Clacton Flog It!


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Clacton

The team is in Clacton-on-Sea, looking through the items brought along by crowds taking a break from the pier and sandy beaches. The finds include a Victorian tea set.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Ice creams, miles of sandy beach and, of course, a pier.

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The perfect recipe for a bit of traditional British antique spotting.

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Welcome to Flog It from Clacton on Sea.

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Clacton's pier was constructed in 1871 and it now reaches over 1,000 feet into the sea.

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It survived a fire and storms and helped this Essex seaside resort becomes the attraction it is today.

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And like most seaside resorts, Clacton has a history of glitz, glamour and showbiz.

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And we've set up in the heart of this seaside town

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at the Princes Theatre

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and it looks like word has got out that Flog It is in town

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because look at the size of this massive queue!

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And I can't wait to see what's in all of these bags and boxes.

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And later on in the show we'll be dipping into the world of variety here at Clacton's oldest theatre.

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This stage has provided a springboard for many well known British entertainers.

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But, first, helping me sort through all the bags and boxes are today's experts Elizabeth Talbot and

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Will Axon and they'll be looking for today's star attractions.

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And first on today's bill is a silver trio brought in by a local lady, Georgina.

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Georgina, I love this tea service, this tea set, and I just feel like

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we should pour ourselves a refreshing cup of tea now. That would be nice.

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What a good idea!

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What can you tell me about this set?

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-It's obviously a silver tea set.

-Yes.

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It belonged to my husband and it belonged to his father.

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-Right.

-And I don't know where he could have been...

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-So it might have been family silver via him then, through the family.

-That's right.

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I mean, they're Victorian pieces and they will predate your husband's father by some way.

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-Yes.

-Interestingly, I don't know whether you know, but the teapot and the milk jug are London 1844,

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but the sugar bowl

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is dated London 1850, and actually if you look closely and

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compare them, you will see there is subtle differences in design.

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Well, I've always thought it was oversized compared with the other two.

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Yeah, I'm not too fretful about the over-sizing, because Victorians did like their sugar.

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-Well, yes.

-And it did often come in large bowls, but it's more the question of the actual design.

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Whereas these two are floral...

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-Yeah.

-..between the vacant cartouches,

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this one has more of a sort of a crest in the middle.

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I can see what you mean, but I never knew it was different

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-until your expert eye pointed it out.

-Well, there you go.

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Live and learn all the time.

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Interestingly, the shape of these, the melon fluted shape with the baluster outline

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reflects very much the William IV period which just preceded Victoria,

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so there's this transition into the Victorian era.

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And the Victorians just through everything else at it,

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so they threw all the floral design and all the lavishness of it, this wonderful flower

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and the handles, so the Victorians just loved more rather than less. But I think, all in all...

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Well, you tell me, what do you think it might fetch? Have you got an idea?

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-375.

-Oh, my goodness! I think we'd better make a note of that to see how...

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I like decisive suggestions, that's good.

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Well, I think given the weight alone, it should make £300, and I would hope it should

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make somewhere between £300 and £450, so I think, you know, you're quite in the middle there,

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so I think between us, we should have success

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-so we'll put on a £300 reserve...

-Yes.

-..if you're comfortable with that.

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-Yes.

-OK. I think it's a lovely set, so thank you for bringing it in and we'll...

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Do attend the auction, you can buy it!

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I shall be at the auction, but I cannot buy it. So...

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-No, no.

-But someone will, I'm sure.

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-Thank you for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

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-Karina, Sue, welcome to Flog It.

-Hello.

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You're sisters, right? Tell me I'm right.

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-No.

-No?

-No.

-Mother and daughter?

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-Yes.

-You're looking great, both of you.

-Thank you.

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And you've brought in what's perfectly obvious - we're hidden behind these because

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-neither of us are particularly gifted in the height department - but a pair of corner chairs.

-Yes.

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So, Sue, are these pieces that you've inherited through the family or...?

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No, a friend gave them to me.

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Very nice friend, yes.

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And you've had them on display in the house? Do you use them?

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They were in my conservatory, but they didn't look quite right, so...

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-Don't tell me they're in the loft.

-In the loft, yes.

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I tell you, the number of times we hear that on this show.

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They're in the loft.

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-But at least you've held on to them and you haven't chucked them on the skip or the bonfire.

-No.

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-Karina, you're not tempted?

-No.

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They don't do anything for you?

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-No, I'm afraid not, no.

-Really?

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-They've got to go.

-They've got to go, so we've got to flog them.

-Yes.

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Well, I like them because A, they're a pair of...

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You know, anything that, you know, comes in pairs tends to be sort of

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well received on the antiques and the auctions. And another thing, they...

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The sort of shape of them, this corner chair, it really sort of harks back

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to the earliest chairs that they used to make.

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In the late 17th century, mid 17th century, they used to call them thrown chairs,

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thrown being another word for turned, and you can see here on these spindles at the back and

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along these top where all this is done by turning.

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This is what they would call turning, so they sort of hark back to the late 17th century. They're not that old.

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They're going to be late Victorian, that sort of period, 1890s, maybe into the 1900s perhaps.

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That sort of late Victorian, early Edwardian.

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They look to me as if they're made in beech, in beech wood, which is a reasonable wood.

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It's not sort of Premier league but, you know, it's not Jewson's League either,

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it's, you know, second division, shall we say.

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-Value wise, they're not going to be hugely valuable.

-OK.

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-I would say let's put these in at an auction with an estimate of 100 to 150.

-That's all right.

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-How do you feel about that?

-Yes, yeah.

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Yeah? £100 in your pocket, hopefully a bit more, maybe.

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What about a reserve? Are you going to want them back if they don't sell?

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What do you think?

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-What do you think? What do I think?

-What do you think?

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Well, my suggestion is... Well, I'm always a bit cheeky on reserves and

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I like to go in without reserve, but they're not mine.

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-I mean, let's protect them at £80. How you feel?

-What about 100?

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You just valued them at 100.

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-Yeah, do you think 100?

-With discretion.

-Yes.

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-So 90, meet me halfway.

-Yes, yes.

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-Yes, OK.

-What do you reckon, Karina?

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-Yeah, fine.

-So they're £100 discretionary reserve.

