Melksham Flog It!


Melksham

The Flog It! team are in Melksham, where Paul Martin and experts David Barby and Philip Serrell uncover a variety of local treasures.


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Transcript


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Here in Wiltshire, we have some wonderful wooden ale casks,

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made by this chap here, England's last master cooper.

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But all this could soon be a thing of the past and we'll be finding out

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later on in the show, but for now let's Flog It!

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in the market town of Melksham.

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Situated in the county of Wiltshire, Melksham is a small market town.

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Its prosperity was founded on agriculture

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and the woollen cloth making industry.

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Today the townsfolk are weaving a path to the assembly hall,

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carrying a variety of bags and boxes.

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The crowds here are anxious to discover whether their antiques

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can be flogged at auction and turned into cash.

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Joining me here are our two experts, Mr Philip Serrell and David Barby,

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and we're keen to see what gems might lie in the queue.

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Well, it's now 9.30. I think it's time to get this massive queue

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inside the assembly hall, don't you?

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-Yes!

-And see what we can uncover.

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So with the doors of the assembly hall thrown open

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the crowds pour inside, and it looks like

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Philip has spotted a great item from his Melksham treasure trove.

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Jo, it's a cold day, isn't it?

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-Oh, it's been freezing today, yeah.

-Absolutely. This is yours?

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-It belonged to my mother, well, my mother and father.

-Yeah.

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Not entirely sure when they got it or whether it was a present or...

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Yeah. But do you like it?

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I love it. I do love it, but...

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-Why have you brought it along today to Flog It!?

-Well, we've

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-inherited a lot of things since my mum passed away...

-Yeah.

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-And we can't keep everything.

-Yep.

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And although it's absolutely gorgeous, it's very difficult

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to display, being a plate.

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Right. Any why do you think I should get excited about this?

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-Well, it's Lalique.

-Yeah.

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-And the iridescence on it is absolutely gorgeous.

-Yeah.

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And the pattern, so...

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-Well, all of these designs were sort of themed upon water.

-Yeah.

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And his marks, if I can just hold it up, you can see his

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signature just there, R Lalique, and that's a stencilled mark.

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Sometimes it's moulded so it's in relief and sometimes it's in script

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as a signature. He died in 1945 and I would think that this

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particular plate would date to about 1925 or there or thereabouts.

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-Really? That early?

-Yeah.

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I think to display these properly, rather than put them down like that

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you should actually mount them up and perhaps have a light...

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-Absolutely.

-..shining through them.

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This opalescence or iridescence,

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if you feel the back, it's different levels and layers.

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Yes, it's quite tactile, isn't it?

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It is, but this milky colour at the back here, the thickness of the glass

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-as it cools...

-Mmm.

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-..clearly the thin bits cool a lot quicker than the fat bits.

-Yeah.

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And that's what makes these milkier and it causes this iridescence.

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So it's nothing actually in the glass?

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-No, it's just the speed at which it cools.

-Right.

-OK?

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So you've got here a plate by Rene Lalique, 1925, what is it worth?

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Well, we really didn't have any idea.

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We obviously saw the Lalique stamp so knew that you know...

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-It's worth something, yes.

-Yeah.

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I think that you should put an estimate on this of £120 to £180.

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-Mm-hm.

-And I think that it could go and sell, and sell quite well,

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but I think you need to put a fixed reserve on it of £90. Clearly, if it

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-doesn't make £90, and you should have it back.

-Yeah.

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I think it'll do fine, particularly if we can illustrate it

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-in the catalogues or on the web. How does that sound?

-Lovely.

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-Sounds great.

-Good. What are you going to spend the money on?

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Well, maybe a bit of a family get together in memory of my mum.

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-Oh, that's nice.

-Yeah, that would be nice.

-That's nice.

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Ivy. That's a lovely name. Where did it come from?

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Oh, I'm named after my mother.

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Right. This is fantastic.

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In fact, it's rather an appropriate name, isn't it, to call it fantastic,

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-because it's part of the fantasy range of Clarice Cliff.

-Yes.

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I suppose most viewers to Flog It!

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and similar programmes have seen Clarice Cliff before and

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know the history of this girl from Staffordshire who had the ability to

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interpret the art deco style

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into this format

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and make it commercially appealing to young couples of the 1920s and '30s.

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And it was comparatively inexpensive.

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-Yes.

-There's a whole range of pottery that she designed and

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in the 1920s and '30s it would brighten up

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-those rather dark interiors.

-Yes.

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-Have you ever used this little preserve pot?

-I'm afraid not.

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I was under the understanding

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it was a mustard pot, but it's rather large for mustard, isn't it?

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It is indeed, and I think they always say that the mustard manufacturers

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-made their money from what was left behind.

-Quite.

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No, this was a breakfast preserve pot,

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so it would have had homemade marmalade.

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The design is fantasy landscape and cottage, and there we have

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the cottage actually incorporated into this wonderful landscape.

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Of all the patterns that Clarice Cliff produced, I think this is

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probably the most desirable.

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-Good.

-The fantasy landscape always comes as a shock

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because of the colours that she's used in the trees and the bushes.

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-Purples and orange together...

-Yes.

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Blues and oranges together.

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They're the sort of colours

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-you wouldn't wear all together.

-Definitely not.

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No. So why are you selling this? Does it not have any sentiment at all?

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No, not really. I have two grown up sons

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and that's not really their taste,

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so it might as well go.

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Right. The only problem that I can see is this little thing here,

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which is a minute chip, and really to get the top end of the market which

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will be about 180, it will have to be absolutely perfect.

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-Yes.

-So I'm going to give you a margin of 120 to 180.

-Right.

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And we'll reserve it at 100.

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-That'll be fine.

-Is that agreeable?

-Yes.

-Will you replace it

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with a cut crystal one or something like that?

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I don't know. It might just go into our holiday fund.

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-I think that's the safer option, quite honestly.

-Thank you.

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Thank you very much for bringing it along, and I shall

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be at the auction there with you.

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Hopefully, there'll be loads of Clarice Cliff collectors.

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I hope so. Thank you.

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Chris, I'm a big shell collector.

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-I spotted that nautilus from over there.

