Clacton Flog It!


Clacton

Paul Martin is joined by experts Will Axon and Elizabeth Talbot as they peruse the antiques of Clacton-on-Sea at the Princes Theatre.


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Transcript


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Welcome to Flog It. Today we're at the seaside on the Essex coastline on the lookout for some real treasure.

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And later on in the programme, I won't be building sand castles, I've got a real one to play with!

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This is the fascinating Harwich Redoubt fort, built 200 years ago

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to fend off the threat of Napoleon's invading French army.

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It's now hidden away and nearly forgotten.

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Later in the programme,

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I'll be having a good look around and finding out

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why this place was once of great importance to our island nation.

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Just look at this! It feels like one great big solid mass, but it is a visual delight.

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But first we're off to a traditional British seaside holiday resort,

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nearby Clacton-on-Sea in Essex,

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where the queue is already forming for our valuation day.

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Today we're at the Princes Theatre,

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just a couple of minutes from the seafront and the town pier.

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Our experts are already mooching through this massive crowd,

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searching for the best items to take off to auction

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and today we've got the wonderful Elizabeth Talbot and Will Axon.

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Well, by my watch, it is now 9.30.

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It's time to get the doors open and get this show on the road.

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-Are you ready to go in? CROWD:

-Yes!

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Everybody is now settled inside and it's time to get started.

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It looks as though Will has found an item to put a big smile on his face.

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-Malcolm, hello there.

-Hello.

-Thanks for coming in.

-Yeah.

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-Tell me, are you a cat lover in particular?

-Yes.

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-I've had collections of cats.

-So what drew you to this cat,

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because looking at him, he's got quite a scary face, hasn't he?

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He's very unusual to look at, the green eyes and the funny-coloured mouth.

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Yeah, I mean...

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And that's what took me to him.

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-That big grin, I would say Alice In Wonderland.

-Yeah.

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-It's the Cheshire Cat, isn't he?

-Yeah.

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Let's have a closer look at him because I rather like him.

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And I can just see inside here,

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-"Modelled by FG Doughty". Freda Doughty.

-Yeah.

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So 1957, Royal Worcester, Cheshire Cat modelled by Freda Doughty.

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Now, Royal Worcester, Freda Doughty, good names,

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in this case, for a series of Alice In Wonderland figures.

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-Have you got the whole set at home?

-No, I wish I had.

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-So do I. That would have been nice.

-Yeah.

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So how come you've come by getting just the one figure here?

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Well, the one figure - I was car-booting at Weeley

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and it started to rain, a lady was packing up, and I...

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I just looked in the bottom of a box and it was wrapped in a towel.

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-Really?

-Yeah. And I said, "Are you selling it?" And she said,

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-"Yeah, a pound."

-And you said, "I'll have that!"

-Yeah.

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-You didn't know what it was?

-No.

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-You didn't even look at the mark.

-No, I just had that...that thing that it was worth something.

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Well, we love to hear stories like that on Flog It!

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It makes you want to get up early and get out to the boot fairs.

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-Yeah.

-Something for £1.

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Because once you got it home, you did a bit of research, did you?

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Or did it hang about in the display cabinet for a while?

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Well, when I was at the car boot, there was a dealer there

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and he said, "I'll give you £50 for it, here and now,"

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and that's what tipped me over the edge.

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I thought, "No, I'll stick with it, I'll keep it,"

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just to have a bit of a study and I looked it up

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and, lo and behold, it was worth more than I thought.

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I've done a bit of research. If we had a full set, then you're talking,

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because that's a lot rarer than just single figures.

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-Yeah.

-A set of seven, you're looking at about £1,500 to £2,000, because obviously, there's a premium.

-Yeah.

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-So, what's that? A couple of hundred each, just over.

-Yeah.

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So what I would like to sort of say to you is it's worth about 150, 250.

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-Right.

-OK? Right. So, straddle that £200 mark.

-Yeah.

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-Shall we reserve it at the bottom figure?

-Yeah.

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-150 with discretion?

-150, yeah.

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-Not a bad return for £1!

-No, it's not.

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-A lot of people would have been tempted to take the £50.

-That's right.

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Alistair, I think you've made my day.

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-Oh, that's good.

-I've seen a lot of Black Forest carving,

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we've seen a lot on Flog It! before, but I think...

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this has got to be the best piece I've seen, that's for sure.

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And the biggest! So tell me, how did you come across this?

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The earliest I can remember is when I went to my grandmother's house.

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-I was about five or six.

-So you were about that high.

-Yeah.

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I remember the bear used to come up and stare me in the face!

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-I was quite frightened of it sometimes.

-Aww!

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So it's been in the family a long time.

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-Did they use this as a stick stand?

-It was an umbrella stand.

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-Yeah.

-We used to put umbrellas in there.

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My mother inherited it and now she's given it to me.

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I don't know how old it is, actually.

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It's quite old, late Victorian.

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-OK.

-And it is absolutely gorgeous.

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It's still got its original glass eyes.

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It's chip carved, as you can see.

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-I love chip carving.

-This is all hand carved?

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-Yes. With a tiny gouge, and this was one great lump of beech.

-Wow!

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He'd have been working on this for days on end.

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Now, the problem is, wood dries out.

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If it's not seasoned properly and you put it inside next to radiators,

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-it splits.

-That's what's caused that.

-That's what's happening.

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I love Mr Bear!

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I do as well. You can see the colour.

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You can see on his forehead, you can see where everyone's walked past him.

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-Yeah, I remember doing that myself.

-And stroked him.

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I think he's got the potential to do an awful lot of money.

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Had you any figure in mind? What do you think he's worth?

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Well, I'd like to get about 1,000 for him, I think.

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I actually thought, before you said you wanted £1,000,

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I was going to put this into auction with a valuation of £1,000 to £2,000,

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but because you want to go home with £1,000...

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-It would be nice!

-There's commission to pay, so let's call the valuation £1,100, fixed reserve.

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1,100 to 1,900.

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Instead of 1,000 to 2000, 1,100 to 1,900.

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-Well, if I could get 1,000 for him, I'd be very happy.

-OK.

