Bangor Flog It!


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Bangor

Antiques series. Experts Mark Stacey and Adam Partridge join Paul Martin at Bangor University in north Wales. Finds include an exquisite early tea caddy.


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Welcome to "Flog It!" -

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the show that values your unwanted antiques and collectables

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and then whisks you off to auction,

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and today we're in the most stunning part of the world.

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We're in North Wales, and this auction room is where we're

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putting our valuations to the test a little later on in the show.

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But first, we need some antiques to sell, so it's off to Bangor.

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Bangor lies on the coast of North Wales, near the Menai Strait which

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separates the Isle of Anglesey from Gwynedd.

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It's one of the smaller cities in Britain, but that doesn't stop it

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boasting a cathedral, a university and a rich cultural life.

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Well, for such a small city, I'm delighted to see such a large crowd

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gathering here outside Bangor University's Prichard-Jones Hall.

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And I can't wait to see what's in some of these bags and boxes

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because hopefully there's going to be something really interesting

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and it's going to bring some big results for our owners

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when we put them under the hammer later on in the show.

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Our team of experts are here in force and are led by Mark Stacey,

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who enjoys both the antiques and the tales behind them.

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-Where did you get this from, then?

-That's a long story.

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Is it? Do tell.

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And Adam Partridge, a tenacious auctioneer who searches high

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and low for the right item to take off to auction.

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Normally this wouldn't be right, would it?

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Rummaging in a lady's bag like this.

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Coming up, Mark spots something rather enjoyable.

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It's really rather grand, isn't it?

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You've got this wonderful sort of classical scene

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revolving around it in sort of silver-plate.

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They're having a really good time, aren't they?

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And fortunately, most of them are clothed, which is a bonus.

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And I find something top rate.

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Well, I like that a lot. Oh, I do. Yes. Yes, I do. Isn't it super?

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It's a lovely example.

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We also take the opportunity to visit Portmeirion

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to find out about pottery designer Susan Williams-Ellis.

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One of our reps was rather intelligent.

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He said, "What we want is a very smart coffee set."

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So I thought, "All right, I'll try and do one."

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Mark's up first with Dora, but not at the table because she's

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brought in an old family trunk which is full to the brim.

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-Is it going to be a treasure trunk today, Dora?

-I hope so.

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Shall we have a look?

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I can't resist any longer. Well, we open it up here. There we are.

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Well, now, tell me about this lovely set.

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Well, my cousin bought it for my boys.

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And it was second-hand.

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She brought it off somebody else whose children had all outgrown them.

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Oh, wonderful.

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Your sons were very well-behaved children, weren't they?

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They had to be because we've got a small house.

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So once they were finished playing with it,

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they all had to go back into the boxes.

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Fantastic.

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Well, I mean, it's lovely because this is what collectors really want

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-to see, is these original boxes.

-Oh, great.

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And, you know, there is a few bits of scuffing on this,

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but, you know, at the end of the day, it's 50 years old or more and,

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you know, it's going to be. It's going to have that sort of damage.

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And when we open this up... we've got the locomotive here.

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And some of the carriages in its box there.

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And I particularly like seeing these sort of boxes

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because you never know what you're going to find in them, do you?

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Now, what are we going to find in here, do you think?

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I hope there's no mice. SHE LAUGHS

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I hope not. Are you squeamish? Should we risk it?

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Should we have a go?

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Oh, that's wonderful, isn't it? One of the little station units.

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What have we got here? The goods depot.

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And in really quite good condition, because these are printed on here

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and when kids play with them,

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they get scuffed and they get chipped and scratched.

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And this is really rather good condition. It's nicely made there.

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And we'll just have a look at one more.

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There we are. Shell's oil.

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Well, thanks for struggling in with it, Dora.

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You've obviously had it a long time.

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Why have you decided to sell it today?

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Well, I have three boys.

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I couldn't give it to one without to the other, so I said I'll keep it

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and I'll sell it one day and they can have the money.

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It's not the earliest type of train,

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but there's a lot of it here and I think we should be looking

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at an estimate of somewhere in the region of £150-£250.

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-Now, would you be happy with that?

-£150? More than that.

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-SHE LAUGHS

-More? Well, we'd always like more.

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-How much more do you think it's worth?

-Well... I don't know.

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-Over £500, I'm sure.

-Oh, well, it...

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It might be at that, but I think we've got to be realistic about it.

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We could try at maybe £200 to £300 and put a reserve of £200,

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because then we won't sell it below that figure.

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And hopefully we'll, you know, chug into the station in first class.

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I hope so. SHE LAUGHS

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It's a lovely collection, but I think Mark is right to be conservative.

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-Looks like a watercolour.

-HE LAUGHS

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Adam has found some nice-looking silver belonging to Jim and Eileen.

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Tell us about this little cruet set.

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Well, we bought this about ten years ago in an antiques fair,

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and we saw it and we thought it very attractive.

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We were rather taken with the design.

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It has a number of nice qualities to it, doesn't it?

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Very attractive design

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and these are not engraved with initials on any of them, are they?

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-No, that's right.

-The shields are blank. All nice, matching hallmarks.

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Good condition for the blue liners.

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And most unusually, really, the amount of these

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we get through the sale rooms that have got the wrong spoons.

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-EILEEN:

-Oh, right. Yes.

-They've lost the spoons.

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And the hallmarks on these are the same maker,

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same year as everything else.

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So everything matches, doesn't it?

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I wonder if once it might have been in a fitted case.

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That's the only other question I'd have.

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Perhaps originally you do see them in those fancy fitted cases.

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-But it's a lovely set, isn't it?

-It is. Yes.

-Have you dated it?

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-I think it's 1907.

-That's what I looked up. I've checked it as well.

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Birmingham, 1907.

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And there's initials CEW on there, which is CE Williams

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of Birmingham, who was in operation from 1901 to 1909, I think.

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I had a quick look, anyway.

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Well, I think most people will agree with us that these

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-are pretty nice, aren't they?

-Yeah.

-And what did you pay for them?

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-Do you mind if I ask?

-I think it was about £150.

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Right. Well, that's not too bad for a fair. Um...

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-You always pay top whack, really. Even if you twist their arm.

-You tend to.

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I'd suggest a lower estimate, but not much lower.

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I think we should put a reserve of £100,

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as long as you don't mind potentially losing £50.

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Oh, no.

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But that's what the name of the game... Name of the game, isn't it?

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And an estimate of £100 to £150.

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And I think there's every chance of us getting the £150 you paid for it,

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-which would be quite nice.

-Oh, yes.

-That would be good.

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What would be extra nice would be a small profit

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so that after your commission, you end up with what you paid for.

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Yes. Yes. Or that we've broken even. Yes. That's right.

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Now, why are you selling them?

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Because we've moved on now to collecting silver pincushions.

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-Animals, birds.

-Very nice.

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-And they are quite expensive.

-They are very expensive.

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In fact, we bought two in the Portobello Road about...

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..a month ago. Six weeks ago.

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-Have you got a pig one yet?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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How much did you have to give for that?

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-The pig wasn't too bad. I think it was £120.

-Oh, that was all right.

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-I sold a muzzled bear one once.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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Anyway, I'm always digressing. We'll put these in the auction.

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£100 to £150.

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I don't need to ask you what you're going to do with them, I think.

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I know you're going to spend it on either small silver,

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silhouettes, pot metal, Staffordshire figures.

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-That's correct.

-Thank you very much for coming.

-Yes.

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-Nice to meet you.

-Nice to see you.

-Yes. Lovely.

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I'll have my fingers crossed that they do break even.

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Liz has brought in an interesting piece of jewellery which has caught

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Mark's eye.

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Now, you've brought this rather nice brooch in. Is it a family heirloom?

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No. Um, I actually bought it in a charity shop about 10, 12 years ago.

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-No. Really?

-Yes. And I just thought it was really pretty.

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It is. And dare I ask you what you paid for it?

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I think I paid about five pound for it. £5.

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That's not bad, is it?

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This is really rather nice.

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We've got a sort of shotgun here and then you've got a pointer or

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something like that. A hunting dog.

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-And it is actually nine carat gold. Did you know that?

-No, I didn't.

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I knew there was a hallmark on the back,

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-but I didn't know what year or what...

-Yeah, I know.

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It's stamped 375 at the back, which says nine carat gold.

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And it's just... I mean, it's a quirky item.

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It appeals to those people who are into hunting and shooting, I suppose.

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Not the most politically correct subject these days,

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but, you know, there are a lot of people who like country pursuits

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and I think a lady would like that on a sort of hunting jacket or whatever.

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-But I think also as a tiepin, maybe.

-Yes.

-You could use it as a tiepin.

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I have no idea what it is or it was used for.

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Well, it's a brooch, really, I think.

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A little bar brooch, but certainly you could use it as a tiepin.

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And it's quite well modelled.

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The little dog has had his body chased,

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so you can see the texture of the hair on there.

