Todmorden 26 Flog It!


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Todmorden 26

Flog It! visits Todmorden, a town in Yorkshire bordering Lancashire. Lots of local people bring their forgotten or unusual items along to be valued.


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Today's show comes from the heart of the Pennines.

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In that valley, just down there, is our destination. Todmorden.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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Todmorden Town Hall is our venue for today's show.

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Apparently, the building used to lie in both Yorkshire

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and Lancashire until 1888 when the boundaries moved.

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There's plenty of space inside for our Flog It fans who were all patiently waiting outside.

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Come on, follow me.

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Hundreds of people queuing up to meet our experts Adam Partridge and Catherine Southon,

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hoping they are going to be one of the lucky ones to go through

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to the auction and go home with lots of money.

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They've all come here to ask that all important question, which is, "What's it worth?"

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When you find out, what are you going to do?

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Flog it!

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Adam and Catherine are both outside scouring the crowds' unwanted items

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hoping to find some treasures and hear the stories behind them.

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However, Adam's not a fan of the Yorkshire weather.

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I didn't stop when I got here, I got soaked.

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Never mind. It runs off the bald head easier.

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-And Catherine's shocked by what she is being shown.

-I don't like that!

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I thought you were going to show me a nice piece of pottery.

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Don't worry, once they get warm inside they'll soon cheer up.

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With so many lovely people streaming in to be seen with their items,

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it can only be a good day.

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Coming up later in the show.

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All bets are off when Adam and I jockey in on Catherine's valuation.

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Go on, then. Good start.

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Adams starts a cabaret around the valuation table.

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# Little brown jug, little brown jug Little brown jug, do I love thee? #

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And up on the Pennines, things are not what they seem.

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Right, everybody is now safely seated inside.

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We're unravelling all the bags and boxes and bubble-wrap and hopefully

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someone's going home with a lot of money. It could be you two.

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It could even be you. It looks like Adam Partridge is our first expert to choose his first item.

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Let's take a closer look at what he's found.

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It's a bit of local history and a heavy piece of iron which Stephen has brought in to show Adam.

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Where's your plaque come from?

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It was my mum's. She worked in the cotton industry in Bolton and I believe her mum before her did that.

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-I believe it's probably connected to that.

-I think you're right.

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It's a very nice to see something like this in this region because this region is famous for textiles.

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I believe so, yes.

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It's such an unusual object and I didn't really know anything about it.

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I remember it as a kid and I thought I would bring it

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along today to see if I could find out a bit more about it.

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Do you have it on display at home?

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To be fair, no.

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It gathers dust and it's a shame.

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-It is.

-It is quite old and it might bring pleasure to someone else.

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It is a Victorian cast-iron plaque, God Speed The Loom.

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It is quite nice.

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There is a loom on there.

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-It's nicely done.

-Yes. It's quite a nice bit.

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Cast-iron plaque, this was put on the entrance to the mills.

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I believe so, it was put on the entrance to the mill so that when

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the workers came into the factory they saw that and they did their job.

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It would inspire them to work harder.

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I think that was the idea.

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-Do you think that would work nowadays?

-Probably not.

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I believe most of the cotton mills have gone anyway, haven't they?

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If we spin it around there, we've got the Victorian registration mark on there.

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All of these can be worked out to tally when it was produced.

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-It is really unusual, isn't it?

-It is.

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We did our research before and I'm not going to pretend to read it.

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2nd August 1883.

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-That's quite good, isn't it?

-I'm told that is these numbers.

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I didn't realise it was that old, to be honest.

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It's a nice piece, isn't it?

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Nice, good Victorian cast-iron plaque.

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Are you sure you want to sell it? Now you've talked about it.

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Again, I've got a few things from my mum and dad but certain items are more sentimental than others.

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Like I said, I'm restoring a 1964 Morris Minor Traveller which is a half-timbered car.

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It might go towards a little bit to restoring that.

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Good. I would put an estimate, 20 to 40.

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A reserve of £20 and hopefully it'll make 40 or 50 quid.

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If anywhere is a good area to sell it, this has to be it.

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Yes, if it brings enjoyment to someone else, so be it.

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I do like that plaque. It's nice to see something local.

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Catherine's spotted a lovely piece of vintage entertainment brought in by Lorna.

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Lorna, we do like a little bit of fun at Flog It.

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-This is certainly a nice little bit of fun in a box.

-Absolutely.

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We've got a racing game here.

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"Ascot, the new racing game"

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by Jaques.

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Jaques, as you may know, are a very famous maker of games.

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Still making games today, I believe.

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Making croquet games, carpet bowls, that sort of thing.

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This was probably made from about 1900, so it's late-Victorian in date.

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If we open this up here,

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we can see these lovely, little painted lead figures.

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The jockeys mounted on the horses as part of the racing game.

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I'm guessing what would happen here is you turn the handle, pull

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-these all out and extend them all, and turn the handle and then each time you get a different one.

-Yes.

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Depending on how the string unravels.

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Where did you get it from?

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We bought it from auction, my dad and myself, a couple of years ago.

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We like anything quirky and this caught our eye.

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A lady after my own heart, that's wonderful.

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And you were attracted to this?

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Yes, simply because of its age and it looks in good condition for its age. It was a bargain.

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When you say it was a bargain, how much did you pay for it?

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-£18.

-80?

-18.

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-That's very good.

-We thought that was quite good.

-Absolutely.

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The thing that concerns me is that when you look at the figures,

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these lead figures here, these would have been...

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-As you can see, they've been painted and they have got the original paint on them, which is nice.

-Yes.

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There is quite a lot of the paint missing.

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-It has been chipped which is a real shame and that will detract from the value.

-OK.

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-Nevertheless, I still think they're worth more than the £18 that you paid for them.

-Good.

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I would suggest putting them in an auction with an estimate of £40 to £60.

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-Right.

-And a £30 reserve.

-Right.

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-Would you be happy to sell at that?

-Yes.

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-That would be fine.

-It only gives you a little bit of profit on your £18 but,

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nevertheless, I really think at that estimate, £40 to £60, it should attract quite a lot of interest.

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-I hope that it does take off.

-Right, brilliant.

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I've just got to have a go at this because it's such a great piece of fun.

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-If we just pull all these out.

-Yeah.

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I think we need to get a few volunteers together. There we are.

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They're ready for the off.

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We can have a bit of fun with this, I think.

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-What do you think?

-Any bets on?

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This is my baby.

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I saw this in the queue earlier, didn't I?

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I said to one of our experts about this.

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I said, when I looked at these horses, I think this one stands a chance of winning. Do you know why?

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-No.

-Because his front feet have been bent up by somebody quite crafty so it acts as a sledge.

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-There's no friction!

-Oh, yes.

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That's my horse. That's my horse!

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Catherine's already had her pick, hasn't she?

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On that basis I'll go with this one.

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OK. Who's going to wind?

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-I'll wind.

-Then you're impartial then, aren't you?

-Yes, exactly.

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What do we get if we win, by the way?

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We'll work that one out.

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Come on then.

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Good start.

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-Come on.

-It's all over. Yes!

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Yay!

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That was rigged, wasn't it. That was rigged.

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No, it wasn't!

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Best-of-three? No. Time to move on.

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I've been busy having a browse and it's an ocean liner owned by Tony that's caught my eye.

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Tony, you lucky, lucky man.