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Jack, I have never seen a pair of Carlton Ware figures like this before.

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They're new to me, but what can you tell me about them?

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They belonged to my father and they're about 35, 40 years old

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and he just went out one Sunday and came back with them, like.

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He said he'd bought them at a market.

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-An impulse buy, was it?

-Yeah, well, that's it.

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He's like me, he's a military man, well, he was in the Navy,

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and I like anything military, so they caught his eye.

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Hence you've carried them forward to this date.

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-Well, that's it.

-But you're looking possibly to sell them, now.

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-Yes, yeah.

-And why is that?

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Well, I want to go to Australia next year and see my boy

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and, you know, everything else at the moment...

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-Everything adds up towards the big fund.

-Yeah.

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-But do you like them, though?

-I do, as it happens.

-Yeah?

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-I'll be sorry to see them go, really, but as needs must.

-Sure.

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I think that they date slightly from before when your father bought them,

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-but they were probably nearly new when he bought them.

-Yes.

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-I think they date from the 1960s and they were intended to be advertising figures.

-Yes.

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They do appear even to possibly have hollow tops

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and it could be that they were intended to have contents as well.

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Having said all that, because... because they're unusual,

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it doesn't necessarily mean to say that they're any more valuable.

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-No.

-Because there will be, I think, a very specific person

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who looks at them and thinks they are collectable and interesting,

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although I do like your idea of the military link,

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somebody who's interested in the military and uniforms and history.

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I think that's also an aspect which could appeal.

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To be fair, you'd need to be looking at around about £60 to £90 for the pair.

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They might make a little bit more. It would be lovely if they make a lot more, but I think it's unlikely.

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I think £60 to £90 is about the area that we would...

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-Yes.

-That we should be looking for before auction.

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Does that suit you?

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I'd rather put a reserve on them of £100.

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-You'd like £100?

-Yeah.

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-That means we need to make the estimate higher.

-Yes.

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Because we can't put a reserve higher than an estimate,

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so we need to make the estimate 100 to 150.

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-So that's kind of doubled, well, almost doubled what I think.

-Yes.

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-But if you're happy to go, we'll see.

-Yeah.

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The worst thing that can happen is they don't sell.

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Or they sell and we all learn what they're worth,

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which is a big question mark at the moment.

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-So see you at the auction.

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

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Carol, is this your money box from childhood you brought in?

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That's right, it is, yeah.

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-Was it full of pennies before you brought it in?

-It was.

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Emptied those out, have you, put them to one side?

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-It was my nan's.

-OK.

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And she died six years ago at 96

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-and I've inherited it, so...

-OK.

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It carries the date underneath, the patent date, for 1883.

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-That's right.

-So, it's 19th century.

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Let's see if it does work, shall we?

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There's 10p, I'll donate that to the cause.

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Let me see if I can just pop that in mother bird's beak.

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There she goes, holding on to that,

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and let's see if she can dip it in the nest and feed the young.

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Hey! There we go.

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So, that's another 10p in there.

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Hopefully that will entice the bidders!

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Now, did your nan give you any idea of what it was worth

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when you inherited it from her?

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-No, she never did.

-No?

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Never talked about value?

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-The cast-iron money box has been much reproduced.

-Right.

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They started making copies of these

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and the reason I mention that is because that can, in turn,

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affect the value of even the genuine ones

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because the market gets a bit nervous, isn't sure if something is genuine or not,

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but the fact that you've got this story that ties it back to your nan

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that helps put it into some sort of perspective, give it what we would call a bit of provenance

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and just puts me at ease that we're not dealing with something here that is brand new or made to deceive.

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Value wise, I'm going to sort of remain a bit cautious

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because of those factors that I've mentioned

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and I'm going to say it's worth 100 to 150.

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What do you feel about that valuation?

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I'll put a reserve on it for 100.

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Well, straight to the point! I like it, no mucking about!

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Let's get that bottom figure fixed at 100, then.

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Are we going to give the auctioneer some discretion?

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Would you let him sell it at 90 if he's struggling on the day?

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No. A fixed reserve at £100. You're quite right to put your foot down.

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-Well, we'll give it a go for you...

-All right.

-At 100 to 150.

-OK.

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Everybody's working so hard down there.

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Our valuations are underway, but we've found our first items to take off to auction,

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so while we make our way over, we're going to leave you with a recap of the items going under the hammer.

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Malcolm bought his Royal Worcester Cheshire Cat from a car-boot sale for an absolute bargain.

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I said, "Are you selling it?" and she said, "Yeah, a pound."

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Will thinks it's worth at least a few hundred.

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I just loved Alistair's inherited Black Forest umbrella stand.

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Let's hope the bidders will feel the same.

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It's time for Carol to part with her cast-iron money box

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which belonged to her gran, and it certainly got Will excited!

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Hey! There we go.

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And, finally, Jack is hoping to add to his Australia fund

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with the proceeds from his two Carlton Ware beefeaters,

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so fingers crossed they'll find fans in the auction room.

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And this is where all our items will be going under the hammer,

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Reeman Dansie Auction Rooms in Colchester,

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and I hope this lot here are getting ready to bid on all our items.

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Before the sale starts, I'm catching up with today's auctioneer, James Grinter,

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to ask him what he's got to say about one or two of our items.

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What do you think of this, James? This belongs to Malcolm.

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Royal Worcester Cheshire Cat.

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We valued it at £150 to £250.

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It's a rare figure and there's a lot of interest in it

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and I think this cat's not the only one that will have a smile on its face tomorrow.

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-A big grin at the end of the day.

-Yes.

-Well, Malcolm paid a lot of money for this.

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-Right.

-And he wants his money back.

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I think he'll be pleasantly surprised.

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What do you think the top end will be?

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Well, I reckon it could do two or three times your estimate.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

-Gosh!

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Can tell you how much he paid for it?

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-Go on, tell me.

-A pound.

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I think he did all right, don't you?

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Will James be right? Wait and see, because first up are those two pieces of Carlton Ware.

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-According to Jack's wife, the beefeaters have to go, don't they?

-They certainly do.

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-She doesn't like them?

