Weston Flog It!


Weston

Paul Martin and the team are at the Winter Gardens in Weston-Super-Mare. Experts Anita Manning and Michael Baggott pick out some choice antiques to go to auction.


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Transcript


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In 1927, this building, the Winter Gardens, was opened as a venue to entertain the townsfolk and

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the holidaying masses that came to this resort of Weston-Super-Mare, but today this glamorous building

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is gonna be packed full of antiques because Flog It is in town.

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Over the years, the Winter Gardens played host to dances, concerts and

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orchestras and is even featured in the movie "Remains Of The Day".

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Well, let's get inside and see if today's headliners, Anita Manning

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and Michael Baggott, our two experts, have drawn the big crowd.

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Well, the Pavilion Ballroom is already packed out and it looks

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as if we're in for quite a performance today.

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Later I'll be visiting Tyntesfield, a historic property

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that was rescued from the gavel at the eleventh hour.

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It even got to the stage where they called in London auctioneers Sotheby's and Christie's

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to come down here and catalogue the entire contents of the house.

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Over at the Winter Gardens, it's our job to hunt out

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valuables to go under the hammer and Michael is already stealing the limelight with his first find.

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Valerie, thank you for bringing this very interesting dish in today.

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Before I tell you anything about it,

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can you tell me, where does it come from?

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Well, my father would have bought it about 1945-46.

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He used to go round the antiques and collectables shops in those days

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and he obviously bought it there and we've had it in the family ever since.

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Did he have a passion for early ceramics?

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No, no. He was interested in all things.

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Oh, marvellous, marvellous - true antiquarian collector!

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Yes, indeed, yes.

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The first time I saw this, my heart nearly stopped.

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-Unfortunately, it wasn't what I thought it was.

-Yes?

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To all intents and purposes, this appears to be a Majolica dish.

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-Yes.

-Now this isn't the Majolica that we're familiar with that's made by Minton's and Wedgwood.

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-No.

-This is the original tin-glazed earthenware that those designs and feel were based on.

-Yes.

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The shape of this dish should be 1580 to 1600,

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if not a little earlier, and this decoration around here is basically

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-grotesques, and when you think of grotesques, you think of grottos.

-Yes.

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But what basically happened is in the middle of the 16th century, there were excavations in

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Nero's Palace in Rome.

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-Oh, yeah, yeah.

-And as they dug down into the "grottos"

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-they uncovered the fabulous decoration on the walls...

-Aah, I see.

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..which were these Bacchic and classical figures with very fine leaf-scroll work and of course,

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-that is a Roman hanging lamp, that is a Roman vase.

-Oh, I see!

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So all of this decoration, people went mad in Italy at the time.

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-Oh, I see!

-They were enthralled by it.

-Yes.

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And this is typical of what a Majolica dish of that period would look like.

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Unfortunately, she was the first thing to strike a chord of worry,

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because the originals are very stark and geometric and completely in profile.

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Now this with figure, we can see the curls rolling down and the necklace

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and the locket which is more in keeping with a Victorian lady.

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The next thing we have to do is turn it over,

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and we've got a factory mark there, which I'm not familiar with.

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-The finish here, this pancake glaze isn't all that it should be.

-Right.

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It should be a little bit paler and there should be slightly more marks

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coming through, so I think this falls into this category

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-of an 1850s-1860s Italian copy meant to deceive.

-Yes.

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-I hesitate to say what it had been worth were it right.

-Oh, well...

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we won't worry about that.

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-I'll have to tell you, it would have been about £15,000 to £20,000.

-Yes!

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Have you got any ideas what it might be worth as a 19th century copy?

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No. I've been vaguely told it could be £350 to £500.

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I think it's certainly in that area.

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I think if we were to put it into auction, we would put an estimate of £300 to £500.

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-Yes.

-And we put a reserve of £300, possibly with a little auctioneer's discretion if it creeps up

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to that figure, but it's certainly a lovely thing.

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-Thank you, yes.

-But why now have you decided to sell it?

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Well, I'm getting to the stage where I need a bit of money, I'm afraid!

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We've enjoyed it, we've loved it and I do admire the artistry, but...

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-The work is fabulous.

-There you are, yes.

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It's time to move on, but we'll put it in the auction and hope it does very well for you.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you for bringing it along.

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It's turning out to be a really busy day at the Winter Gardens and the ballroom is still filling up.

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Mary, welcome to Flog It!

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-Thank you.

-It's a delight to have you along

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and it's also lovely to see this pair of Worcester jugs.

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-Yes, they're nice!

-I love Worcester.

-So do I.

-When you see it,

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you know that it's always quality.

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Tell me, where did you get them?

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Well, they were my grandmother's and I expect she had them

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as a wedding present, so they've been in the family for,

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well, nearly a hundred years, I suppose.

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I see. Well, why are you wanting to sell them?

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It's the usual case that my daughter won't want them,

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the grandchildren won't want them, so I thought I'd sell them and then I'd give the proceeds to my daughter.

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-Good idea.

-She'll be thrilled, yes!

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That's wonderful and that's the thing to do if you don't love them or don't have them on display.

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Yes. Well, I've got lots of other bits at home.

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Oh, I see, a Worcester collector?

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-Yes, yes.

-So you've kept perhaps the best pieces?

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I have, yes.

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Well, I mean these are still very bonny. They aren't actually a pair.

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-No, I realise that.

-They are two different types of vases.

-Yes.

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But Worcester, these vases are hand-painted, so each one is an individual work on its own.