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This is as good as it gets, I think for Triang boats, the large gauge.

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You must have been a spoilt young boy. Who bought you this?

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-My grandmother.

-How old were you?

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About ten.

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Look at it, I love the colours, I love that paintwork.

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It's lovely injection-moulded plastic.

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That runs with an electric motor, it's battery-powered, isn't it?

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-That's right.

-Look at this, you've got the original box as well.

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30% of the value is in the packaging, did you know that?

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-I didn't.

-Yes, the collectors will love this.

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Is it something you're thinking of selling then?

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I was thinking, yes.

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So, you didn't obviously play with it that much, did you?

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Not a lot. The odd paddling pool.

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In the bath?

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Mind you, not much room in the bath, is there, unless you had a massive one.

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Well, let's have a quick look, let's give it the once over.

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-That should open there, shouldn't it?

-Yes.

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Underneath the funnel.

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That's where the batteries go.

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It looks pretty good to me.

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It really does.

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Well, I think, these normally fetch around £100 to £120

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but just to be safe if you want to put this into the sale,

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we could put it in with a value of £80 to £120, with a reserve at £80.

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-Yes.

-Are you happy with that?

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-Oh, yes.

-Judith, what do you think?

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-Time for it to go.

-Time for it to go.

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-It looks like it, doesn't it?

-Oh, yes.

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Adam has spotted a rather modern item brought in by Catherine.

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-Now, you've brought a sheep.

-No, he's a ram.

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He's a ram. How did you get him?

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-Car boot.

-Car boot. OK.

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Tell us a bit more.

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He was bought as a joke for my daughter.

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Since she was little, she's collected sheep.

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-You daughter collects sheep?

-She collects sheep.

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-How old's your daughter?

-She's 16.

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So you've got... How many sheep has she got, roughly?

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She's got about 250 of varying sizes,

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from tiny little ones up to huge humongous things.

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We're not allowed to eat lamb in our house, that's how bad

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she is into her sheep.

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-He was laid on the stall, laid down like that.

-Like a dead ram.

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So I picked him up, I said, "How much is it?" She said, "50p."

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Gave her the 50p, I thought that will be a good joke for her.

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Put it in my bag, got back to the car with my husband,

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and he said, "He's Steiff."

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So if she'd have laid it that way round...

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She'd have probably got a lot more for him,

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but he was my bargain of the day.

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You presented it to your daughter who collected sheep and she was delighted?

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And she hates him. She hates him with a vengeance.

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What's the matter with him?

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Because he's a ram and not a sheep.

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Well, for 100 years now, Steiff has been the leading name

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and the most famous name in teddy bears, and consequently

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later years in all sorts of stuffed toys and novelties.

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This one isn't of great age but it's got that great Steiff pedigree.

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He's lovely, very nicely made, lovely quality.

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You've not dropped on fortunes but you've certainly dropped on a profit.

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And I mean, we always watch this programme so it's like

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-you learn so much.

-So you can tell me what it's worth.

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-I don't know.

-Go on, let's have a prediction off you.

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-£20.

-£20, good idea.

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I was going to say put 20-40. Do you reckon?

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No reserve? Let him go?

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Let him go, yeah.

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If he's cost 50p...

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50p is nothing.

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I know it's not a lot of money but are you going to keep it?

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It's going to more sheep, yes.

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I've popped over the border from Yorkshire to Lancashire

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to a place called Padiham, to show you a true architectural delight.

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And that's all down to one family who lived here

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for 400 years. And believe me, it's quite a house.

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Welcome to Gawthorpe Hall.

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The original structure, hiding underneath the house we see now, was square.

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It was built way back in the 14th century as a Peel tower

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and used as a lookout.

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The tower and land were inherited by a wealthy man

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called Sir Richard Shuttleworth, back in 1596,

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and he set about the radical transformation of the initial

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medieval tower into this very impressive Elizabethan mansion.

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Sadly, he didn't live to see the build begin.

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Shuttleworth is believed to have enlisted the help of an influential

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architect called Robert Smythson,

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the man behind other great country houses -

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Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire

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and Longleat House in Wiltshire.

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Here at Gawthorpe, it's likely he made the most

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of locally sourced materials.

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The wood in the panelling almost certainly

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came from the nearby Mitten Wood, and much of the stone from a nearby quarry.

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The original Gawthorpe Hall took about five years to build,

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and it's as immaculate on the outside as it is on the inside,

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and that's down to generations of Shuttleworths who lived here.

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What you've got to remember about these big ancestral piles is

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they don't always look like they would have done originally.

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That's because each later generation of the family

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would have liked to have updated the property while they lived here,

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and, of course, add their mark.

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All through the life of this magnificent house,

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markers have been left to remember the family who owned it.

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These carved figures are of the original Sir Richard Shuttleworth,

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who commissioned the house, and his wife.

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There are family monograms all over the place.

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By 1850, the house was in need of repair and general updating,

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so its then owner, Sir James Kay-Shuttleworth,

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commissioned another illustrious architect to transform

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this house back to its former Elizabethan glory,

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and such a well-to-do family could only call upon the best.

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The architect he commissioned was also responsible for designing the Houses of Parliament.

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Sir Charles Barry was one of the best practitioners of

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the Victorian fashion for designing in a more historic style.

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His most famous work was arguably the Palace of Westminster in London,

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but up north, you can see more of his work near Gawthorpe

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at Halifax Town Hall.

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Barry used some very clever and quirky design innovations here at Gawthorpe.

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Take, for instance, this magnificent fireplace. Now, normally,

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there should be a chimney breast above it with a flue,

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so it would draw all the smoke off the fire so it doesn't fill the room.

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But look,

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he's put this wonderful, great, big window up there.

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What he's cleverly done is angled the flue,

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so it runs underneath the window and then up parallel

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with the window, so it still does the same practical job

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of drawing the smoke out the room, but he's introduced

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badly needed extra light into this room, because it is

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rather dark due to the wonderful Elizabethan oak panelling.

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And look at this - another clever way of letting extra light

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into the room. Barry designed this Renaissance-style wooden screen

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instead of having a solid wall or a door put here.

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He travelled Europe when he was in his 20s for a few years,

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and he picked up many ideas which later influenced designs like this.

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Very clever.

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This is also a good place to see examples of the work of architect

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and designer Augustus Pugin.

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Pugin designed this fabulous cast-iron gothic fireplace,

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which stands there looking so important, and also

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this magnificent centre table, which was made of burr walnut,

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and the base is of solid oak.

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These are very good examples of Pugin's interior design work,

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but if you look closely, look at the attention to detail.

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He's had the Lancashire Rose inlaid around the border

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amongst all this foliate work, and all that's been done

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with a handcut veneer.

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Fine, fine craftsmanship.

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If only the walls could talk, there's so much history

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here in this room, and it would have played host to many an interesting guest.

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Sir Charles Barry also made changes to the staircase,

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adding stone arches and giving it a fashionably gothic feel.

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Well, fashionable for Victorian times.

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The last of the family to live here was Rachel Kay-Shuttleworth.

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She was accomplished at needlework.

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Gawthorpe boasts a large collection of textiles, thanks to her.

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What I want to show you is this, an example of her work,

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this fabulous embroidery used to decorate the bed.

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It's titled The Tree Of Life,

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and apparently she made it for her father, and it took her ten years

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to accomplish. Now that's dedication and love.

