Liverpool Flog It!


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Liverpool

Mark Stacy and Kate Bateman value an assortment of items including a particularly large Doulton jardiniere pot when they and presenter Paul Martin head to Liverpool.


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Today, we're in one of the most thrilling and vibrant cities in the North-West,

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famous for its creativity, comedy and culture.

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Flog It! is in Liverpool.

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MUSIC: "Live And Let Die" by Paul McCartney

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As a city, Liverpool is diverse, energetic and exciting.

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Situated by the River Mersey, the docks are central to Liverpool's history,

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with the best-known being the Albert Dock,

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the largest single collection of Grade I listed buildings in the UK.

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The city's role as a major port in the British Empire means that many of its finest buildings

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were built as headquarters

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for the shipping firms and insurance companies.

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The Pier Head is perhaps one of the most famous iconic images

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on the city's skyline and it's dominated by

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the Royal Liver, the Cunard and the Port of Liverpool buildings.

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Together, there's over a century of heritage between them

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and they're still fully functioning.

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They're known locally as the Three Graces.

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Later on in the programme, we'll be looking at

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Liverpool's fascinating maritime history, but for now,

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it's anchors away and let's get on with the show.

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And gracing us with their presence today are our two experts,

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the fabulous Mark Stacy and the gorgeous Kate Bateman.

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Today's venue is St George's Hall, right in the centre of the city,

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and by George, do we have a fabulous queue here,

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on a gorgeous sunny day.

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I can't wait to find out what's in all those bags and boxes,

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so let's get the doors open and get Flog It! going.

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So, as the crowds rush in to this great hall, let's see what Kate

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has uncovered from this Liverpudlian treasure trove.

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Tony, you've bought in this vase. What do you know about it?

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All I can tell you is that I bought it from a jumble sale,

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approximately about 25 years ago, so when I was about eight.

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A jumble sale. What did you pay for it?

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I paid less than £1 for it. No more than £1.

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It's quite a weird thing for a small boy of eight or so to buy.

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-What attracted you to it?

-I've no recollection of buying it.

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I just know at that time, I bought a lot of things,

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spent most of my pocket money on junk.

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-On junk.

-On junk.

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-This is an item of junk.

-Yeah.

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OK. Do you know anything else about it?

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-I know it's Troika. I know it comes from Cornwall.

-Right.

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I know it's featured a lot on Flog It!

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It is a favourite of our Paul Martin.

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I have to say, I disagree with him on this.

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I am not a big fan of Troika.

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It just doesn't float my boat, but you obviously liked it.

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I don't particularly like it, actually.

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I have no feelings about it, at all, actually.

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-Ambiguous on the whole subject of Troika.

-Yeah.

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That's probably the best way to be, I think, on Troika.

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So, it's quite highly decorated.

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Obviously, it's Troika and if you didn't know by looking at it,

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it's got all the details on the bottom.

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LT is the initials for Linda Taylor,

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who is one of the artists that works there.

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And, obviously, it's graffito decorated,

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so scratched into the wet clay before it's fired

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and you've got all these different sort of

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highly-painted geometric designs. Quite funky.

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All different on each side.

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Pricewise, £60 to £90 is a fairly normal estimate for something of this size.

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And the condition's good.

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It's obviously quite a mark-up from £1.

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-Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah.

-So quite a good investment.

-Yes.

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-I want to know what else you've bought.

-I'll have to have a look.

-Have a rummage.

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-Is that the kind of figure you'd be happy with?

-Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah.

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-Reserve-wise, what's the least that you'd take for it?

-Maybe about £40.

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What will you do with the money?

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I'm going to spend some of the money on the garden

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and also, I'm going to treat my mum to a bunch of flowers

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because she thinks I gave it her many years ago but I don't remember.

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-You're not going to be tempted to buy more junk, are you?

-Absolutely.

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-You'll be at the next car boot, out there with £1.

-Yes.

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-You've clearly got a good eye.

-Thank you.

-Shall we give it a go at the sale?

-Yeah. Absolutely.

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-Thanks for bringing it in.

-Thanks very much.

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Now it's time for something of a change - a lovely pocket watch.

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Catherine, you've brought this lovely item in. Tell me about it.

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This was my late father's.

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He was an avid watch collector -

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marine chronometers, anything.

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Anything scientific or with a mechanical movement.

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Yes, but it had to be working.

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-If it didn't work, he didn't want it.

-Or he spent a lot of money doing it up, I suppose.

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To restore it, he spent £400

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and nearly two years of a man's time to restore the watch.

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He wanted to see it working.

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-Well, he was quite determined, cos £400 is quite a lot of money and that was some time ago.

-1979.

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-Good Lord. Unfortunately, of course, we can't add that on to the value of the watch...

-No.

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It doesn't work like that. What I can tell you about it is, it's by a very good maker,

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and it's going to date to the sort of second half of the 18th century,

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so it's a nice George III period piece.

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The case is engraved with this lovely design here.

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The face has got a few cracks in the enamel but it's a very typical face for this maker.

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What I like, also, about it... If we close it up and have a look at it...

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the glass here is bevelled and faceted

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so when you actually look, you get a sort of almost like

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an insect's eye view of the face and it's very nice.

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-And of course, it repeats.

-Right.

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So when you press it like that... WATCH DINGS

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Now, what that will tell you when it chimes like that,

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it'll give you the how many quarter pasts...

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-quarter past, half past, quarter to and then the last two are the last hour.

-Oh, right.

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So you know that it's, you know, the time is coming up or has just gone.

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That's the first time I've actually heard it.

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-Oh, really? You've never been tempted to squeeze the top?

-No. No.

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Well, the thing with these, of course, is the gentleman would put this

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by the side at night on a watch stand, so when he woke up, he maybe didn't want to light his candle,

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so he'd press that and it would at least give you an approximation of the time.