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And there's someone engraving on the hilt of the gun,

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which is quite nice.

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Is all this gold or is some of that silver?

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No, I think it's a mixture.

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Certainly the butt here is gold,

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but then it does go up to this white metal, which is not marked.

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It could just be that it was silver-gilt originally

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and some of the gilding has come off.

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But I think we've got a value it as a decorative piece of jewellery.

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-It's not going to send you to the Bahamas, I'm afraid.

-Right.

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-You might get to Prestatyn.

-I quite like Prestatyn, so that's fine.

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Oh, good.

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Well, you've had it for around ten years. Have you worn it?

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-What have you been doing with it?

-No.

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I bought it because I liked the dog.

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I didn't really think any more about the hunting/shooting part of it

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and it's unfortunately just been in the box in the drawer.

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I haven't worn it. It's not the sort of thing I would wear.

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I bought it because of the dog. I like the dog.

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Well, yes. I mean, people do go mad for their little dogs.

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I used to have King Charles spaniels,

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so I love pictures and images of King Charles spaniels.

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People get nuts over those sort of things, don't they?

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The dog is really cute.

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And after all this time,

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why have you decided to bring it along today to sell it?

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Um, because I've never worn it. It's just been in the drawer.

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I'd like somebody to buy it and actually wear it.

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And enjoy it.

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Somebody maybe, as you said, that shoots guns or, you know,

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does the hunting or shooting that would actually appreciate it

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and wear it. I think it's a shame. It's very, very pretty.

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Well, certainly I think somebody would appreciate it.

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Somebody living in the country who likes that sort of thing would appreciate it.

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In terms of value, I would probably say roundabout £70-£90.

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£70 to £100. Something like that.

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And we'd need to put a reserve on it,

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because we don't want to sell it for nothing,

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so maybe a £70 discretionary reserve which gives the auctioneer

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sort of 10% leeway on the day.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Yes, I would be happy with that. Yes.

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I just really, as I said, I don't wear it.

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-I would like somebody to buy it and wear it and appreciate it.

-Fantastic.

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It's not really the money.

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It's just that I think it's such a shame that it's just stuck in a drawer somewhere.

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Well, all I can say is I look forward to seeing you at the auction

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-and let's hope we get a lot of hunters on the day.

-Oh.

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That's a very bad joke.

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We always expect the unexpected at the valuation day.

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Are you ready for this?

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And the next item, brought in by Irene and John, is no exception.

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This is lovely. I can already see it's an Attaboy, isn't it?

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Which is a type of hat make.

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So let's have a look at it. Let's get that lid off there.

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-This is the sort of salesmen sample, I think, really.

-I see.

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And a saleswoman would take it out, because it's small enough to

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carry around and say, "Well, you know, believe it or not,

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"this miniature Attaboy is half the size of an ordinary Attaboy hat."

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So you've got an idea of what it will make...

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-JOHN:

-What it would be. Yeah.

-Isn't that cute?

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And it's got the Attaboy label in there. What a cute little thing.

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-It is lovely, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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These were introduced in the '30s. Attaboy, I believe, started in 1930s.

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-Oh, you said the '30s, didn't you?

-Yeah.

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And I think they carried on for quite a while after that.

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It was quite a popular thing, this type of trilby hat.

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The Attaboy trilby hat was quite well known.

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I think that's dead cute and also it serves a purpose for me because,

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of course, now I'm getting on a bit, I've got one of these bald spots.

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That would cover it just nicely. How did you get to own it, then?

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A gentleman gave us this, didn't he? One of the neighbours.

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And how did he own it?

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-Well, he had a gentleman's shop, didn't he?

-Like an outfitters?

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-Outfitters.

-Yes.

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So he may have got that as a sample or, um, as a shop display article.

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It's just my kind of thing, really.

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So what's brought you to come and sell it? Where does it live at home?

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-Do you have it out or...?

-In the loft. With lots of other things.

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-Like everyone else.

-Yeah. You put it in the loft, you forget about it.

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-That's it.

-Yeah. You just think of looking at it, do you?

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-And yet it is cute, really, isn't it?

-It's lovely. Yeah.

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You've got the box and everything and it's all made exactly...

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-That's still the same tissue.

-I think it's excellent.

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So why are you selling it? I suppose because it's in the loft.

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Yes. We're trying to get rid of quite a lot of things, actually.

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Well, that will free up a load of room, won't it?

0:13:290:13:31

No, I know. This is it.

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-Um, it's not worth a lot.

-I know. We know that, but...

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-Great fun, though, isn't it?

-I know! It's a novelty thing, isn't it?

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-It's a curiosity.

-It's about what you've got

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and, you know, the story that you can tell.

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-So I think it will make £20-£40.

-Quite surprised.

-Fingers crossed.

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You never know. You never know.

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I think we should put a reserve on it, though. 20 quid.

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-You don't want to give it for less than 20 quid, do you?

-No.

-No.

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We'll take it home and look at it again.

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So let's put £20 bottom limit and then hopefully two people will fall

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in love with it and it will find a new head.

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Thanks for coming up. Really enjoyed that.

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Beautiful Gwydir Castle.

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In my view, one of the finest Tudor houses in Wales.

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Nestling in the glorious Veil of Conwy in the foothills of Snowdonia.

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It is a true delight, a fantastically romantic place.

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Just the sort of house that I absolutely love.

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A house like this just echoes of the past. The walls permeate history.

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You can't help yourself. You want to touch them and soak it all up.

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It was once a fortified house.

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The castle was the ancestral home of the powerful Wynn baronets -

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a significant family in North Wales throughout the Tudor

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and Stuart period.

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Today, as you can see, the house has evolved over the centuries.

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But inside, it's full of character and charm and atmosphere.

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All the perfect ingredients for a fairytale.

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This modern-day fairytale started in 1994 when a young couple,

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Judy Corbett and Peter Welford, followed their dreams.

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Throwing caution to the wind they bought Gwydir with the money

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they raised from the sale of an inherited cottage and a bank loan.

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It was totally dilapidated at the time, a crumbling ruin

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with a wild, overgrown garden.

0:15:270:15:30

With the help of the Welsh Historic Monuments Agency,

0:15:300:15:33

they started what will probably end up being their lifetimes' work -

0:15:330:15:37

its restoration.

0:15:370:15:39

A restoration project of this size is a huge undertaking.

0:15:410:15:44

In fact, I'm going to rephrase that. It's a mammoth undertaking.

0:15:440:15:47

But Peter and Judy are totally focused and committed.

0:15:470:15:50

They love architecture, they love history, and with that combination,

0:15:500:15:53

they've succeeded so far.

0:15:530:15:55

It's a beautiful, beautiful castle.

0:15:550:15:58

I'm going inside to catch up with Judy to find out all about it.

0:15:580:16:01

I've got to say, I'm full of admiration for you both.

0:16:060:16:08

What was it like when you first came here?

0:16:080:16:10

Um, it was pretty derelict. Yeah. Roofless in part.

0:16:100:16:13

Horses and chickens living in here.

0:16:130:16:15

-Really? In this particular room?

-Yes.

0:16:150:16:18

Yeah. So it was really quite bad.

0:16:180:16:21

Obviously no plumbing or wiring to speak of.

0:16:210:16:23

I had a walk around the grounds before I came in

0:16:230:16:25

-and they're beautifully landscaped now.

-We're not gardeners.

0:16:250:16:28

Peter calls himself a chainsaw gardener.

0:16:280:16:30

And that's really what we needed at the beginning.

0:16:300:16:32

Just to cut back through the wilderness.

0:16:320:16:34

But, yeah. It's been a lot of clipping.

0:16:340:16:36

A lot of doing clearing just to find that...really get back to

0:16:360:16:39

the bones of the garden and the gardens are Grade I listed.

0:16:390:16:41

Are they? Well, it's beautifully planted up this way.

0:16:410:16:44

Perfect symmetry, isn't there?

0:16:440:16:45

Yes. Yes. Lots of, you know, formal plantings.

0:16:450:16:47

Lots of clipped yew and box.

0:16:470:16:49

And gradually, it's all coming back together again.

0:16:490:16:51

There's one particular tale I know you haven't mentioned yet,

0:16:540:16:57

and that's how you managed to do a bit of detective work on your dining room.

0:16:570:17:01

Yes. That's been a very interesting...

0:17:010:17:03

..very interesting journey for us, really.

0:17:030:17:05

It began just after we moved into the house.

0:17:050:17:08

As I say, we were really buying a sort of a wreck, really. A ruin.

0:17:080:17:12

And a neighbour turned up with the sale catalogue.

0:17:120:17:17

-For the contents of this castle.

-The contents of the castle from 1921.

0:17:170:17:21

Basically, to cut a very long story short,

0:17:210:17:24

it transpired that William Randolph Hearst, who you will know as Citizen

0:17:240:17:28

Kane in the famous film, had bought two rooms at the sale here in 1921.

0:17:280:17:34

The rooms had been destined for San Simeon in California,

0:17:340:17:36

the castle he was building for himself there.