-Oh, right.

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But I don't have shells with incredible penwork like that.

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-Tell me how you got it.

-Well, it's been in

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the family for four generations now.

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Major James Carruthers Best acquired it during his travels.

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-In the mid-1800s.

-Exactly, yeah.

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But look at the detail on it

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and look what it attributes to, the Great Western and SS Great Britain.

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-That's right. Which is very local for Bristol.

-Yes.

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I think you've got something very rare.

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Do you know, a nautilus shell that size would

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have had to have lived to about 100 years old to grow that big?

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-Really.

-If you put that into a good maritime sale, you might

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-get £400 to £500 for that.

-Wow. OK.

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-Bet, how are you?

-Very well.

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-Couple of old dogs these are, aren't they?

-Yeah, aren't they?

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-You don't like them.

-No, I don't.

-Why?

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Um, they're just not me.

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I don't like antique things, really.

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Clearly, you didn't buy them. Are they inherited?

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No, my mother in law.

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-Then before her, her mum or whatever.

-I should think so.

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They're great things because I can remember,

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we're of a certain age, aren't we? These would either

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have sat like that on a mantelpiece, wouldn't they?

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-With a clock in the middle.

-Yes.

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Or they would have been in the fireplace.

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And that proves that they are all yesterday's antiques.

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I think these are lovely, but they are yesterday's antiques.

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But I think the colouring's

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-lovely, they've got a sweet face... you don't like the face?

-Not really.

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-Is there anything you do like about them?

-Um...

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-You don't like...

-Depends on what price they are, really, you know.

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You're a Wiltshire lass, you are. It's all down to pounds, shillings and pence!

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You're right, I am Wiltshire, yes.

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Well, I think they're quite nice, I think they're decorative,

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I also think they've come down in value.

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Perhaps ten years ago, they might have cost you £80 to £120.

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I think that today you should estimate these at £50 to £80,

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put a fixed reserve on them of £40, and they'll sell.

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And you might have a very pleasant

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-surprise. So if they go and make 60 quid...

-Yes.

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What are you going to spend it on?

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Well, it's a little help towards going

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to see my son, who's in New Zealand.

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-Really?

-Yeah. He's been over there nearly four years now so...

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Won't get you as far as Heathrow, that!

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-THEY LAUGH Pay the car park...

-Get me a taxi

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-the other side, mightn't it?

-So these would go towards the trip.

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Yeah, they want me to go over and see them, and they've been

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there nearly four years now. But I've always been frightened of flying.

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If it was down to me, I'd get

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your son to come over here and keep the dogs, I think.

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-So shall we sell them?

-Yes.

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Well, let's hope they do really well for you and get you on that plane.

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Right. Thank you very much.

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Stan, these are quite extraordinary plates.

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They're commemorative plates from the South African war campaign,

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the Boer War. Where did you get them from?

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Well, as far as I can remember, Mother had always had them.

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-Where Mother got them from, I just don't know.

-Did you have any family

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-that was in active service during the Boer War?

-As far as I know, no.

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No. So I wonder why she hung these on the wall.

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Was she keen on sort of heroes or royal family or memorabilia?

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Well, she always bought plates and hung on the wall, she liked

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-plates on the wall for some reason.

-Because these go right back

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to the latter part of the 19th early part of the 20th century,

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the Boer War, because these plates represent personalities

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involved in the campaign. In particular, Baden Powell,

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and this general here with all his badges.

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And what I find interesting is the way that this was done,

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by using a photograph, and the depth of colouring.

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So the deeper the cut in the clay,

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or the impression, filled with a coloured glaze, it was darker.

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So the areas that they required to be dark, like shadow,

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would be deeper cut, as you can see here.

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If I turn them over, there's no mark on the back at all who actually

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produced them, but if you look there, there and there,

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those are called stilt marks,

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little sort of pieces of clay that would take the plate

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above the ground, so when it was glazed,

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it wouldn't stick to the floor of the kiln.

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Now, who's actually going to buy these plates?

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Well, you might get the Boy Scout brigade.

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-Yeah.

-They are interested in buying anything connected

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to Boy Scouts, Baden Powell, or you might find a market for

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militaria, because both of them were involved in South Africa campaign.

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Or you might find somebody that

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just wants to buy commemorative ware, and if you go round to antique fairs

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you will find dealers selling nothing but commemorative ware, and if these

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were for sale at a retail level, they'd be between £60 and £80 each.

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But you've got to allow the dealer a profit margin,

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so he might buy at auction somewhere between £25 and £30 each.

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So when this pair goes up, we're looking at between £50 and £60.

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Now I'm going to suggest to you at that sort of level

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-that we let them run in the saleroom...

-Yeah.

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And they'll find their own level.

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-That's not an awful lot of money, is it, really?

-No.

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Dare I ask, at that little amount, what will you do with it?

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We're giving it to the cats' home.

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-A cats' home. Have you got cats of your own?

-Yes.

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-How many?

-Two now.

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Two. Well, let's hope we can make £100 on this going to the cats' home.

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Stan, thank you for bringing it along.

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I find them particularly fascinating and I hope we'll get a good price.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

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So before we head off to the auction with our first batch of today's

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valuations, here's a brief reminder of what we're taking with us.

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Passed on to her by

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her parents, Jo's decided to let her unwanted Lalique plate head straight

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to the saleroom, knowing that a famous name commands a good price.

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We obviously saw the Lalique stamp, so knew...

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-It's worth something.

-Yeah.

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One of my favourites on this programme, Clarice Cliff, and Ivy

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is hoping her piece of fantasy ware will sell for a fantasy price.

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Sadly not an antique lover like us, Bet wants to find a new home for her

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pair of Staffordshire dogs that once belonged to her mother in law.

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-You don't like the face?

-Not really.

-Is there anything

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-you do like about them?

-Depends what price they are, really,

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you know.

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And finally, Stan has a pair of Boer War commemorative plates

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that are about to do battle in the saleroom.

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Today's items are heading to auction at Henry Aldridge & Son in Devizes,

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just east of Melksham.

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Father and son Alan and Andrew Aldridge are on the rostrum

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today and are the men with the all-important gavel in their hands.