-No.

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-They don't suit the house.

-No.

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-But you love them?

-I do, I don't want them to go, but she's the boss.

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-She's the boss, so.

-She's the boss. Oh, well, I concur there!

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-Keep her sweet.

-You've got to keep the wife happy.

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-That's it.

-I hear there might be a trip to Australia coming up.

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Hopefully, yes, in the end of the year, to see my boy.

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I haven't seen him for five years.

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Really? You talk on the phone, though.

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-Yes, obviously.

-What's he doing out there?

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-He's in IT.

-Is he? Oh, good job.

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Yeah. He's in Perth. So, hopefully going to...

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-This will be going towards...

-The holiday fund to get out and see him.

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-Oh, brilliant. Well, we've got £100 to £150, Elizabeth.

-We have.

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And I saw a couple of elderly ladies this morning viewing them saying, "I like these, I want to buy them."

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-One each.

-One each! You never know!

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Number 24 is the pair of impressive Carlton Ware ceramic beefeaters.

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There are the beefeaters here. What do you say for this lot?

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£100 to start me. £100 to start me.

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80, then? 80 I have down here now.

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At 80. At £80 bid now. At 80, 5.

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At £85 bid now. At 85.

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90, 5. At 95. 100.

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At £100 bid down here now. At 100.

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£100 is bid. Any advance?

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All done now at £100. All done?

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-Yes, £100! A nice, round figure. Well done, Jack.

-Thanks very much.

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-That's a bit towards the holiday fund, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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-Spot-on valuation.

-Spot on, yes. Well done, Jack.

-Thank you.

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Hopefully this next lot should be worth a lot of money

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and it's something to put your money into, as well, because it's a novelty money box.

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It belongs to Carol here.

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-Beautifully modelled, possibly American. It's got traces of polychrome paint.

-Yes.

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It's just what the collectors want, because it's in its original condition.

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Exactly. You mentioned a bit of damage.

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Keep your voice down, because someone might not have spotted that!

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But it's the replicas of these that have affected the market, but there's no doubt this is genuine.

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-Yeah.

-It's been catalogued as late 19th, so we were right on that.

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Yeah, it's ready to go. It's good.

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It's novelty, it's fun, it puts a smile on your face.

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There's lots of collectors for these money boxes.

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-That's good.

-I'm sure this has been picked up on the internet.

-OK, that's good.

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Shame it's not full of money. Then it would be worth a bit more.

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-Full of gold sovereigns!

-Absolutely!

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Number 532 is the unusual late-19th-century cast-iron

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novelty money box.

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I have two commissions and I start the bidding at £200. At £200.

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210. 220. 230. 240.

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250. 260. 270.

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270 is bid over here now.

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At 270. 280 anywhere? At £270. Are you all done?

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Yes! Just over the top end.

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£270, that's a great result.

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-Cor!

-You've got to be so happy with that?

-I am, I am.

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What will you put the money towards?

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-Perhaps we'll go to the theatre.

-Take Mum?

-Yeah.

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-Because I know she's here today to give you a bit of support.

-Yes.

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-Enjoy it, Carol.

-OK, thank you.

-Off to the West End.

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Brilliant! That was a great price.

0:16:470:16:49

You should be able to get front-row seats with that sort of money.

0:16:490:16:53

Next up, my turn to be the expert and I fell in love with this Black Forest bear.

0:17:050:17:09

He's big, he's beautiful, but he is damaged, so it's going to hold it back slightly.

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-I've just been joined by Alistair, Big Bear's owner.

-Yes!

0:17:130:17:17

-Now, at the evaluation day you were adamant, you said you didn't want this to go below £1,100.

-Yeah.

0:17:170:17:22

Because we've got commission to pay, you wanted to come out with 1,000.

0:17:220:17:26

-That's right, yes.

-But you've had a change of heart.

0:17:260:17:29

You want it to go, so we've dropped the reserve to 800,

0:17:290:17:32

which is sensible, but I still feel it stands a chance

0:17:320:17:35

-of doing what we suggested in the first place.

-Hopefully, it will.

0:17:350:17:39

It's the 19th-century Black Forest carved wooden bear umbrella stand.

0:17:390:17:43

A very handsome stand here. What do you say to start me?

0:17:430:17:46

£600 to start me? £600 to start me?

0:17:460:17:49

600 I have. At £600, now. At 600.

0:17:490:17:52

-Do I hear 620? At £600, now. Do I hear 620 anywhere?

-Come on.

0:17:520:17:56

At £600.

0:17:560:17:58

-Oh, it's sticking, isn't it?

-Any advance? All done now at £600.

0:17:580:18:02

All done? I'm sorry, that lot didn't sell.

0:18:020:18:05

I didn't think it would. I had this awful feeling.

0:18:050:18:08

It didn't make any difference.

0:18:080:18:10

I had this awful feeling it wasn't going to sell.

0:18:100:18:12

-Why?

-I don't know, I just had a gut feeling when I woke up this morning.

0:18:120:18:17

I don't understand that.

0:18:170:18:19

It was quality, it was just a bit damaged,

0:18:190:18:22

but there was enough, for somebody, in it to make it work, give them some profit.

0:18:220:18:26

-It's their loss.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:18:260:18:29

-I think Big Bear's going home with you.

-Big Bear, yeah.

0:18:290:18:32

It's not meant to be parted with you.

0:18:320:18:33

I've just been joined by Malcolm and we're going under the hammer

0:18:420:18:46

with that Royal Worcester Cheshire Cat which Will put a value on of 150 to 250.

0:18:460:18:50

I had a chat to the auctioneer, you know what he said.

0:18:500:18:53

It's positive, it's a good result.

0:18:530:18:55

Hopefully, we're going to break that top end

0:18:550:18:58

and we'll all be having these wonderful grins, unlike that cat!

0:18:580:19:01

It's described in the catalogue as "with beaming smile,"

0:19:010:19:04

but I think it looks a bit gruesome, don't you?

0:19:040:19:06

-Yeah.

-But £1, what a find!

0:19:060:19:09

Yeah, a very good find. A very good find at the time!