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What I find so fascinating about this house is, well, obviously,

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it's a place of historical interest, but it feels like a family home!

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Not a museum, and that's down to the family who have loved it

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and cared for it.

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Over the years, they've added their innovations

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but kept true to the original Elizabethan design,

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and to tell you the truth, it's the first time today

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I'd ever heard of it, so I feel like I've discovered a bit

0:19:060:19:09

of our hidden heritage. Gawthorpe ticks all the boxes for me -

0:19:090:19:13

it's well worth the visit.

0:19:130:19:14

And now for my favourite part of the show, let's head to the auction,

0:19:230:19:27

but first here's a quick reminder of what we're taking with us.

0:19:270:19:30

Adam was charmed by Stephen's Victorian cast-iron plaque.

0:19:310:19:35

It's a low estimate but it would be a lovely thing to own.

0:19:350:19:37

Lorna's racing game is in a mahogany box,

0:19:370:19:40

it looks good and it's great fun, too.

0:19:400:19:42

Will it fall short at the auction room?

0:19:420:19:47

Catherine's unwanted Steiff ram surely has to attract bidders,

0:19:470:19:51

as it has no reserve!

0:19:510:19:53

Tony's model ocean liner comes complete with box.

0:19:530:19:56

That must appeal, surely, to all the collectors and toy fans.

0:19:560:20:00

For the sale, we're heading east to a beautiful bit of countryside.

0:20:040:20:07

This is where we're putting all of our owners' antiques

0:20:090:20:12

under the hammer, the Calder Valley auction room. On the rostrum,

0:20:120:20:14

the man with all the local knowledge, Ian Peace.

0:20:140:20:17

Hopefully it's a full house and we get some great results.

0:20:170:20:19

Fingers crossed.

0:20:190:20:21

There seems to be a fair few people browsing

0:20:230:20:25

so fingers are staying crossed for our items.

0:20:250:20:28

Remember, if you're buying or selling at auction

0:20:280:20:30

you have to pay the auctioneer's commission.

0:20:300:20:32

This applies to buyers and sellers. Here today it's 15% plus VAT

0:20:320:20:37

but it does vary from auction room to auction room so check the details in the catalogue.

0:20:370:20:42

It's printed there, because you've got to factor that cost in to the hammer price.

0:20:420:20:46

But first we're selling Stephen's plaque.

0:20:490:20:52

Remember, any profit he makes is going to his beloved Morris Minor.

0:20:520:20:56

-This was Mother's, wasn't it?

-It was.

0:20:560:20:58

She used to work in a cotton mill all her life. It's an interesting object.

0:20:580:21:01

I've got a lot of stuff from my mum's and dad's and you can't keep it all.

0:21:010:21:04

-No.

-So maybe someone else can get pleasure from it.

0:21:040:21:07

Well, we're in the right place to sell this.

0:21:070:21:09

Let's just hope someone wants to invest in a little bit of their own heritage from the neighbourhood.

0:21:090:21:13

That's what it's all about. It's not a lot of money, is it?

0:21:130:21:16

-£20 to £40.

-God speed the bidding.

0:21:160:21:19

Exactly! Let's find out what they think, shall we?

0:21:190:21:22

The Victorian cast-iron circular wall plaque, "God speed the loom".

0:21:240:21:29

Right, what am I bid for that lot there?

0:21:290:21:32

Start me at 15.

0:21:320:21:34

£15 I'm bid.

0:21:360:21:38

-Yes, we're in!

-At 20, sir. 20.

0:21:380:21:40

25? 25, 30.

0:21:400:21:43

35. 40.

0:21:430:21:46

At £40, anybody else now?

0:21:460:21:49

£40. 45.

0:21:490:21:52

Lady at the back at £45.

0:21:520:21:55

-Happy with that?

-Quite good.

0:21:550:21:57

At £45, then. We're going...

0:21:570:22:00

You're in at 50? Right, £50. At 50.

0:22:000:22:04

Anybody else now? £50?

0:22:040:22:07

Front row at £50.

0:22:070:22:10

All finished at 50?

0:22:100:22:13

Excellent. £50. Top end.

0:22:130:22:15

Well done, Adam. And £50 will come in very handy.

0:22:150:22:17

Most definitely. Two wing mirrors for my car.

0:22:170:22:19

Excellent. Let me shake your gigantic hand.

0:22:190:22:21

Thank you. Thanks, Paul.

0:22:210:22:23

What a great project, and I'm glad that Stephen made some money to fund it.

0:22:250:22:29

Tony's up next, with that model ocean liner.

0:22:290:22:33

Let's hope this does cruise away and doesn't sink.

0:22:330:22:37

We've got £80-£120 on this. Are you here alone today?

0:22:370:22:40

No, I've brought Judith along.

0:22:400:22:43

-Judith, OK, is she over there?

-Yes. She's over on the far side.

0:22:430:22:46

What did she think of this model, when you got it out of the loft after so many years?

0:22:460:22:49

"Oh, I'm glad to see that go."

0:22:490:22:51

-Definitely.

-Yeah?

-Yes.

-"And get back up there and clear the rest out."

0:22:510:22:54

Right, "Where's the rest of the stuff?" Yeah.

0:22:540:22:56

Now then. Boxed Triang model of the RMS Orcades ocean liner.

0:22:590:23:04

Right, I'm opening this at £50.

0:23:090:23:11

At £50, at 50...at 50.

0:23:110:23:14

At 60. At 70. At £70.

0:23:140:23:18

At 80, do I see? At £70, at £70.

0:23:180:23:22

Are we all finished at £70? No?

0:23:220:23:24

At £70, not quite there.

0:23:240:23:27

One further bid? At £70?

0:23:270:23:29

All finished for £70, then?

0:23:290:23:32

£10 short.

0:23:340:23:35

-Close.

-Close.

-Close.

-Close.

0:23:350:23:38

Do you want us to try and find the underbidder to sell it at 70?

0:23:380:23:41

Yes, that would be fine.

0:23:410:23:42

We could try. We could have a word with Ian after the sale, couldn't we?

0:23:420:23:46

Because that was so close, it's a shame to lose that for £10.

0:23:460:23:49

You know, let somebody who wants it...

0:23:490:23:51

-Sorry about that.

-No worries.

0:23:510:23:54

-I'm happy.

-Oh, gosh. Oh, dear.

0:23:540:23:56

Well, Tony kept hold of the boat, and it's going into the next sale.

0:23:580:24:01

Fingers crossed.

0:24:010:24:03

The Steiff ram is up next, and owner Catherine and daughter Hannah

0:24:030:24:07

are after funds for some real sheep, rather than the toy variety.

0:24:070:24:11

And I know you're into sheep, you've got a little...

0:24:110:24:14

No, it's not me that's into sheep, it's her!

0:24:140:24:16

Hannah's the sheep girl.

0:24:160:24:17

Ah!

0:24:170:24:19

So Mum bought this for you, and this is great because it only cost 50p.

0:24:190:24:22

So it is classic recycling. It doesn't get greener than antiques

0:24:220:24:26

because they keep going around and around.

0:24:260:24:29

So what's the money going towards then, if you don't...?

0:24:290:24:32

-More sheep.

-More sheep.

0:24:320:24:34

-You didn't want a ram because all yours are ewes, are they?

-Yes.