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What I would say to you as well with this, this is the central bit of the pocket watch.

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It would have been enclosed in an outer case...

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either a full case to make it a full hunter, or a glass open face to make it a half hunter.

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So you are missing that bit.

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Now, value.

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£400-600 would be my suggestion to you, with a reserve of 400.

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And, hopefully, it'll knock up a bit on that. How do you feel about that?

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I'd just like the watch if it went to somebody who'd appreciate it.

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Well, it's certainly going to go to either a specialist dealer or a specialist collector,

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so one way or other, it's going to go to somebody who's going to appreciate it slightly more than sitting...

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-..In a drawer.

-..for 30 years.

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-I look forward to seeing you at the auction and let's hope it chimes the right note at the sale.

-Thank you.

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-Wendy, this is a fabulous postcard album.

-Yeah. It's very musty.

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I know. It's...

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-It's got that smell.

-Yeah.

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Fresh to the trade, they say.

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I think the collectors are going to like this

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because it's not been through the auction rooms or an antique shop before.

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-Never. No.

-No, which is great.

-And if you read, originally, it came from an old friend of ours.

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-Her name was Mabel and she lived in 150 Great Homer St, Liverpool, which doesn't exist any more.

-Oh, really.

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-It's all been bombed down now, pulled down.

-This is the beauty of postcards like this from the early 1900s.

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-It captures social history which has been lost.

-Yeah.

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-And that's why individual images are so highly sought after...

-I see.

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..because these buildings don't exist.

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Well, whoever put this album together has obviously travelled to all the right destinations,

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-sort of towards the end of the 1800s, early 1900s.

-Yes.

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So they're topographic scenes you expect to find in a lovely album.

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They've toured all of North Wales, look.

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Going through Snowdonia, Betws-y-Coed,

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-We've got Colwyn Bay.

-That must have been the old original pier.

-Yes. That's not there now.

-No.

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You see what a wonderful document it is of past civic history, can't you?

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You can see why the collectors want things like this.

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They've gone throughout Derbyshire, Shrewsbury, Durham.

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We're going to London, touring Buckingham Palace, Blackpool.

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Oh, look at that one of Southport.

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-Isn't it beautiful?

-Now that really does sum up the 1920s.

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Yeah. It's lovely, isn't it?

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Look at that. I think this will do quite well in auction, I really do.

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It's a full comprehensive topographic sort of overview of all the right places

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and I think this should do somewhere in the region of sort of high 300s.

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That's what I'm hoping. Can we put this into auction with a value of £225 to sort of £325...

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-with a reserve on at 225?

-Yes.

-Can we do that?

-Yes. That's fine.

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-Fingers crossed.

-Yeah.

-Fingers crossed we get that top end.

-OK. Thank you very much. Thank you.

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-Andy.

-Hi.

-Welcome to Flog It. You've brought me these two Doulton figurines in.

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-They're a study of contrasts.

-They are.

-I think it's fair to say.

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-I know which one's my favourite.

-Is it this one, by any chance?

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-Definitely.

-Yeah. You've got two very different styles from the same factory,

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so you've got the flower seller's children, here, which is quite an early piece.

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Lovely colours. Probably early 1930s.

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And then you've got Old Father Thames here.

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He looks fairly ancient, but in terms of a model, he's not very old.

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-No.

-Probably a 1980s. Some people like this one.

-Yeah.

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I think what you've got is much more collectable on the terms of this one.

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We always moan about condition on these things.

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I'm going to play devil's advocate here and have a whinge, and you've got a few bits missing.

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You've got a few little chips and cracks and things on the flowers, which you expect. They all fall off.

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It's in pretty good condition other than that, though. You've got no heads off.

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-No.

-Fingers are fine.

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-No.

-It's a nice piece. Why would you be selling it?

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I want to take the daughter and the wife down to Great Yarmouth

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to see two good friends of ours who run a hotel down there.

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-And fed up of dusting it.

-Well, I don't mind looking at this one.

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I just want this one to go, you know.

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This is a strange piece. I mean, it's not going to be everybody's cup of tea.

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In terms of pricing, I think the best thing to do is put them in two separate lots

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-because they'll appeal to two different kinds of people.

-Right.

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And this one is the lower figure.

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-Maybe an estimate of £40-50 on him.

-OK.

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-And this one's slightly more collectable, so £100-150.

-Right.

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Would you want to set some reserves on them?

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On this one. I wouldn't like to see it go for less than 100.

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OK. So put a fixed reserve of 100, cos, obviously, if it doesn't make that, you can always have it back.

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-Of course.

-Brilliant. Well, I'll see you at the auction.

-OK. Yeah.

-Fingers crossed it will go.

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Let's get the excitement going. We're going to make our way over to the auction room in Mold

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and leave you with a rundown just to jog your memory of the items that are going under the hammer.

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Kate's not a fan of Troika,

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but having paid the price of just one English pound, how will Tony's vase fare under the hammer?

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It is a favourite of our Paul Martin.

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I have to say I disagree with him on this. I am not a big fan of Troika.

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Catherine wants her father's pocket watch to go to a good home. How much will she pocket at auction?

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-You press it like that.

-That's the first time I've actually heard it.

-Oh, really?

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Will Wendy's album of just over 250 postcards gain a stamp of approval?

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-It's very musty.

-I know. It's got that smell.

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Fresh to the trade, they say.

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And Andy is expecting a decent figure for his Royal Doulton figurines, but will he get it?

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And this is where we're putting all our experts' valuations to the test,

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in Dodds Auction Rooms, in the heart of Mold.

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There's an air of excitement and anticipation, all the ingredients you need for a classic auction.

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Who knows what's going to happen, but we're going to find out.

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And the man with the all-important gavel in his hand today is auctioneer Anthony Parry.

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First up, Tony's £1 piece of Troika.