0:19:090:19:12

Would you be happy with 250?

0:19:120:19:14

-I certainly would.

-Would you be happy with 300?

-Yeah.

0:19:140:19:17

-You'd be over the moon with four, wouldn't you?

-I would.

0:19:170:19:20

You're building his hopes up!

0:19:200:19:22

The 1930s Royal Worcester Cheshire Cat with beaming expression.

0:19:220:19:27

We're just waiting to get through on the telephone here.

0:19:270:19:30

-That's a good sign.

-That's a good sign.

0:19:300:19:32

-We could see this going up to 1,000 nearly, Will.

-I hope!

0:19:320:19:36

A lot of interest in this lot, ladies and gentlemen,

0:19:360:19:39

and start the bidding with me at £300.

0:19:390:19:41

At 300. 320. 340. 360.

0:19:410:19:45

-380.

-Wow!

-400.

0:19:450:19:46

420. 440. 460.

0:19:460:19:49

480. 500. At £500 with me now.

0:19:490:19:52

At £500. Still with me now at 500.

0:19:520:19:55

Do I hear 520? At £500 with me. All done. 520.

0:19:550:20:00

-Yes!

-On the internet.

-Fresh legs!

-540 on the internet.

0:20:000:20:02

They're bidding against each other on the internet! 540.

0:20:020:20:05

560. At 560 on the internet.

0:20:050:20:08

They're bidding against each other at 560. 580 on the book.

0:20:080:20:11

They absolutely love this little cat.

0:20:110:20:13

On the internet now at 580. With me on the book at 580. At £580.

0:20:130:20:19

600. At £600 on the internet.

0:20:190:20:21

-620 with me.

-Wow!

0:20:210:20:23

Still on the book now at 620.

0:20:230:20:25

At 620 with me on the book.

0:20:250:20:27

At 620. Make it 640 on the internet?

0:20:270:20:29

At £620. I'm going to sell it, fair warning now, at 620.

0:20:290:20:34

-Brilliant!

-Wow!

0:20:340:20:36

£620!

0:20:360:20:39

-Brilliant!

-We should be clapping you. Gosh!

0:20:390:20:42

For a pound, not bad!

0:20:420:20:44

-What a lot of money!

-That's right.

0:20:440:20:46

Had you ever thought it would be worth as much as that?

0:20:460:20:48

Not really, no. 300, I'd have said, you know,

0:20:480:20:53

-very good if I'd walked away with 300, but double that, lovely!

-Great.

0:20:530:20:57

Incredible. What are you going to do with all that money? Obviously, there's commission.

0:20:570:21:02

My exhaust fell off the other day, I think I'll replace that!

0:21:020:21:06

Later at the valuation day, we're in for some more surprises

0:21:080:21:11

as Will finds a piece of majolica with an unusual use.

0:21:110:21:14

Do you know what it is, what it should be used for?

0:21:140:21:17

Keep watching and you'll find out.

0:21:170:21:20

Well, that's all to come, but right now I'm heading back to the seaside,

0:21:200:21:24

to rediscover one of the hidden treasures of Britain's coastal defences.

0:21:240:21:28

The port of Harwich on the Essex coast is a bustling trade centre

0:21:310:21:35

with passenger ships and container vessels coming and going,

0:21:350:21:39

but 200 years ago, this was a vital part of England's defences against invasion.

0:21:390:21:45

And proof of that importance is a little-known gem, hidden close to the town's harbour entrance.

0:21:450:21:50

And this is it, Harwich Redoubt fort,

0:22:070:22:09

built to defend Britain from Napoleon's invading French army

0:22:090:22:13

and just look at it! You can see it's such a solid fortress.

0:22:130:22:17

When work started on the fort in 1808,

0:22:220:22:25

there was a perceived threat that Napoleon might invade at any time.

0:22:250:22:29

So Harwich Redoubt was one of four Redoubt forts built along the east coast of England.

0:22:320:22:37

Each was manned with 250 soldiers.

0:22:380:22:41

The idea was traditionally it was built to be undefeatable,

0:22:410:22:45

to withstand any attack.

0:22:450:22:47

The fort was made circular so it had a 360 degree defence against any attack from land and sea,

0:22:470:22:54

as well as squatting low in the ground to make it a very difficult target.

0:22:540:22:58

There's a wonderful feeling of security down here.

0:22:580:23:02

All the bricks were made locally, and thank goodness they didn't have far to travel

0:23:020:23:06

because there's millions of them!

0:23:060:23:08

The thickness of the walls is so deep!

0:23:080:23:10

Look at that, you can see there.

0:23:100:23:12

And considering this was built so rapidly, the attention to detail is second to none.

0:23:120:23:17

Look at these wonderful brick lintels over all of the windows,

0:23:170:23:21

and that's quite aptly called a soldier course.

0:23:210:23:24

And then the fort had this,

0:23:240:23:26

a six-metre-wide dry moat to protect it from invading armies on foot,

0:23:260:23:31

and you can imagine, once you're down here,

0:23:310:23:33

it would be virtually impossible to scale these massive high walls.

0:23:330:23:38

The only way in would be by a working drawbridge.

0:23:380:23:42

All of these design features made the fort a formidable defence.

0:23:420:23:47

But all that preparation was for nothing.

0:23:530:23:56

By the time the fort was finished in 1810,

0:23:560:23:58

Napoleon's attention had turned elsewhere and the feared invasion never happened.

0:23:580:24:04

However, despite the lack of frontline action,

0:24:040:24:07

the fort was manned by an army of 200 to 300 soldiers

0:24:070:24:11

that were billeted here and ate and slept here.

0:24:110:24:14

A century later in the First World War,

0:24:140:24:16

the fort was used as a lookout across the bay,

0:24:160:24:19

but when peace came in 1918, Harwich Redoubt had still seen no front-line action.

0:24:190:24:26

In all that time, in over a century of military service,

0:24:280:24:31

not a single shot was fired in anger from these walls.

0:24:310:24:35

In the 1920s, the fort was abandoned and left to fall in disrepair.

0:24:350:24:40

Houses were built nearby and some land was given over to allotments.

