Barrow in Furness Flog It!


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Barrow in Furness

David Barby is rendered almost speechless by a collection of artwork and a possible Flog It! record, and Anita Manning is captivated by some Victorian needlework.


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Where am I today? Well, I'm in the ruins of Furness Abbey,

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one of the richest and most powerful Cistercian monasteries in the country.

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It's on the outskirts of the town it shares its name with, Barrow-in-Furness.

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Welcome to Flog It!, from Cumbria.

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These magnificent ruins are what's left of a once very imposing abbey.

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It was built on land here in 1127,

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granted by King Stephen, using local red sandstone, as you can see.

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Wonderful to touch the history.

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And because of the monks' incredible knowledge of

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agriculture and architecture, the power and the wealth of the abbey just grew and grew.

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They even had land holdings as far away as Ireland and the Isle of Man.

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But closer to home, they protected their business interests

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by focusing on trade with iron ore and wool from the Island of Walney.

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As well as Walney Island, the monks also came here to Piel Island,

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which is just across the water from their main abbey at Barrow.

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And they built this castle to defend their trading routes.

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Later on in the show, I'll be coming back here to find out a little bit more about the history of this

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island and how such a small place has come to have its very own king, but right now, let's go over to

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the valuation day and see if we can find some right royal treasures.

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Today we're in St Bernard's Catholic High School in Barrow,

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and this massive crowd look like they're ready to go straight back to the classroom.

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And who better to educate them than our two experts, the wonderful David Barby and Anita Manning!

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Well, it's now 9:30, it's time to get the doors open and see who goes straight to the top of the class...

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-or in detention!

-CHEERING

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So do stay with us because there could be a few surprises.

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-Oh!

-Oh!

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The one... The one that is absolutely a knock-out, really,

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is this one here.

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-Oh, I can't believe it!

-That's fantastic!

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Our experts have had a good rummage through all the bags and boxes,

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and it looks as if Anita could score an A with her first item.

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Alison, welcome to Flog It!

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It's lovely to have you along, and to bring this lovely item.

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Can you tell me, where did you get it?

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Well, it came from my father, and I would imagine that it came from

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the time when he was working as a bank manager in the City of London.

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And I think, from what I've found out today, really,

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more than anything else, that this silversmith...

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-Stuart Devlin.

-Stuart Devlin, that's right. I'd never heard of him before.

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He was one of the most prestigious silversmiths in the latter part of the 20th century.

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-That's amazing.

-Came from Australia.

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-I heard that.

-But workshops in London.

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Yes. Well, I think...

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I understand that he studied in London

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and then went back to Australia,

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and then in the mid-60s he wanted to set up on his own

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and I presume that he asked my father for a loan.

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-And presumably my father gave him a loan.

-Well, that was wonderful.

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And of course, those were the days when your bank manager, you knew

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who he was, he would help you, he would give you advice

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on your business and help you along the rocky road.

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I don't think my father would have been an easy person

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to get a loan out of, quite honestly,

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so I think he must have been impressed by this young man.

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Well, let's have a look at it. I mean, it is a splendid piece and it is in its original case.

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-Yes.

-I mean, it has a wonderful 20th century look about it, you know?

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-We are looking at the '60s, '70s, that type of modernist design.

-Yes.

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We have our hallmarks here, with the dates and...

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I would imagine it will be around about '65, '66?

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It must be, because if he was just setting up.

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And we have this wonderful twisted handle with the gilt...

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-almost like trellis work.

-Yeah.

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And it's very pleasing to the eye, and it's beautifully made.

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But with a fairly modern item like this, Alison,

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it's difficult to be absolutely accurate.

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And I'm really just taking a kind of stab in the dark, here.

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But my feeling is that perhaps

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between 120 and 180 is where we should

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pitch the estimate.

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-We'll know on the day, we'll find the right price.

-Yes.

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120 to 180,

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and I think with a firm reserve of 120.

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-Yes.

-If it doesn't make 120...

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Well, I'm looking at it with new eyes now,

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so if it doesn't sell, I shall bring it home again.

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But I hope it will, I hope someone will get it who appreciates it.

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I've enjoyed looking at it,

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I've enjoyed handling it and I'm sure it will do very well.

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-So thank you for bringing it along.

-Thank you very much as well.

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Tim, it's absolutely ginormous.

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I've never seen such a large piece of Carlton Ware before.

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Does it belong to you or Diana?

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No, It was given to a coffee morning that we help at,

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kindly donated.

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Rather like one of these...

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-Tables, second-hand tables?

-Very much so.

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We thought it might be worth something a little more,

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-so we didn't want to sell it on the coffee morning.

-How astute of you, really.

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-And how many people would have done that?

-Who knows?

-Who knows?

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-Did the other piece come from...?

-From the same place, yes.

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-They are so diverse, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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Let's look at this one first.

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-I think it's lovely.

-Yeah.

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I like Carlton Ware, because you've got the major designers of the '20s,

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you've got the sort of Moorcroft pieces,

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you've got Clarice Cliff,

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and I think Carlton Ware should somewhere be at the top.

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The factory started in 1897, and Carlton Ware was one of the product names.

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And they developed, I suppose, more in the 1920s and '30s,

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with very striking designs in what was a style called Art Deco.

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So this is in the Art Deco style.

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The whole concept of putting it on a black ground is typical of the 1920s.

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-Inside, you have this wonderful green sort of lustre.

-Yeah.

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You see that on Maling ware that was made up at Newcastle.

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But I think this inside here is lovely.

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The whole thing is beautiful. Are there any features that you've noticed?

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There's a feature...

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just here, silver, and also on the base there

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is a label as well on the base, which I didn't know what that was.

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Right, OK. That little silver mark there is not part of the design.

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-That's the remnants of the Carlton Ware label that was glued on.

-Right.

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Now that tells me - and looking inside, cos there's no flower debris

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inside or staining - that this has never been used as a flower vase.

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-Right.

-It's probably been used to look at

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as a work of art, but that's about it.

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If I turn it upside down...

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Oh, I can see the mark on the bottom.

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First of all we have the transfer mark, which is Carlton Ware,

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and then the other one, which is...

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Deansgate, and it looks like... would it be

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Raywards, Manchester?

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Was that a store?

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I don't know. I know Deansgate, but I don't know Wards.

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That was the place to shop, wasn't it?

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So there's the retail label and, again, it's not been washed off.

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And we also have the Carlton Ware label,

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which hasn't been washed off. So it's in pristine condition.

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And I think it's the size which is so important.

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Something as large as this,

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I'm sure somebody is going to pay £350 to £500.

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-Oh, right. Good.

-What about this poor little piece of pottery?

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What can you tell me about this? Nothing, we know nothing about it.

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It's a Staffordshire flat figure, that's as much as we know.

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With this, this is cottage art. Cottage art

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of the mid-19th century. Made in Staffordshire,

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and it's remarkable that you said a flat back.

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Well, of course, the back is always flat.

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You'd never see the back if it was on a mantelpiece,

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so there's no need to decorate it.

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So this figure here represents Sebastopol during the Crimean War.

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You can't see it,

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but there's a label right at the very front

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which has an impressed mark, and if you get it in the right light

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you can see Sebastopol.

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There we have two soldiers either side of a gateway, Sebastopol.

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And there we have a French flag at the side there.

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Nice little piece of Staffordshire.

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-After all that, it's only worth 60, £70.

-Oh!

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-But I think we'll put a reserve of £50 on it.

-Yeah.

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-OK? Would you be happy?

-That's great.

-That's good.

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Just bear in mind

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when they go up for auction, you might come out

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-with about £400 to £500 to donate to the charity.

-Yeah.

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Do you think the nuns will be happy?

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I think they'll be very happy, yeah. Very happy.