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-They look nice together!

-Yes, well they're from the same mould.

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I particularly like this very sweet handle with the rosette here.

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I think that's a lovely part of it.

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Well, let's look underneath.

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Now, I had a wee glance at these earlier on and we have the back stamp for Royal Worcester here,

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and we have, as you probably know as a collector of Worcester, you will be able to date it

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from these little dots on either side of the back stamp,

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-so we can date these from 1903.

-Mm.

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Little Edwardian vases, pretty, nice quality.

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Price... now what do you think?

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-I was hoping for about £100.

-Well, I think that's fair enough.

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-To estimate it, probably £100 to £150.

-Oh, well, that would be nice.

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Yes, that would be nice, but they are not exceptional pieces.

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-No, no, I understand that.

-They're fairly standard Worcester.

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I would feel that a reserve of about £80 might be the most reasonable.

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-Yes, I'd like a reserve.

-We'll put a reserve on it of £80, if you're happy with that.

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-I'm happy with that.

-Let's hope that they do well at the auction.

-Yes.

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£100 to £150, reserve of £80, but let's hope it goes much further than that.

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We'll see, won't we?

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Well, Carl, there's no need for me to tell you what it is...

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it's a banjo!

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No, it's a lovely bed-warming pan.

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-Has it been in the family a long time?

-Yeah. My great-grandma had it

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and then my nan had it, and she had it displayed as an ornament and then my mum had it, had it

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displayed as an ornament as well and then I took it on and unfortunately it's not been on display, so...

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So where has it been, tell me?

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-In the shed!

-In the shed! Shame on you!

-I know, I know.

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It's really, really quite incredible to think that these bed-warming pans

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-were used in the mid 1600s.

-Yeah, it's a long time ago.

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Well, this one's not that early, it's sort of around 1780, somewhere around there.

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You'd have got the servants to put hot coals in here from the fire,

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run that upstairs, put it straight underneath the blankets and warm the bed up, and once it's warmed the

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-top of the bed up, you normally put it underneath the bed.

-Oh, I see.

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So it just sort of gives a little more heat throughout the night.

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What lets it down, unfortunately, is good quality ones would have had a lovely walnut or fruitwood handle

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with some nice rich turnings on the shaft.

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This one is quite crude.

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It's of ash, and somebody has stripped it because they've stripped it of its patina.

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The decoration is nice. All this is punch-work, somebody sat

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there with a hammer and a punch and punched that out.

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The good ones towards the end of the 16th century would have had this lovely sort of

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riddle work, armorials put on it, slightly more pictorial and with a lovely date.

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The collectors want those ones, and they're prepared to pay around £1,000 for one of those,

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but it's got to be a very early one with a date.

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Sadly, this doesn't fall into that category. Any idea of its value?

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-No, not really.

-If we put this into auction, I would expect to get around £40 to £60.

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-That's fine.

-It's not a lot of money for a lot of history.

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But at least if I sell it, somebody will appreciate it.

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And put it on the wall, Not in the shed.

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-It's not appreciated at home, so...

-Let's put it into auction with a value of £40 to £60 and

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-let the auctioneer use discretion at the lower end on the 40, OK?

-OK.

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I'm hoping it will get the top end plus a bit more, but you never know with auctions, you just don't know.

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It's a gamble, but we're gonna find out, that's for sure!

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Chris, thank you for making my day today

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and bringing along my almost favourite thing in the world,

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silver spoons.

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-Good!

-I couldn't believe it when I saw you in the queue with these.

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Tell me, how do you get such a wonderful assortment of spoons together?

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Just rummaging in auctions.

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-Rummaging in auctions!

-Yes, through piles and piles of spoons, knives, forks and everything else.

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-You must be a very good rummager!

-Well, we try!

-To put these together.

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Really, the star of the show of these spoons, this wonderful large example,

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and I can tell you where it was made before looking at the hallmarks by one feature.

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Do you know what that feature is?

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-The rat tail?

-The rat tail.

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It's a late Fiddell pattern spoon and you only ever get rat tails on English silver, up to about 1750,

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then the rat tail goes away and even in Channel Island silver, it's about 1770, but for some peculiar reason

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that nobody knows, it persists on Irish flatware so without much doubt I can tell you that's Dublin,

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and if you look at the marks, we've got the date letter for 1822, so it's George IV.

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Rather curiously we've got two maker's marks and that's something you also get with Irish silver...

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you get the maker's mark, which in this case is "LK"

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but then you get a retailer's mark,

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and that in this case is "TWY"

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with a plus sign, which is for Edward Twycross

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-and you get his mark on quite a lot of flatware at this period.

-Right.

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Well, then we rush from Dublin

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closer to home today in Weston and we've got this lovely Exeter pair of sugar tongs

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and they were made in Exeter in 1835 and they were made by a man called John Stone and you can see here

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we've got the lovely period initials on the bow, they're wonderful things.

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Then we're north of the border to Glasgow and we've got a set of six

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teaspoons here and they're from 1836, and then we finish up and we're back over to Ireland and we've got a pair

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-of spoons for Dublin, but this time 1885, so you've encapsulated all the parts of the UK...

-That's right.

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..nearly, and nearly the whole of the 19th century.

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Any idea what this as a group at auction is going to be worth?

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-Maybe 50 plus.

-Maybe 50, yeah.

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I think that on its own is £20 to £30, because it's Irish.

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Those, bizarrely, are only about £10.

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That set of six is nice, being Scottish.