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We've got some real quality for you now.

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It's the top name in glass, Rene Lalique, and it's a wonderful plate.

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-It belongs to Jo.

-That's right.

-What I want to know is,

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why are you selling this? It's gorgeous.

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They're difficult to display though, aren't they?

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And it's a bit vulnerable being glass,

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so somebody else will want it and will know how to display it properly.

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-Great name.

-Lalique glass, it's the one to have, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-Fingers crossed?

-Yes.

-You're having a party

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-with the money, aren't you?

-I don't know about a party,

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-but it'd go towards some drink at a party, wouldn't it?

-Why is that?

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Well, my mother passed away last year and it was her plate,

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so it'll go towards something for the family.

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-The family.

-Yeah.

-Good idea.

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-Fingers crossed, Jo.

-Yeah.

-This is it.

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The Rene Lalique piece of art glass.

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Very pretty little piece, this.

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Very simple, very nice piece.

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Right, 50, I've got. 50, I've got 60, 60.

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70, 80, 90, 100.

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110? 100, 110 seated,

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120, 130?

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120. 130 anywhere else, quickly?

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130, 140...

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-Ooh, come on.

-150?

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What about 145?

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145, 150, 155?

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150, 150 on my left.

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Any more? At 150.

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£150, that is great.

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-Yeah.

-Now it's down to have a good party?

-Absolutely, yes.

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-That's wonderful. Thank you both very much.

-Enjoy.

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-Thank you.

-I expect our invites will be in the post, Paul.

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Hopefully.

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Well, this next lot is the perfect recipe for success.

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It's a dish we're serving up. In fact, it's two commemorative plates,

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David, with no reserve, which is why they're going to be a success.

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-Stanley, did David talk you into no reserve on these? Oh, did he?

-Yeah.

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Oh. Well, we've got £50 to £60.

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-Two wonderful plates.

-Yes.

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You're selling them to raise money for the cats' home.

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-Yes.

-You're a cat lover?

-Yes.

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Well, you picked the right expert, didn't you? This guy knows

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his porcelain, he knows his plates, he knows his pussycats.

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-We've had that conversation. That took most of the interview, didn't it?

-Did it?

-Yes.

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-Yes.

-For the next lot, Alan's son Andrew takes to the rostrum.

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Late 19th, early 20th century treacle glazed Boer War

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commemorative plates depicting military gentlemen.

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£60?

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50? 40? 30?

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Oh, dear, we started right up at the top, didn't we?

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25 anywhere else? 25, 30. £30 anywhere else?

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-It's jammed here, isn't it?

-£30 anywhere else?

-Oh, come on!

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25 to my left. 30 anywhere else?

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Fair warning, £25 to my left.

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-Oh.

-£25.

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A wee bit disappointed there.

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Well, the money is going to a good cause.

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It's going to the cats' home, where in Bath?

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-Not quite enough.

-Not quite enough.

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Well, that's the problem with no reserves.

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I would have thought it would find its own level.

0:17:180:17:21

Very difficult.

0:17:210:17:23

Flatware for you.

0:17:230:17:26

Ivy, we're just a couple of lots away

0:17:320:17:34

from selling your little Clarice Cliff preserve pot.

0:17:340:17:37

There's some other Clarice today. I don't want to put the dampeners on

0:17:370:17:40

the thing, but the Clarice hasn't been selling well, David, has it?

0:17:400:17:43

No. I'm just wondering whether there's a wobble in the market.

0:17:430:17:47

It's a bit disconcerting, isn't it?

0:17:470:17:49

-We've got a protective reserve on this, though, haven't we?

-Yes.

0:17:490:17:52

And hopefully we're looking for around £160.

0:17:520:17:54

-Yes. Yes.

-It's a nice unusual thing, it's a good shape.

0:17:540:17:58

-That's true, that's true.

-302.

0:17:580:18:01

Clarice. Now, bright colours, in the autumn pattern, good pattern,

0:18:010:18:07

I'll start on my bottom bid again, 20 quid.

0:18:070:18:12

Right, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100.

0:18:120:18:16

120, 110, 120...

0:18:160:18:19

Getting closer.

0:18:190:18:21

110. 120, 130?

0:18:210:18:24

120. 130, 140...

0:18:240:18:27

-We're going to sell this.

-150. 140.

0:18:270:18:30

At £140, is there 150?

0:18:300:18:32

Shan't dwell on it. At 140.

0:18:320:18:35

-Are we selling?

-Am I done at 140?

-Yeah, sold it.

0:18:350:18:38

-Yes, I am.

-That's OK.

0:18:380:18:40

It's fine. Yes, it's fine.

0:18:400:18:42

That's OK. Clarice did the business for us.

0:18:420:18:46

-Today.

-Today.

-THEY LAUGH

0:18:460:18:48

It was a struggle.

0:18:480:18:49

It never lets us down, but we've had a few glitches today...

0:18:490:18:52

-Shhhhh...

-At least I won't have to take it home.

-No. No.

0:18:520:18:56

Well, it's all gone to the dogs, hasn't it? Let's hope this £80,

0:19:000:19:03

the top end of Philip's estimate,

0:19:030:19:05

-goes to this pair of Staffordshire dogs. Belongs to Betty.

-Yes.

0:19:050:19:09

I love Staffordshire pottery.

0:19:090:19:10

I think it's good, honest country pottery.

0:19:100:19:13

Needs to be on a lovely oak dresser.

0:19:130:19:14

-Yeah.

-Why are you flogging the dogs?

0:19:140:19:17

They've been stuck in the back of me dresser,

0:19:170:19:19

in the cupboard in the kitchen.

0:19:190:19:21

OK, let's hope they get £60 to £80 plus a bit more, Philip?

0:19:210:19:26

That'd be good, that'd be good.

0:19:260:19:27

248, pretty little pair of liver dogs.

0:19:270:19:32

Nice size,

0:19:320:19:34

nice condition. Let's have a hundred to start me? 80 get me away, then?

0:19:340:19:41

-50? Thank you, 50 I've got.

-£50.

0:19:410:19:44

-Great.