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Bob, Melissa, do you know what you've got here?

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Well, it's a lion.

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It's a naked lady riding a lion, isn't it?

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-It's a bit of Parian ware.

-Yeah.

-A Victorian invention. This was made

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at the Minton factory, and it was modelled by a guy called John Bell.

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The reason it's called Parian is because it's named after

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the purifying white marble that came from the island of Paros in Greece.

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That's where it's quarried.

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But this isn't white marble.

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This is a hard paste porcelain.

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And this dates to around about 1860, 1870.

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That's about the time that my great-great-grandfather moved to Houghton.

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-Has this been in the family a long time?

-I imagine so.

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I remember it when I was a child, I was four, late '50s, early '60s,

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-and it was on my grandparents' dresser. With two ladies as well.

-Oh, really?

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-Which have disappeared, so I think my dad sold them at the boot sale.

-Parian figures as well?

-I think so.

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And it is actually beautiful, and it's a good decorative height.

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It's not too small, it's not too big, it will go anywhere in the house.

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And that's what it was designed for back in the 1860s.

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And it was a way of introducing the naked female figure into the household.

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-She does look very cold.

-She does look very cold, doesn't she?

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I can sit here and comfortably say we've seen a lot of Parian ware

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on the show before, and it does vary from 150

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all the way to £600 or £700. Let's give this a fair chance.

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I'm gonna stick my neck out and say £200 to £300.

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OK?

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-Can we put a reserve on this at £170?

-OK.

-Protect it, make sure it sells

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nothing under 170, because otherwise it means that buyers weren't there on the day.

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-Right.

-Keep it, put it in another auction room on another day.

-Yeah.

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If I kept it and it was on the mantelpiece, something would happen,

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it would get broken. Four children about, so...

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I'm very clumsy.

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Well, I think she's beautiful, and it's so beautifully modelled.

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-It's going to find a new home.

-It is realistic, innit? Very.

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Jean, this is a wonderful object, an absolutely delightful thing.

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Tell me, where did you get it?

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Well, it came from my mother's home in Norway.

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It was in my grandparents' home there, and then when they died, my mother got it.

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And then she's always had it while she's been having her own house. It's something I always remember.

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Yes. Did you visit your grandmother's house in Norway?

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No, it was burned down before...

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I see, I see. But you have brought us along a photograph...

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-Yes.

-..of the interior of your grandmother's house, and it's showing this wonderful bowl.

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-Yes, on the back, there.

-I think it's marvellous.

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Well, let's have a look at it, Jean.

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It comes from possibly Austria or Germany.

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It's in the style of WMF, with this decorative white metal.

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But we had a wee look earlier on underneath,

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we're not going to do it now, and it wasn't WMF, but it's in the style of.

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Right.

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It has these wonderful sweeping handles,

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and a marvellous border here which has an Edwardian feel about it.

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And underneath we have...

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an Art Nouveau motif. We have a wee bit of a mixture

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of styles here, not detracting from the object at all.

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Inside, we have this glass liner

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which has been cut on the top in this fan shape.

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Again, the Art Nouveau period -

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they would use that type of motif then.

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The bowl was probably used for fruit.

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Right, I was always wondering what it was.

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I feel that we should put the estimate perhaps 100 to 150.

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Now, would you be happy to let it go at that?

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Yes, yes.

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We will put a reserve of £100 on it,

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it means we will not sell it below that.

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-We have no discretion on it.

-Right.

-I'm hoping for more,

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because I personally think

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-it's a lovely, lovely thing.

-Yes, right...

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-Let's hope it flies at the auction.

-Thank you.

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Today I'm off to somewhere very special, Piel Island.

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You can see it just over there on the brow, there, on the horizon.

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Now, I believe the King of Piel himself is coming to pick me up, so I'm very honoured.

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And, in fact, there he is now in that four-wheel-drive.

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I don't know how often the king or the queen get over to the shops, so

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I've brought them a basket full of food, a nice packed lunch we can all enjoy today.

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I'm keen to find out more about the island, and who better to tell me than this chap,

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Steve Chattaway, who's the current landlord of the Ship Inn pub of Piel Island,

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-which means you are the current king, Steve.

-I am.

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Now, should I call you Your Highness or Steve?

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-Steve's fine.

-I think that's better, don't you?

-Definitely.

-Look what I brought.

-Thank you very much.

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-This is courtesy of us, from Flog It!

-Makes a change from making my own bread.

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How often do you make this trip across to the mainland?

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It depends how busy the island is and how many stores we go through, how much beer we sell,

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but two or three times a week, usually.

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And are these sands dangerous?

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-It's very tidal here, isn't it?

-They can be dangerous.

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I wouldn't recommend anybody going across without local knowledge or taking advice first.

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-So can we jump in?

-Course we can. Climb aboard.

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Piel Island is located just off the Furness Peninsula, a stone's throw away from Barrow-in-Furness.

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There is evidence of human habitation on the island going back at least 3,000 years,

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and it was probably visited by the Celts and later the Romans during their conquest of Britain.

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The island boasts a castle, Piel Castle, which was built around 1327

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by the monks that resided at Furness Abbey in Barrow,

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and it was mainly used as a fortified warehouse for the storage of grain and wool.

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There is also an inn on Piel Island called The Ship, and although its origins are obscure,

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it is thought to date back at least 300 years.

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Welcome to Piel Island.

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Oh, thank you very much. Innit lovely?!

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So what brought you over to the island?

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-Oh, it's... We've been coming over since we were kids...

-Yeah.

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Just can't keep away from the place.

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Cos we sail too, so we used to come over every weekend with the yacht

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when the kids were little, it was fantastic.

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-You applied for the job of landlord of the pub?

-Yes. Yeah, we did.

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-And how many people applied for that?

-There was 300 applicants,

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from all over the world, from Russia, Poland, America.

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Everybody fancied being a king. PAUL LAUGHS

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We were fortunate enough to be selected by the local council.

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And obviously, with the pub, you inherit the title.

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How does that work and why does that work?

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In 1487 a chap called Lambert Simnel invaded with 3,000 mercenaries.

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-Yeah.

-With the intention of taking over the throne from Henry V.

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But what happened was, basically they got trounced at Stoke Field,

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Lambert Simnel was only a young boy at the time and finished up his time serving in the king's household.

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Ever since then, it's become a tradition that the landlord of the pub becomes the King of Piel Island.

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So we have a crown and we have a sword and a throne.

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So how long have you been landlord and king?

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We had a coronation last year on September the 13th.

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We've actually had the licence for about three years, but we've only been trading for two.

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-Are you enjoying it so far?

-Oh, it's absolutely fantastic.

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Absolutely fantastic. And it's quirky as well, being a king.

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What are your...sort of, royal duties?

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What do you have to do?

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The royal duties, basically you have to appoint knights.

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Services to the Crown, basically to the Crown and the island and the community.

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It's sort of like a reward, which is quite a big celebration and party.

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Any other duties?

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Well, you're entitled to the virtue of any maiden on the island.

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But there's not many of them around!

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What does your wife think of that?

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You can ask her if you like, she's here.

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Come on in, Sheila. We're only jesting, aren't we really?

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-Well, yes.

-What role do you have to do, as the queen?

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I live in Steve's shadow, really.

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I do all the background work and Steve is the face of the island.

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You're the king and queen of the island.

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Can I have a tour of your kingdom?

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-Of course you can.

-Show me round, come on then.

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Tell me the little bit more about the history of the pub.

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The pub goes back to about the 17th century...

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It originally, as far we can gather, it was a chandler's

0:19:030:19:06

and then evolved into a pub, and then a guesthouse and hotel.

0:19:060:19:10

How do the visitors get to the island?

0:19:120:19:15

They can walk across the sands is one way. We do guided walks and things.