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They're about another £20 to £30 and those two, probably £10 to £15

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so if we put it all together and say £50 to £100 to excite interest.

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-That's fine!

-And if we set a reserve at £50 on them so you know if it doesn't make that

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on the day, you can take them home and maybe pin them on a map

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of where they've come from over the British Isles, but

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thank you so much for bringing them in and hopefully the silver buyers will be there on the day.

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-Fingers crossed!

-Fingers crossed.

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Well, what a marvellous day this is turning out to be here in Weston-Super-Mare.

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We've found our first batch of items to take off to auction,

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but which will be the stars of the show when the hammer falls?

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Well, before all that happens, let's quickly remind ourselves of what's going under the spotlight.

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Valerie's Majolica style dish was a Victorian copy but it didn't stop Michael from admiring it.

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The first time I saw this, my heart nearly stopped.

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Unfortunately, it wasn't what I thought it was!

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Mary's Worcester jugs have been in the family for years,

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but she wants to sell them and pass the proceeds on to her daughter.

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I thought Carl's bed-warming pan was hot property

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and I'd like to see a bidder rescue it from the shed at £40 to £60.

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Not a lot of money for a lot of history!

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Well, at least if I sell it, somebody will appreciate it.

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And Chris's silver spoons took Michael on a journey across the British Isles.

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With an estimate of £50 to £100, where will they go next?

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And this is where all our items will end up, the Clevedon Sale Rooms.

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It's a packed house.

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Let's hope we're gonna get some cracking prices!

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Wielding the gavel this morning is Mark Burridge,

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and the first item to go under the hammer is the Majolica style dish.

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It belongs to Valerie.

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-I shall miss it!

-Ooh!

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Why do you want to sell it, then?

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It's just standing there, that's it, isn't it? I will pass it on.

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-You can't withdraw it now, it's a bit late, isn't it?

-No, no.

-£300 to £500, though.

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-That would be very useful.

-It would be, wouldn't it?

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-That's what we've got on it. I like it!

-It's a beautiful thing.

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It is, it is gorgeous, and the condition is so good.

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-Yes.

-Fingers crossed we get the top end of that estimate.

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And lot 280 is the Italian Majolica dish there,

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it's lot number 280 and £280 my bid on the book.

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£280 straight in!

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£300. 300 on the phone, 320...

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340, 340, 360, 380, 380, 400, 420?

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No? 420, thank you, fresh bidder in the room. Anyone else 440?

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Selling then, make no mistake, on £420.

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It's gone. £420, Valerie!

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Lovely! Very useful, very useful.

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What are you going to do with that?

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-Keep it in the savings...

-Oh...

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-My niece has to have half of it because it's a bit of her inheritance.

-Yes.

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-So she'll have half.

-All right. That's generous of you.

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-Thank you very much.

-It was one of the nicest bits of ceramics I've ever seen on Flog It!

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I'm here with Chris. Remember the silver?

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We're selling that at £50 to £100 because we want to buy hat pins!

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-Hat pins!

-What's that all about? Do you collect?

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-Charles Horner, yeah.

-Oh, only... Only the best make, Michael!

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-Fingers crossed!

-If you collect anything, only collect the best!

-How many have you got?

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-11.

-11?

-And a pair of gold ones as well.

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All right, OK. Nice collection!

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We've got to get you up to 12 today then, haven't we?

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-You took the words out of my mouth!

-Even numbers!

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And lot 540, we've got the silver as in the catalogue there.

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50 I'm bid on the book, five now, 55, 55, 55.

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£50 on the book, and five, five, five we look.

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At £50 a maiden bid, five, five, five, anyone else?

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All done selling on £50 then.

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-Got away at the lower end.

-Oh, just, didn't we!

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It's a start, though, it's a start, OK.

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You had to get rid of them, didn't you?

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-Oh, well yes, because I don't collect them.

-No, no. It's...

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You go the right sale room, you will find a Charles Horner hat pin for £50 so we'll do it that way!

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Right! I'll send you to buy one!

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-Good luck, anyway.

-Thank you.

-Thank you for coming in.

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Things have been a bit hot and cold right now but this one certainly is gonna be

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bang in the middle - it's gonna be lukewarm, because it's Carl's bed-warmer.

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Now, we said on the day, didn't we, we've got a reserve of £40

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but we've relaxed that because you don't want to take this home?

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-No.

-You've made up your mind?

-Yeah.

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I would be taking it home if it didn't sell

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for anything under £40, but that's your decision, because I know what you're gonna do.

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Put it back in that shed, aren't you?

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Unfortunately, yeah, unfortunately.

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Well, fingers crossed, OK, someone is gonna love it.

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And lot 20 is the engraved copper warming pan there,

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lot number 20. What's got £10 to start me?

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£10, £10, £10, £10. Ten bid, 12 now, will you?

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12 will you, 12 will you? Maiden bid of £10, who's got 12?

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All done. Are you all done?

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-All done and selling on £10 only, then.

-Oh...

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Well, you're not taking it home!

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-No, but...

-But you're not going home with much money, either!

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-No, no, unfortunately!

-A tenner!

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It was worth the experience. I enjoyed the experience.

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I've just been joined by Mary and we've got some quality going under the hammer, and we say on Flog It,

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if you want to invest in antiques, invest in quality condition, good name, this lot has got the lot.

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There's a premium on this - Worcester jugs, £100 to £150.

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-We've got a fixed reserve at £100. You've just upped that?

-I did.

-I don't blame you.