0:17:360:17:38

And we started doing some detective work and gradually traced the room

0:17:380:17:43

to the Metropolitan Museum in New York and that is where we found it.

0:17:430:17:47

Was it on display or was it just in storage?

0:17:470:17:50

No, it is actually still in its packing crates from 1921.

0:17:500:17:53

-So he'd never done any thing with it?

-Never done anything with it.

0:17:530:17:56

So were they pleased you sell it back to you, then?

0:17:560:17:58

Well, it took us two years to negotiate with them

0:17:580:18:01

and we went over to New York to see the room, in fact,

0:18:010:18:03

and went to this extraordinary warehouse in the Bronx.

0:18:030:18:06

-This whole new world was opening up for you.

-Yes.

0:18:060:18:10

There, in the middle of it, was our panelled room and they literally

0:18:100:18:13

just gave us a hammer and chisel and said go ahead and open the crates.

0:18:130:18:16

And the most astonishing thing was when we started opening the crates,

0:18:160:18:19

we saw this amazing room -

0:18:190:18:21

it still smelled of Gwydir after all those years. 75 years.

0:18:210:18:25

Well, only you know what that smell is, really, don't you?

0:18:250:18:28

Yeah, well, it moved us enormously, just to have a piece of...

0:18:280:18:30

-Did you have a tear in your eye?

-I did, I'm afraid. Yeah.

0:18:300:18:33

-Can I have a look? Do you mind?

-Yes. Here is...

0:18:330:18:35

Of course all the furniture, all the contents were sold as well.

0:18:350:18:38

-All the contents went.

-Why was there big house sale?

0:18:380:18:41

Hard to say. 1921. Just after the war. Money was tight.

0:18:410:18:46

Same old story. It was happening all over Britain.

0:18:460:18:49

And was the start, really, of the decline?

0:18:490:18:51

Yes. In Sir John Wynn's day the estate was huge.

0:18:510:18:55

You know, the deer park alone was 36,000 acres.

0:18:550:18:58

It was a massive estate.

0:18:580:18:59

So this is Lot 88. The remarkably fine 17th-century panelling.

0:19:010:19:06

How much did it sell for back then? Do you know?

0:19:060:19:08

Well, quite a lot of money, actually.

0:19:080:19:10

I think something like 1,000 Guineas, which is a lot of money.

0:19:100:19:14

But it attracted a lot of attention.

0:19:140:19:15

You know, Hearst, obviously was introduced to it by his friend

0:19:150:19:18

who owned the house then and started to asset-strip, basically.

0:19:180:19:23

So after two years of negotiation,

0:19:230:19:26

it got packed away back in that box again and shipped back over here.

0:19:260:19:30

It came back. Yes. Yes.

0:19:300:19:32

After 75 years of exile, it came back to Gwydir.

0:19:320:19:35

Was it a puzzle putting it back together or was it all carefully

0:19:350:19:38

marked joint to joint?

0:19:380:19:39

Well, unfortunately not.

0:19:390:19:41

So that's why it made our job that much more difficult, really.

0:19:410:19:44

It was very hard because they came in great big sheets of panelling

0:19:440:19:48

and they had very loose markings on the back,

0:19:480:19:50

but we were really working from just the sale catalogue.

0:19:500:19:52

These sepia photographs.

0:19:520:19:54

Whilst we were working on the room, we hardly left the place for two years.

0:19:540:19:57

It just was that intense, really.

0:19:570:19:59

Just making sure that everything went back together again.

0:19:590:20:01

-You really are living and breathing this, aren't you?

-Yes.

0:20:010:20:04

We're very passionate about it and love it very much.

0:20:040:20:06

Have you broken the back of this now?

0:20:060:20:08

I think so. I think the end is in sight.

0:20:080:20:10

And actually, last year, we finished our roof,

0:20:100:20:12

so that was a cause of great celebration.

0:20:120:20:15

Yeah. Now you're sound.

0:20:150:20:16

Everything really starts at the roof in a way, doesn't it?

0:20:160:20:19

We're wind- and watertight. That's the main thing.

0:20:190:20:21

-Can I have a look at the dining room?

-Absolutely.

-Which way is it?

-Follow me.

0:20:210:20:25

Gosh. Here we are. Wow. I love the carvings.

0:20:470:20:51

I love the trailing ivy with the grapes.

0:20:510:20:53

Yeah. They're very intricate and very elaborate.

0:20:530:20:57

When was that carved? When was this made?

0:20:570:20:59

Well, the panelling was made for the space in about 1640

0:20:590:21:02

for Sir Richard Wynn, and then it's been embellished

0:21:020:21:05

and played with a little bit over the centuries.

0:21:050:21:07

But really, yeah, 1640.

0:21:070:21:08

-And this echoes what's going on around the doorway, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:21:080:21:12

These twisted columns. They are called Solomonic columns.

0:21:120:21:15

Lovely, deep relief on the carving.

0:21:150:21:18

And then in the middle, we've got the coat of arms of the Wynn family.

0:21:180:21:21

OK. This is what we've got to look out for now.

0:21:210:21:24

If we find anything like this we know where to bring it to.

0:21:240:21:26

Exactly. The three eagles of Owain Gwynedd

0:21:260:21:28

and the three lions of King Cynan.

0:21:280:21:30

Was the leather panelling part of the package

0:21:300:21:33

-out of the crate as well?

-Yes.

0:21:330:21:34

Everything came back except the movable furniture.

0:21:340:21:37

So, even the window shutters came back.

0:21:370:21:39

And this leather frieze up here is actually quite important.

0:21:390:21:44

When it came back from America, it was completely black.

0:21:440:21:46

We took advice from the V&A

0:21:460:21:48

and they said the best thing to clean it with is spit.

0:21:480:21:51

So we spent six months, I'm afraid,

0:21:510:21:53

and a lot of spit later, it now...it now shines.

0:21:530:21:57

But we both ended up with very bad sore throats at the end of it.

0:21:570:21:59

Oh, dear. I can't imagine you spitting at that.

0:21:590:22:01

THEY LAUGH

0:22:010:22:03

Spit and polish, I guess. You know, that's where the saying comes from.

0:22:030:22:06

-Exactly.

-But it's in remarkable condition.

0:22:060:22:08

Well, that's the amazing thing about this room.

0:22:080:22:10

I think because it's been in its crates for 75 years,

0:22:100:22:13

it hasn't been exposed to daylight

0:22:130:22:15

and it really is in wonderful condition.

0:22:150:22:17

What a wonderful tale. It's a great detective story.

0:22:170:22:20

Well, another little piece is that if William Randolph Hearst hadn't

0:22:200:22:24

bought this room, it would have burnt in a fire the following year.

0:22:240:22:27

So we're very grateful to him also.

0:22:270:22:30

Is there anything else you're looking out for?

0:22:300:22:32

Yes. We're now looking for a second missing room,

0:22:320:22:35

and William Randolph Hearst bought two rooms from Gwydir in the 1921 sale

0:22:350:22:39

and we're now looking for the oak parlour, which is also missing.

0:22:390:22:42

But sadly, we just...

0:22:420:22:44

We think it's in America somewhere, but we just don't know...

0:22:440:22:47

-It obviously got sold to a different owner.

-Yes.

0:22:470:22:49

It was disassociated from this room, which is the dining room. So yes.

0:22:490:22:53

-Fingers crossed.

-Fingers crossed. Indeed. Yes.

0:22:530:22:55

Let's hope it's not in some ranch house in Texas.

0:22:550:22:58

I know. That would be a disaster.

0:22:580:23:00

And a sadness for Gwydir. But I hope we're able to get it back.

0:23:000:23:03

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

-Thank you for showing me around.

-My pleasure.

0:23:030:23:06

Right. This is where we up the tempo.

0:23:180:23:20

This is where it gets exciting

0:23:200:23:22

because we are now going to put our valuations to the test

0:23:220:23:24

and we're doing it right here in this building,

0:23:240:23:27

Rogers Jones's auction room in Colwyn Bay.

0:23:270:23:29

Now, right now I know our owners are feeling really nervous or really

0:23:290:23:33

excited. That's auctions for you.

0:23:330:23:34

It's a rollercoaster ride of emotions.

0:23:340:23:36

So I'm going to go inside and make sure they're feeling OK,

0:23:360:23:39

join up with them, settle their nerves

0:23:390:23:41

and leave you with a quick rundown

0:23:410:23:43

of all the items going under the hammer.

0:23:430:23:45

Dora is hoping to get a good figure for her Hornby train set,

0:23:460:23:50

so we need the toy collectors on the day.

0:23:500:23:52

Jim and Eileen's collecting has moved on to other things,

0:23:530:23:56

so the little silver cruet set will go to the highest bidder.

0:23:560:24:00

Irene and John have big hopes for their small hat.

