aunt Hannah was like a mother to Elizabeth

0:42:320:42:35

and they both lived here very happily,

0:42:350:42:37

in this very impressive townhouse. Just look at this.

0:42:370:42:41

What an architectural delight.

0:42:410:42:43

Back then, it was called the Heath but it's since been renamed Heathwaite House.

0:42:430:42:48

Look over there. The aspect.

0:42:480:42:50

That hasn't changed that much.

0:42:500:42:52

The cars and road wouldn't be there

0:42:520:42:54

but that was one vast tract

0:42:540:42:56

of grassland.

0:42:560:42:58

And to find out more about Elizabeth in the early years,

0:42:580:43:01

I've come to talk to one of the Gaskell biographers, Shirley Foster.

0:43:010:43:05

Shirley is a senior lecturer at the University of Sheffield

0:43:050:43:09

and has written extensively on the subject of Mrs Gaskell.

0:43:090:43:13

Shirley, thank you very much for meeting up with me today

0:43:150:43:18

and talking about Elizabeth, here in the garden she grew up in,

0:43:180:43:21

which is lovely, isn't it?

0:43:210:43:23

What sort of childhood did she have here, growing up?

0:43:230:43:27

Well, as you know, she came here from London.

0:43:270:43:29

She was virtually orphaned, although her father remarried.

0:43:290:43:32

She was brought up by Aunt Lumb and I think she had a very warm and...

0:43:320:43:37

-..embracing sort of family.

-..embracing family around,

0:43:370:43:41

and other families close by.

0:43:410:43:43

What inspired her to become a writer?

0:43:430:43:46

Well, I think partly because she read so much.

0:43:460:43:49

In Manchester Library, they have what's called her commonplace book,

0:43:490:43:53

and she copied out folk songs and stories and things.

0:43:530:43:55

What sort of age are we talking about? As a teenager - 12, 13?

0:43:550:43:59

Yes, she was about 13, 14, 15.

0:43:590:44:04

And then between 16 and 19 she did visit back in London,

0:44:040:44:07

but we know that when she was at school she went to visit

0:44:070:44:10

a house called Clopton Hall.

0:44:100:44:12

-Where's that?

-In Warwickshire. It was a school visit.

0:44:120:44:16

She wrote about it. It was published later, in 1840,

0:44:160:44:19

and it's a great account, full of lovely grisly detail, about a girl who was buried alive.

0:44:190:44:24

-So she had a great imagination?

-A great eye for good stories, yes.

0:44:240:44:27

A brilliant writer. The people of Knutsford in the past

0:44:270:44:30

have obviously embraced her, taken her to heart.

0:44:300:44:33

How does Knutsford feature in a lot of her work?

0:44:330:44:36

It's the background to quite a few stories. Obviously Cranford, but...

0:44:360:44:40

-That's the big one.

-That's a big one,

0:44:400:44:42

but also it's Duncombe in Mr Harrison's Confessions, a novella.

0:44:420:44:47

It's Hollingford in Wives And Daughters.

0:44:470:44:50

It also appears in a short story called The Squire's Story,

0:44:500:44:54

which is about a highwayman who lived next door. I'm not sure which side.

0:44:540:44:58

-Really?

-Yes. And she has some lovely stories about Cranford old ladies

0:44:580:45:02

and obviously she had a real ear for picking up gossip and details,

0:45:020:45:07

little details that were going to be interesting.

0:45:070:45:10

What do you think of Cranford? You're very close to the Gaskell...

0:45:100:45:13

I enjoy it very much and I think it did bring out the way in which...

0:45:130:45:17

It's a light touch but it's a serious book.

0:45:170:45:21

It deals with some serious issues but it's got a lovely light touch.

0:45:210:45:24

-It's stood the test of time, hasn't it?

-It has.

0:45:240:45:28

It's not just a dated old-fashioned story,

0:45:280:45:31

and I think you really do sympathise with the people.

0:45:310:45:34

-She's done it very well.

-It's a classic.

0:45:340:45:36

It is a classic. Absolutely, yes.

0:45:360:45:38

In her adult life,

0:45:380:45:39

Elizabeth devoted much of her time to helping the poor.

