Weston Flog It!


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Weston

Paul Martin and experts Anita Manning and Michael Baggott pack their bags for Weston-Super-Mare, where there is a treat in store for all watercolour lovers everywhere.


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LineFromTo

Today I'm in the south west doing what every boy dreams of,

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driving my own tractor.

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Just loving this and what beautiful scenery, look at all of that.

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I'll meet a man who has quite an impressive tractor collection.

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More of that later but right now, as I speak, the crowds are flooding in,

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so I'd better put my foot down, it's time to Flog It!

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in Weston-Super-Mare.

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Weston-Super-Mare has a long history as a destination of choice.

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Its first holiday guide was produced in 1822.

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Early visitors rented rooms or whole houses from local people.

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Although the desire to bathe naked in the health-giving salt water

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may have subsided, the interest in the resort hasn't.

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Today, it survives as a fine example of the traditional British seaside town.

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It's a beautiful, bright day here in Western.

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We've got a massive queue here,

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outside the Winter Gardens on the seafront.

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-Are you ready for this?

-ALL: Yes.

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And helping out today, our experts Anita Manning and Michael Baggott,

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searching the queue for hidden treasures.

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Well, everybody's safely inside, they're all happy,

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big smiles everywhere, it's a packed house.

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And it looks like Anita has already spotted something

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so let's take a closer look at what she's looking at.

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-Rita...

-Hello.

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-I love them.

-I do to.

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# Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. #

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-These are wonderful. I'm a great Beatles fan.

-You are?

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-Yes.

-Good. I'm glad to hear it.

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I believe you must be as well.

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Oh, yes. As long as I can remember.

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Far more years than I care to remember really.

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Uh-huh. So you listened to them?

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-I did. All the time, constantly.

-You danced?

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I did, yes, I drove my parents mad with the record player.

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Did you fall in love to the music?

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Absolutely, yes. And with them, yes.

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-Especially George.

-Yes.

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-He was your favourite?

-Yes, he was, yes.

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This is a lovely wee set here, Rita.

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-Yes.

-Tell me, where did you get them?

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I bought them in Bristol about 11 years ago, £80 for the four.

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-You had to have them?

-I did, yes.

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Yeah, I did, yes.

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Have they been on display in your house?

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They were for a little while, but I think ten of the 11 years

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-they've been in a box under my bed.

-All right.

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Let's have a close look at them.

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-Yeah.

-We have the four of them.

-Yeah.

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And they really are soft toys.

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-They are.

-They were made by an American company called Applause.

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-Right.

-We have John, Paul, George and Ringo.

-Ringo, yes.

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-With his...

-Drum sticks.

-Now these date from the 1980s.

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I think they're 1987, I think.

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-1987.

-Yeah.

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-We have a little booklet.

-Oh, yes.

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Each with their own little details in.

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-"Beatles forever."

-Yes.

-"The Fab Four."

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Absolutely, absolutely.

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Now, you paid £80 for all of them?

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For the lot, for all of them, yeah.

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I would like to put them into auction with an estimate of £50 to £80.

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-Yeah, that's fine.

-Would you be happy?

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Yeah, fine, absolutely fine.

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I've had a lot of pleasure with them and you know, that's fine.

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We'll put a reserve of, say, £50.

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If we don't make that, you can take them home back home again.

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-That's fine.

-Now, if they sell...

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-Yes?

-What will you do with the money?

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I should probably have a weekend away somewhere.

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It might Liverpool,

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or it might be London where I come from.

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Well, I think that would be a nice thing to do.

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-OK.

-Well, I'll be at the auction.

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-Good.

-We'll hope they'll do well.

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-Yeah.

-And we'll have some fun.

-That's fine.

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I look forward to that then. Thank you very much.

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Rosa, thank you for coming in today. You've made me break my Flog It!

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golden rule which is - I'll never do a piece of Moorcroft.

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Look what I've gone and done. Never mind.

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It could be a good thing.

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So how long have you had this?

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About, 40, 50 years. It belonged to my aunt.

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How wonderful. And is it something that you've loved and cherished?

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It's been kept wrapped up and put in the best place in the china cabinet.

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-All that sort of thing you know.

-It is completely different...

-Yes.

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..from a lot of the Moorcroft we see,

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and a lot of the Moorcroft, and I have to say I dislike with a passion,

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which is the large floral patterns.

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-Bright, vulgar colours.

-I was surprised when I saw those.

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We've got this, first of all, this lovely simple shape.

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-Yes.

-Which, of course, is a standard Moorcroft shape,

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but then we've got these lovely wheat ears

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picked out in blue and green and it really is,

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I think, a very successful piece of design.

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-Thank you.

-I absolutely adore it.

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I don't know the name of the pattern,

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but I would be very surprised if it wasn't wheat ear.

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That's the only thing on it!

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I don't know, otherwise I would have told you.

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We've got Moorcroft back stamp and signature

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and we've got "potter to Her Majesty The Queen."

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That's right.

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I would imagine in dates,

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-it's about 1925 up to 1935.

-Is it?

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And it's a wonderful decorative piece.

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Why, after all this time in the china cabinet, have you brought it here?

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Well, my family's all grown up and things are not as easy, the girls

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are having to work, the children are having to be pushed everywhere,

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and I thought, "It's there, we've all enjoyed it",

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and I won't let them fall out who was going to have it, so I thought I'd sell it

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and they could share the money.

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It's often the best way. It avoids heartache.

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-Yes.

-The only defect with it

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-is we've got a lot of surface crazing in the glaze.

-Yeah.

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Which we can see there.

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But it's a charming pot

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-and I think that's well worth £200 to £300.

-Thank you.

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I wouldn't be surprised if it went a bit over that.

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-Oh, well never mind.

-We'll put a fixed reserve of £200 on it.

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And pop it into the auction and I hope it does well for you.

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Thank you very much. You've been most kind.

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Thank you for liberating it from your china cupboard today.

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Well, that's just fabulous.