0:24:000:24:04

And finally, there's plenty of countryside around here,

0:24:040:24:07

so we have a good chance of finding a new owner

0:24:070:24:09

for Liz's gold hunting brooch.

0:24:090:24:11

It's always a good sign to see plenty of browsers at the auction house.

0:24:130:24:17

Start bid, £100.

0:24:170:24:19

£100, I am bid. £110.

0:24:190:24:21

There's quite a buzz in the sale room.

0:24:210:24:23

Our auctioneer on the rostrum is David Rogers Jones.

0:24:230:24:26

First up, it's Dora with her wonderful Hornby train set.

0:24:290:24:33

-And boxed up as well, isn't it?

-Oh, yes.

-Beautiful. Beautiful.

0:24:330:24:36

-A good collectors item.

-I think so.

-£200 to £300? Good luck, Dora.

0:24:360:24:40

It's going under the hammer now.

0:24:400:24:42

-ROGERS JONES:

-Ladies and gentlemen, it's the Hornby clockwork train set.

0:24:430:24:46

Lovely selection of boxed rolling stock in lovely condition.

0:24:460:24:51

Station accessories. There's a water tank, a large quantity of track.

0:24:510:24:55

Everything is here for the model railway enthusiast.

0:24:550:24:58

It's a great lot for somebody to sort of invest in

0:24:580:25:01

to start a collection.

0:25:010:25:02

£300.

0:25:020:25:05

The Hornby clockwork. Lovely condition. Come on.

0:25:050:25:08

They're not battered and flaked. Mint to good condition. £250.

0:25:080:25:13

Push me off at £200.

0:25:160:25:18

£140, I am bid. £140. At £140. £140.

0:25:190:25:23

£140. £160. £160. Is there £180?

0:25:230:25:27

At £160. £160.

0:25:270:25:28

£180 anywhere? At £160. Is there £180?

0:25:280:25:32

-We want a bit more money than that, don't we?

-Oh, no.

0:25:320:25:35

At £160. I would have thought that this was a very, very cheap lot.

0:25:350:25:39

-At £160.

-MAN: £170.

0:25:390:25:41

£170. £170 bid. At £170.

0:25:410:25:44

Struggling badly. At £170 online.

0:25:440:25:48

-£170.

-He's not going to sell.

-I don't think so.

0:25:480:25:51

Sell it subject to approval or otherwise.

0:25:510:25:54

-No, we don't want to sell it.

-No, I'll keep it.

-At £170 online.

0:25:540:25:58

£180, anybody? At £170.

0:25:580:26:02

-Final call. But it has to be with owner's approval if at all.

-No.

-No.

0:26:020:26:08

£170. Doesn't want to sell? OK. £170.

0:26:080:26:11

Any advance? Pass on at £170.

0:26:110:26:14

The auctioneer is calling for £170. We didn't get it.

0:26:140:26:17

We had a reserve of £200 and I think you were right.

0:26:170:26:19

I think so, don't you?

0:26:190:26:21

Yes. Yeah. Good on you for bringing that in, Dora.

0:26:210:26:23

All right. I might see you again.

0:26:230:26:25

You live to fight another day in the auction room, though.

0:26:250:26:27

If you need to get rid of it.

0:26:270:26:29

'That's auctions for you. And it's not worth giving things away.

0:26:290:26:32

'Now it's Irene and John with their unusual display piece.'

0:26:320:26:36

I love this little...

0:26:360:26:37

-Well, it's almost like a tailor's sort of advert, isn't it?

-It is, yeah.

0:26:370:26:41

-It's a miniature.

-A little hat.

0:26:410:26:43

It's the sort of thing that if I saw it at a fair or something

0:26:430:26:45

-I would definitely...

-You'd have to buy it, wouldn't you?

-Yeah.

0:26:450:26:48

And you wouldn't really want to sell it for £30 or £50.

0:26:480:26:50

Well, I don't know if it's worth hundreds, though, is it?

0:26:500:26:53

Well, let's hope it goes to a good family.

0:26:530:26:55

-Be nice to see it make 50 quid, wouldn't it?

-Who knows?

0:26:550:26:58

You never know what's going to happen in an auction, do you?

0:26:580:27:01

Bright little thing, isn't it?

0:27:010:27:02

Hats off to you two for bringing it in.

0:27:020:27:04

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:27:040:27:06

Now, I know that my opinion counts for nothing

0:27:060:27:09

but I think this is one of the most delightful lots in today's sale.

0:27:090:27:12

It really is.

0:27:120:27:13

It's the cardboard-boxed Attaboy velvet trilby hat.

0:27:130:27:17

It won't fit any of us here. I don't think it really matters.

0:27:170:27:21

Original labels to the box and to the hat. It's a real little gem.

0:27:210:27:26

£100.

0:27:260:27:28

You wait. We won't be far away when we finish.

0:27:290:27:32

£50. £40. I am bid £40. £40 bid. £40.

0:27:350:27:38

A real little beaut at £40. £40, I am bid.

0:27:380:27:41

£50. £50.

0:27:410:27:44

£60. £60 bid. £60. And again now. Is there £70?

0:27:440:27:48

-At £60.

-MAN: £65.

-£65.

0:27:480:27:51

£70 with me. £70. Five again now.

0:27:510:27:54

At £70. A delightful little lot.

0:27:540:27:57

£75. £80.

0:27:570:27:59

-£80 bid.

-That sounds good. This is good.

0:27:590:28:02

-It's great, that, innit?

-Are you coming back?

0:28:020:28:04

£80 only. With me now against you.

0:28:040:28:07

At £80 on the book. £80.

0:28:070:28:10

-That's good.

-Great!

-On the book. £80.

0:28:100:28:14

I didn't think we'd get that. I thought I was going home with it.

0:28:140:28:17

-£80.

-£80. The hammer's gone down.

0:28:170:28:21

That was in museum condition, wasn't it? It really was pristine.

0:28:210:28:25

Well done, you two.

0:28:250:28:26

Next, Jim and Eileen with the silver cruet set.

0:28:280:28:31

Here we go. Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:28:340:28:36

We need someone with a posh bed and breakfast sort of thing

0:28:360:28:39

-who want to show it off.

-Or a castle.

0:28:390:28:41

-Or a castle.

-That's right. That's what I said.

0:28:410:28:43

Four-piece silver condiment set. All with Bristol blue liners

0:28:430:28:48

and the nice twist handle salt spoons.

0:28:480:28:51

The right spoons as well, wasn't it? The right spoons.

0:28:510:28:53

They often come without the right spoons.

0:28:530:28:55

With me at £70. £70 I am bid.

0:28:550:28:57

£80. £80 bid.

0:28:570:28:59

-Straight in.

-£90. £90.

0:28:590:29:01

£100. £100.

0:29:010:29:03

At £100. Is there £110?

0:29:030:29:05

£100 seated in the room. At £100.

0:29:050:29:08

I'll take £110. Anybody new?

0:29:080:29:10

£100. Everybody done?

0:29:100:29:13

I'll take £110 before they go. Anybody coming in?

0:29:130:29:16

Final call at £100.

0:29:160:29:18

Well, we got in way within estimate, that's the main thing.

0:29:190:29:22

And hopefully someone's going to use that as well.

0:29:220:29:24

Cos it is a practical thing to use for £100.

0:29:240:29:27

It's showy, but it's practical.

0:29:270:29:29

Good. Well done. I'm glad it didn't sell for too little, anyway.

0:29:290:29:32

-Hopefully it's gone to the castle down the road.

-Hopefully.

0:29:320:29:35

I'm sure you use yours all the time, don't you?

0:29:350:29:37

-There's about ten castles within 16 miles.

-We live near one.

0:29:370:29:42

-In Beaumaris, we live.

-Oh, lovely.

-Thanks for coming.

0:29:420:29:46

Here comes Liz's hunting brooch.

0:29:500:29:52

She's had a little crisis of confidence

0:29:520:29:54

and has dropped the reserve to £50.

0:29:540:29:56

Liz, fingers crossed. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:29:560:30:00

Let's hope there's some dog lovers here as well, shall we?

0:30:000:30:02

-Because that will put the price up.

-Yes.

0:30:020:30:04

Nine carat gold bar brooch.

0:30:040:30:07

Very nice bit of novelty jewellery

0:30:070:30:08

in the form of a shotgun with a gun dog.

0:30:080:30:11

Lovely bit of novelty jewellery.

0:30:110:30:13

It starts with me at £60. £60, I am bid.

0:30:130:30:16

At £60. £70. £80.

0:30:160:30:18

£80, I am bid. £80. £90 anywhere?

0:30:180:30:20

-Come on. Come on.

-At £80. Come on.

0:30:200:30:24

You've got to have this if you're a sporting type.

0:30:240:30:26

At £80 only. Is there £90? The final call.

0:30:260:30:30

£85. £85, I am bid. £90.

0:30:300:30:32

£90 bid. Do you want five again?

0:30:320:30:35

It's going, then. At £90. Everybody done at £90?

0:30:350:30:39

-Yes.