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£60-90. Kate here doesn't really like Troika, do you?

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If I said here's 50 quid, would you go out and spend it on Troika?

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-Not a chance.

-Not a chance.

-Not a chance. No.

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In fact, there must be insanity in your family cos you're mad to buy something like that. Honestly.

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No. I think Troika is really lovely.

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-It's a matter of taste though really, isn't it?

-Well, exactly.

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-And lots of people like it.

-I think it's quite ugly.

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-I'm not really a fan of Troika.

-A man after my own heart.

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-You're outnumbered.

-I know.

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I'm flying the flag here.

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So we're going to find out what the bidders in Mold think.

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It's going under the hammer right now. Fingers crossed.

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Right. Nice little Troika vase.

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30. 40. 50. 60. £60. 60.

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-60. 60. 70. 80. £80.

-Oh, wow.

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80. Going to have 90? No. £80. 80.

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80. Anybody else? £80.

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85. 85. 85. 90. Five, is there?

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90. All done at £90 then?

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We've finished at £90?

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Well done. Well done for you.

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-I had a really nice time.

-What next? You can spot the next thing.

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-I'm going to root through the rest of my drawers and see what I've got.

-Brilliant.

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160. 160.

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And next under the hammer we've got a silver-cased verge pocket watch belonging to Catherine and Peter.

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We've got a value of 400-600 put on by our expert, Mark Stacey.

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This is real quality, and was it your father...?

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My father bought it. Yes.

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And since then, the watch has just been kept in a little green box in a cupboard.

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Well, that's one of its virtues, really, the fact that you've looked after it. It's not been damaged.

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It's still working. It's in mint condition.

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-This is true.

-And it's superb.

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-It's lovely. It's a very good maker.

-Yeah.

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-We've looked it up. It's sort of mid to late 18th century.

-Exactly.

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-So we've put a sensible estimate on it and we protected it with a reserve.

-Good.

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-So fingers crossed.

-Something for the purists.

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It's definitely the oldest thing in the sale. Let's hope the bidders fall in love with this. Here we go.

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We've got a very nice Verge pocket watch here to start off with.

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200 I'm bid. £200.

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200. 225. 250. 275. 300.

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£300 up there. 300. 300. 25 is it?

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All done at 300? 325. 350. 375. 375.

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-375. 375. 400.

-Yes. We've got four.

-400.

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400. Take ten up here if you want.

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£400 is there. All done at £400?

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Missed no-one?

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We just did it - £400.

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-That's a good result.

-Yes.

-It's a good result.

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Right. It's my turn to be the expert today and I've been joined by Wendy, who's looking absolutely fabulous.

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-You really do. Love the scarf.

-Thank you very much.

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-Bit of Marilyn Monroe and some other film stars there.

-Yeah. Ava Gardner.

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Talking about photographs, we've got lots of photographs and postcards, really...

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-Yeah.

-..just about to go under the hammer with your album.

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-And I think there's about 240 odd in total.

-Yeah.

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We've got a value of £225-325.

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Let's hope we can find a new home today. Here we go, Wendy.

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It's going under the hammer.

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Lot 100 now. Lot 100 is the album of 264 photographs.

0:16:270:16:32

-What shall we say for that? Nice album.

-Come on.

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50 I'm bid. £50. 50. 60. 70.

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80. 90. 100. And ten. 120. 130. 140.

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150. 150. 150. 160 is it?

0:16:450:16:49

150, not much money, that isn't. 150. 150.

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All done at £150 then?

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We finished?

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It's worth a lot more than that.

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I'm pleased we put a reserve on, that's for sure.

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They're easily worth over £200.

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So I think the best thing you can do is - no-one in the room wants them today -

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take them home, keep them at home for three or four months,

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and if you decide to sell them, then put them in maybe to a different sale.

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-You can definitely come back here if you want.

-Yeah.

0:17:170:17:19

Watching other valuers value these postcards and I've done them myself and they've been fetching £300-400,

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so there's no reason why those ones shouldn't.

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Well, I've just been joined by Andy and Kate, our expert here.

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We've got two Doulton figures to go under the hammer.

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We're splitting the lots. The first one is the flower seller.

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-Yes.

-Very collectable. We've got £120-150.

-Yeah.

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We've upped it slight from that 100.

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-I think that was the wife, wasn't it?

-It was the wife.

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-Saying, "Come on, we want a bit more than that."

-She must be obeyed.

0:17:540:17:56

-Right. Yeah.

-Don't blame you there.

0:17:560:17:59

And the other one for £40-50.

0:17:590:18:01

Less popular. Hardly any colour, just a bit of gilding on that one.

0:18:010:18:04

-This one's Old Father Thames.

-Yeah.

0:18:040:18:06

Yeah. Hopefully, we've got the collectors here. It's a great name.

0:18:060:18:10

Let's just hope the price is right.

0:18:100:18:12

-Well, we'll see.

-We will... right now. Here we go.

0:18:120:18:15

We come onto the Royal Doulton section now.

0:18:150:18:17

165, the flower seller's children.

0:18:170:18:21

A nice one there. 50. Thank you. £50. 55.

0:18:210:18:25

-60. Five. 70. Five.

-Started low.

0:18:250:18:29

75. 75. This is not much money. 80.

0:18:290:18:32

Five.

0:18:320:18:34

90. Five.

0:18:340:18:36

95.

0:18:360:18:38

£95. 95. Who's following it up? 100.

0:18:380:18:42

And five.

0:18:420:18:44

And ten. 115. 120.

0:18:440:18:48

-This is good. Well done. We've sold it.

-120. And five, is it?

0:18:480:18:51

120. 120's close to me.

0:18:510:18:53

120. Are we missing anybody?

0:18:530:18:56

-120, it's gone.

-Brilliant. First one down. Here's the next one.

0:18:560:19:01

165A. Old Father Thames.