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Rosa's Moorcroft has put a smile on Michael's face.

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I've been doing a bit of digging around myself.

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You never know what's been gathering dust in people's attics.

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What have you got?

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-Is it cigarette cards?

-Yeah.

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Senior service cigarette album.

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Did you collect them?

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-My mother did.

-Your mother did.

-Yeah.

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You've got a table. What have you got?

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Hey, look at that. Is it the same cards?

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-No, no, I don't think so.

-Do you two know each other?

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-No.

-No, no, never seen each other.

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Bought this at a charity auction 20 years ago.

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-And you've got quite a few in there as well.

-Yes.

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-And you've got quite a few.

-Seven.

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Look at that. Well, the bad news is the value's just gone down then.

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If there's lots about.

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As I keep searching for that rare beauty, Anita

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looks like she's found something that's captured her imagination.

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Stuart, I love the arts and crafts movement,

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-and this is a very quiet, modest, but very stylish little item.

-Thank you.

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Tell me, where did you get it?

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Well, my father was brought up in Barnstable

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and he acquired this in Barnstable and took

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it with him when he moved to Plymouth.

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It came to me ten, 15 years ago

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and it's been in our display cupboard ever since.

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-Have you enjoyed it?

-It's a beautiful thing.

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-You like it?

-But it's time for a change.

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Time to put something else in its place.

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Right. Did you know what it was?

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Yes, having looked at the bottom which it quite clearly states.

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-CH Branham...

-That's right.

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I'd come across that before on your shows.

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Yes, of course. Well, as you say,

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if we look at the back stamp it gives us all the information.

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This arts pottery was founded by Charles Hubert Branham

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in round about the late 1860s.

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-As early as that?

-As early as that.

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This I would put probably just at the beginning

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of the 20th century and it has a slightly sort of medieval look about it.

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-It does.

-Um, price-wise,

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have you had it valued before?

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In the bracket of £30 to £40.

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Yes. It is a modest wee thing.

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-Sure.

-It's a modest wee beastie.

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-But a very attractive one.

-But a very attractive one.

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So I would estimate it probably 30 to 40,

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that's round about the price of it.

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-Right.

-And to protect it we can put a reserve of £25.

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Yes, I'm happy with that.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Indeed, yes.

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-Let's hope there are some arts and crafts fans there.

-Indeed.

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Who will like it as much, and get as much pleasure from it as we have.

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I hope so. thank you.

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Whilst I've been busy with the crowds, Michael's homed in on a rather special item.

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Let's take a look.

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Lou, I've seen some wonderful noble wrecks on Flog It!,

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but I think this has to take the biscuit.

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What have you been doing to this wonderful bit of ceramic?

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Not a lot really, which is why it's like it is.

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Come on, where did you find this?

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I found it in a garden in Bath, under brambles,

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where my husband's cousin was actually buying the property.

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-Good grief.

-And they thought it was horrible, I thought it was wonderful,

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and they said if it was still there when they completed with the house I could have it.

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We've had a look earlier underneath because

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this weighs a ton and there's no way I'm going to tilt it up now.

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-No.

-And it is quite obviously Majolica,

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that wonderful lead-glazed earthenware.

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It's Minton, the premiere makers of Majolica

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and it's got the date code for 1862.

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-1862.

-Yeah. I mean, it's just a wonderful idea for a fountain.

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You've got these two cherubs hauling this fish,

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I would imagine out of the river,

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and it's fitted inside with a pipe so this will spew water forth.

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Now, I mean, something like this is a fountain,

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the trouble is it's not an outdoor fountain.

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It's at a time when people have got large conservatories

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attached to their houses and you would have this amongst

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the ferns and leaves, gurgling away and I think a lot of this,

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in fact probably all of it, is frost damage.

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-Right.

-I mean, it really is in a beast of a state

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which means it is a very difficult thing to value.

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-Had you brought this in perfect...

-Ah, it's a dream.

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..With maybe one little chip here

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and a chip there I would have thought we were in

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7,000 - 10,000, 10,000 - 15,000 pound bracket.

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Good grief.

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This piece needs a small fortune spending on it,

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-and once you've done that, it's still restored.

-Yes.

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So it will never be in those many thousands of pounds. I think,

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my initial reaction was to put possibly £300 to £500 on it,

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-but I know that's probably not really near what you want for it is it?

-No. No.

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So I think let's put £700 to £1,000 on it,

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let's put a fixed reserve of £700 and let's hope two people

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that have got a really good inexpensive restorer, really go for it,

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and it might make £1,000, £1,500 on the day.

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But, as noble wrecks go, this is the best one I've ever seen

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-so, Lou, thank you so much for bringing it in.

-That's OK.

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And let's hope it does really well at the auction for you.

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That is a big lump to cart off to auction.

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Let's hope someone else sees its potential. That concludes our items.

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Let's quickly remind ourselves of what's going under the spotlight.

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The Branham jug.

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Anita loved it.

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Stuart's hoping that with a reserve of £25

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the bidders will recognise its quality.

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Next, the Moorcroft.

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It was special enough to coax Michael out of his shell,

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and with the reserve of £200,

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Rosa is hoping it fetches enough to share among the family.

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I wouldn't let them fall out who would have it,

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so I thought I'd sell it and split the money.

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-It's often the best way.

-Yes.

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-It avoids heartache, doesn't it?

-Yes.

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Rita is hoping to get a trip to Liverpool from her sale.

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The Beatles dolls were an instant hit with Anita.

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-I love them.

-I do too.

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# Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. #

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And finally, that 1862 Minton Majolica statue

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that Lou found under a hedge covered in earth.

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We'll be back at the valuation tables later.

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Let's head to the Clevedon auction rooms.

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Before the sale gets underway, let's go inside and have a quick chat

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with today's auctioneer.

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What do you think of this?

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It's got to be the biggest piece of Minton

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we've ever had on Flog It! I think.

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It's a great piece, it's fantastic and it's very rare.