-50, I've got 60. 60, 70, 80, 90.

0:19:440:19:47

At £80, make no mistake.

0:19:470:19:51

90, 100, 110, 110, 120, at 110.

0:19:510:19:58

At 110 and done.

0:19:580:20:00

110. That was short and sweet, wasn't it?

0:20:000:20:03

-That was good, wasn't it?

-Yes.

0:20:030:20:05

-Happy with that? I think that's good.

-Yeah.

0:20:050:20:07

-That is good. Thank you.

-110 quid.

0:20:070:20:10

-Less some commission.

-Yeah.

0:20:100:20:11

Well, we're doing pretty well so far, but coming up,

0:20:140:20:17

Philip and I give Pauline a hard time

0:20:170:20:19

about selling her Staffordshire tankard.

0:20:190:20:21

You know, Pauline's local and I understand why she wants

0:20:210:20:24

to sell it, but I really hope it doesn't sell.

0:20:240:20:27

But first, I'm off on my travels across Wiltshire.

0:20:290:20:33

Here in Devizes, the art of brewing dates back to 1885.

0:20:400:20:44

Now, whilst the production process

0:20:440:20:46

has changed over the years, the art of barrel making hasn't.

0:20:460:20:49

These wooden casks have been made by hand since Roman times.

0:20:490:20:53

However, the ancient craft of cooperage is almost dying out.

0:20:530:20:58

Although there are still coopers in Scotland and France,

0:20:580:21:01

in England only one master cooper remains.

0:21:010:21:04

He works here at the town's Wadsworth Brewery and his name

0:21:040:21:08

is Alistair Simms, and he's been plying his craft for 30 years.

0:21:080:21:13

So how long does it take to make a cask?

0:21:130:21:16

If you make them from scratch, it takes about,

0:21:160:21:18

for a nine gallon size, about three hours.

0:21:180:21:20

If you're remaking, about two, two and a half hours.

0:21:200:21:23

Probably make 20, 30 a year, something like that,

0:21:230:21:25

to keep the stocks up. There's about 700 casks in trade all the time.

0:21:250:21:29

Constantly in trade.

0:21:290:21:31

-So I guess it's more about repairing them, is it?

-It is repairing,

0:21:310:21:34

and we also do remaking, which is cutting the larger casks down.

0:21:340:21:37

We predominantly use 108 gallons, which we're

0:21:370:21:40

-buying in from the whisky trade.

-Right. They're these big, big ones?

0:21:400:21:43

Yeah. 52 inches tall, which as you say has been spending up to

0:21:430:21:46

20 years around the whisky industry, probably up to another 110 years.

0:21:460:21:51

-Yeah.

-So they're 136 years old.

0:21:510:21:53

We know that we'll get another 80 years out of it. So it's recycling.

0:21:530:21:56

We give them a service every three months, so they come in and out

0:21:560:22:00

of trade and when you look at them, they're like your kids.

0:22:000:22:03

You often see them being filled with beer and think "I'll have to catch that one when it comes back,

0:22:030:22:08

-"it looks tired."

-Historically, barrels were used

0:22:080:22:11

for the transportation and storage of items.

0:22:110:22:13

Shaped with a curve, or a bilge, the design meant that the barrel

0:22:130:22:17

could be spun easily to control the direction.

0:22:170:22:21

Great workshop. It's like being transported back in time.

0:22:210:22:24

I want to do something, I want to get hands on. What am I going to do?

0:22:240:22:27

I'll show you where you're going to start.

0:22:270:22:29

This is called dressing out, and this is levelling the insides of the cask.

0:22:290:22:33

Just up against there, and against your knee,

0:22:330:22:36

and I'll give you an apron in a minute.

0:22:360:22:37

-OK, What, what...

-And it works on pushing down here.

0:22:440:22:47

-That's all tar, is it? Can I have a go with that?

-You can. Hang on.

0:22:470:22:50

Before we do, we'd better give you a piece of health and safety equipment,

0:22:500:22:54

-you'd better wear an apron.

-Cor, it's a big leather apron, isn't it?

0:22:540:22:57

Yeah, that's nice buffalo hide.

0:22:570:22:59

You just pop your knees against there

0:23:010:23:04

-so it just rests on the top of your knees.

-Yeah.

0:23:040:23:06

OK. Just try that.

0:23:060:23:09

I love that smell.

0:23:180:23:21

Removing the tar inside this barrel really takes a great deal of effort.

0:23:210:23:26

Yeah, I can see what it does now.

0:23:260:23:27

It makes those seams really tight and level.

0:23:270:23:31

-It does.

-Keeps you fit.

0:23:310:23:34

No, I can't do that.

0:23:380:23:40

-Yeah, you've got it now.

-Got it now, yeah.

0:23:480:23:51

-And the next job, you want to...

-Hang on, let's have a rest.

0:23:510:23:55

-What do you mean, have a rest?!

-Right.

0:23:550:23:57

Next job. And now onto the next part of the levelling off process.

0:23:570:24:03

Loosen your wrist up.

0:24:030:24:05

-How did I do?

-Not bad for the first time.

0:24:120:24:15

-Not that bad.

-I just love working with wood.

0:24:150:24:18

-It's good stuff to work with, isn't it?

-Yeah, and even

0:24:180:24:21

walking over the offcuts and shavings,

0:24:210:24:23

-when you crunch them...

-Yeah.

-And the aromas come up.

0:24:230:24:26

And after all that hard work, time to put my feet up.

0:24:290:24:31

Well, I'd like to say that's the one I made earlier, but it's not.

0:24:310:24:35

Why is the art of coopering dying out?

0:24:350:24:37

-Dying out? It's dead.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

-It's not.

0:24:370:24:40

You're alive and functioning, keeping the flag flying.

0:24:400:24:44

There's only four of us in the country now, working.

0:24:440:24:48

-Not many, is it?

-No.

-In the trade's heyday, how many were there, do you think?

0:24:480:24:52

In the trade's heyday in 1900, Bass in Burton

0:24:520:24:56

had 400 coopers working for 'em, and that was just one brewery.

0:24:560:25:00

Do you think one of the nails in the coffin was the introduction

0:25:000:25:04

of the alloy casks, you know, the metal ones?