0:19:150:19:19

Alternatively, they can get the ferry from Roa Island. There's a little 12 person ferry.

0:19:190:19:25

Or if you've got your own boat, you can sail here.

0:19:250:19:28

The Ship Inn is currently being refurbished.

0:19:280:19:30

When it re-opens, it's going to provide accommodation.

0:19:300:19:33

Conditions on the island are basic.

0:19:330:19:35

There's no mains electricity.

0:19:350:19:37

Instead, the generator is relied upon.

0:19:370:19:39

This doesn't stop the hordes of campers who come to Piel when the weather is good.

0:19:390:19:44

-I can see the ruins of the castle there. Shall we take a look?

-Yeah.

0:19:440:19:48

One of the major attractions on the island is Piel Castle, which is the most breathtaking of ruins.

0:19:500:19:56

Absolutely incredible!

0:20:020:20:04

-Isn't it?

-It's beautiful.

0:20:040:20:06

What does the castle date back to?

0:20:060:20:08

It dates back to the 12th century.

0:20:080:20:11

It was built by the Cistercians at Furness Abbey.

0:20:110:20:15

It was built as a warehouse and as a secure stronghold originally, because of the export of wool.

0:20:150:20:21

Can you imagine the Abbots at the time, were like the local mafia?

0:20:210:20:25

There was some serious money changing hands.

0:20:250:20:29

-They had to build something like this.

-You don't expect to see this when you get to the island, do you?

0:20:290:20:34

No. It's a really well-built castle.

0:20:340:20:37

It's not been a cheap and nasty affair.

0:20:370:20:39

It's a top of the range castle.

0:20:390:20:41

This is the bailey here, isn't it?

0:20:410:20:43

That's correct. We came through the gate house. This was actually where I was crowned King of Piel.

0:20:430:20:47

There was about 2,500 people on this inner bailey, sat on the walls and things.

0:20:470:20:52

-It was absolutely fantastic.

-What a ceremony.

0:20:520:20:54

What a view!

0:20:540:20:56

It's awesome, isn't it?

0:20:560:20:58

This is where we come every evening, we sit and see the sunsets and have a gin and tonic,

0:20:580:21:02

when everybody has gone home and it's nice and peaceful.

0:21:020:21:05

And you think, "Yes, it's worth it."

0:21:050:21:07

This is why we live here, yeah.

0:21:070:21:09

It may feel like a bleak outpost of the British Isles, but Piel has a unique charm all of its own.

0:21:110:21:16

I can just imagine what it's like on a sunny day.

0:21:160:21:19

Thank you so much for showing me around. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

0:21:190:21:23

I'm going to come back and have a pint when the pub is open.

0:21:230:21:26

-Please do.

-You're not sending me back the same way though, are you?

0:21:260:21:30

No, you've got the illustrious John, who's going to take you off.

0:21:300:21:33

-The Piel ferry.

-That Piel ferry, yes.

0:21:330:21:35

-I'll give it a go. Cheerio.

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:21:350:21:37

Good to see you, John.

0:21:370:21:39

I've got my brolly, because I feel it's going to pour down with rain.

0:21:420:21:46

We've had a fabulous morning so far.

0:22:040:22:06

Right now it's time for our first trip to the Kendal auction rooms, so while we make our way over there,

0:22:060:22:11

here's a quick recap just to jog your memory, of our experts' choices.

0:22:110:22:14

And hopefully they're all A+.

0:22:140:22:16

Alison inherited this paper knife made by a prestigious silversmith,

0:22:160:22:20

and Anita thinks it should go to the top of the class.

0:22:200:22:23

It's very pleasing to the eye and it's beautifully made.

0:22:230:22:27

Diane and Tim rescued this Carlton Ware vase

0:22:270:22:30

and Staffordshire flat back from a bric-a-brac table

0:22:300:22:33

to raise more money for charity.

0:22:330:22:35

I was delighted with Bob and Mel's Minton Parian ware.

0:22:350:22:39

It's been in the family a long time

0:22:390:22:41

and they're worried that it will get damaged.

0:22:410:22:43

If I kept it and it was on the mantelpiece, something would happen,

0:22:430:22:47

-it would get broken. Four children about, so...

-I'm very clumsy.

0:22:470:22:51

And, finally, Jean's majestic fruit bowl. It used to grace

0:22:510:22:55

her grandmother's sideboard, but it's time to find it a new home.

0:22:550:22:58

And this is where we're selling all our lots today,

0:23:020:23:05

the Kendal Auction Rooms in Kendal.

0:23:050:23:07

It's a very busy morning so, with a bit of luck,

0:23:070:23:09

there will be some eager bidding to raise the roof on all our lots.

0:23:090:23:12

Taking turns on the rostrum today are auctioneers Kevin Kendal,

0:23:120:23:16

and David Brookes. First up,

0:23:160:23:19

Kevin is selling Alison's paper knife,

0:23:190:23:22

and Alison has brought along her husband for moral support.

0:23:220:23:25

Right, this knife, a little bit special.

0:23:250:23:28

-Yes.

-We've upped the reserve...

-Yes.

0:23:280:23:31

..from 120 to £150. You've done a bit more research?

0:23:310:23:35

Well, I've found out that Stuart Devlin is still around and I've been in touch with him.

0:23:350:23:39

He didn't actually give it to my father, but it must have come from the Goldsmiths Company, I think.

0:23:390:23:45

-OK.

-And as Anita said, he designed the first lot of Australian decimal coins.

0:23:450:23:52

He is an Australian by birth.

0:23:520:23:54

So hopefully with this information and if the auctioneer knows this

0:23:540:23:57

and everybody's aware in the sale, it will put the value up. He is a sought-after artist?

0:23:570:24:01

He's one of the most prestigious silversmiths of the latter half of the 20th century.

0:24:010:24:07

-This might find its way back to Australia.

-I doubt it.

0:24:070:24:11

Silver parcel gilt paper knife. A very stylish piece, Stuart Devlin,

0:24:110:24:16

and I will start the bidding with me at £140.

0:24:160:24:19

-Yeah.

-Good, good.

0:24:190:24:22

140 bid now. 140 bid.

0:24:220:24:24

50, where? 150.

0:24:240:24:26

160. 170. 180?

0:24:260:24:29

180 now. 180 on commission.

0:24:290:24:31

We are selling away this time, then, at 180...

0:24:310:24:34

-Yes! We've done it.

-That was good.

0:24:340:24:37

-£180.

-I'm happy with that.

0:24:370:24:39

-That is exactly the right auction price for it.

-Yes.

0:24:390:24:44

Yes. I'm pleased that it did that.

0:24:440:24:45

Going under the hammer now we've got some real quality.

0:24:520:24:55

We've got a Staffordshire piece and a wonderful piece of Carlton Ware.

0:24:550:24:58

It's not a little bit, it's a MASSIVE piece.

0:24:580:25:01

We have the items but, unfortunately we don't have the owners.

0:25:010:25:04

They can't make it today. So good luck to Tim and Diane.

0:25:040:25:07

David's going to get on the phone when we've sold both of these. Here's the first lot.

0:25:070:25:11

Victorian Staffordshire flat back, the fort.

0:25:110:25:14

That's attractive enough.

0:25:140:25:15

50 for this, please? 50?

0:25:150:25:18

Start me 40, then, somewhere? £40?

0:25:180:25:21

No? £40?

0:25:210:25:22

Not as popular as they used to be, I'm afraid. £40, anywhere?

0:25:220:25:27

-No?

-Not one bid in the room. Oh.

0:25:270:25:31

-OK, here's the second...

-You can phone them!

0:25:310:25:33

Ok. Here's the Carlton Ware, top end, £500.

0:25:330:25:37

The Carlton Ware vase,

0:25:370:25:39

that's a nice large lump, there. Rather attractive.