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Yeah. It's owned by Lou and it was found in a friend's garden in Bath,

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semi-buried under some shrubs, hence all the dirt and the damage.

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A lot of frost damage, but a great find.

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Do you know, I don't mind that.

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It depends where it goes. Whoever buys it might want to restore it.

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If you're going to pay the best part of £1,000 for a piece of Majolica like this

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-it really depends whether you can live with the damage.

-Yeah.

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-Have we got the money right?

-We'll only know on the day.

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Wise words from a seasoned auctioneer there.

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Exciting stuff. Let's get straight on to the action. It's a packed room

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and first up is the Fab Four.

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Rita, will we need any "help"?

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Well, I might!

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Guess what it is. It's those Beatles dolls.

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-I hope we get £50 for these.

-I hope so.

-And a bit more?

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-Yes.

-Found in Bristol.

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-Yes, that's right.

-Why have you decided to sell? I know you're a big Beatles fan.

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Well, I've got a lot of Beatles memorabilia anyway.

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-Yeah.

-Got all their records, books, and these are dust collectors.

-Oh.

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So I thought I better let them go.

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-Bring them along to Anita.

-Yeah!

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The collectibles market is vibrant.

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-People love the Beatles.

-Oh, yeah.

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Yeah, yeah, yeah!

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Let's find out if everybody here in Clevedon likes them, shall we?

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It's going under the hammer now.

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We have a set of four dressed dolls depicting the Beatles,

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under licence by Apple Corporation Limited.

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We've got £35 on the book, give me 40.

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There's four of them, of course. 40, 40, 40, £40 bidder? £40 bidder?

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-40 I'm bid.

-Fresh legs.

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Five and 50 behind, and 5, and 60...

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-Yes.

-Yes!

-60 in the door now.

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£65, your bid sir, waving the catalogue at 55. 60, anyone else?

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All done then at £55.

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£55! Well, that's good isn't it?

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-Yes.

-Is the money going towards any more Beatles memorabilia?

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It might go towards a trip up to Liverpool.

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-To the Cavern?

-I think so, yes.

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-Oh, enjoy it.

-I will do.

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And maybe a trip on the Mersey as well.

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Oh, yes, I've been on the Mersey, yes. Lovely. Thank you very much.

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-A great find.

-Great, yeah.

-Thank you so much.

-I've enjoyed it.

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It's time for a change and it's time to de-clutter,

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according to Stuart, who's brought in this lovely Branham jug.

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We're looking at £30 to £40, Anita?

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-That's cheap.

-Why is it cheap though?

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It's quality, it's a great name as well.

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I'd like to see £60. I would, I would.

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Well, I would as well, Paul, but it is just a little jug.

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For all you arts and crafts lovers,

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-a Branham jug.

-Little Branham, red-glazed cream jug.

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What can we say for that one?

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Give me £20. £20, £20, £20.

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£20, £20, £20. 20 there, 2 here, 5, sir? 5, 5, 5, 25.

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In the room on 25, who's got 8 now? £8.

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£8, £8, £8, 8. All done, yours sir, at £25, selling on 25 then...

0:16:560:17:03

That was quick, and the hammer was so quiet. It wasn't a...

0:17:030:17:07

..but it sold. £25.

0:17:080:17:09

Just made it. Just made the reserve.

0:17:090:17:11

-Just made it.

-That's fine.

0:17:110:17:13

Is this the start of the de-cluttering or towards the end?

0:17:130:17:16

It's an important start, with something nice.

0:17:160:17:19

-It was a good start.

-Oh, yes, it was.

-Wasn't top money, but it was a good start.

0:17:190:17:23

Well, it was just in estimate, but Stuart was happy.

0:17:230:17:26

Let's see if Michael is on the money with his Minton piece.

0:17:260:17:31

You found this in a garden in Bath.

0:17:310:17:34

-I did. Under brambles. My husband was...

-Must've been a surprise.

-Oh, it was fantastic.

0:17:340:17:39

Nobody like it, I loved it,

0:17:390:17:41

and my husband's cousin who was buying the house,

0:17:410:17:44

-he said, "You can have it because we don't like it."

-Wonderful.

0:17:440:17:47

-It's fantastic to find these things for free, isn't it?

-I love it.

0:17:470:17:51

And I know it is damaged but it doesn't necessarily put the collectors off good pieces.

0:17:510:17:56

-If you're going to have anything in ceramics that's damaged, have Majolica.

-Mmm.

0:17:560:18:00

Because it invariably is, and people are prepared to restore it.

0:18:000:18:04

This is it, it's going under the hammer. Good luck.

0:18:040:18:07

It's a very unusual Minton Majolica fountain,

0:18:070:18:11

with the dolphin there. Who's got £500 to start me?

0:18:110:18:14

£500? £500 thank you, now 20. 520...

0:18:140:18:19

-It's promising.

-520. 520. At £500 a maiden bid, who's got £20 more?

0:18:190:18:24

£20 more? At £500 only, is there £20, any one of you? Yes, or no?

0:18:240:18:30

All out on £500 then.

0:18:300:18:33

-Oh, not quite.

-What are we going to do? What are we going to do?

0:18:330:18:36

That's very tempting.

0:18:360:18:38

Take it home, or re-enter it with a lower estimate?

0:18:380:18:41

I'm very tempted to let whoever that was have it.

0:18:410:18:43

I think I'm going to re-enter it with maybe a lower estimate.

0:18:430:18:47

OK. We'll find the bidder that put in the £500.

0:18:470:18:50

-Yeah, I think that's a perfectly valid thing to do after a sale.

-Yes.

0:18:500:18:53

-If the buyer's still interested at 500, let it go.

-Yes.

0:18:530:18:57

I mean, that's obviously its level.

0:18:570:18:59

-Yes.

-I thought initially five to seven might be,

0:18:590:19:02

but it's very difficult to judge.

0:19:020:19:04

-You certainly don't want to carry it home again.

-No!