0:24:340:24:38

Can't throw a ram in amongst all those ewes, cause mayhem.

0:24:380:24:41

It would be, wouldn't it? Good luck.

0:24:410:24:43

Let's find out what the bidders think,

0:24:430:24:46

it's going under the hammer right now.

0:24:460:24:48

Large Steiff soft toy ram in cream and beige,

0:24:480:24:52

right there it's being shown.

0:24:520:24:54

It's got the yellow label and the ear stud, 391 is the lot,

0:24:540:24:59

what am I starting at, 30?

0:24:590:25:01

Open me at £20, 20 I'm bid.

0:25:010:25:04

And 5 anywhere? At 20.

0:25:040:25:06

Any further bids at £20?

0:25:060:25:09

Let's have another one.

0:25:090:25:10

30, sir? 30, 35.

0:25:100:25:13

40, 45.

0:25:130:25:15

At 45 front row, £50.

0:25:150:25:18

At 50 in that corner, anybody else now?

0:25:180:25:21

At £50, selling for £50 then, first and last time in the corner.

0:25:210:25:26

-It's yours.

-Excellent.

0:25:260:25:29

As Adam just said, 50p becomes £50.

0:25:290:25:33

You see, these are all out there,

0:25:330:25:34

you've just got to get there early to the charity shops and car boots

0:25:340:25:38

and little fairs to pick up these bargains. Well spotted, Mum.

0:25:380:25:42

-Two real sheep for that.

-Hopefully!

0:25:420:25:46

Two sheep on the shopping list - now I've heard it all!

0:25:460:25:50

Lorna's horse racing game is waiting in the wings. It's up now.

0:25:520:25:56

Have you done much of this? Buying and selling?

0:25:560:25:58

Only a little bit. It's a bit of fun, really.

0:25:580:26:01

But once you start you can't stop.

0:26:010:26:03

Will you reinvest the money again at auction?

0:26:030:26:06

Possibly some of it.

0:26:060:26:09

-I've got plans for the other for my dog-walking friends, I'm going to buy them all a drink.

-Oh, are you?

0:26:090:26:14

They've supported me from the start, they've backed me.

0:26:140:26:18

-Your dog-walking friends? So you're a dog lover?

-Yes.

0:26:180:26:20

Gets your attention, doesn't it, every time?

0:26:200:26:22

It does. I like me doggies, I like my dogs.

0:26:220:26:25

-I really do.

-We liked our horses on the day, though.

0:26:250:26:27

We did very well. Well, I did well.

0:26:270:26:28

-You did, actually, you won, didn't you?

-I did.

0:26:280:26:31

Do you know, somehow I think that was fixed, looking back at that.

0:26:310:26:33

Bad loser, Paul.

0:26:330:26:35

Well, it was a bit suspicious how I fell at the first, wasn't it?

0:26:350:26:39

No, no, no, it was your choice, your horse.

0:26:390:26:41

Anyway, let's find out what the bidders think, shall we?

0:26:410:26:43

It's odds-on to do a little bit more than top end.

0:26:430:26:45

Edwardian mahogany cased game, "Ascot".

0:26:480:26:52

It's got this lovely box there, with the pictorial label on top.

0:26:520:26:56

What am I bid? All the lead pieces inside there.

0:26:560:26:58

30? 20 I have here to start. £20.

0:26:580:27:02

25, 25 and 30 do I see?

0:27:040:27:08

30, sir. 30. 35? 35, 40?

0:27:080:27:11

£40. 45? 45 and 50. 55.

0:27:110:27:16

At £55.

0:27:160:27:18

At £55, any further bids?

0:27:210:27:23

And 60, 60. 65? 65, 70.

0:27:230:27:28

-75.

-This is more like it.

0:27:280:27:30

85?

0:27:300:27:33

£85.

0:27:330:27:35

90.

0:27:350:27:37

£90 I'm bid.

0:27:370:27:39

-That's great.

-Well done!

-Yeah.

0:27:390:27:41

£90, are you all done at 90?

0:27:410:27:43

We're going.

0:27:430:27:45

Yes, well done. £90. Well done, you.

0:27:450:27:47

-Fantastic.

-I'm really pleased with that.

-Happy?

0:27:470:27:50

-Yes. Very happy.

-How many dog-walking friends have you got, then?

0:27:500:27:53

-A whole bunch.

-Have you?

0:27:530:27:54

Oh, dear. Teas all round, then, is it?

0:27:540:27:56

Yes, absolutely.

0:27:560:27:58

Champagne I think now. Definitely.

0:27:580:28:00

Definitely a champagne finish for Lorna.

0:28:010:28:04

Well, there you are, that concludes our first visit to the auction room today.

0:28:050:28:09

We are coming back here later on in the show, so don't go

0:28:090:28:12

away, because there could be one or two big surprises.

0:28:120:28:15

Now, while I was up here filming in the area, I took the opportunity to

0:28:150:28:18

go and explore some contemporary art on the landscape.

0:28:180:28:21

It sounds fascinating, doesn't it?

0:28:210:28:23

Take a look at this.

0:28:230:28:24

You might think the magnificent landscape of the Pennines in the north-west of England

0:28:350:28:40

is a surprising place to find sculpture, but it's a trend that goes back hundreds of years.

0:28:400:28:45

Follies became very popular during the 18th and 19th centuries.

0:28:500:28:53

They were described as romantic, or foolish, and rich people built them.

0:28:530:28:57

OK, they did look fabulous, but there was no real sense of purpose.

0:28:570:29:01

Many of them looked like old castles, or ruins.

0:29:010:29:04

However, there are some follies dotted around the Pennines here

0:29:040:29:08

which act as a monument to their creators.

0:29:080:29:11

And they serve a real sense of the history that unfolded here.

0:29:110:29:15

Some of the historic follies and monuments you can still see today

0:29:190:29:22

include Darwen Tower, which overlooks the town of Darwen, funnily enough.

0:29:220:29:27

It was built to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria's reign.

0:29:270:29:31

Nearly 15 miles north-east, Blacko Tower overlooks the Pendle district.

0:29:340:29:38

And from there to the south-east, you'll find Stoodley Pike Monument.

0:29:400:29:45

Built in the mid-19th century, it stands high at the top of the hill overlooking Todmorden.

0:29:450:29:52

In recent years, public art has become even more popular,

0:29:570:30:00

and pieces are now tourist attractions in their own right.

0:30:000:30:04

With well-loved examples like the Angel Of The North in Tyne and Wear, and the Willow Man in Somerset,

0:30:050:30:11

it's sculptures like these which stick in people's minds when they think of outside art.

0:30:110:30:16

I'm here to see some striking modern landmarks from a series called Panopticons.

0:30:200:30:24

Four pieces of sculpture were commissioned to make their mark on the local landscape,

0:30:240:30:29

and to encourage people from the towns below into the hills so they could embrace their environment.

0:30:290:30:35

And also get fit and healthy at the same time.

0:30:350:30:37

And that down there, that's Burnley.

0:30:370:30:39

Four different designs were commissioned by Mid-Pennine Arts,

0:30:450:30:49

working with the Royal Institute of British Architects, who organised the competition back in 2003.

0:30:490:30:55

This is called the Singing Ringing Tree, and I love this piece.

0:31:090:31:13

It is designed by Tonkin Liu, a partnership in London, and it's extremely clever, because from

0:31:130:31:18

a distance, as I was approaching it, it looked like a weather-beaten tree, standing alone on the horizon.