0:25:040:25:06

It was the biggest nail.

0:25:060:25:08

We were first introduced to that in the Second World War,

0:25:080:25:12

-when the American government brought it over for their troops.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:25:120:25:15

-Because...

-Way back then.

0:25:150:25:18

Yeah, because when the pilots landed a plane, they rushed

0:25:180:25:21

a cask of beer out so the crew in the bomber could have a drink.

0:25:210:25:24

Well, imagine putting a wooden cask on the back of a Willis jeep,

0:25:240:25:27

what the beer would be like by the time it got to the plane.

0:25:270:25:30

-So how do you become a cooper?

-Well, I started at 16

0:25:300:25:33

and by the time I was 20 and a half, I became

0:25:330:25:36

what they call, gone from an apprentice

0:25:360:25:38

-to a journeyman cooper.

-Yeah.

0:25:380:25:40

But you are a master cooper now, so how do you get to the next level?

0:25:400:25:44

A master cooper is a journeyman that's had an apprentice that's successfully come out of his time.

0:25:440:25:49

You come out with a proper, old-fashioned

0:25:490:25:51

-trussing in ceremony.

-What does that mean?

0:25:510:25:54

It means that you've got to make a hogs head 54 gallon cask

0:25:540:25:58

and then it's put in a steam bell and when it comes out,

0:25:580:26:01

when they're actually bending it, they chuck the apprentice

0:26:010:26:04

inside it and it's bent with the apprentice inside,

0:26:040:26:07

and then when the last hoop goes on they chuck in stale ale, stale yeast,

0:26:070:26:11

hops, soot out of the boiler, shavings off the cooperage floor.

0:26:110:26:15

They tip the cask over, take it for a trundle round the cooperage...

0:26:150:26:19

-You inside still?

-You inside still. THEY LAUGH

0:26:190:26:22

Back now to the assembly hall in Melksham for more valuations.

0:26:260:26:30

People keep turning up throughout the day with a great range of items,

0:26:300:26:34

and it looks like David has his eyes on a very colourful plate.

0:26:340:26:38

-Pat, you're a local celebrity, aren't you?

-A local celebrity? No.

0:26:380:26:41

Well, thousands of people see you in your professional capacity.

0:26:410:26:45

Well, I don't know about thousands.

0:26:450:26:47

Hundreds, maybe.

0:26:470:26:48

-And what is that?

-I'm a registrar of births, deaths and marriages.

0:26:480:26:52

That's right. How many ceremonies do you do per week?

0:26:520:26:54

-Marriage ceremonies?

-Yes.

-I don't know.

0:26:540:26:57

It's difficult to say. A few hundred in the season.

0:26:570:27:00

-Well, it must be a lovely job to see so much happiness.

-It is, actually.

0:27:000:27:04

Well, we see them in and we see them out and we marry them in the middle.

0:27:040:27:09

Well, I hope we're going to make somebody happy with the purchase

0:27:090:27:12

of this when it comes up for sale.

0:27:120:27:14

Pat, I think this is a lovely plate and I want to know why

0:27:140:27:17

you're wanting to get rid of it.

0:27:170:27:20

It is quite lovely but it was passed on to me from an elderly lady

0:27:200:27:25

in the village that I live and it has been on the wall,

0:27:250:27:28

it's not been in a cupboard anywhere,

0:27:280:27:30

but I would really like to put it towards buying a painting.

0:27:300:27:34

-I think that's a good idea. What? A view? Landscape?

-I don't know yet.

0:27:340:27:38

I just want something that's... I'll know when I see it.

0:27:380:27:40

-Something you can escape into.

-Yes.

-Yes, very nice.

0:27:400:27:44

-Where do you think this was made?

-I thought maybe from the Middle East.

0:27:440:27:48

It has that feel about it.

0:27:480:27:50

-The colours.

-Now, that's a very, very clever observation of yours.

0:27:500:27:54

-Very clever. Because the design has that sort of Persian element.

-Yeah.

0:27:540:27:58

And when I looked at this from a distance, I thought,

0:27:580:28:01

-"My goodness me, it's sort of William De Morgan".

-Yes.

0:28:010:28:03

Then you look closer and you think, "Hmm, is this tube lining?"

0:28:030:28:08

-Can you see?

-Yes.

-OK.

-It is.

0:28:080:28:11

Because it's the enamelling, isn't it?

0:28:110:28:13

That's right. You call this tube lining.

0:28:130:28:15

-Oh, I see.

-And this was such a feature of Staffordshire pottery.

0:28:150:28:19

-Oh.

-And in particular, the latter part of the 19th to the 20th century,

0:28:190:28:23

this tube lining became very fashionable.

0:28:230:28:26

-If you think in terms of Moorcroft...

-Yes.

-That was all tube lining.

0:28:260:28:29

Yes, it is, isn't it?

0:28:290:28:31

The reason why we can't put a name on to it, firstly, there's no...

0:28:310:28:34

-Name on the back.

-At all, to tell you who made this.

0:28:340:28:37

-No.

-But I think this could be experimental.

0:28:370:28:40

There were so many companies in Staffordshire that were rather

0:28:400:28:45

envious of Moorcroft's success, particularly with his tube lining.

0:28:450:28:49

-I see.

-And there were so many companies

0:28:490:28:52

that started producing wares in a similar manner.

0:28:520:28:54

There was one called Morris Ware which copied Moorcroft

0:28:540:28:58

very successfully, but I think this could be a prototype from a factory

0:28:580:29:02

in Staffordshire who wanted to produce something on the same lines.

0:29:020:29:06

-Same lines.

-But discovered it was so expensive.

0:29:060:29:10

-Yeah.

-So this may never have gone into full production.

0:29:100:29:13

And I love the colour tones and the colour balances.

0:29:130:29:16

And what is so clever, all this sort of tube lining creates little

0:29:160:29:20

reservoirs, little dams, so when it was fired the actual coloured glazes

0:29:200:29:25

did not run into one another. Now, we've got to talk about

0:29:250:29:29

how much this is going to realise at auction.

0:29:290:29:31

-I'd love it to go for about £500, £600.