0:19:040:19:07

-It's too heavy, isn't it?

-Yes, it is.

0:19:070:19:09

-I don't think my husband wants to carry it home again either.

-Spare his shoulders, yeah!

0:19:090:19:14

-Hopefully, Lou, we can have a chat to the auctioneer after the sale and find that bidder.

-Yes, OK.

0:19:140:19:20

You never know what'll happen at an auction,

0:19:200:19:22

and that's part of the fun. Next up,

0:19:220:19:24

Michael liked it but will anyone else bite on Rosa's vase?

0:19:240:19:28

Rosa, the Moorcroft vase.

0:19:310:19:33

Will it or won't it?

0:19:330:19:34

I think it will, I trust Michael.

0:19:340:19:37

-We've got £200 to £300 on this.

-Yeah.

0:19:370:19:39

-Why do you want to flog it?

-Well, I've had it years. I am 92.

0:19:390:19:43

You look fantastic for 92.

0:19:430:19:45

You've had this 50 years, it's been in the family a long time.

0:19:450:19:48

Yeah, well, as I say, I've got one granddaughter,

0:19:480:19:51

the rest of them are all over the world, so I thought,

0:19:510:19:54

it's sitting in a cupboard, I can't care for it, I've got bad hands now,

0:19:540:19:58

it would be just like me to drop it.

0:19:580:20:00

-Ohhh!

-So I did that with it.

-Rosa made my day.

0:20:000:20:05

This vase is beautiful. I think the Moorcroft collectors will be here today for this.

0:20:050:20:10

You were impressed with the state of it, weren't you?

0:20:100:20:13

-I love it. You kept it beautifully.

-Yes, you said that.

0:20:130:20:16

I bet you've got an immaculate house. You look after everything.

0:20:160:20:19

I live in a one room flat and I live on me own and I do all me housework.

0:20:190:20:23

Well, that's what keeps you going though, isn't it?

0:20:230:20:26

-Oh, absolutely.

-Keeps you busy. And you look fantastic for 92.

0:20:260:20:29

-Can you believe Rosa is 92?

-SHE CHUCKLES

0:20:290:20:32

Here we go, this is your lot.

0:20:320:20:34

The Moorcroft vase.

0:20:340:20:36

We've got 290, 300, 320 in the room.

0:20:360:20:40

340, 360, 380, 400.

0:20:400:20:44

Lady's in at 380, 400 fresh bidder,

0:20:440:20:47

420, 440, 460, 480, 500, 520...

0:20:470:20:52

-This is good.

-580. No?

0:20:520:20:56

550 in the front row. 580?

0:20:560:21:00

All done at £550 then.

0:21:000:21:03

-He's knocked the hammer down. £550.

-How wonderful!

0:21:030:21:07

You can share that out, can't you, with the family?

0:21:070:21:10

-Oh, yes.

-Well, that's a happy ending to the first part of our auction.

0:21:100:21:14

Later on we'll see just how happy Michael was about some 17th century silver.

0:21:140:21:19

-I fell in love with it.

-You did, I know.

0:21:210:21:24

I mea,n to find a thimble dated 1678 is just fantastic.

0:21:240:21:27

That's your kind of thing, isn't it?

0:21:270:21:29

It doesn't get any better.

0:21:290:21:31

Now, from family treasures to a treasured collection,

0:21:310:21:34

I'm off to play with some rather large toys over in Bristol.

0:21:340:21:38

As a boy I loved tractors, and do you know what? I still do today.

0:21:470:21:51

They're clunky, they're cumbersome, they're Steady Eddies, they get the job done.

0:21:510:21:56

If you look at the front of any tractor, you can see

0:21:560:21:59

they've almost got the expression of a little face.

0:21:590:22:02

They've got their own characters, that's why I love them.

0:22:020:22:05

And they're full of nostalgia.

0:22:050:22:06

Show me a boy who doesn't like tractors and I'll show you where you can catch a bus to the moon.

0:22:060:22:12

This is wonderful.

0:22:120:22:14

Do you know, a lot of us don't have anything to do with the land.

0:22:140:22:18

People don't know where their food comes from.

0:22:180:22:20

We don't get involved with planting or picking.

0:22:200:22:23

Maybe the odd pick your own during the summer season, getting the strawberries,

0:22:230:22:27

and if you haven't done that, it is quite back-breaking.

0:22:270:22:30

So spare a thought for the humble farmer

0:22:300:22:34

before one of these things came along.

0:22:340:22:36

People have long cultivated the soil.

0:22:410:22:43

Before the industrial revolution, farming was limited to the physical endurance of man

0:22:430:22:48

and his beast of burden. The horse, the ox and the weary farmer

0:22:480:22:53

toiled relentlessly over a crop

0:22:530:22:55

until steel and mechanical engines were available to the masses.

0:22:550:22:59

By the late 1800s, farm labour had become mechanised

0:22:590:23:03

and for the first time, increased production meant smaller human endeavour.

0:23:030:23:09

At last, a tireless alternative to sheer muscle power was available to food producers.

0:23:140:23:19

By 1910, the gasoline engine had pushed steam engines aside.

0:23:190:23:24

These engines were smaller and a lot more affordable and, of course,

0:23:240:23:28

the model for the tractor that we love and know today emerged.

0:23:280:23:33

There's been many revelations in farming machinery,

0:23:330:23:36

but none have enabled man to take such a leap forward

0:23:360:23:39

in harvesting our food as the way the old tractor has.

0:23:390:23:42

And today I've come here to meet a man in Bristol

0:23:420:23:45

who's got a fantastic collection of tractors.

0:23:450:23:48

His name's Keith Sherrell and his tractors date back to the early part of the 20th century.

0:23:480:23:54

And he said to me in this field...

0:23:540:23:56

about now. Hope I've got the right field. Yeah, any moment now.

0:23:560:24:01

-ENGINE APPROACHES

-Ah, there he is.

0:24:010:24:03

-Keith?