0:45:390:45:43

She married a Unitarian minister and moved to Manchester,

0:45:430:45:46

a city worlds apart from the quaint, sleepy town of Knutsford.

0:45:460:45:50

Her early upbringing and religious beliefs equipped her

0:45:500:45:54

with the compassion she needed to take on this new role.

0:45:540:45:58

And this is where Elizabeth worshipped as a young child,

0:45:590:46:02

when she grew up in Knutsford.

0:46:020:46:04

It's the Brook Street Unitarian Chapel.

0:46:040:46:07

Shall we go inside? After you, Shirley.

0:46:070:46:09

What was particular to the beliefs and doctrines of the Unitarians,

0:46:120:46:17

let's say compared to other Christian dominations of the day?

0:46:170:46:20

Apart from the fact that they didn't believe in the divinity of Christ,

0:46:200:46:24

it was really a religion of what you might say rational benevolence.

0:46:240:46:28

They believed in the essential goodness of everybody

0:46:280:46:31

and the potential for everybody to be good,

0:46:310:46:33

and also rejected the idea of damnation.

0:46:330:46:35

How did religion shape her novels?

0:46:350:46:38

Well, you find an emphasis on love, compassion, again, and forgiveness.

0:46:380:46:45

There are several novels in which characters work out their own

0:46:450:46:48

salvation, and that includes learning to forgive other people

0:46:480:46:51

-and forgiving themselves too.

-She was compassionate towards the poor.

-Yes.

0:46:510:46:57

In life but also in her novels, especially in Ruth. The fallen woman.

0:46:570:47:00

Of course. It is a novel about a young girl who is seduced,

0:47:000:47:03

becomes pregnant, but then is allowed to be redeemed by her own good life,

0:47:030:47:08

but what was so shocking was that people felt it was something that shouldn't be written about.

0:47:080:47:13

It was something that they all knew about but they didn't really want brought out into the open.

0:47:130:47:17

And of course, by doing that, she was doing a very brave thing.

0:47:170:47:21

-It was very progressive.

-It was.

0:47:210:47:23

It was very radical, yes.

0:47:230:47:25

And how was that reviewed by the critics of the day,

0:47:250:47:29

and also the readers?

0:47:290:47:31

Well, some readers really responded well,

0:47:310:47:34

and people like Charles Dickens, I think it's important to note,

0:47:340:47:38

did think very highly of it, because he much respected what she'd done,

0:47:380:47:42

but there were those who were deeply shocked.

0:47:420:47:45

Some members of the congregation, the Unitarian Church in Manchester,

0:47:450:47:48

burnt it, and a famous instance is a librarian who took it off the shelves

0:47:480:47:53

because it was not fit for family reading.

0:47:530:47:56

So I think that was one of the things...

0:47:560:47:58

-It's very hard to understand today.

-Yes.

0:47:580:48:01

On 12th November in 1865, at her retirement home in Hampshire,

0:48:020:48:06

Elizabeth Gaskell suddenly died in mid-sentence

0:48:060:48:10

and it later transpires she died of heart failure.

0:48:100:48:13

Elizabeth was only 55 at the time.

0:48:130:48:16

Her body was brought back here to Knutsford, to the town she loved

0:48:160:48:20

in her formative years

0:48:200:48:22

and she often wrote about in her more gentle novels.

0:48:220:48:26

Elizabeth would never have thought that she'd end up

0:48:260:48:29

being one of the most highly regarded Victorian novelists,

0:48:290:48:32

and some 150 years after her death,

0:48:320:48:35

people are still enjoying reading and looking at her works.

0:48:350:48:39

Let's have a quick reminder of all the items we're taking off to auction.

0:48:470:48:51

Kate's sure that June's gold watch chain

0:48:510:48:54

will catch the bidders' attention.

0:48:540:48:57

Remember Barbara's mechanised money box?

0:48:570:49:00

Did Will upset her with that £80-£120 estimate?

0:49:000:49:04

Oh! I've been shot. Well done.

0:49:040:49:07

Jill's Belleek honey pot has been in the cupboard for 60 years.

0:49:070:49:11

Will the bidders be buzzing round it at the auction rooms?