0:24:410:24:45

The fortified embankments became lost in the landscape,

0:24:450:24:48

but one man who remembers this fort as a little boy

0:24:480:24:51

is Bernie Sadler from the Harwich Society, which rescued the fort.

0:24:510:24:57

-It's good to meet you, Bernie, up here on a rather breezy day.

-Very breezy.

0:24:570:25:01

When was the first time you discovered the fort?

0:25:010:25:04

Oh, as a small boy, just after the war, I used to play round here

0:25:040:25:08

and this was... Part of our adventure playground was to pop into here.

0:25:080:25:13

It must have been exciting as a young lad!

0:25:130:25:15

Yes, it was, but fairly inaccessible,

0:25:150:25:17

because it was in such a state, particularly dumping,

0:25:170:25:21

so that most of the staircases, there was no access,

0:25:210:25:24

but it was certainly an exciting place for a young lad.

0:25:240:25:26

-Did it feel like a special place?

-Even in those days, yes.

0:25:260:25:29

One knew there was something special about it.

0:25:290:25:33

Not only because of the size, but because of the construction.

0:25:330:25:36

What were your fears? What could happen if it hadn't have been restored?

0:25:360:25:40

Well, we'd already seen the lower parts develop during the 1930s and the concern was, of course,

0:25:400:25:48

that the allotment area at the top would be taken for housing as well and this would be demolished.

0:25:480:25:53

But it was kind of discovered by the Society in the late '60s

0:25:530:25:58

and then it was very quickly listed.

0:25:580:26:01

It wasn't even a listed building until 1969,

0:26:010:26:04

and then the Harwich Society started carrying out its renovation works.

0:26:040:26:08

From 1969 until the present day, the people of the Harwich Society

0:26:140:26:18

have worked tirelessly to save the fort.

0:26:180:26:21

The volunteers have cleared the rubble

0:26:220:26:25

and in doing so, they unearthed an original cannon.

0:26:250:26:29

They have shored up the structure of the fort

0:26:290:26:32

and have turned the lower rooms into a museum.

0:26:320:26:36

So what does the future hold now?

0:26:360:26:39

Well, we're glad that we've got the structure stabilised now,

0:26:390:26:43

although of course, even that's a continuing process.

0:26:430:26:45

We have chaps working up here every Sunday throughout the year.

0:26:450:26:49

-All volunteers?

-All done on a voluntary basis.

0:26:490:26:52

There's also a lot of space up here,

0:26:520:26:54

so we do need to fill the various rooms,

0:26:540:26:57

-particularly downstairs, with various artefacts.

-Yeah.

0:26:570:27:01

I expect the local community are really proud of this.

0:27:010:27:04

Yes, of all the ancient monuments in the town, this is the largest and one of the most attractive.

0:27:040:27:10

I noticed your people, when they came up here this morning,

0:27:100:27:13

it almost took their breath away and that's the usual impression that people get.

0:27:130:27:17

It is amazing what can be done when a group of volunteers work together,

0:27:170:27:21

and thanks to the Harwich Society, the fort continues to stand

0:27:210:27:25

as an important monument to England's military history.

0:27:250:27:29

It's still packed at the valuation day in Clacton's Princes Theatre

0:27:330:27:38

and Elizabeth has found an impressive collection.

0:27:380:27:41

Sylvia, I'm intrigued by your collection of jewellery,

0:27:430:27:46

which is rather an unusual cross section of the history of jewellery,

0:27:460:27:50

but how have you come by it all?

0:27:500:27:52

Well, I started collecting mourning jewellery about 30 years ago

0:27:520:27:57

and I started with a lot of ebony, which has long since gone,

0:27:570:28:01

and these are some of the pieces that I've kept.

0:28:010:28:05

-I used to wear them.

-That's good.

0:28:050:28:08

But fashions change and I don't wear them any more,

0:28:080:28:12

so they've just been sitting in the back of the cupboard

0:28:120:28:15

and I thought, well, it's time they had an airing

0:28:150:28:18

and so I thought I'd bring them along.

0:28:180:28:20

I'm pleased you did, because it really is a joy to see so much, and so much quality.

0:28:200:28:24

You obviously have quite an eye for both interesting things, good quality items.

0:28:240:28:31

Starting at this end we have the Georgian elliptical elegant ring,

0:28:310:28:37

which contains a glazed panel of plaited hair.

0:28:370:28:40

Typically Georgian,

0:28:400:28:42

-very much of the sort of late 17, very early 1800s in dates.

-Right.

0:28:420:28:47

And that progresses through to the much more traditional

0:28:470:28:51

Victorian mourning jewellery,

0:28:510:28:53

where they introduced the black background and the use of seed pearls heavily

0:28:530:28:57

and a lot of scrollwork and decoration.

0:28:570:29:00

And then this translates to, again, the later Victorian period,

0:29:000:29:03

the love of the cameo, which was popular in the Victorian period.

0:29:030:29:06

And moving through to the Edwardian period

0:29:060:29:10

and the early 20th century with this stunning watch.

0:29:100:29:12

I think this is gorgeous.

0:29:120:29:14

The enamel work on this, which is guioche enamel,

0:29:140:29:17

where they tool that the case and then an enamel over the top

0:29:170:29:20

so the decoration shines through,

0:29:200:29:22

-and if I just turn that over, that is just...

-So lovely, isn't it?

0:29:220:29:25

Gorgeous. Really rich and sumptuous.

0:29:250:29:28

And moving through from that watch

0:29:280:29:30

through to this very high Art Deco wristwatch.

0:29:300:29:33

-That was my mother's.

-That was your mother's?

0:29:330:29:35

-Yes, yeah.

-So do you remember her wearing that?

0:29:350:29:38

I think on a Saturday night, maybe, yes!

0:29:380:29:41

-It was a special occasion watch. Absolutely.

-Yeah.

0:29:410:29:44

Well, they're all gorgeous and it's difficult to say which I prefer.

0:29:440:29:49

I think they're all very good examples of their type.

0:29:490:29:52

I would strongly recommend that you're looking at this to be offered not as a collection.

0:29:520:29:56

It needs to be sold, I believe, in a minimum of, probably, eight lots.