0:19:140:19:18

If they're gonna sell at £80, they were gonna sell at £100 anyway.

0:19:180:19:21

-Yes, hopefully.

-Protect them, protect your interest.

0:19:210:19:24

Why do you want to sell them?

0:19:240:19:26

I just wanted to come to Flog It, actually!

0:19:280:19:31

-Have a bit of a gamble!

-Yes!

0:19:310:19:34

480, the two Royal Worcester jugs,

0:19:340:19:37

-both the same shape there, 1903, what can we say, 55 with me?

-Oh!

0:19:370:19:41

£60 with you in the room.

0:19:410:19:44

-Good start.

-60, five, 70, five, 80, five, 90, five, 100. Now ten.

0:19:440:19:52

-110 behind you, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160...

-Oh, my gosh!

0:19:520:19:58

£150 behind you, madam. 160 is it?

0:19:580:20:01

All done at £150 then.

0:20:010:20:05

-Yes, top end of the estimate!

-Excellent!

-Worth the gamble!

0:20:050:20:08

-Good valuation.

-The quality came through.

0:20:080:20:10

-Good valuation as well.

-150! My daughter's sitting over there!

0:20:100:20:15

-That's a nice result.

-Yes! I'm so pleased!

0:20:150:20:18

Anything else you'd like to bring in future?

0:20:180:20:20

-Lots of things!

-We'll see you, details in the local press, don't forget.

0:20:200:20:24

-We're coming to an area near you soon and we'd like to see you!

-Yes.

0:20:240:20:28

Later I'll be back in the auction room, when I find myself outnumbered two to one...

0:20:280:20:34

-I think you look great!

-I'll be wearing it again tonight!

0:20:340:20:37

-He's a bonny laddie!

-He looks a bonny laddie!

0:20:370:20:40

It's a good job he's married, he could be going home to Glasgow as husband number four!

0:20:400:20:44

This magnificent country house, Tyntesfield, lies just up the road from Weston-Super-Mare

0:20:520:20:56

in a small village called Wraxall, and just looking at its facade,

0:20:560:21:00

it is an architectural triumph - the detail is superb,

0:21:000:21:03

but behind closed doors, it's a property with a difference.

0:21:030:21:07

Not only is there an insight into Victorian family life,

0:21:070:21:10

but there's also a genuine piece of conservation work in progress,

0:21:100:21:17

and it's the side of a National Trust property we rarely, if ever, get to see.

0:21:170:21:22

The story of the house begins in 1843 with William Gibbs.

0:21:220:21:28

He made his fortune from importing guano, solidified bird-droppings,

0:21:280:21:32

from South America, to be used as fertiliser.

0:21:320:21:35

The great wealth he accumulated enabled William to purchase

0:21:350:21:39

a Regency property, which was on this site.

0:21:390:21:42

William Gibbs re-modelled the house into the ornate Gothic revival building which is in evidence today.

0:21:420:21:49

At its height as a family home, Tyntesfield would have been a grand, thriving property

0:21:490:21:54

with a host of staff working in the house and on the surrounding land.

0:21:540:21:58

It had its own farm, slaughter house and even a quarry.

0:21:580:22:02

In 2001 with the death of Lord Wraxall, William's great grandson,

0:22:030:22:09

Tyntesfield as a family home sadly came to an end.

0:22:090:22:13

Lord Wraxall, who was a reclusive bachelor, lived here all alone

0:22:130:22:17

and he bequeathed the mansion to 19 of his family members,

0:22:170:22:21

giving them instructions to sell the estate, the land, the house and all its contents.

0:22:210:22:29

As one of the last intact Victorian grand houses,

0:22:290:22:33

the National Trust had a considerable interest in the property,

0:22:330:22:37

but not the funds to secure the purchase.

0:22:370:22:40

So, with the clock ticking away,

0:22:400:22:42

they launched a vigorous campaign to raise the £25 million required.

0:22:420:22:47

It even got to the stage where they called in Sotheby's and Christie's

0:22:470:22:51

to come down here and catalogue the entire contents of the house,

0:22:510:22:55

give everything lot numbers ready to be auctioned off.

0:22:550:22:58

But at the eleventh hour, with considerable donations from the general public, private donations

0:23:000:23:06

and even a promise from the Heritage Lottery Fund,

0:23:060:23:09

the National Trust were able to buy Tyntesfield for the nation

0:23:090:23:13

so we could all enjoy it but in a first for the National Trust,

0:23:130:23:16

they decided they wanted to renovate the property to its former glory,

0:23:160:23:20

but not behind closed doors - they wanted the doors open immediately

0:23:200:23:25

so we could all enjoy the conservation work in progress and watch the whole thing unfold.

0:23:250:23:32

I've come to talk to Sarah Schmitz, who is the House Manager here,

0:23:320:23:36

to find out a little bit more about this unique project.

0:23:360:23:40

Sarah, thank you very much for meeting up with us this afternoon.

0:23:400:23:43

-Hello.

-What I've seen so far I'm very impressed with.

0:23:430:23:46

This is what you expect from a National Trust property - it's magnificent!

0:23:460:23:50

Absolutely! It's big and there's lots of gold and beautiful furniture

0:23:500:23:53

and things like that but it's not really how a lot of the house looks.

0:23:530:23:57

It's really a work in progress,

0:23:570:23:59

so whereas in many places the National Trust might perhaps close the house down

0:23:590:24:04

to complete the project works, what we're trying to do here is to do it on display so that people can see

0:24:040:24:09

what we're doing and be involved in it and engage with it because that's what's important to Tyntesfield.