0:19:010:19:03

30 years.

0:19:030:19:05

20. £20. 20. Two. 24.

0:19:050:19:08

£24. 24. 24. Where's six?

0:19:080:19:13

24. 26. 28. Have one more, Michael.

0:19:130:19:17

30. £30. 30. 30. 30. I'm very grateful to you for that.

0:19:170:19:21

£30. 30. Two, is there?

0:19:210:19:24

All done at £30 then?

0:19:240:19:26

-That's not bad, is it?

-No.

-£150.

0:19:260:19:28

-So I think the wife will be really happy.

-Yeah. I hope she is.

0:19:280:19:31

-That's something towards that trip.

-Yeah.

0:19:310:19:34

Coming up, we go from minor to major, with Royal Doulton.

0:19:370:19:41

It cost a fortune to post, but can Tam find an over the top price for his vase from down under?

0:19:410:19:48

-It must have cost you a fortune to have it shipped over.

-Just over £300.

-Good Lord.

0:19:480:19:53

# From Liverpool to Bristol a-roving I went

0:19:590:20:04

# But a stay in that country well, it was my intent

0:20:040:20:07

# For drinking strong whisky like other damn fools

0:20:070:20:10

# So not need transported back to Liverpool... #

0:20:100:20:15

The docks have always been central to Liverpool's rich history

0:20:150:20:20

and the most famous of them all being the Albert Dock here,

0:20:200:20:23

which Queen Victoria's husband, Prince Albert, gave his name to.

0:20:230:20:27

Its heyday was the second half of the 19th century,

0:20:270:20:30

but within a fairly short period of time, it became obsolete, spiralling into decay and disuse.

0:20:300:20:36

Once considered a blot on the landscape, some 30 years later,

0:20:390:20:42

it's now become the jewel in the crown of Liverpool's rejuvenation.

0:20:420:20:47

It's now a global tourist attraction...

0:20:470:20:49

with museums, restaurants, bars, luxury apartments and offices to visit. So, let's go back in time.

0:20:490:20:56

How did it all begin?

0:20:560:20:59

Until the early part of the 18th century, vessels used to unload upon open quaysides,

0:20:590:21:04

but they were at the mercy of thieves and smugglers.

0:21:040:21:07

Ships' contents were taken to around 200 bonded warehouses scattered all over Liverpool

0:21:080:21:14

and, consequently, the government found it very difficult to impose customs' taxes.

0:21:140:21:19

When St Katherine's Dock opened in London, in 1828,

0:21:210:21:25

it was the first enclosed dock with quayside warehouses.

0:21:250:21:29

Ultimately, a much better port system to control tax evasion.

0:21:290:21:33

The Albert Dock was based upon this pioneering design.

0:21:330:21:36

I've come to Liverpool's Maritime Museum to meet Stephen Guy to find out more about this amazing dock.

0:21:360:21:43

Who was behind the design and when was it built?

0:21:430:21:46

Jesse Hartley... he was...an engineer.

0:21:460:21:52

He had no experience, really, of port engineering, but he created this role which he fulfilled in Liverpool,

0:21:520:21:59

and he designed and built this dock and, of course, it worked tremendously well.

0:21:590:22:05

-Yeah.

-But, really, if you were going to choose a place to put a port, Liverpool isn't it.

0:22:050:22:10

The engineers had to overcome these problems with the tides and with the docks,

0:22:100:22:15

and he created the template for dock engineering throughout the world.

0:22:150:22:19

By February 1845, the dock was ready to receive its first ships,

0:22:220:22:27

but it was only on the 30th July 1846 that Prince Albert formerly opened the docks.

0:22:270:22:32

It was truly a grand occasion.

0:22:330:22:36

It was the first state visit by a member of the British royal family to Liverpool

0:22:360:22:40

and it was a time to celebrate. After all, Liverpool had arguably the world's first

0:22:400:22:44

fully-enclosed fireproof and theft-proof system of dock warehouses.

0:22:440:22:50

When you look around you, everything you can see, apart from the modern frontages etc,

0:22:540:22:59

is original Victorian engineering at its very best.

0:22:590:23:05

-It really is.

-It's incredible because this is the largest group of Grade 1 listed buildings in Britain.

0:23:050:23:11

It's amazing and it's all done by hand.

0:23:110:23:14

You know, look at all those bricks, all laid by hand, all that cast iron,

0:23:140:23:19

granite, sandstone, and it's a great place to be.

0:23:190:23:24

-It is. It feels good, doesn't it?

-It does. Yeah.

0:23:240:23:27

Now, is that part of the original mechanical loading system?

0:23:270:23:30

Previously, it was blokes hauling ropes.

0:23:300:23:33

-Pulleys and tackles.

-Push and pull, push and pull, labour intensive.

-So that really did speed things up.

0:23:330:23:39

The machine changed. I mean, this was the industrial revolution, you know.

0:23:390:23:42

This was a major change, and so, obviously, you could shift cargos so much quicker.

0:23:420:23:48

-What were they unloading?

-All sorts of things were brought in from all over the world.

0:23:480:23:52

-It must have been colourful and vibrant and the smells would have been wonderful.

-It was.

0:23:520:23:57

In Victorian times, the smells of the spices, the smell of the cotton, the smell of the rum, the tobacco.

0:23:570:24:04

Everything was incredible and the characters, of course, they would have been all round here.

0:24:040:24:09

-Yeah.

-You know, tremendous characters, including Jesse Hartley was a great character himself.

0:24:090:24:13

You can imagine him shouting, "Get on with this," you know.

0:24:130:24:17

-He was the ultimate foreman and he either altered or built every dock in Liverpool...

-It's incredible.

0:24:170:24:24

..during his time. He was a colossus.

0:24:240:24:27

And I guess it employed in its heyday thousands and thousands of people.