0:31:180:31:24

I felt sorry for it. But when you get up close, you can see

0:31:240:31:26

it's a striking sculpture, made of steel pipes, cleverly put together.

0:31:260:31:31

It almost looks like an organic, living shape.

0:31:310:31:34

It is very clever and it's also a musical instrument.

0:31:340:31:37

If you put your ear to any of the pipes the way the wind's blowing,

0:31:370:31:40

you can hear this sort of single droning noise.

0:31:400:31:44

It's one note, and it's quite constant, but it certainly does catch it up here.

0:31:440:31:48

Because we're up here on the open plains, and the wind...

0:31:480:31:50

here we go now! It's just driving through it.

0:31:500:31:53

It just really is so fabulous.

0:31:530:31:56

It puts a smile on your face, it makes you feel good.

0:31:560:31:58

It's the effort of getting all the way up here and seeing this,

0:31:580:32:01

and all of that together, it's just a brilliant combination.

0:32:010:32:04

Panopticon is defined in the dictionary as a place where everything is on display.

0:32:120:32:17

And I think you could easily describe this as a showroom

0:32:170:32:20

for the scenery of Lancashire and nearby Yorkshire.

0:32:200:32:23

There's a bit of a distance between the Panopticons, so let's continue with the sculpture trail.

0:32:250:32:30

Atom is definitely an arresting sight on the landscape.

0:32:360:32:39

It was designed by Peter Meacock and perches on the hill overlooking Wycoller Valley in Lancashire.

0:32:390:32:45

Well, from a distance, it does look like a blob on the landscape.

0:32:510:32:54

But the closer you get, well, it starts to make your heart beat faster.

0:32:540:32:58

It's got function and it's got form. It's a wonderful art installation,

0:32:580:33:01

a piece of sculpture which sits so comfortably with this stunning bit of countryside.

0:33:010:33:08

The outer shell is made of ferro-cement,

0:33:080:33:11

and inside there's this wonderful ball, which is made of steel.

0:33:110:33:14

And it reflects the images through these portholes.

0:33:140:33:17

So you can see this panoramic view of Pendle and all the historic sites

0:33:170:33:21

at any time of the year, because this embraces you.

0:33:210:33:24

It's a cocoon, it shelters you from the elements. And I just think it's absolutely fabulous.

0:33:240:33:30

You know, if I was the architect, if I was Peter, I'd be really proud of myself.

0:33:440:33:50

This is lovely.

0:33:500:33:51

Down in the valleys, in the centre of Blackburn, as a contrast to the solitary landmarks on the hills,

0:33:560:34:01

you'll find another Panopticon, called Colourfields.

0:34:010:34:05

Created by Jo Rippon, this structure is all about colour, space, and of course the scenery.

0:34:050:34:11

Again, you get fantastic, panoramic views.

0:34:110:34:15

It's on the site of an old cannon battery, regenerated by this project.

0:34:150:34:20

But, for the last treat in store, let's head back to the hills.

0:34:200:34:23

And, with the final Panopticon, transformation is a very important part of the design.

0:34:260:34:31

I'm on a former landfill site near Rossendale, which has been reclaimed

0:34:310:34:35

and regenerated for the local people and walkers alike to use.

0:34:350:34:39

Now let's see what's on the other side of the hill.

0:34:390:34:42

Oh, gosh. Look what greets you.

0:34:520:34:53

This is so futuristic. It looks like a UFO has landed on the hilltops overlooking the valleys.

0:34:530:34:59

Isn't that striking?

0:34:590:35:00

It's called Halo, and it was designed by John Kennedy.

0:35:000:35:04

And it overlooks one of the major roads

0:35:040:35:06

leading into Lancashire, welcoming all the visitors to the county with a sense of vision and civic pride.

0:35:060:35:13

This is certainly a monument to embrace the landscape,

0:35:130:35:16

and especially with the sun, look, just setting low.

0:35:160:35:19

And when that dips down behind the horizon, this whole thing glows when it gets darker.

0:35:190:35:25

There's a wind turbine over there, look, harnessing all the energy which drives all these LEDs.

0:35:250:35:30

And they're coming on now, look, as the light's starting to dip.

0:35:300:35:32

Can you see that? How fabulous.

0:35:320:35:35

All I can say is, I've thoroughly enjoyed my time here in Lancashire.

0:35:350:35:39

Well done. Well done, Lancashire.

0:35:390:35:42

What a beautiful sunset to close a brilliant day of exploration.

0:35:460:35:50

But I couldn't leave without showing you Halo glowing in the night sky.

0:35:500:35:55

Welcome back to the valuation day here in the town hall.

0:36:190:36:22

As you can see, there's a lot going on still.

0:36:220:36:24

Our experts do have their work cut out. People keep piling through those doors.

0:36:240:36:29

Let's find out what Adam Partridge has been up to.

0:36:290:36:31

Well he's found an interesting piece of drinking paraphernalia, owned by Andrew and Maureen.

0:36:340:36:40

You have brought in a nice piece of Doulton there.

0:36:400:36:43

A lot of people will recognise this, this is Kingsware.

0:36:430:36:45

Known as Kingsware, the brown ground with the figure on the top.

0:36:450:36:49

Often made for Dewar's whisky.

0:36:490:36:50

-Correct.

-Hence the Dewar's on this one.

0:36:500:36:53

Can you tell me, whose is this?

0:36:530:36:56

It's actually mine.

0:36:560:36:59

It was my grandmother's father's whisky decanter.

0:36:590:37:03

He worked for one of the big brewing companies

0:37:030:37:09

-in the early 20th century.

-Right.

0:37:090:37:11

And he actually kept whisky in that.

0:37:110:37:13

-Excellent, so it was used for its purpose?

-Absolutely.

0:37:130:37:16

This one was made to commemorate the coronation of George V and Queen Mary.

0:37:160:37:23

-Which you'll know was on 22nd June 1911.

-Yes.

0:37:230:37:29

So this was made in quite large quantities.

0:37:290:37:31

A lot of commemorative ware was produced to commemorate royal weddings, coronations,

0:37:310:37:37

any major royal event.

0:37:370:37:39

So this, as Kingsware goes, isn't a particularly high rarity.

0:37:390:37:43

-Right.

-Although some pieces can be worth an awful lot.

0:37:430:37:46

It largely depends on the figures, the shape.

0:37:460:37:49

Of course, condition is another factor.

0:37:490:37:51

Whilst this one hasn't got any major damage, I think you've got a bit

0:37:510:37:55

of a blemish on the spout there, it does have this crazing on it.

0:37:550:38:00

You can see this crazing all on the body here

0:38:000:38:05

which, you know, you expect that of something that's 100 years old, but some of them don't get it.

0:38:050:38:10

-Right.

-So it does have a negative impact on the value.

0:38:100:38:14

Usually these make 60 to £80, they are a model

0:38:150:38:19

that we are familiar with, because we see them quite often.

0:38:190:38:22

Particularly where I am near the Potteries, we get loads of Doulton and Kingsware and things like that.

0:38:220:38:28

So how does that fit with your expectations?

0:38:280:38:32

I think we thought it was worth a bit more than that.

0:38:320:38:35

I had a feeling by your reaction, you weren't exactly jumping for joy.