0:25:390:25:43

and I have commission interest,

0:25:430:25:45

so I'm gonna have to start bidding with me at £340, lot 615.

0:25:450:25:51

-With me at £340?

-That's just sold it, really.

0:25:510:25:54

With the commissions I'm going in straight at £340, here to be sold.

0:25:540:25:58

340.

0:25:580:26:00

-Oh, good.

-360, is that?

-Yes.

-360.

0:26:000:26:02

380, now, with me?

0:26:020:26:03

-Yes.

-380. That's a 400?

-Yes.

0:26:030:26:07

I have 405 commission.

0:26:070:26:08

With me at £405, it's going, make no mistake.

0:26:080:26:12

Yes, the hammer's gone down.

0:26:140:26:15

We got the second one away, and that was mid estimate,

0:26:150:26:18

-so that was well done, David.

-That's good.

0:26:180:26:20

Now, this next lot is so unusual, I've not seen anything like it.

0:26:240:26:28

I kind of like it because it's so different. It's a fruit bowl

0:26:280:26:31

shaped like a boat and it belongs to June,

0:26:310:26:33

-and we're looking for 150-odd pounds?

-We're hoping so.

-Top end.

0:26:330:26:36

It's a nice thing.

0:26:360:26:38

I don't know how the bidders of Kendal are going to take to this,

0:26:380:26:41

-cos it's quite striking in design, isn't it?

-It is very exciting.

0:26:410:26:45

-I think it's a little bit exotic.

-Yeah.

-I love it.

0:26:450:26:49

Yeah, it's definitely got the Scandinavian kind of look about it, hasn't it?

0:26:490:26:53

When you think about designers like Georg Jensen,

0:26:530:26:56

you think, "Yes, different, but there's quality there."

0:26:560:26:59

Fingers crossed. Let's see what it does.

0:26:590:27:01

Art Nouveau pewter. Rather nice fruit bowl.

0:27:010:27:05

£100, anywhere? £80, I'm bid, thank you very much. 80.

0:27:050:27:09

85. 90. 95. 100.

0:27:090:27:13

Commission's out. 100 in the room, now.

0:27:130:27:15

In the room at £100. Any advance? To my right

0:27:150:27:18

-In the room at £100. 110.

-Great.

-Ah, yes!

-120.

0:27:180:27:23

In the room at £120. It's going in the room at £120.

0:27:230:27:28

-He's sold it.

-That's probably about the right price for it.

0:27:290:27:32

-Yeah, we did it, we did it.

-Great, it's sold!

0:27:320:27:34

Right, it's my turn to be the expert.

0:27:410:27:43

We've got some Parian ware, it's Minton, it belongs to Bob and Mel, who's just here. Hello!

0:27:430:27:49

-How've you been since the last time I saw you?

-Fine.

0:27:490:27:52

School holidays now. Enjoying it?

0:27:520:27:55

It's really fun, cos in the school holidays it's like...

0:27:550:27:58

-there's loads of things to do.

-Yeah.

0:27:580:28:00

Well, we've got £200 to £300 on this, Bob.

0:28:000:28:02

We've got a reserve of 170.

0:28:020:28:05

I hope I don't let you both down, do you know that?

0:28:050:28:09

I think we have to put our fingers together. Let's cross our fingers. OK, Mel? Oh, Mel's already done it.

0:28:090:28:15

Rather attractive piece of Minton Parian ware, Una and the Lion.

0:28:150:28:19

I have commission bids, so I'm going to have to start this one

0:28:190:28:24

between the two and go at £320.

0:28:240:28:26

-Oh, yes!

-£320.

-Straight in at the top end.

0:28:260:28:30

With me at 320. 340, anywhere?

0:28:300:28:32

At £320, now. With the commission at 320.

0:28:320:28:37

Straight in at £320, Mel!

0:28:380:28:41

So what's the money going towards?

0:28:410:28:43

-We'll recarpet my dad's house.

-Will you?

0:28:430:28:45

So he's doing his house up, is he, really?

0:28:450:28:48

Are you gonna get any money as well?

0:28:480:28:49

School holidays. What would you like to do, if you could?

0:28:490:28:53

-I'd like to go to London.

-You'd like to go to London, would you?

0:28:530:28:56

Ooh, do you really wanna go there?

0:28:560:28:58

-You get stuck in traffic.

-I want to go sightseeing.

-Sightseeing.

-See everything.

0:28:580:29:02

-Dad'll take you one day, won't you?

-At least she's not shopping.

-At least you're not shopping!

0:29:020:29:07

Not a bad start then but the real shocks are yet to come.

0:29:090:29:13

Oh, you'll get that fish and chips now.

0:29:130:29:16

But before we look to the future, let's turn our sites on the past.

0:29:160:29:20

Remember James Ramsden? He was one of the founding fathers

0:29:280:29:33

of modern Barrow, and helped the town become what it is today.

0:29:330:29:36

He introduced modern shipbuilding to Barrow in 1871,

0:29:360:29:40

which was the driving force behind the town's success and development.

0:29:400:29:44

The shipyards built some of the most advanced vessels

0:29:440:29:47

of the day from steam yachts to liners, cargo ships, and even submarines.

0:29:470:29:54

But it was in 1897 that the fortunes of Barrow's shipyards really changed.

0:29:540:30:01

They were bought by steel makers Vickers & Sons and arms manufacturers Maxim,

0:30:010:30:06

and they were immediately able to benefit from the soaring demands for re-armament.

0:30:060:30:11

As the order books filled up,

0:30:110:30:12

the town struggled to house the rapidly increasing labour force.

0:30:120:30:16

This housing shortage was so great that workers were forced to lodge on

0:30:160:30:21

the Atlantic liner Alaska, berthed in the nearby Devonshire Dock.

0:30:210:30:26

Necessity forced Vickers to find a solution, so they bought land here

0:30:260:30:30

on Walney Island just across the Walney Channel,

0:30:300:30:34

and in 1900 they built around 1,000 houses in two estates, and so Vickerstown was born.

0:30:340:30:40

It was designed as more than just a housing estate, developers envisioned self-sufficient,

0:30:400:30:47

classless communities where the man-made was balanced with nature.

0:30:470:30:52

But with 250 workers already living in a floating hostel,

0:30:520:30:56

these grand ideals proved impractical.

0:30:560:30:59

So plans were scaled down to give workers decent, basic living conditions

0:30:590:31:04

on the principle that a happy worker was a productive worker.

0:31:040:31:07

And far from being a classless community,

0:31:070:31:09

the estate layout segregated the workers from the management

0:31:090:31:13

and the majority of the houses were like this, built for the workers.

0:31:130:31:17

Homes like these were designed for the skilled people and foremen.

0:31:190:31:24

These grand villas with their wonderful views and large gardens were reserved for the elite.

0:31:260:31:31

The first tenant, David Mason, moved into this house,

0:31:440:31:47

28 Latona Street, in November 1900. Others were quick to follow.

0:31:470:31:52

By 1903, the population was more than 3,000,

0:31:520:31:56

and people were moving in even before the cottages were finished.

0:31:560:32:00

But not everybody was eligible, to become a tenant you had to be

0:32:000:32:03

a reliable worker and have a recommendation from the foreman.

0:32:030:32:07

And a house like this is typical of the type a foreman would have enjoyed,

0:32:100:32:14

and thanks to its current owners, who have lovingly restored it,

0:32:140:32:18

we can see what life was like back in the early 1900s in Vickerstown.

0:32:180:32:23

-And here are the couple, Russ and Nicola.

-Hello.

0:32:290:32:32

-Pleased to meet you.

-Pleased to meet you too.

0:32:320:32:34

What a talented couple, as well!

0:32:340:32:36

-Thank you.