0:24:270:24:32

-This area down here would have been total noise, the clanking of machinery.

-A hive of activity.

0:24:320:24:37

Total hive of activity.

0:24:370:24:39

# As I walked out one morning fair down by the Liverpool docks

0:24:390:24:44

# Heave away, me Johnny Heave away! #

0:24:440:24:48

Although the dock prospered hugely, slowly the demands of ships began to change.

0:24:490:24:54

Consequently, a downturn in the life of the Albert Dock was almost inevitable.

0:24:540:24:59

Why did the docks go out of favour? What was their demise?

0:25:020:25:05

Well, you can make all the great plans for a dock, but, really, what happened was the ships got bigger.

0:25:050:25:11

Right. OK. And I guess access is quite tight here.

0:25:110:25:14

Well, you look at the lock gates.

0:25:140:25:17

-Yes.

-They weren't able to predict how big ships were going to go.

0:25:170:25:21

They couldn't predict the leviathans of the sea which were coming,

0:25:210:25:24

but a simple thing like the lock gates not being big enough

0:25:240:25:27

really sounded the end for this dock as a major dock in the town.

0:25:270:25:33

What happened in the 20th century then?

0:25:330:25:36

Throughout the '70s, this was a very, very bad area.

0:25:360:25:40

Nothing was happening here and the dock board crashed. It went bust.

0:25:400:25:44

-It went bankrupt. And at about that time, there was an accident here, where a ship rammed the gates.

-Here?

0:25:440:25:51

Yeah. Rammed the gates to the Canning Dock and because of the state of the dock board at that time,

0:25:510:25:56

there was no repairs done.

0:25:560:25:58

So what happened was, this area became tidal.

0:25:580:26:02

All the tide came in and it silted up, so if you'd look behind you here,

0:26:020:26:07

you know, 30 years ago, it was just a mass of silt.

0:26:070:26:11

I mean, the Piermaster's House over there, the warehouse round the back there, they were ruined.

0:26:110:26:17

It was a very sad time for Liverpool.

0:26:170:26:20

But it was Michael Heseltine who spearheaded turning around the fortunes of the Albert Dock.

0:26:200:26:26

In the early 1980s, the newly-elected Conservative government

0:26:260:26:30

appointed him Environment Secretary, and under his guidance, the Merseyside Development Corporation

0:26:300:26:36

was set up to take over the responsibility of regenerating and redeveloping Liverpool South Dock.

0:26:360:26:43

Thank goodness it's been preserved cos this is Liverpool's social history, isn't it?

0:26:430:26:48

It's all here. It's a world history.

0:26:480:26:50

-These buildings are really quite symbolic of that.

-Yeah.

0:26:500:26:55

And so the transformation slowly began to take place.

0:26:560:27:01

With new plans for leisure usage, the docks had a new lease of life.

0:27:010:27:05

Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, this place has now become a huge tourist attraction,

0:27:070:27:12

giving you a sense of connection to the past to Liverpool's glorious maritime days,

0:27:120:27:17

but also offering the city inspiration for the future.

0:27:170:27:21

Back now to the valuation day at St George's Hall and Mark has his eagle eyes on a collection of silver.

0:27:280:27:34

-What a lovely group of silver and you've brought lots of pieces in to show us which is fantastic.

-Yes.

0:27:350:27:41

But we've chosen this little group as a mixed lot

0:27:410:27:44

-because they're all of a type, aren't they?

-They are. Yeah.

0:27:440:27:48

The designs are not the same, but very similar.

0:27:480:27:51

Well, a lot of them are quite lightweight silver.

0:27:510:27:55

This is actually quite a good weight, this little bonbon basket, I suppose.

0:27:550:27:59

You know, you'd use it at the end of a table, in a bygone era really,

0:27:590:28:02

when you had maids to do all the silver cleaning for you.

0:28:020:28:05

This one is hallmarked for London, 1895.

0:28:050:28:08

And then this is Chester, 1901, I think, isn't it?

0:28:080:28:12

So they're all from that sort of general late-19th century, early-20th century period.

0:28:120:28:16

And we've got a little mustard pot and two pepperettes there.

0:28:160:28:20

-We've decided to put them in as a group lot and you're happy with that.

-Yes.

0:28:200:28:24

Now, they're a nice little group of pieces. Where did you get them from, Michelle?

0:28:240:28:27

-I bought them off the internet.

-Off the internet.

-Yeah.

0:28:270:28:30

Are you a dabbler on there? Do you like it?

0:28:300:28:32

Well, I had hoped to be a dabbler, but it's not working out.

0:28:320:28:36

Oh, dear. I'm sorry to hear that. You need an awful lot of money you know, these days, to be a dabbler.

0:28:360:28:42

-I found that out.

-What did you pay for the group? Can you remember?

0:28:420:28:46

-Probably about £120-130.

-Well, that's not too bad.

0:28:460:28:51

I mean, I think I would probably suggest putting them in at 100-150,

0:28:510:28:55

with a reserve of 100. And then, hopefully, they'll drive a little bit towards the upper estimate.

0:28:550:29:00

So you're happy with that then? You're happy if we put £100-150 on it?

0:29:000:29:04

That would be fine. Yeah.

0:29:040:29:06

-And why have you decided to sell them with us now?

-I just need the money.

-You need the cash.

0:29:060:29:11

-Well, we all do at this credit crunch time, don't we?

-We do.

0:29:110:29:14

I wish I had some things to flog.

0:29:140:29:15

Mike, you've bought in this wonderful painting.

0:29:230:29:27

What can you tell me about it?

0:29:270:29:29

-Well, it belonged to my father.

-Yeah.

0:29:290:29:31

It hung over his mantelpiece for about 40 years and I've inherited it essentially. Yes.

0:29:310:29:36

Right. There is a little bit of background about this history.

0:29:360:29:39

It's a fairly well-known painting.