0:38:350:38:40

Like you said, if they are mass produced, I mean...

0:38:400:38:42

or there was quite a lot about...

0:38:420:38:44

Dewar's commissioned Doulton to make a whole range of Kingsware flasks,

0:38:440:38:48

and some of them were designed by Noke, who was one of

0:38:480:38:51

the main designers at Doulton, and they are worth hundreds of pounds,

0:38:510:38:55

but in my view this is a fairly... Not a scarce one, that's nicer than saying a common one, isn't it?

0:38:550:39:02

We'll put a 40 reserve just in case, and I'd hope it would make 60, 70, really.

0:39:020:39:07

Do you have any memories, enduring childhood memories about this jug?

0:39:070:39:12

Oh, yes, absolutely.

0:39:120:39:14

When I was a child, my grandmother played the piano and my grandfather sang, and he used to...

0:39:140:39:21

I mean, I remember it so well because it was so funny, it made me realise

0:39:210:39:24

that my grandparents had a sense of humour, but...

0:39:240:39:27

Have you heard of Little Brown Jug?

0:39:290:39:30

I think so, but I could do with a reminder.

0:39:300:39:33

OK.

0:39:330:39:35

# Little brown jug, little brown jug Little brown jug, do I love thee?

0:39:350:39:39

# Little brown jug, little brown jug Little brown jug, I do love thee. #

0:39:390:39:44

-How's that?

-Very good. What was the second verse?

0:39:440:39:46

Oh, I...

0:39:460:39:47

I don't think he got the first verse right!

0:39:470:39:50

Oh, that's a bit harsh, Maureen, but I get the feeling Andrew wants the jug to sell on its own merit.

0:39:510:39:57

We'll find out later.

0:39:570:39:59

Now, let's catch up with Catherine, who has gone all showbiz with Debbie and Alec.

0:39:590:40:04

I can see here you've got two James Bond posters from the 1970s,

0:40:040:40:08

nice selection of lobby cinema photos from the '70s for Grease,

0:40:080:40:13

and then I believe your Grease poster as well, cinema poster.

0:40:130:40:17

So who is the film buff?

0:40:170:40:19

-We both are.

-You're both into films?

0:40:190:40:21

-Yeah.

-And where did you get these from?

0:40:210:40:22

They were a gift from my brother in the '70s.

0:40:220:40:26

He knew I liked James Bond and he knew I liked Olivia Newton-John, so...

0:40:260:40:31

Oh, a secret crush on Olivia Newton-John!

0:40:310:40:33

It swayed it.

0:40:330:40:36

So have you got these displayed all around your house?

0:40:360:40:39

No, unfortunately we've not got them displayed because they are too large for the house, really.

0:40:390:40:43

-But I appreciate the artwork that's gone into the posters and it's very eye-catching.

-Right.

0:40:430:40:50

So what's your favourite Bond film?

0:40:500:40:53

Moonraker, really, I suppose. I like the space...

0:40:530:40:57

-It is. So he's your favourite, as well, is he, Roger Moore?

-Yeah.

0:40:570:41:00

Debbie, what's your favourite film?

0:41:000:41:02

Are you a big Grease fan?

0:41:020:41:04

I am a big Grease fan, and I do enjoy musicals, all musicals.

0:41:040:41:08

It was interesting that shortly after the time when this

0:41:080:41:11

film was really, really popular, Olivia Newton-John came to England to do a tour, to do a concert tour,

0:41:110:41:18

-so we actually saw Olivia live in Manchester, which was really, really brilliant.

-Oh, how lovely.

0:41:180:41:24

So why do you want to sell these?

0:41:240:41:26

They are quite a big part of your life.

0:41:260:41:27

We do, we love the film and we love the fact that we have memorabilia, but we don't display them

0:41:270:41:32

-and we don't see them every day.

-You don't enjoy them?

0:41:320:41:35

No, we don't enjoy them, so it seems a shame for them to be hidden away.

0:41:350:41:38

-Time to move on?

-We thought you might be interested in them.

0:41:380:41:41

That's very kind of you.

0:41:410:41:43

Any idea how much your brother paid for them?

0:41:430:41:46

There's a price on the back which says £2.50, so...

0:41:460:41:49

-For each item, or...?

-Yeah.

-Right.

0:41:490:41:51

Well, that was not a bad investment.

0:41:510:41:53

Well, I mean, I've done a little bit of research and I've found out that a poster of The Spy Who Loved Me

0:41:530:41:58

has been known to make £120, but I must stress that that was in absolute mint condition.

0:41:580:42:04

This one has got a little bit of general wear to it

0:42:040:42:07

and obviously the crease as well right down the middle, which does affect the value considerably.

0:42:070:42:12

With James Bond, it's really the '60s posters that make the money.

0:42:120:42:16

The 1970s ones, unfortunately, don't make so much money,

0:42:160:42:20

and especially if they are not in pristine condition.

0:42:200:42:24

Just thinking about valuation, I'd probably put this into auction at 80 to £120, how does that sound?

0:42:240:42:29

-Sounds fine.

-With a £60 reserve.

-Yes, that's OK.

0:42:290:42:33

Would you be sorry to see them go?

0:42:330:42:35

Yes and no. They are beautiful posters,

0:42:350:42:38

but it's time to move them on.

0:42:380:42:41

Maybe they'll find something else to put up on the walls if the posters sell at auction.

0:42:410:42:45

Away from the tables, there's still a queue.

0:42:470:42:49

Are you all being looked after? Because there are teas and coffees.

0:42:490:42:52

This is thirsty work, valuing antiques.

0:42:520:42:54

I've just been given a cup of coffee, as well.

0:42:540:42:56

So I'm going to take a seat, because all I need now is a coffee table.

0:42:560:43:00

Right there.

0:43:000:43:02

And at one of our blue tables, Adam's found a friend in Rita.

0:43:020:43:07

Rita, it's very nice to see you.

0:43:070:43:10

You seem to have grown a little.

0:43:100:43:11

I'm afraid we've had to put Rita on a little box, which makes a change,

0:43:110:43:15

because I normally get jokes about being short, I'm not the tallest.

0:43:150:43:18

But because of our stand here, we were obscuring you.

0:43:180:43:22

It's very nice to have you here, smiling away.

0:43:220:43:24

-It's an absolute pleasure.

-Well, the pleasantries are over.

0:43:240:43:28

Down to the object.

0:43:280:43:29

Where did you get it from?

0:43:290:43:31

-A church fete.

-Did you?

-I did.

0:43:310:43:34

-Was it all black and dirty and...?

-Yes.

-And how long ago did you get it?

0:43:340:43:38

-Oh, 20 years.

-A while ago?

0:43:380:43:40

-Yes.

-So you cleaned it up?

0:43:400:43:42

-Yes.

-Took it home?

-Yes.

0:43:420:43:44

-And enjoyed it?

-Yes.

0:43:440:43:46

-Did you have it on display?

-Sometimes.

0:43:460:43:49

Sometimes it lived on the dresser, sometimes it lived in the sewing box.

0:43:490:43:53

OK. So you've used it?

0:43:530:43:55

Not as a pincushion, no.

0:43:550:43:56

Well, of course, it is a pincushion.

0:43:560:43:59

And that's a later addition, isn't it?

0:43:590:44:02

How much later is that?

0:44:020:44:04

My husband put it in today.