0:29:560:30:00

-Virtually every item will stand alone.

-Oh, really?

0:30:000:30:03

-As an item.

-Oh, OK.

0:30:030:30:05

So you've got certainly six to eight lots of jewellery there

0:30:050:30:08

with an overall value, which I think is realistic

0:30:080:30:11

and possibly slightly conservative, of between £800 and £1,000.

0:30:110:30:16

-Oh, wow! That's really good. Fantastic.

-So we're going to have an exciting day!

0:30:160:30:20

It's nice to know that someone's going to appreciate them

0:30:200:30:24

and they're not just collecting dust.

0:30:240:30:26

I think they'll be highly appreciated.

0:30:260:30:28

Heather, thanks for coming along today

0:30:370:30:39

and I must say, this is probably one of my favourite bits today.

0:30:390:30:43

-I love this. The wacky world of Victorian majolica!

-Yes.

0:30:430:30:46

You knew what it was when you brought it in.

0:30:460:30:49

How have you come by it?

0:30:490:30:50

Is this something you collect or have bought?

0:30:500:30:52

-No, it was my grandmother's.

-Right.

0:30:520:30:54

And then my mother had it, and then...

0:30:540:30:57

-OK. So it's come down to you.

-Yes.

0:30:570:31:00

No-one left to pass it on to?

0:31:000:31:01

Well, I've got two sons and a daughter

0:31:010:31:03

and they're not really interested.

0:31:030:31:06

We hear that a lot in this business, I'm afraid.

0:31:060:31:08

It gets to a certain point and then no-one's interested in it.

0:31:080:31:11

Do you know what it is, what it should be used for?

0:31:110:31:15

Only recently.

0:31:150:31:18

-It's a spoon warmer.

-You're right.

0:31:180:31:20

-That's exactly what it is.

-Yes.

0:31:200:31:22

-Fill it with hot water.

-Yes.

0:31:220:31:25

-Put the spoons in, it warms the spoons.

-Yes.

0:31:250:31:27

Now, I knew it was majolica as soon as I saw it across the room.

0:31:270:31:31

You've got these wonderful bold colours,

0:31:310:31:34

this nice turquoise, the green, the blue,

0:31:340:31:37

real deep, rich colours typical of the majolica palette.

0:31:370:31:42

They tend to be by a chap called George Jones.

0:31:420:31:45

George Jones was one of three big majolica producers.

0:31:450:31:48

You had Minton's, Wedgwood and George Jones.

0:31:480:31:52

-Minton and Wedgwood I'm sure you've heard of.

-Yes.

0:31:520:31:55

George Jones, interesting this, probably why you haven't heard of him,

0:31:550:31:59

is because all he did was make majolica, so when the fashion for this waned

0:31:590:32:04

at the end of the 19th century, when we turn into the 20th century,

0:32:040:32:08

he had nothing to fall back on. This was all he made.

0:32:080:32:11

As soon as people stopped buying it, he went out of business.

0:32:110:32:14

I've had a close look over it and I can see that generally,

0:32:140:32:17

it's in good condition, I'll give you that,

0:32:170:32:19

but there is a hairline crack. It's not the end of the world.

0:32:190:32:22

It gets disguised in with the crazing which you get on the glaze,

0:32:220:32:26

but it does go through to the other side,

0:32:260:32:29

so that would be classed as a crack rather than a hairline glaze flaw.

0:32:290:32:34

-That's going to have to be taken into consideration when we come to a value.

-Yes.

0:32:340:32:39

Have you any idea, have you come with a figure in your mind today?

0:32:390:32:43

Well, it's only because I took it to the Antiques Roadshow,

0:32:430:32:46

and they said about £200, but that was over ten years ago.

0:32:460:32:50

Well, you've stolen my thunder now! What am I going to say?

0:32:500:32:53

Because that's exactly where I was going to come in too, at 200 to 300.

0:32:530:32:58

I sold a few bits in the last antiques sale,

0:32:580:33:01

which we estimated cautiously and they made a lot of money.

0:33:010:33:04

-Yes.

-And, again, you had Americans bidding

0:33:040:33:06

as well as English collectors and dealers,

0:33:060:33:09

but I'm going to be cautious and stick to my guns

0:33:090:33:12

and while it hasn't appreciated much from your last valuation,

0:33:120:33:16

I'm going to say 200 to 300 today.

0:33:160:33:17

-Would you be happy with that?

-Yes.

-Yes?

0:33:170:33:20

Doreen, your painting stopped me in my tracks when I saw you coming into the queue

0:33:290:33:34

and I think it's lovely, but what can you tell me about it?

0:33:340:33:37

I bought it 45 years ago in an antiques shop.

0:33:370:33:41

-Well, I exchanged it for another painting.

-Right. OK.

0:33:410:33:45

And I've enjoyed it for years

0:33:450:33:48

and now I've changed house and it doesn't go with the decor at the moment.

0:33:480:33:54

You're having a refurbishment of your new surroundings and it just doesn't fit.

0:33:540:33:58

-After so many years, you're looking to part with it?

-Yes.

-Aha, OK.

0:33:580:34:02

Well, it was in the cupboard, so I think, you know,

0:34:020:34:05

somebody will get a bit more pleasure out of it.

0:34:050:34:08

And what was it particularly that drew you to this one?

0:34:080:34:12

Well, it's peaceful.

0:34:120:34:14

I think it's a peaceful painting

0:34:140:34:16

and I enjoyed having it, you know,

0:34:160:34:18

in an old farmhouse that we had

0:34:180:34:19

and it looked beautiful.

0:34:190:34:21

What we've here is a Highland scene, a Scottish Highland scene, with a sort of a loch in the foreground.

0:34:210:34:26

-Yes.

-And if you look carefully,

0:34:260:34:30

there is a sort of flock of sheep and a shepherd,

0:34:300:34:33

and looking even more closely,

0:34:330:34:35

-I see he's wearing his kilt, which is rather charming.

-Yes.

0:34:350:34:38

A lovely picture.

0:34:380:34:39

-Yes.