-£90.

-Thank you very much indeed. Thank you.

0:30:400:30:43

-We're happy with that, aren't we? Well done.

-I am very happy.

0:30:430:30:46

Well done, Mark. That sold at the top end of the estimate.

0:30:460:30:49

Now something for all you pottery fans. I'm off to Portmeirion.

0:30:540:30:58

I've come to the village of Portmeirion,

0:31:100:31:11

just down the coast from Bangor,

0:31:110:31:13

to find out about a remarkable woman called Susan Williams-Ellis.

0:31:130:31:16

Susan was an imaginative and multi-talented designer.

0:31:210:31:25

She's most famous for being the creative force behind Portmeirion Pottery, which hit the big time

0:31:250:31:30

when Susan launched her Botanic Gardens range in 1972.

0:31:300:31:35

Her inspiration may well come from her love of horticulture.

0:31:350:31:39

Her father, Clough Williams-Ellis, the creator of Portmeirion Village,

0:31:390:31:43

had nurtured Susan's gardening ambitions.

0:31:430:31:45

And to find out more about Susan, the woman and the artist,

0:31:460:31:49

I've come to have a chat with her son, Robin Llewelyn.

0:31:490:31:52

Robin, thanks very much for meeting up with me today,

0:31:580:32:01

especially right here, your mother's favourite spot.

0:32:010:32:03

And I can see why it's rapidly becoming one of mine.

0:32:030:32:06

What did this mean to her?

0:32:060:32:08

Well, this was where she enjoyed putting a bit of her

0:32:080:32:11

creativity into Portmeirion.

0:32:110:32:14

She was very heavily involved in the gardening

0:32:140:32:17

and in developing the formal gardens within the village.

0:32:170:32:20

And it's without doubt that her love of gardening inspired her

0:32:210:32:24

design work.

0:32:240:32:25

She was an enthusiastic plantswoman with an intense love of nature.

0:32:250:32:31

Her father gave her the responsibility for landscaping large

0:32:310:32:35

areas of the gardens.

0:32:350:32:37

She made her mark by adding oriental features, which she designed herself.

0:32:370:32:41

She studied at Chelsea School of Arts under Henry Moore

0:32:490:32:52

and Graham Sutherland, so shapes were important to her.

0:32:520:32:56

But she didn't really want to become an artist who simply produced

0:32:560:33:00

one-off pieces.

0:33:000:33:02

She wanted to become an industrial artist who could design elegant

0:33:020:33:07

and functional pieces for daily use.

0:33:070:33:09

SUSAN: One of our reps was rather intelligent.

0:33:110:33:14

He said what we want is a very smart coffee set,

0:33:140:33:17

so I thought, "All right. I'll try and do one."

0:33:170:33:20

It was something that nobody had done before

0:33:200:33:22

and that was a tremendous success.

0:33:220:33:25

I think it's terribly important to be absolutely in straight contact with

0:33:280:33:34

customers, with real ordinary people and see what they like,

0:33:340:33:39

and what my father's motto always

0:33:390:33:43

was about Portmeirion - good design is good business.

0:33:430:33:46

And so that's what's been my motto ever since.

0:33:460:33:50

This desire to make useful artworks led Susan to establish

0:33:510:33:55

the Portmeirion Pottery brand with her husband Euan in the early 1960s.

0:33:550:34:00

When they first started out,

0:34:000:34:01

they were producing innovative patterns such as Cypher and Totem.

0:34:010:34:05

Those striking shapes are now iconic, but it was the Botanic

0:34:050:34:08

Garden design which made Portmeirion a household name.

0:34:080:34:12

Susan found its huge commercial success a mixed blessing.

0:34:120:34:16

That was in 1972, I think, and it's never stopped.

0:34:190:34:25

And it's bunged up our factory.

0:34:250:34:27

We just didn't have enough room to make anything else.

0:34:270:34:30

And that is why I'm really sad about all these things,

0:34:300:34:33

which I like much better.

0:34:330:34:35

The Botanic Garden is a classic and it's continued to flourish,

0:34:350:34:38

but that was when she wanted to do other things.

0:34:380:34:40

I was just about to ask you that. Was she proud of that legacy?

0:34:400:34:43

She was proud of it, but she always thought, "Well, why can't people

0:34:430:34:45

"forget the Botanic Gardens, and now I want to design something else."

0:34:450:34:49

40 years on, Botanic Gardens is still a top seller,

0:34:490:34:53

but thank goodness its success didn't dampen Susan's creativity.

0:34:530:34:56

What was she working on in her final years?

0:35:000:35:02

Well, her passion during the last decade or

0:35:020:35:05

so or more of her life was underwater painting.

0:35:050:35:09

-Really? She took up snorkelling?

-Well, she did.

0:35:090:35:12

When we were very little, my mother asked me

0:35:140:35:17

and my sister, "If you could choose what sort of animal you would like to

0:35:170:35:20

"be, what would you like to be?"

0:35:200:35:22

And my sister, I thought rather sensibly, said a giraffe.

0:35:220:35:25

I, for some unknown reason, said a lady oyster.

0:35:250:35:28

SHE LAUGHS

0:35:280:35:30

I can't imagine that.

0:35:300:35:33

But I don't think I should.

0:35:330:35:35

I mean, if you've got to be a shellfish, be a scallop,

0:35:350:35:37

because at least they've got eyes.

0:35:370:35:39

At times, she felt more at home underwater than

0:35:400:35:42

she did on the surface.

0:35:420:35:44

It was another world and she invented a method of drawing

0:35:440:35:50

underwater using a special crayon and a board.

0:35:500:35:53

She didn't actually colour underwater, but she

0:35:530:35:55

-would make detailed notes of the various colours.

-Sketches.

0:35:550:35:59

And then come on land to colour it in

0:35:590:36:01

and my father Euan would then also look up in the books the exact names

0:36:010:36:05

of all the fishes, the corals and annotate the drawings.

0:36:050:36:08

So it was quite a scientific process as well.

0:36:080:36:12

But that was her passion, was the underwater painting.

0:36:120:36:15

On November 27 in 2007, Susan Williams-Ellis sadly passed away

0:36:160:36:22

here in Portmeirion, the village she dearly loved,

0:36:220:36:25

leaving behind a wonderful artistic legacy for all of us to enjoy today.

0:36:250:36:31

Our experts are deep in their studies at the

0:36:400:36:42

Prichard-Jones Hall at the university in Bangor.

0:36:420:36:46

Coming up, one of our owners gets more than just financial

0:36:460:36:50

reward at the auction.

0:36:500:36:52

Condition made that sale, you know. It was in perfect condition.

0:36:520:36:55

-Your luck has changed forever now.

-I hope so.

0:36:550:36:58

Alan and Gwyneth have brought in a little treat for Mark.

0:37:010:37:04

-You've brought in a spectacular cup.

-Yes.

0:37:050:37:08

Now, is it a treasure of your family's?

0:37:080:37:11

No, not at all. I'm representing here today St David's Hospice in Llandudno.

0:37:110:37:16

And this has been donated, really. It came in a box with lots of other

0:37:160:37:19

items in this last week or so to our distribution centre.

0:37:190:37:23

So my staff there were looking at it and they thought,

0:37:230:37:26

"Well, this might be an item for Flog It!"

0:37:260:37:28

Wonderful. So you thought, "I'll come along and see whether it's worth anything."

0:37:280:37:32

That's right.

0:37:320:37:33

And were you as excited as Alan when you saw this piece?

0:37:330:37:36

-Oh, I love the cup. It's beautiful.

-Fantastic.

0:37:360:37:38

It's a remarkable-looking object, actually,

0:37:380:37:41

because it's really rather grand, isn't it?

0:37:410:37:43

You've got this wonderful sort of classical scene

0:37:430:37:45

revolving round it in sort of silver plate.

0:37:450:37:47

I don't think it is silver.

0:37:470:37:48

And then you've got this sort of gilt bronze, I suppose.

0:37:480:37:51

Or gilt metal which forms the rest of it.

0:37:510:37:55

I'm a little bit concerned about one thing.

0:37:550:37:57

There's a little rim just underneath here, which is plain.

0:37:570:38:01

-I think that would have sat on a bigger base.

-Right.

0:38:010:38:04

And I think it's copying an old Roman or Etruscan drinking cup.

0:38:040:38:11

And I think this was probably done in the 19th century.

0:38:110:38:14

It's very much in the style of the early 19th century.

0:38:140:38:17

The Empire period in France.

0:38:170:38:19

-But I think it could be a little bit later than that.

-Right.

0:38:190:38:22

And I wouldn't be surprised if it's English.

0:38:220:38:24

-Right.

-And possibly by a firm called Elkington's.

0:38:240:38:27

There are very few marks underneath.

0:38:270:38:29

Some scratch marks

0:38:290:38:30

and there's a little mark which has been partly obliterated that says B.

0:38:300:38:34

But a very nice quality piece.