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-Yes.

-So at £90 they'll go...

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-Yes.

-And if they don't reach that, they'll be in the boot of your car back down to Clacton.

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Claudia, Mary, it's good to see you.

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-Now, it's... That's grandma, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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So, is this is yours, Claudia, or is it grandma's?

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Well, it's my nan's and my granddad's.

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OK. This dog needs a new home, I guess?

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Yeah, it does because it's been in the family for a while now, but my nan and granddad have just moved

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and they're going to sell a few things and split the money between the grandchildren.

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-So you get to benefit!

-Yeah.

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So it was yours, Mary.

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-Yes.

-And you had a paint shop?

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-Yes, wallpaper and decorating.

-What a lovely little business. Was that based in Clacton?

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That was in Old Road in Clacton.

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Are you going to take over one day, Claudia?

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-No, the businesses isn't there any more.

-Isn't it?

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What happened to the business?

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-You just sold it?

-Yes.

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-Sold it and now it's a block of flats.

-It's a block of flats!

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-Yeah.

-Oh! But, nevertheless, you managed to hang on to this.

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-Yes, yes.

-And you know it's made by Beswick, don't you?

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-Yes.

-And there's a registration mark, there's a little stamp underneath, just there. Can you see that?

-Yes.

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-Yes.

-These were first issued in 1964 and then they stopped issuing them in 1970, so it was just a short...

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A short spell of time that Beswick were making them.

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A few times on the show we've had these on and they've been full of cement

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because the shop owners have filled this hole up underneath with sand and cement and it's left to set

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so it weighs an absolute ton and they've used this little dog as a doorstop for the shop.

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And we've also seen little holes cut in here.

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-Yeah, we saw that one.

-You've seen that one!

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Where the little paint tin's been used as a money box.

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Well, this is in perfect, perfect condition, it really is.

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And all credit to you, Mary...

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-Thank you.

-..for looking after this little dog.

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There are a lot of fakes on the market now.

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-Right.

-Because these peaked at around £300 four or five years ago,

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a lot of fakes have been reproduced...

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-Yes.

-..which has now devalued the good ones.

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-Oh.

-And even though this one is in perfect condition, I'd say it's in mint condition,

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we might struggle to get that £300 today purely because of the fakes.

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-Yes.

-So, if you're willing to sell this, we could put it into auction

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with a value of £180 to £280 and still hope for that top end.

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-Yes.

-That sounds good, doesn't it?

-Yeah, that does sound good.

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-Happy?

-Very.

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What would you spend your half of the money on, then?

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-Well, a fifth.

-A fifth! Oh, a fifth!

-Yeah.

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-Oh, crikey.

-I'll just save it.

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We need £500 for this dog!

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Well, a camel in Clacton is a comparatively rare sight, Paul, but you tell me your story behind it.

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Well, a long story, really.

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I started off getting involved in antiques and collecting about

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20 years ago from a friend who introduced me to the subject.

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I've been going to boot sales and antiques fairs,

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auctions on and off for the last 20 years.

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This one, I picked up about two years ago at an auction in Brentwood.

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-Right.

-And I was just taken by the size of it, really, and the fact

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that it's a bit quirky. I'm quite a quirky person and I think I was just taken to it quite instantly, really.

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OK. Well, it's certainly an unusual piece.

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Do you know much about the factory?

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I know it's Czechoslovakian, but apart from that, it something I don't know much about.

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OK. I mean, it's by the Royal Dux factory, which was founded in Dux in Czechoslovakia in 1860,

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and they do favour a sort of Arabian and sort of desert type subjects, but in their heyday, during the

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late 19th century, they were very, very influenced and influential within the Art Nouveau period, and

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they did some very romantic stylised figural groups, particularly shepherds and shepherdesses

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in very sort of artful poses and they were large because they were intended to be statuesque.

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They were intended to be the equivalent of

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almost painted marble statues. They were the bigger figures.

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-Right.

-You do find smaller, more elegant ones, more in the size of Royal Worcester

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or Royal Doulton sized figures, but most of them are actually quite large size.

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And in the 19th and early 20th century, a lot of their figures

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were actually brighter than this, they were more colourful. They used a lot of browns and greens.

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This one is later. It comes further into the 20th century, but it still retains all

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the elements of the original large figures that they were making several decades earlier.

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-It looks to be in good condition. I couldn't see any damage.

-I've not seen any.

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I've had a good look over it and it looks to be in perfect condition.

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So, you bought it at auction. What did you pay for it?

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-I paid £200.

-£200.

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Well, you know, I mean, you get a lot for your money at £200.

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It probably will be a little steep for where the market would support it at the moment.

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I think a more realistic estimate is in the region of £120 to £160 at the moment.

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Yeah, I expect it to have gone down.

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-Right.

-Obviously if you get two bidders buying...

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-That's it.

-..it may reach the 200.

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That's the joy of auction. But you're a realist and you know the marketplace

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well enough to understand that, which is important.

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A lot of people fall short there.

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Making a profit's nice, but it's not always possible.

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No. Who knows - good condition, quality piece, well known factory.

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-It's got all the elements of a good day, so let's go and flog it!

-Fingers crossed, yeah.

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-Fingers crossed.

-OK.

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Everybody's working so hard down there.

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Our valuations are well underway, but we've now found our first items to take off to auction.

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So while we make our way over there,

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we're going to leave you with a recap of all the items going under the hammer.

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Paul's Royal Dux camel has outgrown his flat

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and after two years together, he's ready to let go of the reins.

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Sue and her daughter Karina might have banished these chairs

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to the loft, but Will's interest has upped their expectations.

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-Yeah, do you think 100?

-With discretion?

-Yes.

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-So 90, meet me halfway.

-Yes. Yes, OK.

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With the price fixed, the corner chairs are heading to auction.

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I loved the Beswick sheepdog brought in by Mary and her granddaughter, Claudia.

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I give it a broad estimate of 180 to 280. This should get it away.

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And, finally, Georgina's Victorian silver tea set.

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It may be a bit of a mix and match, but Elizabeth loved the detailing

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and is confident the bidders will, too.

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For today's sale,

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we've travelled inland to Reeman Dansie Auction Rooms

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on the outskirts of Colchester, once the old Roman capital of Britain.