-Oh, so would I.

0:29:310:29:34

-But there's no name on it.

-No.

0:29:340:29:35

I don't think it detracts from the design and style of the plate,

0:29:350:29:39

I love it, I shall be very envious of the person who buys it,

0:29:390:29:42

but I think we've got to be sensible about the price.

0:29:420:29:45

-I think it's going to go somewhere in the region of 150 to 200.

-Oh.

0:29:450:29:48

But we've got to encourage people to buy,

0:29:480:29:50

so I think we should tuck it under the £100 at 90. What do you think?

0:29:500:29:55

-A little bit more, maybe.

-Hundred?

0:29:550:29:57

-Yes, OK.

-Done.

0:29:570:30:00

So we'll put the reserve at £100.

0:30:000:30:02

-Right.

-And I'm sure it's going to go considerably higher.

0:30:020:30:05

-So do I.

-Thank you very much for bringing it along.

-Thank you, David.

0:30:050:30:09

I've seen these before on the show.

0:30:170:30:19

I've seen them in breweries as well

0:30:190:30:20

when we've been filming. How did you come by these?

0:30:200:30:24

-I bought both of them at various times in antique shops.

-Did you?

0:30:240:30:28

Ex-brewer, I was interested in collecting.

0:30:280:30:30

Ah, that's why you wanted these.

0:30:300:30:33

-These measure the strength of the alcohol, don't they?

-Yes.

0:30:330:30:37

And how much did you pay for these?

0:30:370:30:38

I paid 125 for one of them...

0:30:380:30:41

-Yes?

-And the other one was less, but I can't remember how much it was.

0:30:410:30:44

You paid about the right price. I'm sure if we put these into

0:30:440:30:47

auction, if you ever wanted to sell them, and I'm sure you don't...

0:30:470:30:50

No, not at the moment.

0:30:500:30:52

We'll get around about £120 to £150 for each of them.

0:30:520:30:55

-Oh, that's OK, yes.

-They're brilliant, aren't they?

0:30:550:30:57

It would be nice if there was Devizes on the box somewhere,

0:30:570:31:01

-but alas, there isn't, is there?

-No.

0:31:010:31:03

Nevertheless, it's a wonderful piece of,

0:31:030:31:06

I think this is how they say it, breweryalia.

0:31:060:31:08

-Is that right?

-Sounds good.

0:31:080:31:10

Brewerynalia, maybe. No, it's breweryalia. Oh, what is it?

0:31:100:31:14

Write in and tell me.

0:31:140:31:15

Pauline, I think this is really lovely. It's Staffordshire,

0:31:260:31:30

and the nice thing about it is, I would probably date it around 1858.

0:31:300:31:34

-Always helps when it's got a date, doesn't it?

-Yeah.

0:31:340:31:37

But there's lots going on everywhere. We've got this clipper ship

0:31:370:31:41

on the front here and that would have been lovely if it was named,

0:31:410:31:44

and then on this side we've got this man with a horse-drawn

0:31:440:31:47

plough which normally has the sort of text "God speed the plough"

0:31:470:31:51

underneath. I mean, there's so much going on because if you turn it over,

0:31:510:31:56

inside, look, we've got this spaniel and he's seated underneath a tree,

0:31:560:31:59

and we've got all this busy line going on around here, and underneath

0:31:590:32:04

we've got this racehorse and he's almost standing underneath

0:32:040:32:07

these palm trees in an oasis with pyramids in the background.

0:32:070:32:10

I think it's wonderful.

0:32:100:32:12

I really, really love it because there's so much history.

0:32:120:32:15

And for me, the real joy of it is this here, because this is

0:32:150:32:18

Robert Elderage, Througham.

0:32:180:32:21

-This Robert Elderage, he's a relative of yours?

-Yeah.

0:32:210:32:24

That's my father's mother's father.

0:32:240:32:27

So Robert Elderage was your great grandfather.

0:32:270:32:30

-Yeah. Yeah.

-What do we know about Robert Elderage?

0:32:300:32:33

-Farm worker. That's all we know.

-Just a farm worker?

-Yeah. Yeah.

0:32:330:32:36

So this has been in your family since 1858.

0:32:360:32:41

Pauline, and you want to sell it?

0:32:410:32:43

Yeah, because, um,

0:32:430:32:45

you know, after me, I mean, there's no-one to hand it down to,

0:32:450:32:49

and I mean, what's going to happen to it? You know.

0:32:490:32:52

I understand your sentiment, but I think it's sad

0:32:520:32:54

-there's no-one else for you to give it to.

-Yeah.

0:32:540:32:56

But for me, that's the crown jewels.

0:32:560:32:59

I think it's just wonderful.

0:32:590:33:01

I'm almost tempted to buy it meself, but I can't.

0:33:010:33:04

Because it's not worth a great deal of money.

0:33:040:33:07

-No. How much do you think?

-How much?

0:33:070:33:09

How much? I think that at auction

0:33:090:33:12

it might make, it might make between £50 and £100.

0:33:120:33:15

-Well, that's more than I thought.

-Are you pleased with that?

-Yeah.

0:33:150:33:19

Yeah? We'll put it in auction with a 50 to 80 estimate,

0:33:190:33:23

reserve it at £40 for you.

0:33:230:33:24

You know, but for me, if that was

0:33:240:33:28

Robert Serrell, Worcestershire, 1858, that's worth £1,000 to me.

0:33:280:33:35

-Do you know what I mean?

-Yeah, yeah.

-Because it's so specific to you.

0:33:350:33:39

-Yeah.

-God bless you for bringing it.

0:33:390:33:41

Well done, you, Pauline.

0:33:410:33:43

Jean, of all the silver items that have come through the door today,

0:33:480:33:52

these are the most exciting.

0:33:520:33:57

-And why on earth do you want to part with them?

-They're my brother's.

0:33:570:34:01

And he doesn't like them?

0:34:010:34:03

No. He doesn't want them.

0:34:030:34:05

These are by one of the most famous makers of the 20th century.

0:34:050:34:10

-Good grief.

-Georg Jensen,

0:34:100:34:13

silversmith, and these were

0:34:130:34:15

sold from his New Bond Street address in London.