-This is so impressive, just on first impressions it's like a mini museum.

0:32:360:32:41

It really is, but the whole house embraces you as well.

0:32:410:32:45

-So this was the foreman's cottage or the foreman's house?

-Yes.

0:32:450:32:49

We think it could be, yes.

0:32:490:32:50

So how does that differ from the ordinary worker?

0:32:500:32:53

He was probably on more money and therefore he's got a slightly bigger house here.

0:32:530:32:58

So he's got more enriched details with things compared to some

0:32:580:33:01

of the other houses that weren't as embellished.

0:33:010:33:05

So this is more like a three-up, three-down,

0:33:050:33:07

as opposed to a two-up, two-down.

0:33:070:33:09

This one has a hallway, the other ones in the street don't.

0:33:090:33:12

You are straight into the sitting room?

0:33:120:33:15

And a lot of them would have had outside toilets

0:33:150:33:17

whereas this one had one included in the house.

0:33:170:33:20

Attention to detail.

0:33:200:33:22

You spotted it!

0:33:220:33:24

Lots of it.

0:33:240:33:26

-Who's it down to?

-It's both of us.

0:33:260:33:28

We've both have got a good eye for things.

0:33:280:33:30

We both like the same things.

0:33:300:33:32

This was very fashionable, this look, in the early 1900s,

0:33:320:33:35

it reminds me of William Morris, you've got the whole theme going on.

0:33:350:33:38

It is very in keeping, we've done lots of research into it,

0:33:380:33:43

but it's what we love.

0:33:430:33:45

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:33:450:33:46

How did this come about? You obviously bought the house,

0:33:460:33:49

-you're local anyway.

-Yeah.

0:33:490:33:51

It was very old and dilapidated when we got in, it was crying out...

0:33:510:33:55

The fencing was collapsed...

0:33:550:33:57

Yeah, to be loved really. It was just in a desperate...

0:33:570:34:01

You had to renovate it, but where did the idea come in

0:34:010:34:05

to actually go right back to 1903 and dress it properly,

0:34:050:34:09

buy the furniture, choose the carpets.

0:34:090:34:12

It's just what we like.

0:34:120:34:14

William Morris, as you mentioned before,

0:34:140:34:17

has been a very big influence so we've started with the wallpaper and expanded, really.

0:34:170:34:22

Then all the ornaments and knick-knacks have been made up over years of collecting.

0:34:220:34:26

Were the skirting boards and the architraves and the cornices here?

0:34:260:34:30

-No. Put them in myself.

-Really? Yourself.

0:34:300:34:32

-Yeah.

-Right.

0:34:320:34:34

-Were you a carpenter by trade?

-Yes, I served my time in the yard as a carpenter.

0:34:340:34:39

That's really quite nice, actually, because

0:34:390:34:43

that's really taking it back to... In the early 1900s,

0:34:430:34:48

-you would have been working in the shipyard, living here.

-That's right.

0:34:480:34:51

Maybe as a foreman carpenter, and here you are now.

0:34:510:34:54

Yeah. Maybe we've lived here before.

0:34:540:34:57

Yeah, this could be our second time.

0:34:570:34:59

-Spooky.

-So how much of the house is original?

0:34:590:35:02

The layout is more-or-less as it was.

0:35:020:35:05

We've done slight changes in the kitchen,

0:35:050:35:07

there was a pantry there, but that's gone.

0:35:070:35:09

-But the hallway floor is original, all our doors and door handles were all left here.

-The fireplaces?

0:35:090:35:15

No, they've been replaced.

0:35:150:35:18

How do you take this house into the millennium?

0:35:180:35:20

What's the kitchen like?

0:35:200:35:23

-Well, come and have a look.

-OK.

0:35:230:35:25

Oh, wow!

0:35:270:35:28

Very nice. I like the Aga, obviously you cook on this.

0:35:280:35:33

Yeah, we do, just about.

0:35:330:35:35

We heat things on it.

0:35:350:35:37

So how has this changed, what have you done in here?

0:35:370:35:41

Originally, it used to be a small kitchen, half and half,

0:35:410:35:45

and the downstairs bathroom.

0:35:450:35:47

So there was a toilet, bath and sink there, we've taken that upstairs now.

0:35:470:35:50

Where are the white goods?

0:35:500:35:53

LAUGHTER

0:35:530:35:55

-If you look in that cupboard there.

-Can I look in your cupboard?

0:35:550:35:58

-You certainly can.

-Oh, yeah, look at that, a fridge freezer.

0:35:580:36:02

-Well, hidden away.

-Microwave...

0:36:020:36:04

And toaster under there, and underneath there.

0:36:040:36:06

Everybody's got to do some washing, so there's the washer and dryer.

0:36:060:36:10

They're all the boring bits.

0:36:100:36:13

Great, though, isn't it? So what's your favourite room then?

0:36:130:36:16

Difficult, difficult one.

0:36:160:36:19

It changes every day.

0:36:190:36:21

The bathroom's really nice because we've got proper period fittings in there.

0:36:210:36:25

The most recent one we've done though is the bedroom,

0:36:250:36:29

that's probably the favourite one of them all.

0:36:290:36:31

We've done the best job there.

0:36:310:36:33

-Can I have a look?

-You certainly can, yes.

0:36:330:36:35

Come with me.

0:36:350:36:38

So, this is our favourite room at the moment.

0:36:470:36:50

-Great colours again.

-Nice, isn't it? Really rich and warm.

0:36:500:36:53

Yeah. Is it all original?

0:36:530:36:55

Most of it is, yeah.

0:36:550:36:57

Most of the windows are, the fireplace is original.

0:36:570:37:01

There's one thing that's not original.

0:37:010:37:03

I've just looked up, I think I can guess.

0:37:030:37:06

It's the biggest coving you've ever seen!

0:37:060:37:08

-Look at that cornice!

-I know.

0:37:080:37:10

We made a little mistake, but we think we've got away with it!

0:37:100:37:13

-That is a bit OTT, isn't it?

-Yeah, it is.

0:37:130:37:16

-But, hey, it's a bedroom. It looks great.

-It's nice and rich.

0:37:160:37:19

Thank you for showing me around. I think it's great. It's a trip back in time, definitely.

0:37:190:37:24

-Thank you.

-It's been a pleasure showing it off.

0:37:240:37:27

Wasn't that fabulous?

0:37:340:37:37

We see so many stately homes and manor houses on Flog It!, but what's great about this house

0:37:370:37:42

is it belonged to an ordinary working person,

0:37:420:37:46

and restoring it like they have, back to its former glory,

0:37:460:37:49

the early part of the 1900s, it's keeping another precious part of our social history well and truly alive.

0:37:490:37:56

Back at the valuation day, David's looking at his own snapshot of history.

0:38:030:38:10

Pippa, I'm fascinated by the objects you've brought along, because it's a complete cavalcade,

0:38:100:38:15

is it not, of late-19th and early-20th century life,

0:38:150:38:20

-captured in a dual form on stereographic viewing slides.

-Yes.

0:38:200:38:26

It's a bit of a mouthful, but this way, you see a three-dimensional image.

0:38:260:38:30

-Right.

-Are these family pieces?

0:38:300:38:33

-No.

-Tell me where they came from.

0:38:330:38:36

When we moved into the house...

0:38:360:38:38

-In Barrow?

-In Barrow. ..A few years down the line, we found them in the loft.

0:38:380:38:43

But you've got all the elements here,

0:38:430:38:46

you've got stereographic slides, but most importantly,

0:38:460:38:50

you've got the camera, which is a combined camera and also viewer.

0:38:500:38:54

-Yes.

-And it's beautifully inscribed, and it's called...

0:38:540:38:58

-Le Glyph-oscope. Or Le Glye-phoscope.