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As you can see, the car park's pretty full which means there's going to be a lot of bidders

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packed inside the room, and it looks like somebody has got an eye for quality!

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And in charge of this arena is auctioneer James Grinter, who's almost ready to sell our first lot.

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At the centre of the action now is this gorgeous centrepiece.

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It's a table centrepiece, in fact. It's a Royal Dux, it's the figures with camel. It belongs to Paul.

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Now I know you're a bit of a buyer and a seller, aren't you?

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-A bit of a dealer?

-I like to make a bit of money if I can.

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Hopefully we'll get your money back today.

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-I know Elizabeth has put 120 to 160 on it.

-Yes.

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-How much did you pay for it?

-£200.

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£200. Not long ago?

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Two years ago. I bought it on a whim. I really liked it.

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-It was very big, it was impressive.

-It is, isn't it?

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It's showy. That's what you want for a centrepiece, something, "Wow!"

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So, hopefully the quality will get it away at the top end. We're going to find out. Here we go.

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The impressive Royal Dux porcelain camel table centre with Arab rider.

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There we are. The one as shown. £100 to start me. £100 I have.

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-Yes, come on.

-At £100 now. Do I hear 110?

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-At £100 is bid.

-Oh, come on.

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Any advance?

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110 down here now. At 110. 120. 130.

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At £130. Down here now at £130.

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Are you all done? 130 it is.

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-Mid estimate, but...

-It's fair enough.

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-Fair enough.

-Happy with that.

-Sorry about that.

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-No, I'm happy with it.

-But it's gone.

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Are you going to reinvest the money back into antiques?

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I collect Poole pottery, so I'm hoping to buy one or two pieces of that.

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-Early Poole?

-1920s normally.

-Ah, good period.

-Nice designs.

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-Well, you'll pick up something for £130.

-Yeah, hopefully.

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-Sue and Karina, it's great to see you again.

-Hello.

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-I've got to say you both look stunning.

-Thank you.

-You really do.

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Your corner chairs are just about to go under the hammer.

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We've got £100 to £150 riding on this.

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Plenty of dealers here and there's lots of good kit, so hopefully these will get snapped up.

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Yeah, I mean they're nice, they're small, they're easily accommodated.

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We all know we love a pair, so, you know, I'm sure that there's going

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to be someone here who's going to fall in love with these.

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Number 557 now is the pair of Edwardian corner chairs.

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£80 for these somewhere? 80? 60?

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-60's bid on there. At 60. At £60 now.

-Come on, come on.

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Do I hear 65? At £60 is bid, only. At £60. Do I hear 65 anywhere?

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No? At £60 only, are you all done?

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No. That's it, the hammer's gone down on it, didn't sell it.

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-Oh, no.

-Oh, well, they'll have to go back in the loft.

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No, put them in the conservatory.

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-No, no! They won't go, they won't go.

-Oh, what a shame.

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Look, there is another auction room on another day if you fancy doing that again,

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-but I'm just sorry it wasn't your day today.

-That's all right.

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Now it's my turn to be the expert and we've got the Dulux sheepdog

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made by Beswick going under the hammer.

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It belongs to Mary and unfortunately we don't have Claudia with us today, so let's say hello to her anyway.

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-Yes, she's very sorry.

-I hope she's OK.

-Thank you.

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-I put 180 to 280 on this. Let's just hope we can break that top end.

-Yes.

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OK, it's going under the hammer now. This is it.

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Number 100 now is Beswick Dulux dog.

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There we are, the advertising figure.

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Can I start the bidding with me at £260? With me now at 260.

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At 260 with me now. 270. 280.

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290. 300. At £300 with me now.

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At 300. At 320. 340. At 340.

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With me on the book at £340.

0:17:020:17:06

All done now at 340? All done?

0:17:060:17:09

-Yes, £340.

-Very good.

-Brilliant.

-Well, done.

0:17:090:17:12

So, that's going to be split now between the five grandchildren.

0:17:120:17:16

OK, what are their names?

0:17:160:17:17

-Is Claudia the oldest?

-No, Jonathan.

0:17:170:17:20

OK.

0:17:200:17:21

Chloe, Ellie... Oh, I've forgotten Claudia in the middle there!

0:17:210:17:25

And Evie. Evie's 11 months.

0:17:250:17:27

Oh, all lovely names. Well, look, wish them all well, won't you?

0:17:270:17:30

-Will do.

-And have fun. Get them all together and spend the money.

-Yes.

0:17:300:17:34

It's about that time of day when we're thinking about a cup of tea.

0:17:370:17:40

Well, don't rush away to the kitchen to put the kettle on.

0:17:400:17:43

We are selling Georgina's silver tea service.

0:17:430:17:46

Why are you selling this, because there's a lot of silver here and it's worth a lot of money.

0:17:460:17:51

I've had my pleasure out of it and I need a new bathroom.

0:17:510:17:54

OK. And how much money have you got saved up?

0:17:540:17:56

-Towards the bathroom?

-Yeah.

-4,000.

-4,000!

-Yes.

0:17:560:18:00

Cor, this is going to be a posh bathroom, isn't it?

0:18:000:18:02

The shower is over £700.

0:18:020:18:05

It's a steam shower, it's got a radio in and I was tempted.

0:18:050:18:09

And it's only a little two bedroom bungalow but, boy, is that going to be a good shower!

0:18:090:18:14

Number 186 now is the Victorian silver teapot and

0:18:140:18:17

the two other items with it.

0:18:170:18:19

I have three commissions with me and

0:18:190:18:22

I start the bidding at £360 with me now. At 360.

0:18:220:18:26

Fantastic! At £360 with me. 380.

0:18:260:18:29

400. 420. 440. 460. 480.

0:18:290:18:34

500. At £500. Over here now at 500.

0:18:340:18:36

520. 540. 540. 560. 580.

0:18:360:18:42

At £580. On my left at £580.

0:18:420:18:45

Are you all done?

0:18:450:18:47

-Excellent, well done. That was brilliant.

-Fantastic!

0:18:470:18:51

£580! That's going to go a long way towards that walk-in shower.

0:18:510:18:55

-Well, it is.

-Instead of the radio, you could get a TV put in there.