-Hello. Are you Paul?

-Yes, I am.

0:24:100:24:13

-How are you? Sorry I'm a bit late.

-That's OK.

0:24:130:24:15

-You've come to see my tractors?

-I have, yeah.

0:24:150:24:18

-Well, we'll walk on down the shed then.

-OK.

0:24:180:24:21

-Good drive up?

-Yes. Yes.

0:24:210:24:23

Keith has been working the land ever since he can remember.

0:24:240:24:28

If you're born into an agricultural family,

0:24:280:24:31

tractors and machinery are an integral part of growing up.

0:24:310:24:34

Keith started collecting his own agricultural machinery in 1966

0:24:340:24:38

and has now an impressive collection that's open to the public.

0:24:380:24:43

Oakham Treasures is the result of his appreciation for the utilitarian charm of the mechanical workhorse.

0:24:430:24:48

What an incredible space, Keith. It's a great warehouse, massive.

0:24:510:24:56

How big is it?

0:24:560:24:57

About 20,000 square feet.

0:24:570:25:00

-How many tractors have you got in your collection?

-About 60.

0:25:000:25:04

You are a passionate man about your farming equipment. What's the dateline of the tractors?

0:25:040:25:09

Anything from about 1920 up to 1976.

0:25:090:25:14

-So this is one of the earliest, this is 1920.

-'20, yeah.

0:25:140:25:18

It's a solid lump, isn't it? So is that the birth of the tractor?

0:25:180:25:21

Yes. Previous to that, it was the steam engine type.

0:25:210:25:25

So you're always out on the hunt?

0:25:250:25:27

Always on the hunt for something different, unusual.

0:25:270:25:30

You've got tractors from all over the world.

0:25:300:25:32

Yes. Plenty from America, Australian...

0:25:320:25:37

-Some big Aussie ones.

-Some big Aussie ones.

0:25:370:25:39

Beautifully displayed, the really are.

0:25:390:25:42

Oh, I've just spotted my favourite one, that grey Massey.

0:25:420:25:45

-That's a mid-1950s, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:25:450:25:48

I saw one for sale, the farmer was selling it, I had to ask my wife

0:25:480:25:51

but she said no, so I had to let the chap down.

0:25:510:25:53

-Well, I didn't use to ask my wife, I came home with it.

-I can see that!

0:25:530:25:57

-I think there's a lot more through there, isn't there?

-Yes.

0:25:570:26:00

Wow, incredible.

0:26:000:26:02

-That's unusual.

-This is a bit of a special.

0:26:090:26:13

It was a war-time tractor on airports and aerodromes.

0:26:130:26:18

It's stripped back to the bare essentials. It's small and squat.

0:26:180:26:21

It was basic, and that's what just made it unusual

0:26:210:26:25

to the one which is next to it which is an agricultural.

0:26:250:26:28

-Same make.

-Same make.

-You can see the difference, can't you?

-Yes.

0:26:280:26:32

-That's designed for the fields.

-Yes.

-So these came into their own during the war.

0:26:320:26:36

-We had to produce food...

-Yes.

-..for the war effort.

0:26:360:26:40

For those who lived through World War II, it's a different world now

0:26:400:26:45

to the one that existed during Hitler's ransack of Europe.

0:26:450:26:50

That was a time of rationing, and the steel used for arms and munitions was in short supply.

0:26:500:26:55

The humble tractor came into its own.

0:26:550:26:57

Mottos like Dig For Victory provoked a spirit that united the nation.

0:26:570:27:01

As 5 million British men were called upon to serve their country and fight abroad

0:27:010:27:05

a hole in the labour force emerged.

0:27:050:27:09

Around 80,000 women were drafted in to become farm labourers,

0:27:090:27:12

driving tractors and harvesting crops.

0:27:120:27:16

They worked the fields and managed the machinery,

0:27:160:27:19

taking the place of the men who were away fighting.

0:27:190:27:22

For many the smell of a tractor still brings back intense memories

0:27:220:27:26

of a time when they were called to work the land for the good of the nation

0:27:260:27:30

and the pride they felt for having served their country.

0:27:300:27:33

This one's interesting, this International.

0:27:370:27:40

It's a bit special to me because there's a photograph of me with my father on it

0:27:400:27:44

when I was about five years old,

0:27:440:27:46

and that's probably where it all started.

0:27:460:27:49

-Would your father be proud of this collection?

-Oh, I think so, yes.

0:27:490:27:52

There is just so much here to see. I could spend all day here.

0:27:520:27:56

Well, I've definitely rediscovered my love for tractors.

0:27:560:27:59

The next time you're stuck behind one on a small country road,

0:27:590:28:03

why not just sit back and marvel at all they've done for you.

0:28:030:28:07

Welcome back to our valuation day here at the Winter Gardens.

0:28:180:28:21

There's still so many people which means lots of antiques to see,

0:28:210:28:25

but right now let's catch up with our experts

0:28:250:28:27

and see what else they've found.

0:28:270:28:29

Over at Michael's table, David is keen to discover

0:28:290:28:33

whether his lucky finds have any history to them.

0:28:330:28:37

So how did you get them?

0:28:370:28:39

I was working on a house, oh, about 40 years ago, we were re-roofing it.

0:28:390:28:44

-Oh, OK.

-And the lady's husband had died a few years before,

0:28:440:28:48

and in the attic was his workshop.

0:28:480:28:50

We noticed there were some quite nice bits and pieces in there

0:28:500:28:55

so we said, is there anything in there you want?

0:28:550:28:57

She said no, she just wanted to empty the room,

0:28:570:29:00

so we agreed to clear out the room and not charge her.

0:29:000:29:03

And, you know, we would make our money on what we found in there.

0:29:030:29:07

These wonderful things were part of that.

0:29:070:29:09

-We've got B for brandy, G for gin and R for rum.

-Yeah.

0:29:090:29:13

So have you had a chance to look at them and look at the hallmarks?