0:24:090:24:14

Can we have a little tour?

0:24:140:24:16

Yes, certainly. Come on through.

0:24:160:24:18

Our first stop was Tyntesfield's grand library.

0:24:180:24:21

Well, it certainly looks different in here.

0:24:230:24:26

Why did the National Trust choose this particular house for this unique project?

0:24:260:24:31

Something to do with timing, really, through having so many donations,

0:24:310:24:36

over 70,000 people donated to the Trust to save Tyntesfield.

0:24:360:24:41

There was a lot of interest.

0:24:410:24:42

-I guess you want to see how your money is spent.

-Absolutely!

0:24:420:24:45

So open the doors up, let them in and let them enjoy it and they'll keep coming back!

0:24:450:24:50

Definitely! Well, our vision for Tyntesfield is all about access and involvement and engagement,

0:24:500:24:54

it's about doing as much as we can for as many people as we can.

0:24:540:24:59

What kind of condition was it in when the National Trust took this over?

0:24:590:25:02

It was the favourite haunt, a country haunt of the ancestors of Lord Wraxall, so although some bits

0:25:020:25:09

were covered up and some things were closed down and so on, and areas were off-limits,

0:25:090:25:15

-the house wasn't completely kind of dead and quiet and full of cobwebs and spiders.

-Where did you start?

0:25:150:25:20

For the Trust, in this property, it's been looking at the risks

0:25:200:25:23

and priorities within that so, for instance, putting enough lighting in

0:25:230:25:27

so that people can see when they come to visit.

0:25:270:25:30

Keeping on top of the woodworm and things like that!

0:25:300:25:33

Yes, woodworm and a significant moth population, all that side of things,

0:25:330:25:36

the things that kind of growl at us, more often.

0:25:360:25:40

Do you catalogue every single item?

0:25:400:25:43

Just about, yes. We do have to take practical decisions about whether it's realistic to do everything

0:25:430:25:49

within a series but wherever possible we try to keep everything listed

0:25:490:25:54

so that we know exactly what we've got.

0:25:540:25:56

What are some of the unusual items that you've uncovered?

0:25:560:26:00

Well, all sorts of things still come to light, even now

0:26:000:26:03

while the inventory team are working.

0:26:030:26:05

In the basement recently we came across some theatre sets and

0:26:050:26:10

we're hoping to maybe use them in the future. We don't know yet.

0:26:100:26:12

It must be so exciting for the National Trust members to see this.

0:26:120:26:17

-Yes.

-It's fascinating!

-Well, we think so, and we like everyone else to think so.

0:26:170:26:21

What a beautiful ceiling!

0:26:250:26:27

-What was this room?

-Believe it or not, it's the dining room.

0:26:270:26:31

We normally display it with a dining table and dining chairs.

0:26:310:26:34

However, in the move of collections we have to designate some spaces for

0:26:340:26:39

storage while other rooms are cleared out.

0:26:390:26:41

It would be nice for the public to see

0:26:410:26:44

the conservation works, see all this storage racked up, sort of organised chaos, but also come back and

0:26:440:26:50

see it come to light, you know, see it come to fruition and see that gorgeous dining table.

0:26:500:26:54

Yes, indeed. It is a beautiful dining table and it will come up out of storage just like everything else

0:26:540:26:59

with the end of the project, part of the attraction of a historic house

0:26:590:27:04

is that close proximity to the objects,

0:27:040:27:07

it's seeing them in context, it's not just about a set of vases

0:27:070:27:10

or a set of beautiful tablecloths or anything like that,

0:27:100:27:13

it's about seeing them perhaps in the way they were used and feeling the ambience around them.

0:27:130:27:18

So you won't mind cross-pollinating in certain rooms things from the 1960s and '70s

0:27:180:27:23

with things that the family collected from Queen Anne to George I?

0:27:230:27:27

Definitely not, no.

0:27:270:27:29

-It's part of the family history, the accumulation of each generation on top of each other.

-I like that.

0:27:290:27:34

Yes, I'd like to think that you can hear the echoes of all the people that sort of laughed and danced and

0:27:340:27:39

drank and so on in here, or maybe ate their dinners at the tables and had banquets and so on.

0:27:390:27:46

It's part of imagining the people that were here and the families and servants and so on.

0:27:460:27:50

So far, has it been a success?

0:27:500:27:53

Very much so, yes. We've managed to pass our half million visitor mark last season and we're looking to

0:27:530:27:59

really expand on that successfully this season and engage with lots and lots more people in what we're

0:27:590:28:05

trying to do, so we think it's been a success thus far and we think it will continue to be in the future.

0:28:050:28:10

I think it's a wonderful project.

0:28:100:28:12

It shows a lot of initiative and I think you're going to succeed.

0:28:120:28:16

Thank you!

0:28:160:28:17

We're back at the Winter Gardens in Weston-Super-Mare, where Anita is in sparkling company.

0:28:220:28:29

-Jean, you've heard the old saying "diamonds are a girl's best friend"!

-Yeah!

0:28:300:28:35

This is a pal that I would really like to have! I like diamonds.

0:28:350:28:40

I'll sell it to you!

0:28:400:28:42

And I think this is a gorgeous one. Is it your own ring, Jean?

0:28:420:28:46

Well, it is mine but it was given to me, you know.

0:28:460:28:49

An elderly friend gave it to us, so...

0:28:490:28:52

-Was it a lady or was it a gentleman friend?

-A lady!