0:29:390:29:41

It's a copy of a Rubens, which has got a very long-winded title,

0:29:410:29:45

Night Scene With An Old Lady With A Basket And A Candle. As you can see, you can tell she's uplit

0:29:450:29:50

as if she's got a candle out of the shop here and she's uplit by the light of the candle.

0:29:500:29:55

And it's a very beautifully painted thing. If you've not hung it, do you not like it?

0:29:550:29:59

Well, some people say it's a bit spooky.

0:29:590:30:01

My father was fond of it, but if I can get a fishing rod and reel out of it, I'd rather catch a trout.

0:30:010:30:08

Right. OK. Obviously, we all go on about the subject matter.

0:30:080:30:12

This was part of a large painting that has a young child in the same picture,

0:30:120:30:17

and that's a nice contrast between young girl and old crone.

0:30:170:30:19

But it's still a beautifully painted thing.

0:30:190:30:22

If you look at how well it's done, it's not signed so we don't know who did it

0:30:220:30:25

and it's certainly a copy, a late-18th, early-19th century copy of the original Rubens.

0:30:250:30:30

They've left quite a lot of thick paint, which is known as impasto, here on her forehead you can see.

0:30:300:30:35

And the uplighting's wonderful.

0:30:350:30:37

And all of this darkness is called chiaroscuro which is shadow.

0:30:370:30:41

It's a really dramatic painting. I don't think it's spooky.

0:30:410:30:44

I think it's lovely.

0:30:440:30:46

The original sold at auction recently for £2.4 million.

0:30:460:30:51

-Wow.

-I would love to say, "Here it is, another one."

-I'd love you to say it, too.

0:30:510:30:55

This painting, actually, this particular one is a known copy

0:30:550:30:58

so it has been catalogued as a known copy of this original. I think...

0:30:580:31:04

a cautious estimate would be £700-900.

0:31:040:31:08

-I mean, would you be happy with that or what do you think?

-Well, it'll find its own value, I guess.

0:31:080:31:13

I think what you're saying is probably right and I'd be happy to go with that.

0:31:130:31:16

So maybe if we put a reserve of 700,

0:31:160:31:20

we can put a guide price of maybe straddling the £1,000,

0:31:200:31:24

so maybe 800 to 1,200 as the guide price in the catalogue.

0:31:240:31:27

And then hope it makes about the £1,000 mark.

0:31:270:31:30

-Yeah. Smashing.

-Hopefully a new fishing reel for you.

0:31:300:31:32

-Hope so.

-Or two.

0:31:320:31:34

-Hello, Tam.

-Hello, Mark.

-Now, who's this charming young lady with you?

-That's my daughter, Keeley.

0:31:410:31:45

-Hello, Keeley.

-Hello.

-And what did you think of dad's huge pot?

0:31:450:31:49

-Horrible.

-Horrible.

-Yeah.

0:31:490:31:51

-You don't like it at all. Does it give you nightmares?

-No. It's just the horrible colours.

0:31:510:31:55

-The youngsters don't appreciate these things, do they?

-No.

0:31:550:31:57

But it is a real corker, isn't it?

0:31:570:32:00

-It's an absolute beauty.

-I've never seen a Doulton vase of this size

0:32:000:32:04

-by, of course, the famous Hannah Barlow and Frank Butler.

-That's correct.

0:32:040:32:08

I mean, an amazing combination.

0:32:080:32:11

I think we ought to look at it straightaway, really, the quality of it.

0:32:110:32:14

We've got a very typical frieze in the centre of the horses and the cattle.

0:32:140:32:19

And then it's flanked either side, top and bottom, by this wonderful glazing on the top of it,

0:32:190:32:24

the green and the blues, by Frank Butler.

0:32:240:32:26

Again, a top notch Doulton designer, so you've got really two leading names.

0:32:260:32:30

I haven't even had the courage to try and pick it up, but I'm sure it's marked underneath - Doulton.

0:32:300:32:36

And I wouldn't be surprised if it wasn't made for some sort of ceramic exhibition somewhere.

0:32:360:32:41

Now, tell me, where did you get this pot from?

0:32:410:32:44

Actually, I bought it online from an auction in Australia.

0:32:440:32:47

It must have cost you a fortune to have it shipped over.

0:32:470:32:49

It cost just over £300 for shipping.

0:32:490:32:53

-Good Lord.

-Yeah.

-Now we've got to think about price.

0:32:530:32:56

-We know Keeley wouldn't give her pocket money for it.

-No.

-But I'm sure she'll be happy to know the value.

0:32:560:33:02

-I would suggest maybe putting it in at a £2,000 to 3,000 estimate, with a 2,000 fixed reserve.

-That's fine.

0:33:020:33:08

-But five or six years ago, we probably would have been saying £3,000 to 5,000.

-Without doubt.

0:33:080:33:15

But that's the nature of the beast, isn't it? Are you happy with that?

0:33:150:33:18

Yeah. That's fine. That's fine.

0:33:180:33:20

I think I almost saw a smile with Keeley then when she heard the 2,000 figure.

0:33:200:33:24

-Do you like it more now that it's worth that much money, Keeley?

-Yeah.

0:33:240:33:29

Thank you very much for bringing it in, Tam.

0:33:290:33:32

Ranging from small to large, here's a quick reminder of all the items heading off to auction.

0:33:320:33:38

Michelle hopes she can polish off a decent profit on her silver collection.

0:33:380:33:44

-Why have you decided to sell all of this now?

-I just need the money.

0:33:440:33:47

-Well, we all do in this credit crunch time, don't we?

-We do.

0:33:470:33:50

I wish I had some things to flog.

0:33:500:33:52

Can Tam find a giant price for his giant vase?

0:33:530:33:58

We know Keeley wouldn't give her pocket money for it, but I'm sure she'll be happy to know the value.