0:29:130:29:17

At the time I did,

0:29:170:29:18

and realised they were, you know, 1808 I think it was, is it?

0:29:180:29:22

These are fully marked for Birmingham.

0:29:220:29:25

-And with Birmingham wine labels at this period, you always get a full set of assay marks.

-Yes.

0:29:250:29:30

-In this case the JW is for Joseph Willmore.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:29:300:29:33

-He made all sorts of small work.

-Uh-huh, yeah.

0:29:330:29:36

He made boxes, caddy spoons, all manner of things will bear his mark.

0:29:360:29:42

And he's quite a large firm.

0:29:420:29:44

We've got the date letter for 1807, 1808 on those.

0:29:440:29:46

-Yeah.

-So they're a pair.

0:29:460:29:49

Then we get this one, you had trouble identifying it?

0:29:490:29:52

Because there's no town mark, I couldn't work out the date letter.

0:29:520:29:56

Small articles at this time don't necessarily bear the town mark

0:29:560:30:02

-and you get stud marking. The maker is JS.

-Yeah, I got that.

0:30:020:30:05

-There are a couple of makers, it's probably Josiah Snatt.

-Uh-huh.

0:30:050:30:09

He was also a caddy spoon maker.

0:30:090:30:11

And that's for London 1812.

0:30:110:30:14

Oh, right. So that really confirms what I thought then,

0:30:140:30:17

maybe that one had been made up to go with the other two.

0:30:170:30:21

Well, this is it. Even though these are made

0:30:210:30:23

in Birmingham and this is made 100 miles away in London,

0:30:230:30:27

it's still got exactly the same script.

0:30:270:30:29

-Yes.

-So someone has obviously bought these

0:30:290:30:32

-and four or five years later...

-Yeah, decided to have a...

0:30:320:30:35

..commissioned that. So have you had any idea of value of them?

0:30:350:30:38

Not really, no.

0:30:380:30:40

They've just been stuck in a drawer, I haven't looked at them for the last 30 years.

0:30:400:30:44

Good lord. Is that why you've decided to part with them?

0:30:440:30:48

What's the point of sticking them in a drawer? Somebody will love them.

0:30:480:30:52

-Well, there's either a wine label collector, of which there are many.

-Yeah.

0:30:520:30:56

-Or there's somebody with three decanters.

-Well, yeah!

0:30:560:31:00

That's right.

0:31:000:31:02

-I think we should put them into auction for £70 to £100.

-Yes, yes.

0:31:020:31:07

Because they are interesting but fairly standard.

0:31:070:31:10

Put a fixed reserve of £70 on them, and on a good day they'll make over the £100 mark.

0:31:100:31:14

So if you're happy to do that?

0:31:140:31:17

-Yeah, yeah.

-Thank you so much for bringing them in.

0:31:170:31:20

Excellent. Lovely. Thank you very much.

0:31:200:31:23

-Angela, welcome to Flog It!

-Thank you.

0:31:280:31:30

What an interesting and atmospheric

0:31:300:31:34

pair of marine scenes we have here.

0:31:340:31:38

Tell me, where did you get them?

0:31:380:31:41

Found them in a loft.

0:31:410:31:43

My husband was third generation butcher,

0:31:430:31:47

and we moved in to become the third generation,

0:31:470:31:49

and they were in the loft when we moved in.

0:31:490:31:51

They could be my father-in-law's, could be his father's,

0:31:510:31:56

we don't know any history about them at all.

0:31:560:31:59

So they had been squirreled away in the loft and forgotten about.

0:31:590:32:02

-Exactly.

-And you came along and rescued them, Angela?

0:32:020:32:05

That's right, yes.

0:32:050:32:07

Did you like them?

0:32:070:32:09

Er, I felt they needed some attention,

0:32:090:32:12

they needed cleaning maybe to perhaps lighten them up a bit.

0:32:120:32:16

I don't know if it's part of the painting or part of the loft!

0:32:160:32:20

They are by Adolphus Knell.

0:32:200:32:22

He was a British artist,

0:32:220:32:25

and he was active in the middle to the late 1800s.

0:32:250:32:30

And marine scenes are what he specialised in.

0:32:300:32:34

And I love the atmosphere.

0:32:340:32:38

We have this lovely glow in yellow and red

0:32:380:32:42

which is reflected beautifully on the sea.

0:32:420:32:47

I think they're lovely. I really enjoy them.

0:32:470:32:50

If they came in to my auction,

0:32:500:32:52

on looking at them, just at the subject matter and the artist,

0:32:520:32:58

I would probably estimate somewhere 250 to 350.

0:32:580:33:02

I would put a firm reserve of 250 on them,

0:33:020:33:06

I think that they deserve that.

0:33:060:33:09

When they go to auction, the auctioneer will examine them more carefully,

0:33:090:33:14

but they're certainly worth £250.

0:33:140:33:17

Are you happy to put them to auction at that price?

0:33:170:33:20

Yes, I'm quite happy, thank you.

0:33:200:33:22

I'm sure they'll do very well, Angela, and thank you very much for bringing them in.

0:33:220:33:27

Well, Anita's quite taken with those watercolours

0:33:270:33:30

but bidding on the items she's valued isn't allowed.

0:33:300:33:33

And the same goes for Michael, who's excited about what he's got on his table.

0:33:330:33:39

Trevor, it might be inconceivable that two small items like this

0:33:410:33:45

would make somebody's day,

0:33:450:33:47

but you've absolutely made mine today, bringing these in.

0:33:470:33:51

Before I go and tell you more about them,

0:33:510:33:53

could you tell me where you got them?

0:33:530:33:55

-Well, this one here I think was found in the garden originally.

-Good Lord.

0:33:550:33:59

I can remember something about it years ago, that it was found in the garden.

0:33:590:34:05

Well, if we look at the ring first, which is absolutely delightful,

0:34:050:34:10

this is a particular type and it's called a posy ring.