0:28:520:28:57

-Have you worn it?

-No, no, not at all.

0:28:570:29:00

Are you not into diamonds?

0:29:000:29:01

Well, it would only fit my little finger anyway, it's a bit small.

0:29:010:29:05

It is actually quite a small ring.

0:29:050:29:07

It would have to be resized for most people.

0:29:070:29:11

-And it's quite thin.

-It's quite thin, it's been well-worn.

0:29:110:29:15

Now, we have measured this diamond and we have.

0:29:150:29:20

0.70 carats in it so it's between a half and three-quarters of a carat.

0:29:200:29:27

When we look at diamonds there are several things which we have to take into consideration -

0:29:270:29:33

size, clarity and cut.

0:29:330:29:37

The cut of this is a round brilliant.

0:29:370:29:40

It indicates that this is probably from the beginning of the 20th century,

0:29:400:29:48

so it's quite an old diamond.

0:29:480:29:51

The clarity of it, we have quite a big inclusion.

0:29:510:29:56

Yes, I've been told that.

0:29:560:29:59

And that's gonna hold it back a wee bit.

0:29:590:30:02

Difficult to see with the naked eye, but once you look through it with a magnifying glass,

0:30:020:30:08

you can see this inclusion, but it's still quite a desirable item.

0:30:080:30:13

Now, it was given to you by a friend.

0:30:130:30:15

Is there a wee bit of sentiment, do you feel sort of...?

0:30:150:30:18

Well, not really because it's a long time ago

0:30:180:30:20

-when she gave it to us and she said if you want to sell it, do.

-Yeah.

0:30:200:30:27

If we wanted the money, sell it.

0:30:270:30:29

Price-wise, I would estimate it possibly £450 to £650.

0:30:290:30:37

-That's fine.

-Would you be happy to sell it at that?

0:30:370:30:40

-Yes.

-We'll put a firm reserve of £420 on it.

0:30:400:30:43

-Well, I'll be at the auction to hold your hand.

-Oh, lovely!

0:30:430:30:47

And let's hope that there are plenty of women there who fancy having a

0:30:470:30:54

-nice substantial diamond like that.

-Let's hope so!

0:30:540:30:57

Maureen, thank you for bringing this wonderful collection of tiles along.

0:31:050:31:10

Can I ask you, where did you get them from?

0:31:100:31:13

Well, they were in the house.

0:31:130:31:15

My mother-in-law had them and she said they came from a washstand.

0:31:150:31:21

Ah, well, I can believe that because there's two things with these.

0:31:210:31:26

Firstly, we've got an odd number.

0:31:260:31:28

If you see them in a fireplace you usually have four and four

0:31:280:31:31

or five and five, so you always have an even number of tiles,

0:31:310:31:35

so it's highly suggestive that they were in a wooden frame, probably running

0:31:350:31:39

along the back as a splashguard and they are, of course, Minton tiles

0:31:390:31:45

and all we have to do is turn them over and there we've got the Minton globe back stamp

0:31:450:31:52

and emblazoned Minton's Chinaworks, Stoke on Trent

0:31:520:31:57

and they really were the premier quality of tile manufacturers

0:31:570:32:02

and often artist/designers would buy their blanks and at home decorate them.

0:32:020:32:08

In this case we've got the various biblical scenes

0:32:080:32:12

that would have been popular in the late Victorian period.

0:32:120:32:15

I don't know if you ever noticed in the speckling by the water jug, we've got the initials IMS

0:32:150:32:24

and the I should be a J

0:32:240:32:26

and it's for J Moyer Smith, who did a lot of the aesthetic designs.

0:32:260:32:32

-Really you would hope for something a little bit more upbeat.

-Yes.

0:32:320:32:35

We've got turning the water into wine, and I'm all for that!

0:32:350:32:41

Gets a plus

0:32:410:32:43

And then we've got probably the most risque -

0:32:430:32:46

Adam and Eve out of the Garden of Eden

0:32:460:32:49

and Eve seems to be taking it slightly better than Adam,

0:32:490:32:54

and then, of course, we've got various scenes from the life of Christ.

0:32:540:32:59

Now, have you ever given any thought to what they might be worth?

0:32:590:33:03

No. In fact, this is the first time I've really looked at them.

0:33:030:33:07

They were in a cupboard in my mother-in-law's house when I knew about them.

0:33:070:33:12

-She died 13 years ago at the age of 97...

-Good grief!

0:33:120:33:18

And I remember her saying to my husband, "don't forget the tiles in the back sitting room cupboard"

0:33:180:33:24

and then they came and they went in yet another cupboard

0:33:240:33:27

where the electricity meter is and they just sat there.

0:33:270:33:31

Fabulous! I mean, the severe biblical nature of them will hold them back

0:33:310:33:37

-to probably a restricted market of simply tile collectors that want these designs.

-Yes.

0:33:370:33:44

And I would imagine that this is seven from maybe a series of 12.

0:33:440:33:49

I think they're worth between £10 and £15 each.

0:33:490:33:54

That's about their level.

0:33:540:33:56

Had they been polychrome or scantily-clad ladies or even Shakespearean scenes, which he did,

0:33:560:34:02

or seasons, then they might have been sort of £30 to £40, so I think if you're happy,

0:34:020:34:07

we'll put them into the auction for £60 to £100, put a fixed reserve of £60

0:34:070:34:14

and, you know, if you get two tiling enthusiasts that really want them,

0:34:140:34:18

they might make £120, so we'll keep our fingers crossed.