-Glyph-oscope. I wouldn't know!

0:38:580:39:03

And this was patented by Jules Richard of Paris.

0:39:030:39:06

Right.

0:39:060:39:08

You put the glass negative in,

0:39:080:39:10

you slide that along...

0:39:100:39:12

..pull it out...

0:39:140:39:17

You may decide to put this on a tripod...

0:39:170:39:20

Look through it,

0:39:210:39:23

-and you take a photograph.

-Fascinating.

-That is absolutely fascinating.

0:39:230:39:27

But when you've taken that and you have them developed,

0:39:270:39:31

you then want to use this for viewing.

0:39:310:39:33

-Now, you've picked out two that you think we might be interested in?

-Yes.

0:39:330:39:38

-OK. Well, I can see one is entitled Mermaids.

-Yes.

-Is that bathing belles?

0:39:380:39:43

-It is.

-Right, let's have a look.

0:39:430:39:46

This is almost like being a child again, isn't it?

0:39:460:39:51

Oh, and that's absolutely super.

0:39:510:39:54

There are two rather attractive-looking girls

0:39:540:39:57

going into one of those bathing huts with wheels.

0:39:570:40:01

-Yes.

-Rather good, aren't they?

-They are good.

-The costumes are superb.

0:40:010:40:05

-It's the costumes that make it, I think.

-And what's the other one?

-The other one's Furness Abbey.

0:40:050:40:11

Oh, right, let's have a look at that. Put the clip down.

0:40:110:40:14

Oh, that's extraordinary,

0:40:180:40:20

and in the foreground there's a family picnicking.

0:40:200:40:23

Oh, that's absolutely brilliant!

0:40:230:40:25

-So, you're gonna sell these?

-Yes.

0:40:250:40:28

There's nothing here that you really want to keep, is there?

0:40:280:40:31

No, there's no family, nothing.

0:40:310:40:33

-No, nothing at all. So, it doesn't mean an awful lot to you apart from its historical context?

-Yes.

0:40:330:40:38

It's an extraordinary collection, and I'm sure there will be great demand,

0:40:380:40:43

-particularly for the local views.

-Right.

0:40:430:40:45

I would like to price it somewhere in the region possibly about 150 to 200.

0:40:450:40:51

-Uh-huh.

-So, if we say, a reserve of, what, £150?

0:40:510:40:54

-That would be fine.

-Would you be happy?

-Yes, that would...

0:40:540:40:57

The beauty is, that, with the camera,

0:40:570:41:00

these are unique.

0:41:000:41:03

-Nobody else has got a collection of these, cos they've all been taken with this camera.

-Yes.

0:41:030:41:08

-Jenny, welcome to Flog It!.

-Thank you.

0:41:120:41:15

I'm always delighted to see samplers at Flog It!,

0:41:150:41:19

-I think that they're a wonderful piece of social history.

-Yes.

0:41:190:41:23

Where did you get them?

0:41:230:41:25

I came across them when we were clearing my mother's house out,

0:41:250:41:29

and when I did find them, they weren't in their frames, it was just the two samplers.

0:41:290:41:34

And they looked as if they were getting a little bit frail,

0:41:340:41:37

so I took them to one of the shops in town that specialise in framing,

0:41:370:41:42

and the gentleman there kept them for quite a while,

0:41:420:41:46

because he said he needed to research the best materials

0:41:460:41:50

-to use in framing them, so he didn't, sort of, compromise the samplers.

-Yeah.

0:41:500:41:55

Erm... Do you like them?

0:41:550:41:58

I do, yes, but like a lot of things, they're just, sort of, hanging on the wall,

0:41:580:42:02

and after a while, you don't notice them.

0:42:020:42:04

Uh-huh. I mean, they're so sweet, they're done by children.

0:42:040:42:09

You've got little girls who were made to sit silent on the settee

0:42:090:42:15

and do all this type of stuff.

0:42:150:42:18

This one here is perhaps a little bit more typical, where you have the alphabet,

0:42:180:42:24

her numbers, her name, Sarah Johnson, and the date here.

0:42:240:42:28

This one here, which is a little faded, has the Tree of Life

0:42:280:42:34

-and, I believe, Adam and Eve here.

-Yes.

0:42:340:42:38

And I think this is the most... THEY BOTH LAUGH

0:42:380:42:40

-..dreadful poem!

-Dreadful, yes!

0:42:400:42:43

"So on a tree divinely fair, Grew the forbidden food,

0:42:430:42:49

"Her mother took the poison there, And tainted all her blood."

0:42:490:42:53

I think that's a bit, sort of...!

0:42:530:42:56

It is really, isn't it? Yes.

0:42:560:42:57

But these were ideas that they had in those days.

0:42:570:43:04

A nice little piece of Victorian history.

0:43:040:43:08

But I must say, Jenny, that the collectors like them in the original frames.

0:43:080:43:14

You did the right thing. By reframing, you were protecting.

0:43:140:43:19

-That's what I thought.

-But I'd put both of them together.

0:43:190:43:22

Yes, that's fine.

0:43:220:43:25

-I would put an estimate of £100 to £150?

-Yeah, that would be beautiful.

0:43:250:43:29

-With a reserve price of £80.

-That'll be fine.

-Is that fine with you?

-That's great.

0:43:290:43:36

But I think that they'll go beyond £100, I feel that they should.

0:43:360:43:40

-That'll be lovely.

-Will you be sorry to see them go?

0:43:400:43:44

Not really, no. I'll be quite happy to have a little bit of something back to put in the holiday pot!

0:43:440:43:50

-Oh, yes, that's always nice!

-Yes, yes. Thank you very much.

0:43:500:43:55

Ken, I find it extraordinary that we've come on a programme called Flog It!.

0:44:020:44:07

I think it should be renamed Attic Treasures.

0:44:070:44:10

-Yeah, probably.

-Because these have come out of your attic.

-They have.

0:44:100:44:14

-How long have they been stuck up there?

-Over 30 years, I think, since the '70s, anyway.

0:44:140:44:19

So you've kept them in a box, un-looked at, unloved...

0:44:190:44:24

-Yeah.

-..and not admired.

-Exactly.

0:44:240:44:27

Have you tried to sell these or give them away?

0:44:270:44:30

I once offered them to a model railway club, and they said, "Well, they're just worthless,

0:44:300:44:35

"but we'll take them, and we might use one or two of them."

0:44:350:44:38

But I thought, "No, I'll not bother."

0:44:380:44:41

I can't believe that! But it's only probably recently

0:44:410:44:45

that these are now appreciated for what they are, as, sort of, railway - or "railway-ana" - art,

0:44:450:44:50

-which is very popular at the moment, and these will create a great deal of interest.

-Oh, good.

0:44:500:44:56

Now, I've gone through them, I've taken out one or two which I think are interesting,

0:44:560:45:01

from the design point of view, or my own selfish reasons, cos I can relate to them, like this one here,

0:45:010:45:07

which is Royal Leamington Spa, where I used to work. I've worked in Royal Leamington Spa for 25 years.

0:45:070:45:12

I recognise this as the Spa Rooms, where there was a spa for taking the waters, and it's still there.

0:45:120:45:20

If you saw this on railway hoardings, you'd think, "I might take a train to Leamington Spa."

0:45:200:45:26

-These all date from the '50s and the '60s.

-They do.

0:45:260:45:29

How did you actually acquire them?

0:45:290:45:31

Well, it was a friend that had asked me to be the executor under his will...

0:45:310:45:36

-Yes.

-..and he meticulously left all his possessions to different people,

0:45:360:45:41

and I got the leftovers, as you call it.

0:45:410:45:44

And I got these and an electric wheelchair.

0:45:440:45:47

So what's happened to the wheelchair? THEY BOTH LAUGH

0:45:470:45:51

Well, that's gone to a person that needed it!