0:33:580:34:02

And, finally, will Mark's dark, Ruben-style painting brighten up the saleroom?

0:34:020:34:08

And before it goes under the hammer, I've found a few minutes to sit down with Anthony to get his opinion.

0:34:110:34:18

-Now, would you like this on your wall at home?

-At home?

0:34:180:34:22

-Not in the sale room.

-Not in the sale room.

0:34:220:34:24

No. I wouldn't like it at home. It's a very dull-looking picture.

0:34:240:34:28

I find a lot of Rubens are quite sort of spooky.

0:34:280:34:31

This is after Rubens, obviously.

0:34:310:34:33

-Yes.

-It's A Night Scene With An Old Lady Holding A Basket And A Candle.

0:34:330:34:37

It belongs to Michael. He doesn't like it. He keeps it in bubblewrap.

0:34:370:34:41

-Oh, right.

-So he wants to sell it to buy a fishing rod and a reel.

0:34:410:34:44

Oh, I think we might manage that, a fishing rod and a reel out of it.

0:34:440:34:48

-But you haven't heard the valuation.

-Oh, right.

-OK. 800 to 1,200.

0:34:480:34:51

-There has been a fair bit of interest in it.

-Has there?

0:34:510:34:53

-Yeah. We've had international interest in it, as well.

-Good.

0:34:530:34:56

-So, hopefully, it'll make money.

-Fingers crossed.

-Fingers crossed.

0:34:560:35:00

-Could we double the top end?

-Oh, don't be greedy.

0:35:000:35:02

Fingers crossed, Michelle. We're going to find out and so are you

0:35:130:35:16

because all the silver collection is just about to go under the hammer.

0:35:160:35:20

We're selling it because...

0:35:200:35:22

-got to pay some bills, haven't you?

-Got to pay a lot of bills.

0:35:220:35:25

Fact of life, we've all got them and we all have to pay them, Mark.

0:35:250:35:29

-We do.

-We've got a top end of the estimate at £150.

0:35:290:35:32

And there's a lot of silver here, bonbon dish, all sorts of things, mustard pot.

0:35:320:35:36

Nice little mixed lot, actually. Should appeal to the trade buyers,

0:35:360:35:39

-cos there's a lot there, or private collectors who want to furnish their little silver cabinets with it.

-Yeah.

0:35:390:35:45

All different assay offices so there's something for everybody.

0:35:450:35:48

And I know they've been wrapped up at home ready to go for a long time.

0:35:480:35:51

-Yeah.

-Let's hope this is the day, shall we?

0:35:510:35:54

Good luck, both of you. Here we go.

0:35:540:35:57

36. A mixed collection here.

0:35:570:35:58

A mixed collection of silver, a swing-handle basket.

0:35:580:36:03

Three ounces. London hallmark. Bonbon dish. Chester, 1901.

0:36:030:36:06

A pair of pepperettes. Birmingham...

0:36:060:36:09

-It's a long list

-It is.

-He's getting out of breath describing it.

0:36:090:36:13

Sheffield, 1889. Five items.

0:36:130:36:16

-Have you got them all, Mike?

-Yes.

-Right. What shall we say for those?

0:36:160:36:19

50. Thank you. £50 the lot. 50.

0:36:190:36:22

Five. 60. Five. 70. Five. 75. 80.

0:36:220:36:26

Five. 85. 90. Five.

0:36:260:36:29

-100. Five. 110. 115.

-Oh, good.

0:36:290:36:34

-120. 120. 120. 120. 120. 120.

-A bit more.

-Five, is it?

0:36:340:36:40

All done at 120 then? We finished at 120. Are they gone?

0:36:400:36:44

-120. That's not bad.

-It made estimate.

0:36:440:36:48

-It's going towards those bills, that's for sure.

-Absolutely.

-You're happy?

-I'm relieved.

0:36:480:36:54

It's after Rubens, it's a wonderful oil on canvas and I know you love this.

0:37:010:37:05

-Yes.

-And I know you want to sell it.

0:37:050:37:08

-I do.

-And I think, I just think, we've got a new home for it somewhere here in Wales.

0:37:080:37:14

I had a chat to Anthony, the auctioneer, before the sale started.

0:37:140:37:16

Well, he said he's had quite a bit of interest.

0:37:160:37:19

There's been a lot of viewings.

0:37:190:37:20

-If you could just find a signature in the bottom right, that would be quite helpful.

-Just a bit.

0:37:200:37:24

-No. It's beautifully painted and I love it.

-Why do you want to sell it?

0:37:240:37:28

-Well, it's a legacy for my father and it's got to be split three ways.

-OK.

-It's got to go.

0:37:280:37:33

It's an easy way of dividing up the value then, isn't it, really?

0:37:330:37:36

-Quite.

-It's hard to value unless it goes into an auction like this where everyone has the chance to buy it.

0:37:360:37:42

I think the talking's over with, don't you? We can't really say any more about it.

0:37:420:37:46

We all love it and we're going to find out what the bidders here in Mold think of it. Here we go.

0:37:460:37:50

It's going under the hammer.

0:37:500:37:52

After Peter Paul Rubens, I wish it was Peter Paul Rubens.

0:37:520:37:56

The study of the old lady. Part of A Night Scene Of The Old Lady Holding The Basket And The Candle.

0:37:560:38:03

The original was sold, as we've got in the catalogue, for 2.4 million,

0:38:030:38:09

in 2004. So there's a chance for you all now to have a Rubens.

0:38:090:38:13

What shall we say for it?

0:38:130:38:16

We won't ask you for 100,000 to start.

0:38:160:38:20

500. Thank you. £500. 500.

0:38:200:38:23

£500. 500. 500. 550. 550. 550. 550.

0:38:230:38:30

600. £600. 600.

0:38:300:38:34

£600. 600. 600. And 50.