0:34:180:34:21

-Yes, I'm happy.

-Splendid, and see how they do on the day.

-Thank you.

0:34:210:34:26

Mike, I was so excited when I looked at these lovely little figures.

0:34:340:34:42

Tell me, where did you get them?

0:34:420:34:44

My father got them about late '40s

0:34:440:34:48

and happened to be walking past the shop, spotted them and went back in and bought them.

0:34:480:34:53

I wonder what he paid for them, all those years ago. Do you know?

0:34:530:34:58

Well, there was a figure banded around 45, something like that.

0:34:580:35:01

45 shillings?

0:35:010:35:04

Well, it could have been, especially the wages then!

0:35:040:35:07

-So, they were obviously passed down to you?

-Yeah.

0:35:070:35:12

Let's look at them closely because something of this quality deserves to be looked at closely.

0:35:120:35:20

Do you know who the carver was?

0:35:200:35:21

-Yes. Ferdinand Preiss.

-Yes, that's excellent, excellent!

0:35:210:35:25

Well, he was one of the most prestigious ivory carvers

0:35:250:35:31

of the Art Deco period.

0:35:310:35:35

I would date these from maybe 1915/1920.

0:35:350:35:40

His figures are highly prized.

0:35:400:35:43

If we look at them, they're on an onyx base

0:35:430:35:47

and the quality of the carving is so fine

0:35:470:35:53

and so beautiful and so precise.

0:35:530:35:56

We have a little girl figure here holding a box, possibly Pandora's box

0:35:560:36:03

and we have the little boy who is holding a ball.

0:36:030:36:09

Now, if you look at the beautiful features in their face and the wonderful hair,

0:36:090:36:15

we can really see the quality of the carving

0:36:150:36:18

in these figures. If we look at the back,

0:36:180:36:22

we see his signature here...

0:36:220:36:25

F Preiss.

0:36:250:36:27

They are in beautiful condition, the artist is highly-prized.

0:36:270:36:33

You can understand why I'm delighted!

0:36:330:36:36

Now, why do you want to sell them?

0:36:360:36:39

Well, my children are grown up and neither of them are interested as such.

0:36:390:36:45

I would put an auction estimate of £1,500 to £2,500 on them.

0:36:450:36:52

I think that's a reasonable and perhaps conservative estimate

0:36:520:36:57

and we'll put our reserve price on them,

0:36:570:36:59

a fixed reserve of £1,200 but we want them to get more.

0:36:590:37:04

-I hope so!

-I hope so, too!

0:37:040:37:06

I love them, I love them!

0:37:060:37:08

Over at the auction room, what will Mark Burridge make of those figures?

0:37:110:37:15

They belong to Mike and he inherited them from his father who bought them

0:37:150:37:18

in Bristol in the '40s and paid £45 for them.

0:37:180:37:22

It's a nice story because they hadn't been on the market before then,

0:37:220:37:27

they do appeal to modern tastes, very good name, Ferdinand Preiss.

0:37:270:37:31

It's got everything you want in an investment piece -

0:37:310:37:34

-condition, maker's name and fresh to the market.

-And fresh to the market.

0:37:340:37:38

It was a lot of money back then in the '40s, £45!

0:37:380:37:40

£45 would have bought you a very good motor car, if not a deposit on a house!

0:37:400:37:45

Probably a third of a house, I think!

0:37:450:37:47

A third of a house, yes!

0:37:470:37:48

Will we get the top end?

0:37:480:37:50

We have had interest and I think we may well have telephone bidding on this lot.

0:37:500:37:55

-Great, great!

-It's the best lot in the sale.

0:37:550:37:58

At the moment, best lots are selling very well.

0:37:580:38:01

And it's on the front page of the catalogue, which is undoubtedly going to help.

0:38:010:38:05

Also going under the hammer today is Jean's diamond ring.

0:38:050:38:08

Will it find a new best friend in the sale room?

0:38:080:38:11

Well, this is a pal that I would really like to have!

0:38:110:38:15

And Michael is praying that someone will splash out £60 to £100 on Maureen's Minton washstand tiles.

0:38:150:38:22

Now it's time to put our final round of valuations to the test.

0:38:220:38:27

This really is a sparkler... £450 to £650...

0:38:270:38:30

-and you've never worn it!

-No!

-It's too small!

0:38:300:38:33

Oh dear, that's just such bad luck, isn't it?

0:38:330:38:36

The diamond's not too small - it's nearly three quarters of a carat!

0:38:360:38:41

Ooh, we could do something with that!

0:38:410:38:43

Do you think it might get remounted, or bought by the trade?

0:38:430:38:46

I think it probably will.

0:38:460:38:48

But the diamond there is a good size and it's in nice condition.

0:38:480:38:52

Well, let's hope it goes this time. We have tried before.

0:38:520:38:55

-Have you, in auction?

-Yes.

-Yes, and what did it reach?

0:38:550:38:58

I've forgotten. It was a long time ago!

0:38:580:38:59

It was a long time ago! Times have moved on, now!

0:38:590:39:02

Here we are in Clevedon, we've got a packed house, so fingers crossed we're gonna get that top end.

0:39:020:39:08

600 is a solitaire diamond ring, what can we say there?

0:39:080:39:11

-I've only got £400 to start me. 400...

-Good!

-400.

0:39:110:39:16

Give me £300 then. £300, nice solitaire ring there, £300?

0:39:160:39:22

Doesn't look like you want it today.

0:39:220:39:24

I'm sorry, we'll move on, then.