0:45:510:45:54

Oh, good! Well, I think these are going to prove quite interesting.

0:45:540:45:58

This one here, if you wanted a camp holiday, you could go to Prestatyn.

0:45:580:46:03

And what does it say?

0:46:030:46:05

"Prestatyn Holiday Camp, luxury all-in holiday on the North Wales coast."

0:46:050:46:10

But what I love about this

0:46:100:46:11

is the colours they've used, it's more like the French Riviera.

0:46:110:46:16

-They were good salespeople.

-Absolutely. And in the middle here,

0:46:160:46:20

you've got this sun motif with the attractions for the holiday camp. I think this is lovely.

0:46:200:46:25

We're not just talking in terms of just a few pounds, I can assure you.

0:46:250:46:29

These are very evocative of the period,

0:46:290:46:32

and the excitement of travel by train in England

0:46:320:46:35

-that is...that is gone.

-Gone.

0:46:350:46:37

This one we've included,

0:46:370:46:39

because it has this wonderful Rita Hayworth-type figure,

0:46:390:46:42

this wonderful female here, and she's having a happy holiday in Ayr.

0:46:420:46:48

I think this is absolutely super, but it gets even better.

0:46:480:46:52

I note that these have been folded.

0:46:530:46:55

-Unfortunately.

-Unfortunately, for it creates damage at the corners.

0:46:550:47:00

So a lot of the posters will have to be backed.

0:47:000:47:02

-Right.

-But the one...

0:47:020:47:04

The one that is absolutely knockout, really, is this one here.

0:47:040:47:11

If you wanted a winter holiday you would go to Southport,

0:47:130:47:18

and this is the clientele that apparently they hoped to attract.

0:47:180:47:22

These film stars, they're straight out of Hollywood, aren't they, of the 1930s?

0:47:220:47:29

Look at that wonderful car there.

0:47:290:47:31

But look at these fabulous clothes, most have cost an absolute fortune,

0:47:310:47:36

and the haughty look on the people's faces.

0:47:360:47:38

One wonders whether they're having a happy time or not!

0:47:380:47:41

But this is wonderful, this is the best,

0:47:410:47:45

and you've got, probably, about, what? 25 others?

0:47:450:47:48

-Roughly, yeah.

-You thought they're worth round about £1, £2 a time?

-£1 each, something like that.

0:47:480:47:53

-We're looking at about £30.

-Something like that.

0:47:530:47:55

-I'll give you £60 and take them off your hands.

-No, I think you'll knock commission off that as well!

0:47:550:48:02

-These are to go up for auction.

-Yeah.

0:48:020:48:05

I suggest that we leave it up to the auctioneer to put these posters into various groups.

0:48:050:48:10

-Whatever he thinks.

-This will be sold on its own.

-Right.

0:48:100:48:13

OK? And it might realise something in the region of about £250 to £300.

0:48:130:48:17

-Oh, you're joking!

-But I think this is absolutely superb.

0:48:170:48:20

-Good.

-I think we can look favourably to getting...

0:48:200:48:24

-I'll not get you too excited...

-No.

-..but probably about £600 to £800.

-Oh, blimey! Yeah, well...

0:48:250:48:32

-I'd be more than happy with that.

-But I hope it's going to make more!

0:48:320:48:37

-THEY BOTH LAUGH

-So do I!

0:48:370:48:40

-I think they're absolutely super.

-You surprised me, now, yeah.

0:48:400:48:43

When you consider that a reproduction in one of these poster shops, you'd pay £100 for it.

0:48:430:48:49

-True.

-OK, so, rationalise it. This is an original.

0:48:490:48:54

-Ken, thank you very much.

-No, I'm glad I brought them in.

0:48:540:48:57

So am I! You've really made my day, this is wonderful.

0:48:570:49:02

We'll be back at the auction house for our last few items,

0:49:050:49:09

But before they go under the hammer, there's time for a quick chat with auctioneer David Brooks,

0:49:090:49:14

to see what he thinks of the marvellous collection of railway posters.

0:49:140:49:18

-We're surrounded.

-We are!

0:49:190:49:22

You've done a fantastic job of putting these up, actually,

0:49:220:49:25

cos they all deserve to be seen individually.

0:49:250:49:28

And, I guess, you have to do that, because David was unsure what to do at the valuation day.

0:49:280:49:32

-He couldn't see all of them, that was the problem.

-No, he kind of suggested maybe lots of six or ten.

0:49:320:49:38

He's put an overall valuation of £600, and obviously

0:49:380:49:43

you've split every single one, which is fabulous.

0:49:430:49:46

-It's give them more of a chance, as each one appeals to different people.

-Exactly.

0:49:460:49:50

I particularly like the ones with the women on, I think they're fantastic.

0:49:500:49:54

-This, I think, is...

-Southport. That's an early one.

-What sort of value would that do by itself?

0:49:540:49:59

Well, we're hoping mid-hundreds, but it could easily go well over that.

0:49:590:50:04

I'm getting quite excited thinking we've got 29, and some are worth £400 to £500?

0:50:040:50:09

And some are worth 50. Both ends of the spectrum. Something for everyone.

0:50:090:50:13

Could we be looking at, for argument's sake, somewhere in the region of £2,000 to £3,000?

0:50:130:50:18

-I think we could well be, with the wind in the right direction.

-Yes.

0:50:180:50:22

Fingers crossed, eh?

0:50:220:50:25

He's gonna be chuffed to bits, if you pardon the pun!

0:50:250:50:29

Now, before we get to them, let's not forget the other items we've brought along to the auction.

0:50:290:50:35

Pippa's camera and slides may have been dusty from the attic, but they really clicked with David.

0:50:350:50:41

Oh, that's absolutely brilliant!

0:50:410:50:43

That really brings the past alive, you know.

0:50:430:50:46

Despite the modern frames, Anita still thinks the Victorian samplers

0:50:460:50:50

Jenny inherited from her mother will bear fruit at the auction.

0:50:500:50:55

Watch us focus on this next lot, the stereograph and the camera.

0:50:570:51:01

It belongs to Philippa, found in that loft. Great find.

0:51:010:51:04

£150 to £200, David's put on this. It's all about capturing that social history that's disappeared,

0:51:040:51:10

and that's what the collectors buy in to.

0:51:100:51:12

-So, good for you for not chucking it away, thinking it's a load of rubbish!

-I nearly did!

0:51:120:51:16

-I know!

-But...

-It's going under the hammer now! Good luck!

0:51:160:51:20

We come now to lot 57, the stereoscopic viewer.

0:51:200:51:23

A rather attractive piece, some wonderful illustrations with this.

0:51:230:51:27

£200 for this, please? 200?

0:51:270:51:30

Start me £100, somewhere? 100, thank you, sir, now...

0:51:300:51:33

110, 120... 130 with the commission...

0:51:330:51:35

140... 150...

0:51:350:51:38

Take 160? No? 150, now. Any advance?

0:51:380:51:41

160. Commission out. Are you bidding?

0:51:410:51:43

160 in the room, with the lady seated.

0:51:430:51:46

The lady seated at 160, 170, fresh bid.

0:51:460:51:49

180.

0:51:490:51:51

190...

0:51:510:51:52

-200...?

-This is more like it!

0:51:520:51:54

200 now, I'll take 220. 200, the lady seated.

0:51:540:51:57

The lady seated, now, at £200, and selling at 200...

0:51:570:52:00

-Selling at 200.

-Oh!

0:52:000:52:02

-Yes! Top end to that estimate. Well done.

-Very good!

0:52:020:52:05

Right now, something for all you textile lovers, we've got two perfect samplers.

0:52:090:52:14

They're in cracking condition, and they belong to Jenny,

0:52:140:52:17

and we got a valuation of £100 to £150 on the pair.