0:38:340:38:37

You know, the quality of the casting is very exciting.

0:38:370:38:41

-And what a lovely thing to have donated.

-That's right. That's right.

0:38:410:38:44

And obviously it would be better turned into monetary value.

0:38:440:38:49

Cash for the hospice, for the care of the patients that we look after.

0:38:490:38:53

And I tip my hat off to your colleagues as well, to recognise

0:38:530:38:57

it as something of interest.

0:38:570:38:58

And rather than putting it in the shop or the stall for £20 or

0:38:580:39:02

something, you know, saying, "Look, we ought to check this out."

0:39:020:39:06

That's right.

0:39:060:39:07

Yourselves, have you thought of how much you'd like it to be worth?

0:39:070:39:11

Well, I think one would have sort of thought we'd try it

0:39:110:39:17

initially at about £80, £100 in one of our shops.

0:39:170:39:20

Particularly a little shop in Rhos on Sea,

0:39:200:39:22

I think that item would go quite well.

0:39:220:39:25

Yes. I'm sure. I'm sure.

0:39:250:39:27

And it's just lovely, this whole almost bacchanalian scene

0:39:270:39:30

going along there, with all these figures in various positions.

0:39:300:39:33

They're having a really good time there, aren't they?

0:39:330:39:36

And fortunately, most of them are clothed as well, which is a bonus.

0:39:360:39:39

We're not going to get offended by them.

0:39:390:39:42

If I was putting it into auction, I would suggest a realistic

0:39:420:39:47

-estimate of something like £150-£200.

-That's fine.

0:39:470:39:51

-That's great.

-And we'll put a reserve on it of £150.

-OK.

0:39:510:39:56

With 10% discretion, if that's OK, for the auctioneer.

0:39:560:39:59

And I think if he catalogues it well and puts it on the internet,

0:39:590:40:03

-we should get quite a lot of interest.

-Excellent.

0:40:030:40:06

Well, Alan and Gwyneth, it's a pleasure meeting you.

0:40:060:40:08

And I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

0:40:080:40:10

Let's hope we can really raise a good

0:40:100:40:12

-amount of money for your hospice.

-Lovely.

0:40:120:40:14

It's always nice to hear of a charity benefiting from the auction.

0:40:160:40:19

Next, Adam is enjoying examining a scientific item belonging to Gillian.

0:40:220:40:26

-This is an interesting collection, isn't it?

-Yes. I think so.

0:40:280:40:32

How have you accumulated all of this?

0:40:320:40:34

The man who had the factory next door to my father collected microscopes.

0:40:340:40:38

He had a big collection of them.

0:40:380:40:40

-Oh, right.

-And he knew I was interested and he gave me all this.

0:40:400:40:43

-How long ago was that?

-About 40 years ago.

-Right. Excellent.

0:40:430:40:47

Well, I think this is a nice little collection.

0:40:470:40:49

Firstly, you've got this mahogany-cased microscope which is

0:40:490:40:52

a lacquered brass microscope.

0:40:520:40:54

A nice quality instrument.

0:40:540:40:56

-About 100 years old now.

-Oh, right.

-Getting on a bit. That's right.

0:40:560:41:00

And retailed by Baker of High Holborn in London.

0:41:000:41:03

A good-quality thing. And you've got the case.

0:41:030:41:06

It's fitted, of course, with your extra bits and pieces.

0:41:060:41:09

Accessories and lenses.

0:41:090:41:10

But what people find of particular interest these days -

0:41:100:41:13

I mean, these are fairly common, but the slides.

0:41:130:41:16

-People are really getting much more interested.

-I couldn't imagine.

0:41:160:41:20

-I nearly didn't bring those.

-When the microscope slides come up,

0:41:200:41:23

they're getting much more enquiries about them.

0:41:230:41:25

They've improved the value of this fairly significantly, anyway,

0:41:250:41:29

because this one on its own, you know, without being rude,

0:41:290:41:31

-it's a fairly ordinary, as they go.

-Yes. Well, I thought that, yes.

0:41:310:41:34

Still quite a nice example.

0:41:340:41:36

But you've got a whole load of slides here

0:41:360:41:38

and they're from all around the world, aren't they?

0:41:380:41:40

Yes. There seems to be different countries on them.

0:41:400:41:42

In this one, we've got insects. Quite easy with that one, isn't it?

0:41:420:41:46

Lots of flies and bees.

0:41:460:41:47

Bees and butterflies and all that sort of thing.

0:41:470:41:49

This one looks like... little microorganisms of some sort.

0:41:490:41:54

These are privately prepared ones, so they're not going to be...

0:41:540:41:57

-I think there might be one or two.

-..of great value these days.

0:41:570:42:00

No, I think most of these are the man himself.

0:42:000:42:02

It's mainly in these ones and these ones that were purpose-made.

0:42:020:42:06

And this one's from Santa Monica. From Venice. From Colombia.

0:42:060:42:10

Coast of Dalmatia. Sweden.

0:42:100:42:13

So there's a whole geographic selection here.

0:42:130:42:15

-Have you got any idea what it might be worth?

-No idea at all.

0:42:150:42:18

I've never valued, looked at them or anything.

0:42:180:42:20

Well, based on the fact that this is worth £60, £80,

0:42:200:42:23

maybe £100 and I would think these are worth a similar amount.

0:42:230:42:27

-Oh, very good!

-So £150 to £250, probably.

0:42:270:42:30

And it might go on from that.

0:42:300:42:32

Wouldn't be surprised if it went on a little bit longer.

0:42:320:42:34

-So does that sound all right to you?

-That sounds very good. Yes.

-Good.

0:42:340:42:37

I wasn't thinking they were worth anything at all.

0:42:370:42:40

Pleased to hear you so positive, Gillian. Now, why have you decided to sell?

0:42:400:42:43

I don't have time to look at them now

0:42:430:42:45

and they've been sitting at my mum's house for years now.

0:42:450:42:48

-Right. So time to get rid.

-I think so.

0:42:480:42:51

-They'll go to a collector, I'm sure.

-Oh, lovely.

0:42:510:42:53

It would be nice if they were...

0:42:530:42:55

If they made a few hundred pounds, would you have any plans for that?

0:42:550:42:58

-Um, doing things in the garden, really.

-Are you a keen gardener?

0:42:580:43:02

Well, I bought an old house with a field behind it and I'm making

0:43:020:43:05

a vegetable plot and doing, you know, my own little allotment in the back.

0:43:050:43:09

That's great to hear.

0:43:090:43:11

Thanks for coming in, and I really hope that they take off and I think

0:43:110:43:15

they probably will. We'll put a reserve at £150, just in case.

0:43:150:43:18

Lovely. All right. Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:43:180:43:21

What a fascinating collection of slides.

0:43:210:43:24

Someone's going to really enjoy looking at those.

0:43:240:43:26

It looks like Valerie

0:43:260:43:28

and Gary have brought in one of our old "Flog It!" favourites.

0:43:280:43:32

-Hello, Valerie. Hello, Gary. How are you doing?

-Fine.

-Fine, thank you.

0:43:320:43:36

Well, you've brought a "Flog It!" favourite on, haven't you?

0:43:360:43:39

It's a Clarice Cliff.

0:43:390:43:41

A rather nice biscuit barrel.

0:43:410:43:43

Are you a collector of Clarice Cliff?

0:43:430:43:44

-We'd like to be.

-We'd like to be, but not these days.

0:43:440:43:48

-It's too expensive, isn't it?

-Yes. It is these days, yes.

0:43:480:43:51

-So where did you get it from?

-Well, um, some time...

0:43:510:43:55

In '74, '75, we went into a car boot and we saw this on the table

0:43:550:44:02

-and as it happens, we knew the people that were selling it.

-No!

0:44:020:44:05

And I said, "Oh, how much?" you know.

0:44:050:44:08

And he said, "Well, to you, 50p."

0:44:080:44:11

And she said, "No, 30p."

0:44:110:44:13

You didn't. 30p, you paid for it? Good Lord.

0:44:130:44:17

Mind you, in those early days of car boots, you really could get a bargain.

0:44:170:44:20

People just went mad and took everything.

0:44:200:44:23

Cleared auntie's house out.

0:44:230:44:24

-You know, didn't know what they were selling.

-Correct. Yeah.

0:44:240:44:27

Well, good on you. You spotted a really nice shaped piece.

0:44:270:44:30

In some ways, I love and loathe Clarice Cliff,

0:44:300:44:33

but I do like unusual shapes.

0:44:330:44:35

Though, the pattern is rather boring on this one

0:44:350:44:38

because it's the Spring Crocus pattern.

0:44:380:44:40

But the shape is rather nice.

0:44:400:44:42

This shape is known as the Bonjour shape. Because of these loops.

0:44:420:44:47

And it is very morning-looking, actually.

0:44:470:44:49

It's got that rather fresh look about it.

0:44:490:44:52

This is the original handle, of course.

0:44:520:44:54

And underneath, we've got the usual Clarice Cliff mark.