0:18:550:18:59

-You could watch Paul!

-Now, stop being silly, Paul.

-You could watch Flog It, then!

0:18:590:19:03

What a great result!

0:19:050:19:07

And, coming up, Jacqueline was not impressed to find out her plastic box is actually ivory.

0:19:070:19:12

I honestly thought it was plastic.

0:19:120:19:15

When I bought it, all I was looking for was a jewellery box.

0:19:150:19:19

Until she gets to the auction.

0:19:190:19:21

I don't believe this.

0:19:210:19:22

I honestly don't believe this.

0:19:220:19:25

But, before all of that, it's show time at the oldest venue in town.

0:19:250:19:29

Welcome to the West Cliff Theatre, home for over 80 years to the variety show.

0:19:360:19:41

Now, the curtain is just about to rise,

0:19:410:19:43

so I'm going to get myself ready for a very special performance.

0:19:430:19:48

By day Bill Graham was a civil servant, but by night

0:19:480:19:51

he was a talented performer. So in 1894 he gathered some friends together and

0:19:510:19:56

they started giving open air concerts in Clacton on a piece of wasteland.

0:19:560:20:01

The first permanent theatre, the West Cliff Gardens Theatre, was established on this site in 1898.

0:20:010:20:08

Open to the elements initially, it developed in stages as a large marquee,

0:20:080:20:13

a timber building and finally to its current design in 1928.

0:20:130:20:19

And now, ladies and gentlemen, at enormous expense, stars of stage,

0:20:320:20:39

screen and the local job centre, for one night only, Bob and Reg, the Young Brothers!

0:20:390:20:47

APPLAUSE

0:20:470:20:49

# Oh, I'd give the world to start all over

0:20:510:20:56

# Back in the old routine

0:20:560:21:00

# To live my life in fields of clover

0:21:000:21:05

# Back in the old routine. #

0:21:050:21:07

Bob and Reg Young have come from a long tradition of acts that have

0:21:070:21:11

developed the variety show from its beginnings on the Victorian stage.

0:21:110:21:15

It's a collection of musical and comedy performances knitted together by a compere or host.

0:21:150:21:20

# Or calling encore, we'll walk in a wonderful glow

0:21:200:21:24

# Oh, see the joy to be there pluggin'

0:21:240:21:29

# Back in the old routine

0:21:290:21:32

# You're up, you're down, you're in there slugging

0:21:320:21:36

# Back in the old routine, oh! #

0:21:360:21:41

So, tell me a little bit about your career.

0:21:410:21:44

Well, we've been performing 59 years, 59 years this year, Robert.

0:21:440:21:49

-Yes, yes.

-We're getting on a bit now.

0:21:490:21:51

We started in 1950 and we started in a young people's club.

0:21:510:21:55

They began to start a drama group.

0:21:550:21:57

We thought we'd go into drama group, but it didn't turn out that way.

0:21:570:22:01

It certainly didn't, because two chaps arrived

0:22:010:22:04

who were obviously ex variety performers and

0:22:040:22:07

instead of a drama group we found ourselves at a concert party.

0:22:070:22:10

And he picked out his talent from our members at the club and actually there was no talent there at all!

0:22:100:22:16

-Not really.

-So, it was rather difficult for him.

0:22:160:22:19

Yeah. He had... He had a couple of singers and he thought,

0:22:190:22:22

-"Well, that's a start and we could do some chorus work".

-Yes.

0:22:220:22:25

And then he said, "We want some comedy," and he looked at us, didn't he?

0:22:250:22:30

And we said, "Well, we actually haven't done anything like this before."

0:22:300:22:34

"Don't worry, I'm writing a script for you."

0:22:340:22:38

-Which he did.

-Yeah.

-Straight in at the deep end.

0:22:380:22:41

-Oh, indeed.

-Well, you must know all the old gags, then.

0:22:410:22:44

-Please.

-Oh, yes. Some of them...

0:22:440:22:45

Well, actually, we are now older...

0:22:450:22:48

We are now older, Paul, than some of the gags.

0:22:480:22:50

-Between you and I.

-Yeah.

0:22:500:22:52

-I've got little bit of trouble downstairs.

-Downstairs?

-Yes.

0:22:520:22:57

How can that be, you live in a bungalow?

0:22:570:23:00

-No, no, I don't mean that.

-People don't think we rehearse.

0:23:000:23:03

They say, "It looks as though you're making it up as you go along." I wish that were true!

0:23:030:23:07

We spend hours, you know, rehearsing so that we get...

0:23:070:23:10

And, like all comics, it's timing.

0:23:100:23:13

Of course it is and you've both got great timing.

0:23:130:23:15

I always remember timing because when we first started doing

0:23:150:23:19

-professional work at the Savoy Theatre in Clacton...

-Big gig!

0:23:190:23:22

-Oh, big gig.

-Always a big gig.

0:23:220:23:24

And Max Miller, the famous variety star of the music hall,

0:23:240:23:29

came down for one week and he was supposed to be the man

0:23:290:23:33

that you used to look at and say, "It's the timing."

0:23:330:23:36

You see, I'm going to ask you a leading question.

0:23:360:23:39

-A leading question.

-Now, I want you to answer this truthfully.

0:23:390:23:42

-He said, "Have you passed water lately?"

-And had you?

0:23:420:23:47

Well, I had to admit I walked along the riverbank on the way to the surgery.

0:23:470:23:52

-And it's also wonderful to think of the wonderful performers that have been on this stage.

-Yeah.

0:23:520:23:58

-I mean...

-Tommy Trinder was one.

0:23:580:24:00

-Oh, Tommy Trinder.

-Remember Tommy Trinder?

0:24:000:24:02

Don MacLean. Old Jimmy.

0:24:020:24:04

-Jimmy Cricket.

-Jimmy Cricket, yeah.

-Roy Hudd, Roy Hudd.

0:24:040:24:07

And they all say that it's wonderful, the acoustics are great.

0:24:070:24:11

It's a wonderful little theatre.

0:24:110:24:13

It's like really performing in somebody's front room.

0:24:130:24:17

When I went to see the doctor, you know what he's like. He said, "What's the matter this time?"

0:24:170:24:21

I said, "Well, I've got a touch of the old lumbago again."