0:44:040:44:07

-So this chicken was stuffed this morning?

-It was indeed.

0:44:070:44:11

So I suppose when you cleaned it,

0:44:110:44:12

you thought, "Excellent, it's silver."

0:44:120:44:14

-Yes.

-And I presume at the church fete it wasn't much?

0:44:140:44:18

-A pound.

-A pound.

-Yeah.

0:44:180:44:19

Well, we've got the marks on the bottom there,

0:44:190:44:22

which is the Chester mark there in the middle,

0:44:220:44:25

and the date letters for 1905.

0:44:250:44:27

-Right.

-So a good age to it.

-Yes.

0:44:270:44:30

And there's SM & Co on the bottom, which is the maker's mark, which

0:44:300:44:34

stands for Sampson, Mordan & Co, which is a very posh, famous firm.

0:44:340:44:39

And they were particularly well known for novelty silver, little pincushions and things like that,

0:44:390:44:44

and for those propelling pencils that you probably remember, you push, slide up.

0:44:440:44:48

They were the first patented inventors of the propelling pencil. So it was a famous firm.

0:44:480:44:53

-So what you've got there is a chick with some pedigree, really.

-Yes.

0:44:530:44:57

Any idea what it's worth, then?

0:44:570:44:59

-I should think about £40.

-Very good.

0:44:590:45:02

-Do you watch the show?

-I do.

0:45:020:45:04

Very good. I'm going to be out of a job soon, because all the viewers know as much as us nowadays.

0:45:040:45:08

Absolutely spot-on. I would say 40 to 60, and hopefully we'll get

0:45:080:45:13

70 or 80 quid, would be nice, if two collectors chase after it.

0:45:130:45:16

There's a lot of market in novelty silver, people collect them a lot.

0:45:160:45:19

-Yeah.

-They'd rather buy a small piece of silver for their cabinet

0:45:190:45:22

like that than a great, big lump of silver, so...

0:45:220:45:25

Let's put 40 to 60, shall we?

0:45:250:45:27

-Reserve of 40?

-That would be fine.

0:45:270:45:29

Excellent. And if it goes and makes £80, would you do something with it in particular?

0:45:290:45:34

-A weekend away with my husband.

-Is this your husband here?

0:45:340:45:37

-It is indeed.

-And we didn't even introduce him.

0:45:370:45:40

-None of these are anything to do with you, are they?

-No.

0:45:400:45:43

-Just your husband here?

-Yes.

0:45:430:45:44

Well, that's very nice. I hope you have a good weekend away.

0:45:440:45:47

-Thank you.

-And thanks for coming.

-Thank you very much, been a pleasure.

0:45:470:45:52

Now, I've spotted a bit of wood with a rather unusual purpose.

0:45:520:45:56

Right, Stuart and Eleanor, what have we got here? I guess this is Dad's,

0:45:560:46:00

isn't it? Yeah? It wouldn't be yours, would it?

0:46:000:46:03

Tell me, what do you know about it?

0:46:030:46:06

Not a lot, really.

0:46:060:46:07

It was given to my parents about 30 years ago by an old sailor.

0:46:070:46:11

And they just had it on the wall.

0:46:110:46:14

About ten years ago when my dad died, we had it decorated

0:46:140:46:17

and it went in the garage. And it's been there ever since.

0:46:170:46:19

My mum died last year and we cleared the garage out

0:46:190:46:22

and that was on one of the shelves.

0:46:220:46:23

What's really nice is this came from an old sailor, so that means

0:46:230:46:27

it's got great provenance because he brought it back from his travels.

0:46:270:46:30

-Do you know what this is?

-I haven't got a clue.

0:46:300:46:33

If I did this - bash-bash - have you got a clue now?

0:46:330:46:37

-Some sort of club.

-Yes. It's a Fijian gunstock war club.

0:46:370:46:41

I don't know what wood this is, but it's incredibly hard,

0:46:410:46:44

close-grained, dense wood.

0:46:440:46:47

And it's meant to do a lot of damage as well.

0:46:470:46:50

With the weight, I would have expected so, now I know it's a club.

0:46:500:46:54

It's known as a gunstock war club.

0:46:540:46:57

You can see why because it looks like a gunstock.

0:46:570:46:59

You see this wonderful geometric carving on the handle.

0:46:590:47:02

That's known as crosshatching.

0:47:020:47:04

It's virtually what you see on the stock on the handle of a gun.

0:47:040:47:08

-Right.

-It's just to give you extra grip. And you do need a lot of grip.

0:47:080:47:12

That is to be held with two hands.

0:47:120:47:15

-And that seriously would do an awful lot of damage.

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:47:150:47:20

You see this section here? That's been broken.

0:47:220:47:24

Maybe this actually terminated in a point at one stage

0:47:240:47:28

like an arrowhead. Maybe it's just a sort of spear as well.

0:47:280:47:31

-But that's obviously...

-The damaging bit.

-Meant for...

0:47:310:47:35

We thought originally it was a plough, like a hand plough,

0:47:350:47:38

being that shape.

0:47:380:47:40

-Understandably. You can see that would be for sort of tilling.

-Yes.

0:47:400:47:43

-No, it's not. That's the war club.

-I take it it's not ceremonial.

0:47:430:47:47

-It's probably been used.

-If this was ceremonial,

0:47:470:47:50

most of the handle would be decorated with geometric pattern.

0:47:500:47:53

-Right.

-So that's what it is.

0:47:530:47:56

That's what's been in your garage all this time.

0:47:560:48:00

-Amazing.

-Incredible, isn't it? It really is. This is 18th-century.

0:48:000:48:05

-As old as that?

-Yes, it is. Circa 1790.

-Gosh!

0:48:050:48:09

At the very latest, early 1900s.

0:48:090:48:12

And it's got that lovely patina to go with it.

0:48:120:48:15

You know, wood, over the years, gets tighter and tighter

0:48:150:48:18

-and holds the dirt and grime in the wax.

-Yes.

0:48:180:48:21

That's your patina.

0:48:210:48:22

-Any idea of value?

-Absolutely none at all.

-What would you be happy with?

0:48:220:48:27

-What would you take?

-Anything.

-Would he?

-Yes.

0:48:270:48:31

-Is he going to treat you to something with the money, do you think?

-I hope so.

0:48:310:48:35

-Are you a student at the moment?

-Yes.

-Studying. OK.

0:48:350:48:38

-Well, the money is going to come in handy, isn't it?

-I hope so.

0:48:380:48:42

Would you be happy with £300?

0:48:420:48:44

-Definitely, yes.

-Yes?

-Yes. I'd be more than happy with £300.

0:48:440:48:49

-OK, you would be extra happy at £500.

-Just about, yes.

-Right.

0:48:490:48:54

I think, to tempt these bidders in, we've got to show them

0:48:540:48:57

it's not a trade lot, not done the rounds, it's from a private source

0:48:570:49:00

and you're prepared to let this go at £300 to £500.

0:49:000:49:04

-OK.

-How about that?

-Fantastic.

-That's auction psychology for you.

0:49:040:49:07

-You know what happens. It really is a tricky business.

-Yes.

0:49:070:49:12

We'll put a fixed reserve on of £300.

0:49:120:49:14

If it doesn't go for anything over £300, it goes home with you.

0:49:140:49:17

This is where it gets exciting

0:49:170:49:19

because you just don't know what's going to happen in an auction room.