0:34:100:34:14

And it's nothing to do with posies of flowers,

0:34:140:34:18

it's because they are inscribed on the inside with small poetical mottos.

0:34:180:34:22

-Yes.

-And in this case it says "Be constant in love,"

0:34:220:34:29

which is wonderful.

0:34:290:34:31

The other thing you can see is that there are traces of gold

0:34:310:34:36

inside, so originally when this was made,

0:34:360:34:39

the whole thing would have been mercurially gilded

0:34:390:34:42

-to appear as a gold posy ring.

-Yes.

0:34:420:34:46

And possibly, because they were up to all sorts of naughty business,

0:34:460:34:50

sold as a gold posy ring.

0:34:500:34:52

But then, of course, that brings us to the date of it,

0:34:520:34:55

and the date of it is really quite astonishing

0:34:550:34:59

because these rings are almost exclusively made in the 17th century.

0:34:590:35:05

-Yes.

-And I would put this no later than 1680.

0:35:050:35:11

So that could have been certainly put on the finger

0:35:110:35:15

of a young maiden during the reign of Charles II, Charles I.

0:35:150:35:20

-I mean, it's an extraordinary find.

-Right.

0:35:200:35:24

-So now we move on to this very humble thimble.

-Yes.

0:35:240:35:27

That came from the garden.

0:35:270:35:29

But this, believe it or not, is approximately the same date as that.

0:35:290:35:33

-Yes.

-And we can see that it's made for tiny fingers.

-Yes.

0:35:330:35:38

I mean, I've got chubby fingers so nothing ever fits,

0:35:380:35:41

but they did have incredibly small hands in the 17th Century.

0:35:410:35:45

So, having said all that, why have you decided to sell them now?

0:35:450:35:50

It's not taking up a lot of room, as you can see.

0:35:500:35:52

-No, no.

-It's just we may be moving into a smaller house and...

0:35:520:35:57

It all helps to de-clutter, doesn't it?

0:35:570:36:00

Just having a good sort out.

0:36:000:36:01

Yes. I mean, I think had they been mine,

0:36:010:36:05

you would have had to claw them out of my cold, dead hand,

0:36:050:36:08

but in terms of value, that's probably £50 to £100 as it stands.

0:36:080:36:14

The posy ring £150 to £250.

0:36:140:36:17

-I think, if you put them together in a lot £200 to £300.

-Yeah.

0:36:170:36:22

A fixed reserve of £200, because I wouldn't want you to sell them

0:36:220:36:26

for a penny less than that, and if you're happy with that,

0:36:260:36:30

we'll pop them into the auction and see what they do.

0:36:300:36:33

Hopefully, they will do well for you.

0:36:330:36:36

-Thank you.

-Thank you so much for bringing them along.

0:36:360:36:39

So with that, you're now up-to-date

0:36:390:36:42

on all the items going under the hammer.

0:36:420:36:45

Anita was taken with them,

0:36:450:36:46

but will someone meet the 250 reserve for the maritime water colours?

0:36:460:36:52

Next, those silver bottle labels.

0:36:520:36:55

David hasn't looked at them in 40 years.

0:36:550:36:58

With a reserve of £70, he hopes someone will take a shine to them.

0:36:580:37:03

And finally, Trevor's garden find, the 17th century silver thimble

0:37:030:37:08

and posy ring will be up for grabs at auction.

0:37:080:37:11

The auction is in full swing so it's time to take our positions

0:37:130:37:17

as our first item is about to go under the hammer.

0:37:170:37:21

We've been joined by Trevor in the nick of time

0:37:210:37:24

because his lot is about to go under the hammer. It's a thimble and ring.

0:37:240:37:27

It's a nice little lot and Michael, our expert, has put 200 to 300 on it.

0:37:270:37:31

-I fell in love with it.

-You did, I know.

0:37:310:37:34

To find a thimble dated 1678 is just fantastic.

0:37:340:37:37

That's your kind of thing, isn't it? It doesn't get any better.

0:37:370:37:40

But then when the little 17th century posy ring

0:37:400:37:43

came out as well I thought, "two ticks".

0:37:430:37:45

Yeah, both very rare things.

0:37:450:37:47

-Rare things.

-Hardly see them on the market.

0:37:470:37:49

This is the first time I've seen something like this for years.

0:37:490:37:52

I haven't seen a prick dated thimble,

0:37:520:37:54

I don't think I've ever seen one actually, so it's a rare thing.

0:37:540:37:58

Sewing collectors, when they want something they will pay for it.

0:37:580:38:01

Yeah. We're going to find out what this lot think now. Here we go.

0:38:010:38:05

Antique white metal betrothal ring "be constant in love",

0:38:050:38:10

gilded interior and a thimble, 17th century date.

0:38:100:38:16

130 I'm bid here, 140 now, 140 will you? 140, thank you.

0:38:160:38:21

150, 160, 70, 80.

0:38:210:38:24

190, 200 in the room, now 10, 210, 210, 210.

0:38:240:38:29

At £200 in the room, and 10 anyone else?

0:38:290:38:33

Are you all done then, selling at £200.

0:38:330:38:36

-That was good. Happy?

-Yeah.

0:38:360:38:39

Well, there's a bit of commission to pay.

0:38:390:38:41

But why did you want to sell these now?

0:38:410:38:44

-Well, we're sorting through a lot of bits and pieces.

-Having a de-clutter?

0:38:440:38:48

-Yes.

-And what are you putting the money towards?

0:38:480:38:51

More car boots and stuff like that.

0:38:510:38:54

-So you're going to buy more clutter?

-Probably, yes.

0:38:540:38:56

De-clutter to get more clutter.

0:38:560:38:58

I don't want to discourage people from bringing thimbles in,

0:38:580:39:02

-but they do need to be dated 16-something to be worth money.

-Yeah.

0:39:020:39:05

But no, that was super, I think, and we got them both away.

0:39:050:39:08

Cracking item.

0:39:080:39:10

That's a good result for Trevor and Michael,

0:39:100:39:13

but will Michael be on the money with the wine labels?