0:24:210:24:24

He said, "The lumbago again?" I said, "Yeah, I've got it again."

0:24:240:24:27

He said, "Would you go and stand by the window?

0:24:270:24:30

"Stand by the window and stick your tongue out."

0:24:300:24:32

I went and stood by the window, stuck my tongue out.

0:24:320:24:35

"Why am I doing this", I said.

0:24:350:24:37

I said, "Does this help the lumbago?"

0:24:370:24:39

-He said, "No, I've had a row with the bloke over the road."

-Oh!

0:24:390:24:43

-We'd better go home now.

-All right, we'll go, then.

-Got to go now.

0:24:430:24:46

-Cheerio!

-See you later. Right-o, bye bye.

0:24:460:24:49

The theatre is now managed by a charitable trust and

0:24:510:24:54

there's an army of volunteers, but only one employee,

0:24:540:24:57

Mike Bareham, who's also very passionate about this theatre.

0:24:570:25:02

Why is the theatre so special?

0:25:020:25:04

It was built as a variety theatre, a seaside variety theatre,

0:25:040:25:08

and that's what it's remained right the way through it's history.

0:25:080:25:11

-Besides, it has got a special feel.

-There is a nice feel in here, isn't there?

0:25:110:25:16

You can imagine when it's packed, there's a wonderful atmosphere.

0:25:160:25:20

Let's talk about the future. What does that hold for the theatre?

0:25:200:25:23

I think we look to the future very optimistically.

0:25:230:25:27

We have a very strong following in Clacton and the surrounding areas.

0:25:270:25:31

I think the thing that worries me most of all would be that

0:25:310:25:35

where are the big names of tomorrow coming from?

0:25:350:25:40

There are no longer the holiday camps, we don't have the variety shows on TV that we use to have

0:25:400:25:45

which were the proving ground, of course, for so many of the stars of the stage. So, that is a worry.

0:25:450:25:51

So I believe there is a bit of bad news because this year there is no summer season.

0:25:510:25:56

This year, it was just not possible for us to stage a summer season,

0:25:560:26:01

so we're basically busy working away to see...

0:26:010:26:03

-Planning next year.

-To see what we can possibly do next year.

0:26:030:26:06

I think one of the things we have to face now, of course, is that

0:26:060:26:10

seaside resorts do not draw the sort of crowds that they used to draw.

0:26:100:26:15

-No.

-We have put entertainment on every week.

0:26:150:26:17

-Well, that's good. That's fine.

-Oh, yes.

0:26:170:26:19

-We haven't closed our doors.

-Thank goodness.

-Far from it!

0:26:190:26:22

# Gee, the joy to be there pluggin'

0:26:310:26:35

# Back in the old routine

0:26:350:26:39

# You're up, you're down, you're in there sluggin'

0:26:390:26:43

# Back in the old routine, oh

0:26:430:26:47

# Give me the jazz

0:26:470:26:49

# The razzmatazz, and we'll tread on Heaven's scene.

0:26:490:26:55

# Back in the old routine

0:26:550:26:58

# That's where the corn is green

0:26:580:27:02

# Back in the old routine. #

0:27:020:27:12

APPLAUSE

0:27:120:27:14

Well, there's still plenty of entertainment going on

0:27:250:27:28

at the Princes Theatre, and Will has found some diamonds to put in the spotlight.

0:27:280:27:33

Jan, you've brought in a rather showy watch to show me today.

0:27:340:27:38

-Yes, yes.

-Is this something that you've worn through the years and had enough of, or have you inherited it?

0:27:380:27:44

No, I inherited it from my mother's jewellery

0:27:440:27:47

about ten years ago and it's been in my drawer ever since, I'm afraid.

0:27:470:27:54

-And it's very pretty, but hasn't been worn. It's unlikely to be worn, so...

0:27:540:27:59

-Do you remember your mother wearing it?

-No, I don't.

0:27:590:28:02

-Was it some something she wore?

-No, not at all.

0:28:020:28:06

So it probably hasn't got a lot of sentimental value to you.

0:28:060:28:08

It hasn't, no. To be honest, it hasn't, no.

0:28:080:28:11

There's not a lot to say about it. It really is what it is.

0:28:110:28:14

It's an Art Deco cocktail watch,

0:28:140:28:17

-diamond set. They are diamonds.

-Yes.

0:28:170:28:20

It's on platinum, which is nice also, good quality.

0:28:200:28:25

But the trouble with these is, you're selling it for the very reason people don't buy them.

0:28:250:28:30

-Yes.

-They're hard things to wear.

0:28:300:28:32

They're not terribly commercial, as we would say.

0:28:320:28:35

-Not something you'd wear every day is it, really?

-Certainly not.

0:28:350:28:38

Well, some people might, but not in my circles!

0:28:380:28:42

Now, the other problem that we come up against when we see these, they do get brought into valuation days

0:28:420:28:48

at work and at Flog It and we do see a fair amount of them because they were very fashionable at one stage.

0:28:480:28:53

People had them, were given as gifts. People often think that they're worth a lot more than they actually are.

0:28:530:28:59

-Yes.

-Usually because they see diamonds, platinum.

-Exactly.

0:28:590:29:02

-Art Deco.

-Pounds notes!

-Exactly.

0:29:020:29:05

For us it's a little bit tricky, we have to try and talk people down.

0:29:050:29:08

Now, have you got any idea?

0:29:080:29:10

Did you have a figure in mind when you came here and said, "I'm not going to let it go for less"?

0:29:100:29:14

Well, I thought it would be a four figure, but realistically looking

0:29:140:29:20

at it, I realise it probably won't be four figure. A three figure.

0:29:200:29:24

Let's go for three figures.

0:29:240:29:25

-I think two figures would be cheap! So, let's go for three figures.

-Yes.

0:29:250:29:29

I mean, I've seen these sell.

0:29:290:29:31

Like I say, we do see them in the saleroom quite often.

0:29:310:29:35

Not so good quality ones can make a couple of hundred, the better quality ones can make 400, 500.

0:29:350:29:41

It's that sort of price bracket, so what I'm going to suggest is, I think it's better than a £200er.

0:29:410:29:48

-Right.

-I don't think it's £1,000er.