-But it's signed at the bottom here, I think it says HB Goodman.

0:34:390:34:44

-It's not the clearest of signatures.

-No.

0:34:440:34:46

And I haven't been able to establish anything about an HB Goodman.

0:34:460:34:50

-No, no.

-But don't give up hope,

0:34:500:34:53

because I think there's a chance that if further research was done

0:34:530:34:57

on another occasion,

0:34:570:34:58

-we could put a bit more meat on the bone of the artist, if you like.

-Yes.

0:34:580:35:03

-And I do believe that the signature is possibly 1901.

-Yes.

0:35:030:35:07

Certainly stylistically, it would look to be late 19th, early 20th century painting.

0:35:070:35:11

It's an oil on canvas and it's very evocative

0:35:110:35:14

-of the Victorians' love of anything Scottish.

-Yes, yes.

0:35:140:35:19

Led by Victoria's, Queen Victoria's, love of Scotland

0:35:190:35:22

and I would have said that

0:35:220:35:23

market value was somewhere between £150 and £300,

0:35:230:35:28

I think, without even really trying.

0:35:280:35:30

-Right.

-And I think you should expect to get that.

0:35:300:35:33

I think if you don't fetch that, it's disappointing.

0:35:330:35:37

-Yes.

-You know, put £150 reserve on it, if you're happy at that.

-Yes.

0:35:370:35:41

-That would be fair.

-That's fine.

-Are you comfy with that?

-I'm quite happy with that.

0:35:410:35:46

Well, it's now time for Doreen's painting of a rural scene by Goodman

0:35:460:35:50

to go under the hammer on our final trip to the auction room.

0:35:500:35:54

Joining Doreen's painting is Heather's inherited majolica

0:35:540:35:57

egg-shaped spoon warmer, which is one of the most unusual items of the day.

0:35:570:36:02

Finally, we're selling Sylvia's fabulous collection of jewellery,

0:36:020:36:06

which really impressed Elizabeth.

0:36:060:36:08

You obviously have quite an eye for both interesting things, good quality items.

0:36:080:36:14

Let's hope the bidders agree with Elizabeth.

0:36:140:36:18

It's now time to find out as the jewellery is first under the hammer.

0:36:180:36:21

I've been joined by Sylvia. We've got eight separate lots.

0:36:210:36:25

The first one is the pocket watch and then we've got the wristwatch

0:36:250:36:29

and it goes on and on.

0:36:290:36:30

There's some quality items

0:36:300:36:31

and hopefully, we can get a total of around £1,000.

0:36:310:36:35

We've got a lot of trade here. There's a lot of dealers and prices are good.

0:36:350:36:39

-Great.

-That's what we like to hear.

0:36:390:36:41

We've got a packed saleroom and it's going under the hammer right now.

0:36:410:36:45

A good quality late-Victorian lady's yellow metal and enamel fob watch.

0:36:450:36:49

-I have two commissions. I start the bidding with me at £180.

-Good start.

0:36:490:36:54

At 180. Do I hear 190?

0:36:540:36:57

-Good quality!

-All done now at 180.

0:36:570:36:59

Straight in, straight out. There was one bid left on the book.

0:36:590:37:03

Number 302 is the 1930s lady's gold Dayton wristwatch.

0:37:030:37:07

I have 120 with me now.

0:37:070:37:09

At 120. Do I hear 130 anywhere?

0:37:090:37:12

Oh, late call!

0:37:120:37:13

At 130 down here now. Against you at 130.

0:37:130:37:15

Down here on the internet.

0:37:150:37:17

-Yes, £130!

-Right.

0:37:180:37:20

This is firing along now. Next up is the nine-carat-gold bracelet.

0:37:200:37:24

-Three commissions and I start the bidding at £200.

-Good start.

0:37:240:37:28

At £200 now. Do I hear 210?

0:37:280:37:30

At 210. 220. At 220 with me.

0:37:300:37:33

-Wow, that's £530! That's incredible!

-That's kind of what I've spent.

0:37:330:37:38

Number 304 is the lady's nine-carat-gold gate bracelet.

0:37:380:37:42

At £90. At £90 bid. 95. All done now at £95?

0:37:420:37:48

That one didn't sell. The memorial ring's coming up now.

0:37:480:37:51

Commission to start at 100. At £100 for the memorial ring.

0:37:510:37:54

110 beside me. 120. 130. 140.

0:37:540:37:57

150. 160.

0:37:570:37:58

170. At 170 down here now. At 170.

0:37:580:38:02

-That's a good result. 170.

-That's great.

0:38:020:38:04

Number 306 is two Victorian yellow metal enamel memorial brooches.

0:38:040:38:09

Say for this lot, 50?

0:38:090:38:11

£50 to start me. 55. 55 I have.

0:38:110:38:14

At 55. Make it 60? 60. 65.

0:38:140:38:18

At 65 against you. At £65.

0:38:180:38:20

70 on the internet. Are you all done?

0:38:200:38:23

Yeah, £70. That's a total of 770 so far.

0:38:230:38:27

The lady's gold necklace set with jade at £60.

0:38:270:38:31

With me on the book now at 60. 65. 70, 5.

0:38:310:38:35

80, 5.

0:38:350:38:36

-At £85. Over here now at 85.

-Yes.

0:38:360:38:40

Number 308 is the lady's nine-carat white gold mounted cameo brooch

0:38:400:38:43

and a bracelet.

0:38:430:38:45

50. At £50. Down here now at 50.

0:38:450:38:48

At £50 bid. Are you all done?

0:38:480:38:50

50. And that is for 980.

0:38:500:38:53

That's £905! Perfect.

0:38:530:38:57

That's mid-estimate. We said 800 to 1,000.

0:38:570:38:59

We did. One lot didn't sell, so still a bit in reserve for a future date.

0:38:590:39:03

-I'm amazed.

-That's great, isn't it?

0:39:030:39:05

Elizabeth was certainly on the money with Sylvia's jewellery.

0:39:060:39:09

Let's see if she can do as well now with Doreen's painting.

0:39:090:39:14

Going under the hammer right now, a bit of fine art. It's by Goodman.