0:49:110:49:15

Olive had no idea how sought after her Distinguished Flying Medal was.

0:49:150:49:20

-You almost didn't bring it in.

-I thought there'd be loads of them! I nearly didn't bring it.

0:49:200:49:25

Now, since Will valued that medal,

0:49:250:49:27

there have been developments with the story,

0:49:270:49:30

as I found out from auctioneer Adam Partridge.

0:49:300:49:33

Well, Olive's been in touch with us and she's found three more medals.

0:49:350:49:39

As good as this?

0:49:390:49:41

No, these are more standard World War II medals.

0:49:410:49:44

This one's a good one, the Air Crew Europe Star.

0:49:440:49:47

That's worth over £100 on its own, thereabouts.

0:49:470:49:50

These two are standard World War II medals.

0:49:500:49:53

Which everybody was issued. Yeah. OK.

0:49:530:49:56

So that's a bit rarer, but this is the really important one.

0:49:560:49:59

It's so nice to have this extra information

0:49:590:50:02

about Squadron Leader CJ Farmery.

0:50:020:50:06

Are you putting the four into one lot or splitting them?

0:50:060:50:09

-We thought it appropriate to include those with those.

-Yes.

0:50:090:50:12

-Assuming they came from the same recipient. It's acting on her information.

-OK.

0:50:120:50:18

-We had four to six on that.

-We've upped it to five to seven.

0:50:180:50:22

I see where you're going! Yeah!

0:50:220:50:24

That one makes them worth a bit more but those two not so interesting.

0:50:240:50:29

-Has there been any interest on this?

-Yeah. A lot.

0:50:290:50:32

Are we going to see more than £700?

0:50:320:50:35

Yeah. Fasten your seatbelts!

0:50:350:50:37

-It's going to fly!

-They are going to fly and I would expect four figures.

0:50:370:50:43

-That's what we like to see. Well done, Adam.

-Thank you very much.

0:50:430:50:46

The auction house is linked to the internet so there could be plenty of interest from all around the world.

0:50:480:50:54

Now it's time to sell the gold chain. Fingers crossed.

0:50:540:50:58

There's a lot of gold here, June, isn't there?

0:50:580:51:01

It's that chain which can be worn as a bracelet, which Kate has valued at £300-£500.

0:51:010:51:05

You actually bought this at a fair where we held the valuation day,

0:51:050:51:10

so it's all come home again.

0:51:100:51:12

It's on home territory. Let's see how it goes in the room.

0:51:120:51:17

It's all now down to this lot, the bidders. Here we go.

0:51:170:51:20

735 is the nine carat gold chain and bracelet.

0:51:200:51:22

Chain-cum-bracelet, about 57 grams, this one.

0:51:220:51:27

And I'm bid 320, 340, 360. Is there 380 now?

0:51:270:51:31

-Yes.

-360's bid. 380, 420. 420, I'm out.

0:51:310:51:35

420, front row.

0:51:350:51:37

Any more now?

0:51:370:51:39

At 420? All done, then, £420.

0:51:390:51:42

-Gosh, that was quick.

-420. It just flew, didn't it?

0:51:420:51:46

-Straight in, straight out. You've got to be happy.

-Yes.

0:51:460:51:49

-15% commission, don't forget.

-Yes.

-Adam's got to earn his supper.

0:51:490:51:52

-He has. Bless him.

-Bless him. He's doing a fantastic job.

0:51:520:51:56

-What are you going to put the money towards?

-Maybe a balloon flight.

0:51:560:52:01

-Ooh!

-Have you ever done that?

-No.

-I have done one. It was brilliant.

0:52:010:52:04

It was very good.

0:52:040:52:05

35, 40, 45.

0:52:050:52:08

35. All done, 35.

0:52:080:52:11

This is quite rare. It's a money box. How many people save nowadays?

0:52:110:52:15

We've got £80 to £120 on your money box, haven't we, Barbara?

0:52:150:52:20

-And this cost about £40 some 30-odd years ago.

-Yes, it did.

0:52:200:52:23

-Yeah.

-Did you manage to save much in it, or was it just a novelty?