0:29:480:29:49

-No.

-I hope I'm wrong on the day.

-Well, that would be nice.

0:29:490:29:52

So I'm going to suggest an estimate of £300 to £400.

0:29:520:29:55

How do you feel about that?

0:29:550:29:57

Yes, I'd be happy to go along with that, actually. Yes.

0:29:570:30:00

I mean, I'm not going to try and force you into it, but like you say, it sits in a drawer.

0:30:000:30:04

-It does.

-What does it do there? Nothing.

0:30:040:30:07

-No.

-It's got no real sentimental value to you.

0:30:070:30:10

-No.

-So as long as you're happy, let's put it in, £300 to £400.

0:30:100:30:14

Let's reserve it at 300.

0:30:140:30:15

Can we give the auctioneer a bit of discretion just in case?

0:30:150:30:18

-Yes, why not?

-I think once you've decided to sell...

-It's got to go.

0:30:180:30:22

You should go for it. Hopefully it'll make a little bit more than that.

0:30:220:30:25

-Yeah.

-Are you going to reinvest it in a piece of jewellery or something else perhaps?

-Well, probably not.

0:30:250:30:31

No, I think I might split it between my son and daughter

0:30:310:30:34

and they can treat the family to a day out or something.

0:30:340:30:37

Very nice. Are they aware of this treat?

0:30:370:30:39

No. They don't know I'm here!

0:30:390:30:41

Are you going to tell them or leave it as a surprise?

0:30:410:30:43

Oh, I'll probably have to tell them. My husband will tell them!

0:30:430:30:46

That's right, blame the husband!

0:30:460:30:47

-Yeah, he'll let the cat out of the bag.

-Exactly.

0:30:470:30:50

-It's been a pleasure meeting you.

-And you.

0:30:500:30:52

And let's hope we can get as much money in your pocket as we can.

0:30:520:30:55

-That would be great. Thank you very much.

-Well done, Jan.

0:30:550:30:59

Barbara, your vase has really caught my eye when I saw you in the queue.

0:31:050:31:09

-What can you tell me about it?

-Well, I work at the St Helena Hospice Shop in Clacton

0:31:090:31:15

and when I turned up for work on a Tuesday morning, as I always do,

0:31:150:31:20

it was sitting on the shelf and I just thought it was very beautiful and

0:31:200:31:24

thought that I would bring it along and see,

0:31:240:31:26

you know, what it's worth and if you can tell us anything more about it.

0:31:260:31:29

Do you know anything about it at all?

0:31:290:31:32

-Have you...

-We did have somebody look at it from...

0:31:320:31:35

We have a coin and metal dealer next door to our hospice shop

0:31:350:31:40

and he came back in the afternoon and said that he thought it was

0:31:400:31:44

about 1905 and that it was German, WMF.

0:31:440:31:48

-It doesn't mean anything to me, but that's all we know.

-OK, fine.

0:31:480:31:51

Well, I did notice that at the bottom here on the foot rim is indeed

0:31:510:31:57

the mark for WMF, which is a foundry

0:31:570:32:01

which was established in Germany in 1880 and

0:32:010:32:04

they specialised in pewter ware, silver and silver plated items.

0:32:040:32:09

-And this is actually a piece of silver plated ware.

-Right.

0:32:090:32:13

And they were very design orientated, specifically for the Art Nouveau market

0:32:130:32:18

of the period, which lasted from the turn of the late 19th century into the early 20th century, and

0:32:180:32:24

they made metal, which is obviously very solid, very heavy, into such a fluid, decorative form.

0:32:240:32:30

And the sinuous handles that flow from the top down, the baluster shaped body,

0:32:300:32:35

incorporating these lovely poppies are just so evocative of that period and that style,

0:32:350:32:39

so it's a lovely example.

0:32:390:32:40

Now, I do think from looking inside, being hollow all the way through and with no bottom to it,

0:32:400:32:47

I do think it probably had some form of liner at some point, possibly.

0:32:470:32:51

-Right.

-But in general terms, it's in very good condition.

0:32:510:32:54

So, have you, in the shop, been sort of wondering what...

0:32:540:32:57

what the vase might be worth?

0:32:570:32:59

-Yes, yes.

-Have you had any sort of...?

0:32:590:33:01

Well, the chap did say that because it doesn't have its liner,

0:33:010:33:06

he thought around about £25 is realistic.

0:33:060:33:09

I thought it would be worth a little bit more than that.

0:33:090:33:12

-Yeah.

-But, I mean, it's just something that I like.

0:33:120:33:14

-Yes, it appeals to you.

-Yes.

0:33:140:33:16

Well, I think that a realistic pre-auction estimate for this vase would be £30 to £50.

0:33:160:33:21

So, I side with you, I think slightly higher than £25.

0:33:210:33:24

And would you like a reserve on?

0:33:240:33:26

I think the £30.

0:33:260:33:28

-Yes, we'll put £30 reserve on, but would you allow auctioneer's discretion on that?

-Yes.

0:33:280:33:33

So, we'll have £30 discretion, £30 to £50 estimate, and we'll take it to auction.

0:33:330:33:37

So that means you can go back to the shop and tell them the good news!

0:33:370:33:41

Yes, I will do straight away!

0:33:410:33:43

-Excellent. Oh, thank you for bringing it in.

-You're welcome.

0:33:430:33:46

-Jacqui, thank you for coming in today to Flog It.

-That's all right.

0:33:560:33:59

And bringing along your item today.

0:33:590:34:03

Now, from the outside

0:34:030:34:05

I can do a bit of guessing as to what this is.

0:34:050:34:08

I would suspect that it's made of ivory from where I'm sitting.

0:34:080:34:12

I haven't had a look inside, so it could be a jewellery box, a little trinket box, maybe even a tea caddy.

0:34:120:34:19

So let me just have a look inside so I can make a decision from that.

0:34:190:34:25

Well, looking at the interior here, nicely lined in this felt,

0:34:250:34:30

I would say that that's a jewellery box.

0:34:300:34:33

-Is that what it's used as at home?

-That's what I bought it as...

0:34:330:34:36

to use as a jewellery, yes, and that's what I've been using up until today.

0:34:360:34:40

-So, do you do use it?