0:44:540:44:57

So we're looking at maybe the 1935 period. So a nice period to be in.

0:44:570:45:02

There is a small chip.

0:45:020:45:04

Very small chip on the corner, which I have to point out to you.

0:45:040:45:07

Now, how much do you think it's worth?

0:45:070:45:10

Because I have a feeling you've done some research on this.

0:45:100:45:13

-Well, we thought £300 to £400.

-Oh!

0:45:130:45:15

HE LAUGHS

0:45:150:45:17

But I don't know.

0:45:170:45:19

Well, you know, I think you should stop thinking, Gary.

0:45:190:45:24

Several of these have come up recently in more exciting patterns,

0:45:250:45:28

I have to tell you.

0:45:280:45:30

And the more exciting patterns have been making £300, £350, £400.

0:45:300:45:34

As much as £500 or £600.

0:45:340:45:36

But I think because this is the crocus pattern,

0:45:360:45:40

we've got to think a little bit less than that, really.

0:45:400:45:43

I mean, ideally, I would say around £200 to £300.

0:45:430:45:46

And then you might find that it pushes up towards the £300.

0:45:460:45:49

If you put it in at £300-£400,

0:45:490:45:52

it might not encourage the bidders on the day.

0:45:520:45:55

Would you be happy with that?

0:45:550:45:56

-Um... Yes.

-I think we are.

0:45:560:45:58

Well, then we'll put a reserve of £200 on it,

0:45:580:46:01

because we don't want to sell it below that.

0:46:010:46:04

Valerie, you've knocked it down from a grand total of 50p to 30p.

0:46:040:46:09

You've had it all these years. Why, oh, why are you selling it now?

0:46:090:46:14

-Um, to help raise some money, really.

-Towards?

0:46:140:46:17

-Because we're buying a new car.

-A new car.

0:46:170:46:20

So you're hoping to turn a biscuit barrel into a car.

0:46:200:46:24

-Well, part of a car.

-Part of a car.

-It will help. It will help.

0:46:240:46:27

-Well, thank you so much for bringing it in.

-Well, thank you very much.

0:46:270:46:31

Jill and Peter must have had me in mind

0:46:340:46:37

when they decided to bring in this next item.

0:46:370:46:39

I just love it.

0:46:390:46:41

Tea caddies are so collectable.

0:46:410:46:43

They come in all various shapes and sizes and different materials.

0:46:430:46:47

I've seen them in pewter, I've seen them in silver,

0:46:470:46:49

I've seen them in sort of...

0:46:490:46:51

..pottery items. But my favourite, obviously, are wood.

0:46:510:46:55

And this is particularly nice because it's a Regency one

0:46:550:46:58

and it's got a lot of paper scroll work on it.

0:46:580:47:00

-Quilling, isn't it, they call it?

-Yes. Yeah. Can you see that?

0:47:000:47:03

All the paper is folded up very neatly. Well, I like that a lot.

0:47:030:47:06

-You like it?

-Oh, I do. Yes. Yes, I do. That sort of 1815, 1820s.

0:47:060:47:12

-And that would have been used in this country.

-Oh, yes. England.

0:47:120:47:14

Oh, yes. It's English. Made in this country. Oh, yes. Yes, yes.

0:47:140:47:18

Someone with a lot of money and a lot of quality

0:47:180:47:21

and a very good eye would have owned this.

0:47:210:47:23

Looking at this,

0:47:230:47:24

I suspect this has been gilded slightly at a later date. See this?

0:47:240:47:29

This gold leafing. It's not...

0:47:290:47:31

To me, that doesn't look like gold leafing.

0:47:310:47:33

That looks more like gold enamel paint.

0:47:330:47:35

Which is probably put on in around the '40s or '50s by somebody.

0:47:350:47:39

-And then inside, you've got this...

-Yes. Well, that...

0:47:390:47:43

..that would have sat on a little recessed rib there.

0:47:430:47:47

So the lid wouldn't drop down. And that would then house all your tea.

0:47:470:47:51

This is a single-blend caddy.

0:47:510:47:53

Now, some tea caddies are double blend, so you can have green tea and black tea.

0:47:530:47:56

You can have a large one, with a bowl in the middle

0:47:560:47:59

and mix the two blends together if you want.

0:47:590:48:01

"Caddy" comes from the Malay word "kati",

0:48:010:48:03

which is the amount of weight the tea was sold in.

0:48:030:48:06

And can you see there's traces of tinfoil there and there?

0:48:060:48:10

Well, that was all lined in tinfoil to keep the tea fresh.

0:48:100:48:13

So that would have sat there. That would have kept the tea fresh.

0:48:130:48:17

A single blend. Maybe a green tea or a black tea.

0:48:170:48:20

The lid would shut down and it would be put under lock and key

0:48:200:48:24

because tea was so expensive.

0:48:240:48:27

It was such an expensive commodity.

0:48:270:48:28

Only people in the sort of upper echelons could really afford it to

0:48:280:48:33

start with in the 1600s.

0:48:330:48:35

Whoever made this was a master of his genre, put it that way.

0:48:350:48:39

There's a bit of restoration here.

0:48:390:48:41

Whoever buys this has to spend a couple of hundred pounds on it.

0:48:410:48:45

-Do you know that?

-Yes. We did.

-They have to spend £200 on it.

0:48:450:48:48

If they get it at £400 in the auction room and they spend £200 on it,

0:48:480:48:52

it has cost them £600.

0:48:520:48:54

They're going to be wanting to sell this for £1,200, maybe.

0:48:540:48:57

And it will probably be worth that after a lot of TLC.

0:48:570:49:00

Well, I think the collectors will love this. They really will.

0:49:000:49:03

£300-£400 is the valuation. Reserve at £300, but not a fixed reserve.

0:49:030:49:08

Use a bit of discretion. So he can use 10%. So it might sell at £280.

0:49:080:49:13

-That's fine. Yes.

-Is that OK?

-Yeah, that's fine.

0:49:130:49:15

And we'll let them fight over it and hopefully one of them will be

0:49:150:49:18

a good restorer, pay top money for it, which benefits you.

0:49:180:49:21

-And cuts the middleman out.

-Lovely.

-Yeah?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:49:210:49:27

Even needing restoration, it still looks fabulous.

0:49:280:49:31

Let's have another quick look at our items before they head off to

0:49:310:49:35

the auction house.

0:49:350:49:36

The silver-plated trophy cup is stylish,

0:49:360:49:39

so it should raise a reasonable amount.

0:49:390:49:42

It'll be joined by Valerie and Gary's Clarice Cliff biscuit barrel.

0:49:420:49:46

Gillian's microscope is of little interest to her, so it's time to move it on.

0:49:460:49:51

And finally, my choice, the early 19th-century tea caddy, which is

0:49:510:49:55

pure quality and a beautifully crafted thing.

0:49:550:49:59

Alan and Gwyneth are first with the classical cup.

0:49:590:50:02

Let's hope this next lot is a real winner.

0:50:020:50:05

It should be, Alan and Gwyneth. It should be.

0:50:050:50:07

It's a trophy, for crying out loud.

0:50:070:50:10

We want to hold it up high and say, "Yes, we won."

0:50:100:50:12

-£200 top end of the estimate.

-Well, that's the top end.

0:50:120:50:15

We know you like to get the top end each time, but I just don't know. It's a speculative thing.

0:50:150:50:19

-But I think it should make £150.

-I can't imagine who'd want it.

-Well...

0:50:190:50:23

Look, there's no accounting for taste.

0:50:230:50:26

Somebody here in this room will absolutely love it

0:50:260:50:28

and they will display it beautifully and it will be in the right place.

0:50:280:50:31

We hope so. We need the money for the hospice.

0:50:310:50:33

-Proceeds to the hospice anyway. All of it.

-Good luck.

0:50:330:50:36

-ROGERS JONES:

-Something very, very good quality about this.

0:50:360:50:39

The quality of the figuring is brilliant. Six inches high. £200.

0:50:390:50:44

£200.

0:50:440:50:46

It smacks of quality, doesn't it? £150.

0:50:460:50:49

£100, I am bid. £100. £100 bid.

0:50:490:50:52

£100. I hope you're lucky. It's at the bottom, though.

0:50:520:50:54

At £100 bid. £120 anywhere?

0:50:540:50:56

-Now just go up.

-£120.

0:50:560:50:59

£140. Is there £160?

0:50:590:51:01

At £140. £140 bid. £160 anywhere?

0:51:010:51:04

£140. £160 now?

0:51:040:51:07

At £140. I'll go £150, even.

0:51:070:51:11

At £140. £150.

0:51:110:51:13

Well, we've got £150, so we've made the reserve.

0:51:130:51:17

-£150. I am selling at £150.

-Just on the reserve.

0:51:170:51:22

£160. A new bidder.

0:51:220:51:24

At £160. Worth every penny of £200, in my view.

0:51:240:51:27

At £160. All done. £160 and going.