0:38:340:38:38

650. 650. 650. 650.

0:38:380:38:43

£650. 650. 650. Where's 700?

0:38:430:38:48

£650 then. All done at £650?

0:38:480:38:50

-Not enough, is it?

-No.

-Are we finished at 650?

0:38:500:38:55

I'm really surprised.

0:38:550:38:57

-So am I.

-Oh, dear.

-Oh, dear.

0:38:570:39:00

-Oh, well.

-What a shame.

-You're taking it home.

0:39:000:39:02

There was somebody on the phone, wasn't there, as well, but they didn't want to be pushed.

0:39:020:39:07

-That was the highest bid on the phone - 650.

-Was it to the phone?

0:39:070:39:10

Yeah. Yeah. If someone was in the room pushing that,

0:39:100:39:13

the phone bidder may have gone 750, 800, which would have just sold it.

0:39:130:39:17

-Yeah.

-Which just goes to show you can't get it right all the time.

0:39:170:39:20

-No. That was so close.

-It was.

0:39:200:39:22

What I would do if I was you is have a word with the auctioneer after the sale...

0:39:220:39:26

-he'll have the phone number of the phone bidder.

-Right.

0:39:260:39:29

They might be able to see if he's prepared to go that one bit extra to get it to the reserve.

0:39:290:39:34

-Yeah.

-It's worth trying.

-It is.

-Ask him. Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:39:340:39:37

-Ask him cos it's so close.

-Yeah.

0:39:370:39:40

We're looking for £2-3,000, the Royal Doulton.

0:39:470:39:50

It's made by Hannah Barlow.

0:39:500:39:52

It's absolutely gorgeous. It belongs to Tam. Why are you selling this, Tam?

0:39:520:39:55

It's just that it's a big, massive lump and I just really haven't got room for it.

0:39:550:40:00

I've had it about 2½ years now and I think it's just time to sell it and move on to something else.

0:40:000:40:06

-It is big, isn't it?

-It's huge.

0:40:060:40:07

-Where's it been at home then?

-Stuck in the corner, basically.

0:40:070:40:10

-Stuck in the corner.

-Yeah.

-What, on the floor?

-On the floor.

0:40:100:40:12

-On the floor.

-On the floor.

0:40:120:40:14

-Not a good way to display something like that. No.

-No.

0:40:140:40:18

But it is kind of the wrong size, isn't it, really?

0:40:180:40:20

That's the only thing it's got its downsides on.

0:40:200:40:23

If you were a collector at a very big house and you had a big jardiniere stand to put it on or something,

0:40:230:40:28

-in the corner of the room, and you really wanted to appreciate it, that's fantastic.

-Yes.

0:40:280:40:32

But I love the combination of the Frank Butler border and the Hannah Barlow and I agree with you,

0:40:320:40:38

I think it's an exhibition piece, but it's fingers crossed because it's a specialist market.

0:40:380:40:42

Which means it could be a lot rarer.

0:40:420:40:45

-It's a one-off.

-Yes.

-How can you do your price comparables? You can't.

0:40:450:40:48

That's what auctions are all about. This is what makes this so exciting.

0:40:480:40:52

Right now, it's going under the hammer.

0:40:520:40:54

-We're going to find its real value. Good luck, both of you.

-Thank you.

0:40:540:40:57

181. Are you showing it? You're not even picking it up. 181.

0:40:570:41:02

We've got this heavy jardiniere, the Hannah Barlow decorated one.

0:41:020:41:06

Doulton Lambeth, 1885.

0:41:060:41:10

Never seen one that size before. £500. 500. 500. 600.

0:41:100:41:16

700. 800. 900.

0:41:160:41:19

1,000. 1,100. 1,200.

0:41:190:41:22

£1,200 there. 1,200. 1,200.

0:41:220:41:26

-We're a long way off.

-Yeah. We are, a bit.

0:41:260:41:28

30. 50. 40. 50. 50. 50. 60.

0:41:280:41:34

50. 70. 50. 80. 50. 90. 50.

0:41:340:41:41

Yes.

0:41:410:41:43

One more.

0:41:430:41:44

1975. Was it you?

0:41:440:41:47

Go on. 1,975. 1,975. 1,975.

0:41:470:41:54

-Great year.

-Are you going to fill it up for me? 1,975. It's going.

0:41:540:41:58

At 1,975...

0:41:580:42:01

Yes. We've done it.

0:42:010:42:03

I think the auctioneer's going to make up the extra £25

0:42:030:42:06

because it was fixed at £2,000, but what a great result.

0:42:060:42:09

I'm pleased with that, cos I didn't have high hopes, in fairness.

0:42:090:42:13

-I thought it was the wrong sale.

-You were getting the wobbles this morning, I could see that.

0:42:130:42:17

I had the cobbles this morning, I can tell you.

0:42:170:42:20

Your reputation was on the line.

0:42:200:42:22

Oh, it's been on the line for some years.

0:42:220:42:26

Naughty boy.

0:42:260:42:28

Look, that's great, isn't it? What are you going to do with the money?

0:42:280:42:31

I'll reinvest it into something nice, another piece of pottery, probably.

0:42:310:42:35

-Something smaller.

-Yeah. Definitely. Something lighter.

-Yes. Yeah.

0:42:350:42:40

Well, that's it. It's all over and what a cracking day we've had.

0:42:470:42:51

It's wonderful to be back here in Mold. Anthony Parry, on the rostrum, has worked his magic.

0:42:510:42:56

I hope you've enjoyed the show, so until the next time, from Mold, it's cheerio.

0:42:560:43:00

Paul Martin and the team head to Liverpool. Mark Stacey and Kate Bateman are the experts on hand, ready to value an assortment of items including a large Doulton jardiniere pot.

Paul also takes a look around the city's famous Albert Dock and reveals its fascinating history.