-I did use it, yes.

-You did use it. Not any more?

-No.

0:34:400:34:44

What was the reason for that?

0:34:440:34:47

Well, I thought it... I didn't realise it was ivory, I thought it was plastic.

0:34:470:34:51

-Yes.

-It was my husband that thought it was ivory and a friend of ours.

0:34:510:34:55

Does that put you off a little bit?

0:34:550:34:57

I've never owned everything in ivory, so I wouldn't know, really...

0:34:570:35:02

It's an interesting area in the auction world and you have to be so careful as to dating these pieces.

0:35:020:35:09

-Now, the cut off date is 1947.

-Right.

0:35:090:35:13

So anything pre 1947 is OK to sell.

0:35:130:35:17

-Oh, I see.

-Anything after 1947, you have to have a license to sell it.

0:35:170:35:23

-All right.

-And generally, most places will say, "No, we're not selling that."

0:35:230:35:28

Looking at this trinket box,

0:35:280:35:31

these Chinese...

0:35:310:35:33

what we would call chinoiserie panels, just Chinese figures amongst pagodas in a Chinese garden.

0:35:330:35:41

Yes.

0:35:410:35:43

I would suggest that it's come out of Canton. Canton carved ivory.

0:35:430:35:47

-Around that late 19th century, turn of the century, which is when I think this dates from...

-Yes.

0:35:470:35:53

..there was a lot of exports, ivory carvings from Canton.

0:35:530:35:57

So now you know it's ivory.

0:35:570:36:00

-Yes.

-You've told me they you thought it was plastic.

0:36:000:36:02

I honestly thought it was plastic. When I bought it, all I was looking for was a jewellery box.

0:36:020:36:08

So now you're giving me some clues that I don't think you've probably paid

0:36:080:36:11

the sort of money you would expect to pay for an ivory box.

0:36:110:36:14

-Come clean with me, what have you paid for it?

-A pound.

0:36:140:36:18

You're seri...

0:36:180:36:20

It never happens to me, does it? It never happens to me!

0:36:200:36:23

I honestly bought it as a plastic box.

0:36:230:36:25

-And where did you buy it from?

-A boot sale.

0:36:250:36:27

I tell you, I think the boot sales are pretty handy down here in Clacton

0:36:270:36:32

because I would estimate this, maybe a little conservatively,

0:36:320:36:36

it could make a bit more, at £100 to £200.

0:36:360:36:38

Now, are you happy with that sort of investment for a pound?

0:36:380:36:41

-Who wouldn't be?

-And we'll reserve it at £100 with a little discretion, 10%,

0:36:410:36:47

and really let's just hope it gets away on the day. I'm sure it will.

0:36:470:36:50

And whatever happens you're going to go home with the profit, aren't you?

0:36:500:36:55

-You've done well.

-Couldn't go wrong.

0:36:550:36:57

-I'll see you there.

-Right, thank you very much.

0:36:570:36:59

Well, now it's time to take our final trip

0:36:590:37:01

to the auction and here's a reminder of what we're pinning our hopes on.

0:37:010:37:05

Jan inherited this Art Deco diamond cocktail watch from her mother who never wore it.

0:37:050:37:11

Jan's followed suit, but hope some bidders will want to wear it with style.

0:37:110:37:16

Elizabeth valued this WMF vase at £30 to £50.

0:37:160:37:21

We're all hoping for the top end as the funds raised are going to the hospice where Barbara works.

0:37:210:37:27

And completing the trio is the ivory jewellery box that Jacqueline thought was plastic.

0:37:270:37:32

-Come clean with me, what have you paid for it?

-A pound.

0:37:320:37:35

Ivory is not her thing, but Will thinks this piece should set the auction alight.

0:37:350:37:41

Before it goes under the hammer,

0:37:410:37:43

let's catch up with the auctioneer and get his expert opinion.

0:37:430:37:47

Gorgeous little ivory jewellery box.

0:37:470:37:49

It belongs to Jacqueline. A wonderful fitted interior as well.

0:37:490:37:52

-We've got £100 to £200 on this.

-Well, I think it's going to do very well, Paul.

0:37:520:37:56

The Chinese market is very strong at the moment and they're buying back a lot of their works of art,

0:37:560:38:01

particularly ivories and things like that, and they've really gone up a lot in the last two years.

0:38:010:38:06

-What will it do?

-Well, hopefully it's going to do at least £200 to £300.

0:38:060:38:10

-Oh, that's fantastic, isn't it?

-I think it'll be all right.

0:38:100:38:14

You're not giving much away! You've got this grin on your face which says, "Yes, 300 plus."

0:38:140:38:18

-Can I tell you how much she paid for it?

-Please do.

0:38:180:38:21

-A pound.

-Really, that much!

0:38:210:38:23

She thought it was plastic.

0:38:230:38:26

I think she'll be very happy.

0:38:260:38:27

-I do as well.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, especially if it exceeds 300.

0:38:270:38:30

-Yeah, we'll see.

-OK. Well, it's down to you.

-Right, no pressure!

0:38:300:38:34

I think it's time to get on the rostrum and weave your magic. I'll look forward to watching it.

0:38:340:38:39

I'll do my best.

0:38:390:38:40

If you love the combination of platinum and diamonds, you will certainly love this next item.

0:38:520:38:57

It belongs to Jan and it's that gorgeous cocktail watch and I love it.

0:38:570:39:01

-A good Art Deco piece.

-It is nice.

0:39:010:39:03

£300 to £400. It's not a lot of money for the quality.

0:39:030:39:07

Well, no. I'm hoping it will go higher.

0:39:070:39:09

Oh, so are we, so are we.

0:39:090:39:11

Even Will is, our expert. Did you ever wear this?

0:39:110:39:14

-No, I didn't, no.

-A bit too dressy?

0:39:140:39:15

Well, it was in my mum's jewellery that was left to me and I never...

0:39:150:39:19

just never had the occasion to wear it, to be honest, so...

0:39:190:39:23

-Beautiful.

-It's good quality. I mean, the trouble with these

0:39:230:39:26

cocktail watches is a lot of people think they're worth a lot more than they are.