0:34:150:34:19

-The design is called Cactus.

-Cactus.

-Because when you look at this design

0:34:190:34:25

it looks like a cactus plant, you know, one of the succulents,

0:34:250:34:30

and the actual silversmith that produced these is Gundorph Albertus,

0:34:300:34:36

and he produced these around about 1932.

0:34:360:34:41

Think in terms of the period.

0:34:410:34:43

These are all part and parcel of that exciting

0:34:430:34:46

movement between the two world wars, which we call the art deco.

0:34:460:34:53

-The value of these, have you any idea?

-Not a clue. Not a clue.

0:34:530:34:56

Because I don't think they've ever been used.

0:34:560:35:00

I don't think they have either. I've never known them be used.

0:35:000:35:03

There's no wear or tear or scratches or anything,

0:35:030:35:05

they're in perfect condition. And this does help

0:35:050:35:08

with regard to the price.

0:35:080:35:09

Plus it's got its original box.

0:35:090:35:11

-Mmm-hmm.

-Now, I would like to see them do £120 to £150.

-Mmm-hmm.

0:35:110:35:18

If not a wee bit more, because they are Georg Jensen.

0:35:180:35:21

We need to put a reserve on these.

0:35:210:35:23

-Uh-huh.

-And I'm going to suggest the reserve is round about £100.

-Right.

0:35:230:35:28

-Fixed.

-Fine, yeah.

0:35:280:35:30

Now, you're selling these on behalf of your brother.

0:35:300:35:32

-Yes.

-Will he agree to that figure?

0:35:320:35:34

Yes, I have rung him, actually.

0:35:340:35:36

-He just wants to get rid of them, does he?

-Yeah, yes, yes, yeah.

0:35:360:35:39

What's he going to do with £100?

0:35:390:35:42

Give half to me, I hope.

0:35:420:35:44

Yes, you've been waiting some time, haven't you?

0:35:440:35:47

I'm just wondering if he had them as a christening present.

0:35:470:35:50

-When was he born?

-'33.

0:35:500:35:52

How interesting. So that adds a certain...

0:35:520:35:55

-Yeah.

-..poignancy to that, doesn't it?

0:35:550:35:57

-That's right, yeah.

-Yes. And do you think you still want to sell them?

0:35:570:36:00

-We shall do our very best for them.

-OK. Thank you very much.

0:36:000:36:04

And here's a quick reminder of the wonderful items heading off

0:36:040:36:07

to auction for the last time today.

0:36:070:36:11

Register of births, marriages and deaths, Pat wants someone

0:36:110:36:15

to register their interest in this fabulous Staffordshire-produced

0:36:150:36:18

Moorcroft-style plate.

0:36:180:36:20

David certainly likes it.

0:36:200:36:22

I love it.

0:36:220:36:24

I love this piece.

0:36:240:36:25

Another piece of Staffordshire, this tankard once belonged to Pauline's

0:36:250:36:28

great, great grandfather, farm worker Robert Elderage.

0:36:280:36:32

Pauline wants to sell it, but Philip reckons it's a little gem.

0:36:320:36:36

For me, that's the crown jewels.

0:36:380:36:40

I think it's just wonderful.

0:36:400:36:43

This collection of Georg Jensen silver spoons were given to Jean's

0:36:430:36:46

brother for his christening.

0:36:460:36:48

Now they want to scoop up some cash and split the earnings.

0:36:480:36:52

We're going to stir things up right now, Jean.

0:36:560:36:58

We've got your silver spoons all boxed up.

0:36:580:37:00

-I'm hopeful.

-They were your brother's christening present.

0:37:000:37:03

Yes. My brother lives with us.

0:37:030:37:05

-He wants me to...

-Flog 'em.

0:37:050:37:07

-Flog 'em.

-Because he needs the money.

0:37:070:37:08

-Yeah.

-Well, hopefully we'll get the top end of David's estimate plus

0:37:080:37:12

a bit more, because silver is the thing to invest in right now.

0:37:120:37:15

-It's making good money.

-Particularly leading 20th century artists

0:37:150:37:20

and designers. Georg Jensen. If somebody asks you the major designer

0:37:200:37:25

of silver during the 1930s, '40s,

0:37:250:37:27

you'd immediately think of Georg Jensen.

0:37:270:37:31

-Yes.

-Such a definitive style.

0:37:310:37:33

Coffee spoons, a case set.

0:37:330:37:35

I think these are absolutely beautiful, the design is lovely.

0:37:350:37:39

One will start me then. One I do.

0:37:390:37:41

-One I've got. 110.

-Good.

0:37:410:37:44

120, 130, 140...

0:37:440:37:45

It's the name, it's the name, isn't it?

0:37:450:37:49

170, 180,

0:37:490:37:51

190, 200.

0:37:510:37:55

I'll take 195, it's 190 with me.

0:37:550:37:58

At 190. At 190. Is there 195?

0:37:580:38:01

At £190,

0:38:010:38:04

all done?

0:38:040:38:06

-Yes.

-Lovely.

0:38:060:38:08

Quality always stands.

0:38:080:38:10

-Yes.

-Oh, that was good.

0:38:100:38:12

Yes. Very pleased.

0:38:120:38:14

-You must be ever so happy with that.

-Yes. I think he will be.

0:38:140:38:17

I bet he will be. Is he getting all the money...

0:38:170:38:19

-Oh, no.

-Or will you get a bit for doing the work?

0:38:190:38:22

-I think we'll split it in half.

-Will you?

-Yes.

0:38:220:38:25

-That's very generous of him.

-Oh, yeah.

0:38:250:38:26

-He lives with us anyway.

-OK.

0:38:260:38:28

Well, here's something for you arts and crafts lovers. It's a bit of

0:38:360:38:39

tube line pottery. It belongs to Pat and not for much longer, I gather.

0:38:390:38:43

It is a stylish piece.

0:38:430:38:45

It is stunning. It really is stunning.

0:38:450:38:47

Can I push you, David? What will it go for on a really good day?

0:38:470:38:50

It might do three to four.

0:38:500:38:53

-We'll see.