0:52:230:52:27

-Just a novelty.

-It's great fun, though, isn't it?

0:52:270:52:30

-It is, yes.

-It caught Will's eye, that's for sure.

0:52:300:52:33

-You've put £80 to £120 on this.

-That's right.

0:52:330:52:36

The only doubt we had on the day was period or not because a lot of these were reproduced

0:52:360:52:42

which had the effect of making the market a bit unsteady

0:52:420:52:46

because people weren't sure.

0:52:460:52:48

But having had a good look at it,

0:52:480:52:50

-I think it's right.

-Yeah.

-It's got the right patina,

0:52:500:52:53

good colour finish on it, the paint's nicely worn.

0:52:530:52:57

And great fun. I might save a few pennies if I had this!

0:52:570:53:00

It's great fun. Brilliant.

0:53:000:53:02

-Let's see what this lot think. Good luck!

-Thank you.

0:53:020:53:05

It's down to the bidders. Here we go. It's going under the hammer now.

0:53:050:53:09

590. There we are. I'm bid 95.

0:53:090:53:13

And 100. And 110. Is there 120?

0:53:130:53:15

-Great.

-110 is bid.

0:53:150:53:17

£110. Are you all done on this one? At 110. Any more now?

0:53:170:53:20

110.

0:53:200:53:22

-Brilliant.

-Sold it. £110.

0:53:220:53:24

-Thank you!

-That's great, isn't it?

0:53:240:53:27

-It is, really, yes. I'm happy about it.

-Happy with that?

-Yes.

0:53:270:53:30

Jill, the auction room is jam packed.

0:53:360:53:38

Look at it. There's certainly a buzz about this next lot

0:53:380:53:41

cos it's a Belleek honey pot. £200 to £300. Why are you flogging it?

0:53:410:53:45

It's been in a cupboard for 60 years, so I mean...

0:53:450:53:49

-That's why it's in good nick! Really?

-Yes.

0:53:490:53:53

-Tucked away safe.

-Never used.

0:53:530:53:55

-Belleek is so delicate. It's a real technical thing to put together.

-It is.

0:53:550:53:59

It's a particular type of porcelain that gives that distinctive look.

0:53:590:54:03

That lustrous glaze that it has.

0:54:030:54:05

-These are popular pots, the beehive.

-They always sell well.

-Fingers crossed!

0:54:050:54:10

The Belleek honey pot in the form of a bee hive.

0:54:100:54:13

Lot 340. It's very nice. Lot 340.

0:54:130:54:16

Who'll start me at £200?

0:54:160:54:18

-100, then. Let's get on.

-Come on! Get in there.

0:54:180:54:20

You're not going to bid 100 for it? 100. Ten.

0:54:200:54:23

120. 130. 140.

0:54:230:54:25

150. 160.

0:54:250:54:26

170. 180.

0:54:260:54:28

180 bid now. At 180. Is there 190? At 180.

0:54:280:54:32

190. 200?

0:54:320:54:34

At 190, then.

0:54:340:54:35

Anyone else now? 190.

0:54:350:54:39

-I'm afraid that just falls short.

-Oh!

0:54:390:54:42

You had a fixed reserve, didn't you?

0:54:430:54:46

Yes. It'll go back in the cupboard!

0:54:460:54:48

What, for another 60 years?

0:54:480:54:50

This next lot about to go under the hammer is so rare and is one of the nicest things I've seen on the show.

0:54:550:55:01

It's got great provenance. It belongs to Olive

0:55:010:55:04

who's selling this medal. £400 to £600

0:55:040:55:07

with the right paperwork which Will saw at the valuation day.

0:55:070:55:10

Since the valuation, I've had a chat to Adam Partridge and we've all discussed it

0:55:100:55:16

you've found three more medals, we're putting them all in as one lot

0:55:160:55:20

and we've revised the estimate £500 to £700.

0:55:200:55:25

But that particular medal, the Distinguished Flying Medal, could do really well.

0:55:250:55:30

Were you aware how valuable and rare this medal is?

0:55:300:55:36

-Not at all, no!

-Adam got really excited about it.

0:55:360:55:39

-He said there's been lots of interest.