0:39:130:39:16

Let's find out.

0:39:160:39:18

David, now is the time of reckoning. We've got a packed auction room.

0:39:190:39:23

We've got three silver Georgian bottle labels going under the hammer.

0:39:230:39:27

I've seen these do well before. People collect these so hopefully,

0:39:270:39:31

that room is jam-packed, there's some collectors out there,

0:39:310:39:34

and Michael put our estimate of £70 to £80?

0:39:340:39:37

-70 to 100, it's come hither. I've seen them do more.

-So have I.

0:39:370:39:40

Really they should be making £40, but there are such a number of wine label collectors.

0:39:400:39:46

-Yeah.

-There's a whole circle of them.

0:39:460:39:48

Yeah, the wine label circle,

0:39:480:39:50

so we just need one or two members today and they could fly.

0:39:500:39:54

-How did you come by these?

-I found them up in a loft 40 years ago now.

0:39:540:39:58

-There weren't lots of wine labels, were there?

-No, no.

0:39:580:40:01

But you've managed to hang onto them for 40 years.

0:40:010:40:03

-You've enjoyed them?

-Yeah.

0:40:030:40:04

They've been in a drawer most of the time.

0:40:040:40:07

Well, at least you've kept them safe.

0:40:070:40:09

I haven't got a decanter to hang them on.

0:40:090:40:11

They certainly look the part in the right place and let's hope

0:40:110:40:14

today's the right place to sell them. Here we go.

0:40:140:40:17

The three silver decanter labels there

0:40:170:40:21

and interest with me starting with 70 on the book.

0:40:210:40:24

Give me 80, 80, 80 now.

0:40:240:40:25

80, 80, 80 now. 80, 80, 80.

0:40:250:40:28

80, 90, 100, bid's still with me at £90.

0:40:280:40:33

Give me a hundred bid.

0:40:330:40:35

-Oh, go on, go on.

-With me then and selling, make no mistake.

0:40:350:40:37

All done at £90.

0:40:370:40:39

-£90.

-£30 each.

0:40:390:40:41

That's not bad, is it? Mid-estimate there.

0:40:410:40:44

-You've got to be happy with that.

-Oh, yeah.

0:40:440:40:46

-Don't forget there's a bit of commission to pay.

-Yeah.

0:40:460:40:49

It's going to go towards a holiday in north Scotland so...

0:40:490:40:52

-Wonderful.

-Visiting the Orkney, Shetland islands.

-Lovely, lovely.

0:40:520:40:56

You'll enjoy that, won't you?

0:40:560:40:59

Yeah, exactly. Every little penny helps.

0:40:590:41:01

-Exactly.

-That's what we say.

0:41:010:41:03

Next up, something for all you art lovers, we've got oils,

0:41:100:41:12

maritime scenes, and they belong to Angela,

0:41:120:41:15

with a valuation of £250 to £350. You like these, Anita?

0:41:150:41:20

Yes, well they're wonderful.

0:41:200:41:21

And Adolphus Knell came from a family of marine painters.

0:41:210:41:26

I think this is the son and he lived in Bristol

0:41:260:41:29

for a while so we have some local interest, as well.

0:41:290:41:33

Good local interest. Why do you want to sell these?

0:41:330:41:35

Because you found these, you're responsible for saving them.

0:41:350:41:39

I didn't realise they were, they're not that valuable, but there's local interest.

0:41:390:41:44

We are selling them and we hope to get the top end of the valuation.

0:41:440:41:48

They're going under the hammer right now.

0:41:480:41:50

William Adolphus Knell, pair of oils on board, typical moonlit seascapes,

0:41:500:41:56

both signed Adolphus Knell and interest here

0:41:560:41:59

at 250, 280, 300, 320, 350, 380,

0:41:590:42:06

400, 420, 450, 480, 500 pound on the book.

0:42:060:42:12

550, 600, 650.

0:42:120:42:14

650, 700, 750...

0:42:140:42:17

Listen, it's still going on.

0:42:170:42:19

720, 750, 780, 800.

0:42:190:42:23

£1,000, thank you. £1,000 in the room.

0:42:230:42:27

1,100 anyone else?

0:42:270:42:29

-That's incredible.

-1,100, 1,200?

0:42:290:42:33

-Yeah.

-1,300?

0:42:330:42:34

No?

0:42:340:42:36

-All done now at £1,200 selling in the room on £1,200.

-Yes.

0:42:360:42:40

Yes. Brilliant.

0:42:400:42:43

What are you going to put the money towards?

0:42:430:42:46

-I appreciate that.

-What are you thinking?

0:42:460:42:48

I'm a bit confused at the moment.

0:42:480:42:50

How much Moorcroft can I buy for that?

0:42:500:42:54

You should phone your husband, that could be a wonderful holiday.

0:42:540:42:57

-He's looking all embarrassed now.

-He didn't like them.

0:42:570:43:01

He didn't think they would fetch that money.

0:43:010:43:03

Absolutely delighted, but quality comes out.

0:43:030:43:05

And I do admit I was a wee bit cautious there.

0:43:050:43:09

We won't challenge you on that.

0:43:090:43:10

But what a wonderful moment for Angela.

0:43:100:43:13

It just sums up auctions for you, they are so unpredictable.

0:43:130:43:16

I hope you've enjoyed this show, we've had great fun making this.

0:43:160:43:20

From the West Country until the next time, it's cheerio from all of us here.

0:43:200:43:24

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:380:43:43

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:430:43:45

More delicious treasures are unearthed when Paul Martin and experts Anita Manning and Michael Baggott pack their bags for Weston-Super-Mare. Anita gets all hot under the collar with some Beatles memorabilia prompting a small, if a little off-key performance and Michael is delighted that a piece of Minton lands on his table. There's a treat in store for all watercolour lovers everywhere, and the auction throws up a few surprises. Paul gets nostalgic with a trip to a tractor museum.