-OK.

-I hate making predictions like that.

0:38:530:38:56

There's not a lot here, a lot of ceramics.

0:38:560:38:58

No, there's not a lot in that style. No, no.

0:38:580:39:01

Next, I have another nice plate.

0:39:010:39:03

An unsigned majolica plate.

0:39:030:39:06

80 to get me away. 50, then.

0:39:060:39:08

Come on, it's only money, and you can't take it with you.

0:39:080:39:11

50?

0:39:110:39:13

40, then.

0:39:130:39:14

-30?

-Oh, come on, this is ridiculous!

0:39:140:39:18

God bless you, my dear.

0:39:180:39:19

£30, I've got.

0:39:190:39:21

At 30, I've got, 40 will it be? 50?

0:39:210:39:23

I want to put my hand up.

0:39:230:39:27

50? 50? 60, 70.

0:39:270:39:29

At 60 with me.

0:39:290:39:32

At £60. Not quite enough as well, I want a little bit more.

0:39:320:39:35

-Yes, please.

-70. 80? £70.

0:39:350:39:37

-I can't believe that this is struggling.

-No.

-I can't believe it.

0:39:370:39:41

At £70, is there 80?

0:39:410:39:44

At £70, all done.

0:39:440:39:46

Ladies and gentlemen, not quite enough on that.

0:39:460:39:49

No. Thank goodness there's a reserve on that.

0:39:490:39:52

-Yes.

-Yes. I'm quite pleased.

0:39:520:39:54

-It's just not the right day today, that's all.

-No.

0:39:540:39:56

You were right, it stands out alone.

0:39:560:39:58

It's not enough other things here to bring the collectors.

0:39:580:40:01

-It looked very lonely, didn't it?

-Yes, it did.

0:40:010:40:04

Well, that's a good expression.

0:40:040:40:06

It needs to go into a sale where there's a lot of arts and crafts.

0:40:060:40:09

I'll just take it and put it back in the room.

0:40:090:40:11

I think so. Do you know, Pat said to me, Pat said she's

0:40:110:40:14

bought many times in auction, but she's never sold anything.

0:40:140:40:18

-I know.

-And I think you're never meant to sell anything.

0:40:180:40:20

-That's right. That may be right.

-I think you're a good buyer.

-Choose the colour schemes

0:40:200:40:25

in your house very carefully to go with the plate.

0:40:250:40:28

-It does, actually.

-We gave it our best shot.

0:40:280:40:30

-Thank you.

-Yes. Thank you.

0:40:300:40:32

That was disappointing, but let's hope we have

0:40:320:40:35

better luck with our last lot.

0:40:350:40:37

Oh, Pauline, shame on you.

0:40:420:40:45

Great great grandfather's tankard, 50 to 80.

0:40:450:40:51

Why are you selling it?

0:40:510:40:54

Well, there's no-one to hand it down to, so it's a shame,

0:40:540:40:57

what's going to happen to it?

0:40:570:40:58

Oh, it's lovely, it really is a nice bit of pottery, isn't it, Philip?

0:40:580:41:02

Well, Pauline's lovely and I understand why she wants to sell it but I really hope it doesn't sell.

0:41:020:41:08

-I wish we'd put a £400 reserve on it now.

-Yes.

0:41:080:41:11

The Staffy tankard, this one, I think, is the bee's knees.

0:41:110:41:15

Again, I don't think I've ever seen a more heavily decorated mug.

0:41:150:41:20

I rate this thing £100, come on.

0:41:200:41:23

80, start me.

0:41:230:41:24

80, I'm straight in. At 80 I've got.

0:41:240:41:27

80, I've got 90, 100, 110,

0:41:270:41:32

120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170...

0:41:320:41:36

This is very good.

0:41:360:41:38

-I think actually, it's a superb price for it.

-We haven't stopped yet.

0:41:380:41:41

10, 220, at 210 on the pillar.

0:41:410:41:45

220, fresh blood.

0:41:450:41:46

230, 240, 250, 260,

0:41:460:41:50

270, 280, 290, 300,

0:41:500:41:56

310, 320, 330, 340, 350, 360.

0:41:560:42:02

At 350 on the pillar. At 350.

0:42:020:42:05

At 350, am I done? I am indeed.

0:42:050:42:08

£350.

0:42:080:42:10

The hammer's gone down on grandpop's mug.

0:42:100:42:12

-I don't believe it.

-I know why you sold it now.

0:42:120:42:16

-HE LAUGHS

-Wow, what a lot of money.

0:42:160:42:18

That was bought by the trade as well. I know that guy.

0:42:180:42:20

That flew through my estimate, but I'm pleased

0:42:200:42:23

because it's one of those things, I'd rather you didn't

0:42:230:42:26

-sell it or it go and make a load of money.

-Yeah.

0:42:260:42:29

-And it made a load of money...

-Exactly.

0:42:290:42:30

Just really makes it worthwhile.

0:42:300:42:32

And what will you put that money towards?

0:42:320:42:34

-I guess you haven't had time to think.

-No.

0:42:340:42:36

Because you were thinking it'd get £80, weren't you?

0:42:360:42:39

I thought perhaps £100 at the most, so that's...great.

0:42:390:42:44

Well, spend it wisely anyway and maybe buy something and plant it

0:42:440:42:48

-up in, you know, honour of great great grandpops.

-Yes.

0:42:480:42:53

Well, that's it, it's all over for our owners. We've had a great

0:42:550:42:58

day here in Devizes, so all credit to our experts.

0:42:580:43:01

If you've got any antiques and collectables you want

0:43:010:43:04

to flog, we want to see you.

0:43:040:43:06

You can find details in your local press, because we're coming to your town very soon.

0:43:060:43:10

So until the next time, from Devizes, it's cheerio.

0:43:100:43:13

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:240:43:27

Email [email protected]

0:43:270:43:31

The Flog It! team are in Melksham, where Paul Martin and experts David Barby and Philip Serrell uncover a variety of local treasures. Amongst the finds are a set of Georg Jensen silver spoons and a piece of Clarice Cliff pottery. Paul also gets to experience the ancient craft of coopering at a local brewery.


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