0:39:240:39:26

Aw!

0:39:260:39:28

There's me saying "times have moved on"!

0:39:280:39:30

Aw, I'm so sorry.

0:39:300:39:31

That's all right.

0:39:310:39:33

We haven't got the value wrong, though, have we? The price is right?

0:39:330:39:37

I think the fact that it was a small shank may have influenced private buyers.

0:39:370:39:43

It wouldn't have influenced the trade but the private buyers,

0:39:430:39:46

if a lady tries it on and it doesn't fit her,

0:39:460:39:48

does she want to go and get the shank changed? That may have influenced it.

0:39:480:39:52

Oh, well.

0:39:520:39:54

Next up, the Minton tiles...

0:40:000:40:02

great name, great lot and they belong to Maureen.

0:40:020:40:06

I think they're worth at least £12 each and we've got seven of them.

0:40:060:40:08

-Yes.

-Hence, Michael...

0:40:080:40:10

-Hence the estimate!

-Hence the estimate!

0:40:100:40:13

Minton is such a good name.

0:40:130:40:15

The only trouble is the subject matter being biblical.

0:40:150:40:17

-Yes.

-But even though it's biblical, they managed to get a couple of scantily-clad ladies in there

0:40:170:40:21

-so there's hope, isn't there!

-There is hope!

0:40:210:40:24

Lot 100, the Minton seven blue and white tiles there, biblical scenes, lot 100, interest here.

0:40:240:40:30

£90 on the book, 100 in the room, ten with me, 20, 30, 40, 50, 50...

0:40:300:40:37

Gentleman here at £140, selling on £140 then.

0:40:370:40:43

Yes, that got our blessing!

0:40:430:40:45

-£140, Maureen!

-Wow!

0:40:450:40:48

Surprised!

0:40:480:40:50

I think there was a higher force at work here today!

0:40:500:40:54

Mike and Anita have been looking forward to this moment...

0:40:590:41:01

it's the Preiss figures, they're just about to go under the hammer.

0:41:010:41:04

We've got £1,500 to £2,500.

0:41:040:41:07

It's down to the bidders in the room.

0:41:070:41:09

Hopefully we've got some phone lines booked as well and there's some bids left on the book.

0:41:090:41:12

And the photograph on the front!

0:41:120:41:14

-And of course he's done us proud, yes, with a picture on the catalogue.

-Yeah.

0:41:140:41:19

I've got to say,

0:41:190:41:21

I'm being surrounded by the Scottish clan!

0:41:210:41:25

They're ganging up on me!

0:41:250:41:27

You're not Scottish though, are you?

0:41:270:41:30

-No.

-What's the connection? Have you got... what clan is this?

0:41:300:41:32

-Campbell of Argyll.

-Right, OK.

0:41:320:41:35

But my grandmother was a Thompson.

0:41:350:41:36

-Oh!

-And that's where it ties in. There's a set to the Campbells.

0:41:360:41:41

And do you dress like this often?

0:41:410:41:43

-I wore it last night!

-I think you look great!

0:41:430:41:46

-And I'll be wearing it again tonight!

-He's a bonny laddie!

0:41:460:41:48

He is a bonny laddie! It's a good job he's married,

0:41:480:41:50

he could be going home to Glasgow as husband number four!

0:41:500:41:54

580, you've got the two Preiss ivory figures, both signed.

0:41:540:42:00

I gather they've not be on the market since the vendor's father

0:42:000:42:03

bought them in 1945, so they haven't been about before.

0:42:030:42:08

What can we say, who will start me, please £1,500?

0:42:080:42:11

£1,000 here, £1,100, 1,200,

0:42:110:42:15

1,300, 1,300, 1,400 in the room.

0:42:150:42:19

1,500, 1,600, 1,700,

0:42:190:42:24

-1,800, 1,900...

-More!

-2,000, 2,100.

0:42:240:42:29

£2,000 in the room, 2,100 sat down,

0:42:290:42:33

2,200, 2,200 fresh bidder, 2,300, 2,400, 2,500, 2,600...

0:42:330:42:39

-Oh, this bidding...

-Yes!

-2,800, 2,900, £3,000.

0:42:390:42:42

£2,900 in the room, sat down.

0:42:420:42:44

£3,000, anyone? At £3,000, fresh bidder.

0:42:440:42:47

3,100? 3,100?

0:42:470:42:50

Are you all done, then?

0:42:500:42:52

Selling on £3,000.

0:42:520:42:55

-Yes!

-Yes!

0:42:550:42:57

£3,000! Mike!

0:42:570:42:59

-Well, done, Dad!

-Well, done, Dad!

0:42:590:43:01

Yeah, what a clever dad, eh!

0:43:010:43:04

-Oh, that was...

-And well done for you for looking after them as well! Anita, a great item as well...

0:43:040:43:09

-Oh, thank you!

-Perfect valuation!

0:43:090:43:11

I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:43:110:43:12

What a wonderful end, and obviously quality always counts.

0:43:120:43:16

If you've got something like that, we want to see it, so from Clevedon until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:160:43:21

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:400:43:44

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:440:43:46

Presenter Paul Martin and the team are at the Winter Gardens in Weston-Super-Mare. Experts Anita Manning and Michael Baggott pick out some choice antiques to go to auction, like two Worcester jugs and a selection of spoons from all corners of Britain.

Paul Martin goes behind the scenes of a big restoration project undertaken by the National Trust, and the auction room is set alight by two Ferdinand Priess figurines.


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