-Gosh! Right!

0:55:390:55:43

And he is hoping, it's only a hunch,

0:55:430:55:47

but he's hoping it could do four figures.

0:55:470:55:50

-Crikey!

-That would be nice.

0:55:500:55:52

With the other three medals added in, just could do four figures.

0:55:520:55:56

We're going to find out right now. Here we go.

0:55:560:56:00

470 is the medal group to Sergeant,

0:56:000:56:02

later Squadron Leader Clifford John Farmery, RAF,

0:56:020:56:06

including his courage medal, a lovely medal group indeed.

0:56:060:56:09

-Lot 470. An awful lot of interest on this.

-Great.

0:56:090:56:13

I can start straight in at £1,050.

0:56:130:56:17

-Crikey!

-1,100 next, please?

0:56:170:56:21

1,050 bid. 1,050. Who's going 1,100?

0:56:210:56:24

50. 1,200.

0:56:240:56:25

1,250. 1,300.

0:56:250:56:27

1,350. 1,400.

0:56:270:56:29

1,450. 1,500.

0:56:290:56:31

1,550. 1,600.

0:56:310:56:33

-1,650. 1,700.

-There are two phone bidders waiting to come in!

0:56:330:56:36

1,700 on this phone. Is there 1,750 now?

0:56:360:56:39

-1,750.

-New phone bidder.

-Crikey!

0:56:410:56:44

1,850. 1,900.

0:56:440:56:47

1,950.

0:56:470:56:49

-Perfect.

-2,000.

0:56:490:56:51

Oh...

0:56:510:56:52

2,100.

0:56:520:56:53

2,200.

0:56:530:56:55

2,300.

0:56:550:56:57

You'll have to pick me up off the floor soon!

0:56:570:57:00

2,300 on Mark's phone there.

0:57:000:57:02

2,300. Is there 2,400?

0:57:020:57:05

2,300. Are you all done now? At £2,300. We sell at 2,300.

0:57:050:57:11

-The hammer's gone down.

-Wow!

-Gosh!

0:57:120:57:15

Did you get that? £2,300!

0:57:150:57:19

-Wow!

-Would have been cheap at estimate!

0:57:190:57:22

I hold my hands up there. That was brilliant.

0:57:220:57:24

-Brilliant, yeah.

-Anything to do with bravery, courage.

-Yes.

0:57:240:57:28

Like I say, it's a slice of history.

0:57:280:57:31

-I'm thrilled for you.

-I am as well.

-Thank you!

0:57:310:57:34

I'm so excited. OK, there is 15% commission to pay here.

0:57:340:57:38

-Yeah.

-What are you going to put the money towards?

0:57:380:57:41

Well, we just said a holiday.

0:57:410:57:43

-A holiday. Might be a better holiday now!

-A nice holiday now!

-Yes!

0:57:430:57:47

I'm just so shocked. It hasn't really sunk in yet.

0:57:470:57:51

Go and have a cup of tea. Sit down.

0:57:510:57:54

-A brandy, I think!

-A brandy, yeah!

0:57:540:57:56

What a day and what an auction!

0:58:040:58:06

It's all over for us, but Adam's still weaving his magic.

0:58:060:58:09

All credit to him. He's done us proud and so have our experts.

0:58:090:58:13

But seeing the smile on Olive's face

0:58:130:58:15

as she walked out the sale room

0:58:150:58:17

with a whopping £2,300 for the medal.

0:58:170:58:20

We fought our own personal battle here today and we won.

0:58:200:58:24

Join us next time for many more surprises.

0:58:240:58:26

Until then, it's cheerio from Cheshire!

0:58:260:58:29

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:490:58:52

Paul Martin and experts Kate Bliss and Will Axon visit Nantwich Civic Hall in Cheshire.

A quirky money box nearly delivers a fatal blow when Will puts money in it and Paul tries to hit a six with a celebrity-signed cricket bat. But it is a distinguished flying medal which takes the room by storm.

Meanwhile, Paul visits nearby Arley Hall to find out what it is like to run a stately home, and he tells the story of Knutsford's favourite daughter, the author Elizabeth Gaskell.


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