0:52:170:52:21

-Yes.

-And they're being sold as a pair.

0:52:210:52:23

-Yes.

-Hopefully they'll be kept together just like your mother had them, which is nice.

0:52:230:52:28

-It is.

-Did you enjoy them, and put them on the wall?

0:52:280:52:30

Yes, they've been on the wall in the bedroom,

0:52:300:52:33

-and since I took them down, I haven't dared to hang anything back up!

-Ah.

0:52:330:52:38

Just in case they don't sell, so it's just a bit of reverse psychology,

0:52:380:52:41

so I've left the wall bare, just in case!

0:52:410:52:43

Well, I'm pretty confident they're going to sell.

0:52:430:52:46

They're so sweet, I mean, I have a soft spot in my heart for samplers, and I know you like them.

0:52:460:52:51

-Yes, I do as well.

-They're lovely.

0:52:510:52:54

-A good subject, the Tree of Life there, which is great.

-Yes.

0:52:540:52:57

That's what it's all about. And it's just teaching those needlework skills to young girls.

0:52:570:53:01

-Yes.

-It's fabulous. Great piece of our social history, and thankfully they've been protected

0:53:010:53:07

-and someone else is going to enjoy them now.

-Exactly.

-They're going under the hammer.

0:53:070:53:11

We come now to lot 350, two samplers...

0:53:110:53:15

and I have commission interest. I'm going to have to start the bidding

0:53:150:53:19

at...£300...

0:53:190:53:22

THEY ALL GASP

0:53:220:53:24

-Exactly £300.

-Oh, that's great, isn't it?

0:53:240:53:28

Any advance? Exactly £300.

0:53:280:53:31

-I might need a treat!

-That's 150 each, not 150 for the two.

0:53:310:53:34

I'll take 310, if it helps. It's with me at £300.

0:53:340:53:37

Going at 300...

0:53:370:53:39

And gone! In and out. £300!

0:53:390:53:42

Oh, I can't believe it, I can't believe it!

0:53:420:53:44

That's fantastic. Well, the quality, and the colour's still there, those chromatic hues,

0:53:440:53:49

they're not too faded. Condition's perfect.

0:53:490:53:51

That's just absolutely stupendous!

0:53:510:53:53

-Ooh...!

-I just can't believe it.

0:53:530:53:56

Well, this moment's going to be quite exciting,

0:54:000:54:03

we've got 29 railway posters about to go under the hammer.

0:54:030:54:06

-We're joined by Kenneth and his wife. Hello. What's your name?

-Joan.

0:54:060:54:11

-Joan, what do you think of all the posters?

-Oh, wonderful.

0:54:110:54:14

-Well, it got David excited.

-Well, looking at them now, they're superb.

0:54:140:54:18

-Why didn't you hang them at home?

-Because they'd been in the loft!

0:54:180:54:21

Not been in the loft, we don't live in a mansion, you know!

0:54:210:54:25

-You could have used them for wallpaper!

-We might have done, for all you know!

0:54:250:54:29

The auctioneer's done us proud, they're all displayed.

0:54:290:54:32

He's decided to sell them individually,

0:54:320:54:34

I had a chat with him before the sale, and he's rather excited.

0:54:340:54:37

-On a good day, you could do a couple of thousand pounds.

-Ooh!

0:54:370:54:41

And there's a few stars.

0:54:410:54:43

Joan, we're gonna be in the money!

0:54:430:54:46

I think you are!

0:54:460:54:48

I'd like to see this do, well, a couple of thousand pounds.

0:54:480:54:52

We'll tally it up at the end. Don't go away, this could take a little bit of time,

0:54:520:54:56

but here we go with the first of the posters.

0:54:560:54:59

We come on to the first of the railway posters now.

0:54:590:55:02

I have commission interest, so I'll start the bidding...

0:55:020:55:05

at £60. Lot five with me at £60, now, straight in. Bidding.

0:55:050:55:11

65, 70, now, with me.

0:55:110:55:13

75. 80. I have 80 on commission.

0:55:130:55:16

-85 on the phone. 90.

-It's a good start.

0:55:160:55:19

95. 100.

0:55:190:55:21

With me now, any advance? And, selling. No further bid...

0:55:210:55:25

£100, that's the first one. That's a good start. Great start.

0:55:250:55:28

-One of how many?

-29!

0:55:280:55:31

The West Highland Line. 380 on the internet, now, and, going...

0:55:320:55:36

The next five posters sell for more than £1,000,

0:55:360:55:39

and so with only six sold,

0:55:390:55:40

we've already smashed through David's estimate.

0:55:400:55:43

-£1,140!

-Oh, you'll get that fish and chips, now!

0:55:450:55:51

British Railways, Prestatyn. £60 on the internet, thank you.

0:55:510:55:55

That's another ten lots sold,

0:55:590:56:01

taking our total to £3,200, and we're only halfway through.

0:56:010:56:06

-380 on the internet now, going...

-I can't believe this!

0:56:060:56:10

Bristol, romantic centre for a delightful holiday...

0:56:120:56:16

-£300. It's going at 300...

-There are still four lots to go,

0:56:160:56:21

and we've already made an amazing £4,600.

0:56:210:56:24

Could we be heading for a Flog It! record?

0:56:240:56:28

I've never seen anything like this on Flog It! before!

0:56:280:56:32

And finally, the one that really caught David's attention.

0:56:320:56:35

Now we have the Southport one,

0:56:350:56:37

This is rather attractive. Well...

0:56:370:56:40

-550 on the internet...

-550?!

0:56:400:56:42

We've jumped to 550 on the internet.

0:56:420:56:44

650 on the internet, 700.

0:56:440:56:48

-Oh, God!

-You know, you haven't stopped smiling!

-1,000...

0:56:480:56:53

-1,000. 1,000.

-I'm tingling now!

-19, now, on the internet.

0:56:530:56:58

-This is unbelievable!

-£2,100.

-£2,100!

0:56:580:57:03

22. 23 on the phone. 24 on the internet.

0:57:030:57:08

2,500, I'll take. 26. 27.

0:57:080:57:12

Gosh...!

0:57:120:57:14

-26 now on the internet, any advance?

-It is a new car, isn't it?

0:57:140:57:18

£2,600 on the internet, now, and selling...

0:57:180:57:21

£2,600...!

0:57:210:57:24

£8,000 for all the posters put together! Fantastic!

0:57:250:57:28

-I feel like applauding!

-Yeah, I know!

0:57:280:57:31

BURST OF APPLAUSE

0:57:310:57:33

-Joan, give us a hug!

-Thank you very much, it's been wonderful!

0:57:350:57:39

And don't spend it all at once!

0:57:390:57:42

Absolutely brilliant.

0:57:420:57:43

-That's got to be a Flog It! record, David.

-Thank you very much.

-I go in the record books?

-You do.

0:57:430:57:48

I think Southport helped us out a bit, don't you?

0:57:480:57:51

-Really good, a touch of Hollywood.

-Yes.

-I couldn't believe that.

0:57:510:57:56

-Absolutely wonderful.

-What a great day we've had here.

0:57:560:57:59

Sadly, we've run out of time, but keep watching, because there's more surprises where this came from.

0:57:590:58:04

So, until the next time, it's cheerio from all of us.

0:58:040:58:08

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:200:58:23

Email [email protected]

0:58:230:58:26

Flog It! Is in Cumbria in the historic town of Barrow in Furness. Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts David Barby and Anita Manning who waste no time in rummaging through the bags and boxes to find all the hidden gems. David is rendered almost speechless by a collection of artwork that may see him on the way to a Flog It! record and Anita is captivated by some Victorian needlework. And while indulging his passion for history, Paul takes a trip that sees him rubbing shoulders with royalty.