0:51:270:51:32

-It's gone. We're happy.

-It's gone within estimate. Yes, it has.

0:51:330:51:37

Good estimate.

0:51:370:51:38

Well, that's £160 towards the hospice.

0:51:380:51:42

Now, Gillian has been holding on to the next item for about 40 years

0:51:450:51:48

so let's see what she gets for it.

0:51:480:51:51

Gillian, good luck.

0:51:510:51:52

We're talking about the microscope with the three boxes of slides,

0:51:520:51:55

which are absolutely wonderful. So interesting.

0:51:550:51:57

You must have had so much fun looking through those.

0:51:570:51:59

We could have sat there for hours.

0:51:590:52:01

It was a shame we had other people to deal with.

0:52:010:52:03

In a way, the interest is in the specimens, really.

0:52:030:52:06

Yeah, for the collector nowadays as well.

0:52:060:52:08

I mean, microscopes appear a lot, but a lot of interest in old slides.

0:52:080:52:11

Especially the named ones. Especially produced ones.

0:52:110:52:14

-I guess it's harder to pick up these early slides now.

-Yes. Yeah.

0:52:140:52:17

And always a great demand for them, so I'm quite confident today.

0:52:170:52:20

Also it's a named instrument as well, so that's in its favour too. So that'll put the price up.

0:52:200:52:26

I'm not good at selling things.

0:52:260:52:28

Did you not win things like raffles and lotteries and things like that?

0:52:280:52:31

-No.

-Actually, I don't either.

-Neither do I.

0:52:310:52:34

-But now is the time for Gillian's luck to change.

-Here we go.

0:52:340:52:37

We're going to find out. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:52:370:52:40

This is by Baker. Lights, lenses and a very nice parcel of mixed slides.

0:52:400:52:48

Bid me £200.

0:52:480:52:50

-Got to be.

-It's gone quiet, hasn't it?

0:52:510:52:55

Start me at one and a half.

0:52:550:52:56

-£120. I am bid at £120.

-You pitch it at £100 and build them up.

0:52:590:53:03

£150. £180. £180 bid. £180.

0:53:030:53:06

Well, we're back up there now. £180.

0:53:060:53:09

-£180 bid.

-MAN: £190.

0:53:090:53:11

£190. £200. £200 bid.

0:53:110:53:13

Online, the bidding now. At £200. £200 bid.

0:53:130:53:17

Is there £210 there? £200.

0:53:170:53:19

-£210. Still online.

-That's good.

0:53:190:53:23

-And again now.

-£250.

-£250. £250 bid. Online.

0:53:230:53:27

At £250. £250 bid. £250. Again?

0:53:270:53:31

-To online.

-£260.

-£260.

0:53:310:53:34

We've got an online battle here.

0:53:340:53:36

Is there £270? £260 online the bid.

0:53:360:53:41

At £260. £270 if you like.

0:53:410:53:44

All done?

0:53:440:53:46

-£270.

-£270. £270 bid.

0:53:460:53:49

I think there might be a little tickle in this yet.

0:53:490:53:51

It's gone very, very quiet. At £270.

0:53:510:53:54

-Chewing it to get more meat off the bones.

-They sit there and...

0:53:540:53:58

-"Hmm, actually."

-I've never been to an auction before.

-Haven't you?

-No.

0:53:580:54:01

£280. And again now. You could hear a pin drop.

0:54:010:54:03

At £280.

0:54:030:54:05

It's a baptism of fire, isn't it, for you? In at the deep end.

0:54:050:54:09

Final. Final call at £280. All done. £280.

0:54:090:54:14

Yes! That's a good result.

0:54:150:54:17

Top end of the estimate. We're really happy with that.

0:54:170:54:20

Condition made that sale. You know, it was in perfect condition.

0:54:200:54:23

-Your luck has changed forever now.

-I hope so.

0:54:230:54:26

I'm glad that Gillian's first trip to auction has been so successful.

0:54:260:54:30

Biscuit barrel. OK. £200-£300 put on by Mark.

0:54:320:54:35

We're going to find out exactly what the bidders think right now

0:54:350:54:38

up here in North Wales because it's going under the hammer. Here we go.

0:54:380:54:42

The Clarice Cliff Bizarre Crocus lidded biscuit barrel

0:54:430:54:46

with basket woven handle.

0:54:460:54:48

-Not perfect, but still...

-There we go. He had to say that, really.

0:54:480:54:53

-£210. Bid me £200.

-Fingers crossed.

0:54:530:54:58

£200.

0:54:580:55:00

£180. I have £160 on the book.

0:55:010:55:04

At £160. £160 bid. £180 if you like.

0:55:040:55:07

At £160. £160.

0:55:070:55:09

Is there £80? At £160.

0:55:090:55:12

£180. £180 bid.

0:55:120:55:13

£180. £180. Is there £200?

0:55:130:55:16

At £180. £200, I'll take.

0:55:160:55:18

We've got a £200 fixed reserve. We're one bid away.

0:55:180:55:22

£180. Everybody done? At £180.

0:55:220:55:27

It can be sold on condition, that's all. £180's in the room.

0:55:270:55:30

Do we take it?

0:55:300:55:31

£180. It can be sold on condition, that's all. £180's in the room.

0:55:310:55:36

Final call at £180. £180.

0:55:360:55:39

-Well, he has sold it.

-He's used a bit of discretion.

0:55:390:55:41

I think that was wise, to be honest with you, because of that chip.

0:55:410:55:45

-Are you happy?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:55:450:55:48

For the sake of £20, yes. Exactly. That's a good result.

0:55:480:55:52

That's a very good result for a damaged Clarice Cliff.

0:55:520:55:55

That was just under the reserve and our auctioneer

0:55:550:55:57

use his discretion, on a nod from Gary, and sold it anyway.

0:55:570:56:01

I'm quite confident about this tea caddy that belongs to Jill

0:56:020:56:04

and Peter. Hopefully for not much longer.

0:56:040:56:07

-The auctioneer liked the lot as well.

-Oh, good.

0:56:070:56:10

So there's a great deal of work that's gone into this.

0:56:100:56:12

I know it needs a little bit of TLC. That's why we've got £300-£400 on it.

0:56:120:56:16

It's a wonderful thing.

0:56:160:56:18

-Have you had second thoughts?

-No, it's going towards our anniversary.

0:56:180:56:22

-We're going on a trip for our 50th anniversary.

-Oh, congratulations.

0:56:220:56:26

50 years together. Wonderful. Where are you going?

0:56:260:56:30

-On a cruise. Not far, though.

-Oh, OK. Not around Anglesey. A bit further.

0:56:300:56:35

Oh, a bit further.

0:56:350:56:37

-Little bit better.

-Hey, look, good luck.

0:56:370:56:39

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:56:390:56:41

Very nice quality early tea caddy with the filigree scrolls

0:56:430:56:47

and filigree decoration.

0:56:470:56:49

OK, it needs a bit of attention, but it is a lovely rare piece.

0:56:490:56:52

-Fingers crossed.

-£400.

0:56:520:56:56

£350.

0:56:570:56:58

£300, I am bid. At £300.

0:57:000:57:03

At £300, I am bid.

0:57:030:57:05

£350. £400.

0:57:050:57:08

£425.

0:57:080:57:09

SHE GASPS

0:57:090:57:11

£450. £475, if you like.

0:57:110:57:14

At £450. £475, anybody?

0:57:140:57:17

At £450.

0:57:170:57:20

-That's a good price.

-Very.

0:57:200:57:23

Final call at £450. Once again.

0:57:230:57:28

-Yes! £450. Oh, I'm very pleased with that.

-Thank you very much.

-Gosh.

0:57:310:57:37

Good tea caddies always sell well, and that's quite a rare one.

0:57:370:57:40

Even though it had a bit of damage, you know, that could be sorted out.

0:57:400:57:44

-And that was on you. You take the credit for that.

-Oh, no. Not at all.

0:57:440:57:48

I've just seen them sell for that kind of price before, you know.

0:57:480:57:51

The more you go around the block, the more you get to know, really.

0:57:510:57:55

Well, that's it. It's all over.

0:58:020:58:04

All of our owners have gone home and they've gone home happy.

0:58:040:58:07

OK, there were one or two sticky moments,

0:58:070:58:09

but that's what auctions are all about.

0:58:090:58:11

You get lots of highs and lows and lots of surprises.

0:58:110:58:14

And I hope you've enjoyed today's show,

0:58:140:58:15

because we've loved being here in North Wales.

0:58:150:58:18

And all credit to our auctioneer and our experts.

0:58:180:58:20

Everyone was on the money today.

0:58:200:58:22

Till the next time, it's goodbye.

0:58:220:58:24

Experts Mark Stacey and Adam Partridge join Paul Martin at Bangor University in north Wales. Among the items valued are a microscope with original slides and an exquisite early tea caddy. Paul finds out about the creator of Portmeirion Pottery, Susan Williams Ellis.