0:39:260:39:30

It doesn't stop it making more,

0:39:300:39:32

but you've kept the value sensible again, but like you say, for the platinum

0:39:320:39:37

-and the number of stones in it, it seems good value.

-Yeah, it is.

0:39:370:39:40

Number 326 is the 1930s lady's platinum and diamond cocktail watch.

0:39:400:39:45

I have two commissions with me and I start the bidding at £320 with me.

0:39:450:39:51

-OK. It's a start.

-Good.

-340. 360. 380. 400. 420, I'm out.

0:39:510:39:56

420 in the room now. At 420.

0:39:560:39:59

Do I hear 440? At £420, are you all done?

0:39:590:40:04

-That was quick.

-Yes.

-What are you going to put the money towards?

0:40:040:40:07

Well, I've got a son and a daughter

0:40:070:40:09

and I'm going to split the money up and they're

0:40:090:40:11

-going to have a day out, with the family.

-Oh, brilliant.

0:40:110:40:14

Barbara, the time has come! We're just about to put that gorgeous WMF Art Nouveau vase under the hammer.

0:40:190:40:25

A big fan of that Art Nouveau style, especially with

0:40:250:40:28

that naturalistic handles. You know, those stems.

0:40:280:40:31

Absolutely. Well, this shoot suits the shape of the vase itself, so it's a nice little piece.

0:40:310:40:35

Not too big, suits it very well, so we'll see.

0:40:350:40:38

Number 278 is the early 20th century WMF silver plated Art Nouveau vase.

0:40:380:40:43

I have two commissions with me and I start the bidding at £60.

0:40:430:40:46

-Oh, straight in!

-Do I hear 65?

0:40:460:40:48

65. 70. 75. 80. 85. 90. 95. 100.

0:40:480:40:55

At £100 at the back now. 110 in another place. Against you.

0:40:550:40:59

At 110. 120. 130. At 130 is bid.

0:40:590:41:03

The lady has bid now at £130. 140 on the internet against you.

0:41:030:41:05

-It's still going.

-That's brilliant, isn't it? That's really good.

0:41:050:41:09

At 150 is bid now. 160.

0:41:090:41:10

170 is bid down here now. At 170.

0:41:100:41:13

At 170 is bid down here now. At 170.

0:41:130:41:15

Make 180? 180.

0:41:150:41:17

At 180 is bid down here now. Are you sure?

0:41:170:41:19

-At £180, are you all done?

-Well, how about that?

0:41:190:41:23

-That's wonderful. Wonderful.

-You've got to be pleased with yourself?

0:41:230:41:27

Pleased for the shop.

0:41:270:41:29

-Well, spotted for you, though.

-Yes.

0:41:290:41:31

-Because if you hadn't you would have let it go to somebody else!

-Well, that's the point, yeah.

0:41:310:41:35

That is the point, so...

0:41:350:41:37

-It's brilliant. Thank you very much.

-Excellent.

-Thank you.

0:41:370:41:41

Well, this next item came from a car boot sale and it cost £1.

0:41:430:41:46

It belongs to Jacqueline and it's this lovely ivory jewellery box, which you thought...

0:41:460:41:51

-It was plastic.

-It was plastic. I expect the person that sold it to you thought it was plastic, as well.

0:41:510:41:57

Well, they wouldn't have sold it...

0:41:570:41:58

-For a pound!

-..as cheap as that, no, no.

0:41:580:42:01

It's going to attract a lot of buyers, especially from the Orient, because I had a chat

0:42:010:42:06

to the auctioneer, James, just before the sale started. You know what he said?

0:42:060:42:10

-Tell us, Paul.

-It could fly away. There's been a lot of interest...

0:42:100:42:14

-That's what he said?

-From China, yes.

0:42:140:42:17

Number 491 is the good quality 19th century Cantonese ivory casket.

0:42:170:42:22

I have four commissions on my book.

0:42:220:42:24

-Four!

-Four commission bids!

-And I start the bidding at £500.

0:42:240:42:27

-£500!

-My goodness me!

0:42:270:42:30

At £500 with me now. 520. 540. 560.

0:42:300:42:34

580. 600. 620. 640.

0:42:340:42:36

At 640. With Ian now at 640.

0:42:360:42:38

Jacqueline, what are you thinking?

0:42:380:42:41

-What's going through your mind?

-I don't know.

0:42:410:42:43

-I didn't think it would sell.

-720.

0:42:430:42:45

740.

0:42:450:42:47

760. 780.

0:42:470:42:50

At £780 is bid now.

0:42:500:42:52

I honestly don't believe this!

0:42:520:42:54

At £780 I'm going to sell it. All done now at 780.

0:42:540:42:58

£780! And that was bought for just one quid at a car boot.

0:42:580:43:03

You see, it is out there.

0:43:030:43:05

Jacqueline, that's a lot of money. What are you going to do with that?

0:43:050:43:09

-Well, I expected 100, because we're going to France in November to see my mother in law, she's 92...

-Wow.

0:43:090:43:16

-It would be nice spending money.

-Is she living there?

0:43:160:43:18

Yes, she's had to go and live with her daughter.

0:43:180:43:21

-So we go over there twice a year to see her.

-OK.

0:43:210:43:23

-And...

-That's going to pay for the trip, isn't it?

-Oh, my goodness!

0:43:230:43:26

-Spending money, as well!

-Spend, spend, spend!

0:43:260:43:28

That's what's what we like to hear!

0:43:280:43:30

-Thank you so much for bringing that along.

-Thank you.

0:43:300:43:33

It's given everybody the most wonderful surprise.

0:43:330:43:35

-Thank you so much.

-If you've got anything like that, Will and I want to see it.

0:43:350:43:39

Until the next time, from Colchester, it's cheerio.

0:43:390:43:41

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:450:43:48

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:480:43:52

Flog It! pitches up on the Essex coast as Clacton-on-Sea provides the perfect location for traditional British antique spotting. Experts Will Axon and Elizabeth Talbot hunt through the items brought along by crowds taking a break from the pier and sandy beaches. A Victorian silver tea set discovered by Elizabeth turns out to be a very attractive lot. The star of the show is Will's find, a small box thought to be plastic that turns out to be made of a precious material. And speaking of stars, Paul delves into the almost forgotten world of the variety show at the oldest live venue in town!