0:39:140:39:17

-Yes.

-We've got a valuation of £150 to £300.

0:39:170:39:21

Why are you selling this? It's gorgeous, Doreen.

0:39:210:39:23

-It's a lovely painting.

-Yeah.

0:39:230:39:25

-But I've changed house and it's very modern, this house, and I just have got no...

-It doesn't really fit.

0:39:250:39:31

-It doesn't really fit.

-But when you look at the image, it's sort of romantic.

0:39:310:39:35

It's got a lot of artistic licence and you just want to be there.

0:39:350:39:38

-It puts a smile on your face, don't you think?

-Yes.

0:39:380:39:41

That's what's going to help it sell today.

0:39:410:39:43

-I kept the estimate quite wide, but I did wax lyrical about it, because it's a gorgeous picture.

-Yeah.

0:39:430:39:49

-Hopefully, we find somebody else who appreciates it.

-I'm sure we will.

0:39:490:39:54

Number 652 is the HB Goodman,

0:39:540:39:58

the early-20th-century oil on canvas here, the Scottish loch view.

0:39:580:40:02

£100 to start me.

0:40:020:40:03

£100. £100 is bid. At £100 now.

0:40:030:40:06

Do I hear 110? At £100 bid.

0:40:060:40:09

£100 is bid. Any advance?

0:40:090:40:10

110. 120. 130. 140. 150.

0:40:100:40:16

At £150 in the front row now.

0:40:160:40:17

At £150. Are you all done?

0:40:170:40:22

Yes, we just did it. £150. It was close, wasn't it?

0:40:220:40:25

-It was, yes.

-But it's gone.

0:40:250:40:27

-It's gone.

-It's gone. Happy?

0:40:270:40:29

Yes, happy.

0:40:290:40:31

Going under the hammer we've got some majolica, one of the top names

0:40:390:40:43

to be reckoned with. It's that wonderful egg-shaped spoon warmer.

0:40:430:40:47

I love it, absolutely love it! It's a bit of fun, isn't it?

0:40:470:40:51

It's so typical of the period, though.

0:40:510:40:53

Lovely bright colours.

0:40:530:40:54

-We're looking at 200 to 300, Will.

-That's right.

0:40:540:40:57

You either love it or hate it, majolica.

0:40:570:40:59

These sort of wacky shapes, bright colours.

0:40:590:41:01

I'm hoping there's someone here that loves it as much as I do.

0:41:010:41:05

Why have you decided to sell this now, Heather?

0:41:050:41:07

Because I'm getting old and I don't really have anyone to leave it to.

0:41:070:41:11

Oh, you're not!

0:41:110:41:13

I think it's a bit of fun, actually.

0:41:130:41:15

Number 81 now

0:41:150:41:16

is the Victorian majolica spoon warmer in the form of an egg.

0:41:160:41:20

I'm getting a lot of interest in this lot.

0:41:200:41:22

I have two commissions and I start the bidding with me at £300.

0:41:220:41:26

-Straight in at the top end!

-320. 340.

0:41:260:41:28

At 340. With me now at 340.

0:41:280:41:31

At 340. With me at £340.

0:41:310:41:35

360 on the internet. 380.

0:41:350:41:37

At 380 on the internet. 400 on the internet. 420.

0:41:370:41:41

This where the internet really comes into its own.

0:41:410:41:44

At 460. 480.

0:41:440:41:47

500. At £500 on the internet. 520 with me on the book.

0:41:470:41:51

-They love this!

-540. 560.

0:41:510:41:54

At 560 back with me on the book.

0:41:540:41:56

-580. 600. There's £600 with me.

-It must be quite a rare piece.

0:41:560:42:01

620. 640.

0:42:010:42:03

At 640 with me on the book.

0:42:030:42:04

660, I'm out. At £660.

0:42:040:42:08

On the internet at 660. Are you...

0:42:080:42:11

-Yes, one more!

-Internet bidders bidding against each other.

0:42:110:42:15

£700. On the internet now at £700.

0:42:150:42:18

At £700. I'm going to sell it.

0:42:180:42:21

Are you all done at £700?

0:42:210:42:23

£700. Yes! The hammer's gone down.

0:42:230:42:25

And we were worried about that hairline crack.

0:42:250:42:29

-Heather, £700!

-Yes!

0:42:290:42:31

-It's wonderful.

-Unbelievable!

-Yeah.

0:42:310:42:33

-I bet you never dreamed of that sort of money from us.

-No, I didn't. No.

0:42:330:42:37

A great result. I'm really pleased for you.

0:42:370:42:39

I would have been happy to get 200.

0:42:390:42:41

I thought you'd get the top end, but as you said, peaks and troughs.

0:42:410:42:45

The Americans had stopped buying this, but maybe they're starting to buy back.

0:42:450:42:49

It seems to be the trend at the moment. Majolica is making good money again.

0:42:490:42:53

You heard it and you saw it here first!

0:42:530:42:55

If you've got anything like that in the attic, bring it along, we'd love to see you.

0:42:550:42:59

Enjoy the spending! There is commission to pay, but what will you put the money towards?

0:42:590:43:04

Well, I was going to put it towards bills, but I might treat myself to something.

0:43:040:43:09

Well, pay a few bills and treat yourself as well,

0:43:090:43:11

and thank you so much for coming in.

0:43:110:43:13

-Thank you.

-What a wonderful day we've had here.

0:43:130:43:15

-Thank you, Will.

-Well done, Heather.

-I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:43:150:43:19

That's all we've got time for here today from Colchester,

0:43:190:43:22

so until next time, from Flog It! it's cheerio.

0:43:220:43:25

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:410:43:44

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:440:43:47

Paul Martin is joined by experts Will Axon and Elizabeth Talbot as they peruse the antiques of Clacton-on-Sea at the Princes Theatre. Elizabeth's eye is drawn by a beautiful painting and a fine collection of jewellery, whilst Will finds a piece of colourful majolica which has a very unusual use.

Paul takes a break from the antiques and heads to nearby Harwich to check out a breathtaking Redoubt Fort that was built to protect the Essex coastline from the threat posed by Napoleon.


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