0:49:190:49:22

We are about to find out, aren't we? So whatever you do, don't go away.

0:49:220:49:25

You two could be going home with a lot of money.

0:49:250:49:28

Well, it's been my pleasure to be here at Todmorden.

0:49:280:49:30

Now we've found our last items, it's time to put them to the auction test.

0:49:300:49:34

And we are selling...

0:49:340:49:36

The little brown jug, which sadly doesn't come with

0:49:360:49:40

musical accompaniment, but it's a nice example of Royal Doulton.

0:49:400:49:45

The movie posters hold a lot of memories for Alec and Debbie,

0:49:450:49:49

but will the bidders find them interesting?

0:49:490:49:52

Stuart and Eleanor's wooden gunstock war club.

0:49:520:49:56

And lastly, Rita's bird-shaped pincushion,

0:49:560:49:59

small but perfectly formed - now that is worth watching.

0:49:590:50:04

And over at the auction house, let's see if Andrew and Maureen's jug reaches its potential.

0:50:110:50:16

Good luck, Maureen and Andrew, it's all I can say.

0:50:180:50:21

It's a lovely little brown jug.

0:50:210:50:23

And we had the brown jug song at the valuation day, didn't we?

0:50:230:50:26

-Are you going to sing today?

-No, no, no.

0:50:260:50:28

Once bitten, twice shy. You learn very quickly.

0:50:280:50:30

-He's been warned.

-He's been warned!

0:50:300:50:32

A nice commemorative thing, though. Royal Doulton, great name.

0:50:320:50:36

It's a familiar model, hopefully it will do 60, 80 but, you know,

0:50:360:50:39

I don't think we're going to be going, "Wow!" at the end of it.

0:50:390:50:41

We now move on to the Doulton Kingsware whisky jug for Dewar's.

0:50:430:50:49

Right, may I have an opening bid, please, of £50? 40?

0:50:510:50:55

Open at 20? Thank you, £20 bid.

0:50:550:50:58

At £20. At 20.

0:51:000:51:02

And five. I have 30.

0:51:020:51:05

And five. At £35. At 40, sir. £40.

0:51:050:51:09

At 40 in the back of the room.

0:51:090:51:10

At 45, 45.

0:51:100:51:13

At 45. Do I see 50? At £45.

0:51:130:51:17

The lady on my right, at £45.

0:51:170:51:19

It's going.

0:51:190:51:21

Well, it's gone and it went within estimate,

0:51:210:51:23

so you've got to be happy with that, haven't you?

0:51:230:51:26

I know you would have liked the top end of the estimate, we all would,

0:51:260:51:29

it's a natural feeling, but at least it's gone.

0:51:290:51:31

-Yes.

-And you can go home now and you can sing in the bath.

0:51:310:51:34

Well, maybe the condition put some bidders off, but it's still a lovely piece that made above its reserve.

0:51:340:51:40

Now it's show time for Debbie and Alec's movie memorabilia.

0:51:400:51:45

-You were courting, weren't you, when you saw these movies?

-We were.

0:51:450:51:49

There's a lot of memories here.

0:51:490:51:51

-There are.

-Surely, surely you've got to be hanging on to them?

0:51:510:51:54

They were a fantastic time in our lives, when we first met,

0:51:540:51:59

and I was trying to impress Debbie

0:51:590:52:01

with taking her to these big-time blockbuster movies.

0:52:010:52:04

Aah, just think, stealing his first kiss in the back row to Grease.

0:52:040:52:08

-Were you there?

-Is that what happened?

0:52:080:52:11

Yeah!

0:52:110:52:13

# Tell me more, tell me more Did he get very far? #

0:52:130:52:17

The collection of cinema film memorabilia,

0:52:170:52:21

including the two James Bond posters.

0:52:210:52:25

What am I bid on this?

0:52:250:52:26

50 to open? 40?

0:52:280:52:30

30, I have, thank you, £30. At 30.

0:52:300:52:32

At 40. At 40, at 50. 50, 50. At 60.

0:52:320:52:36

Do I see 70?

0:52:360:52:38

At 70, madam, £70.

0:52:380:52:40

I'll take five, if it helps. At £70, we are selling at 70, then.

0:52:400:52:44

At the back, there, at £70, the lady's bid. Are we all done? At £70.

0:52:440:52:49

-£70, just did it.

-Just did it. I thought they would do a bit more.

0:52:490:52:53

I think someone got a bargain there.

0:52:530:52:55

-But you wanted to let them go?

-Yes, we did.

0:52:550:52:57

-We're happy.

-You're happy? You've still got each other, and that's what it's all about, isn't it?

0:52:570:53:02

The reserve meant the posters sold below estimate,

0:53:020:53:06

but Debbie and Alec's memories of those films were priceless.

0:53:060:53:09

Now it's time for that special silver bird of Rita's.

0:53:090:53:12

Are you ready for this one?

0:53:120:53:14

Hopefully this little bird will fly away.

0:53:140:53:16

It belongs to Rita, doesn't it?

0:53:160:53:18

This wonderful silver pincushion. Great maker as well, Chester.

0:53:180:53:22

-Really nice.

-Real quality. And you got this for how much?

0:53:220:53:25

-A pound, yes.

-Would you be happy with £60?

0:53:250:53:27

-Oh, yes.

-Would you be happy with 70?

0:53:270:53:29

-Yes.

-Would you be happy with 80?

-Yes!

0:53:290:53:31

-Happier.

-Would you be jumping up and down if it made a hundred?

0:53:310:53:34

-I would.

-Great, OK. Let's watch this. We're going under the hammer now.

0:53:340:53:37

Lot 624, the hallmarked silver pincushion in the form of a bird,

0:53:390:53:44

and we open the bidding at £30, on commission bid, 30.

0:53:440:53:48

£30, 35. 35, 40. 45.

0:53:480:53:52

50. And five.

0:53:520:53:55

60. And five.

0:53:550:53:58

-It's getting to that magic number.

-70, and five.

0:53:580:54:02

80, and five.

0:54:020:54:05

90, and five.

0:54:050:54:07

100, and five.

0:54:090:54:11

-Yay!

-Yay!

0:54:110:54:13

110, 115.

0:54:130:54:16

Wow.

0:54:160:54:18

120, and five.

0:54:180:54:20

£125.

0:54:200:54:22

At 125... 130, a fresh bid. 130...

0:54:220:54:25

-Ooh!

-135.

0:54:250:54:27

140, and five.

0:54:270:54:29

150, and five.

0:54:290:54:32

160, and five.

0:54:320:54:34

165, the lady's bid.

0:54:340:54:36

At £165, are we quite finished?

0:54:360:54:40

£165, small is beautiful.

0:54:420:54:44

-Yes.

-What a magic moment.

0:54:440:54:46

-It did fly away, didn't it?

-It did very well.

0:54:460:54:48

-Yes.

-Quality always sells.

0:54:480:54:50

It was a bit of a low, conservative estimate,

0:54:500:54:53

because we knew it only cost you a quid.

0:54:530:54:55

-But that's a good price.

-Yes, yes.

0:54:550:54:57

What a good result.

0:54:570:54:59

Now, I'm under pressure, as the gunstock war club is up for auction.

0:54:590:55:03

I hope this is the one that flies through the roof.

0:55:030:55:06

I know we're talking about £300 to £500.

0:55:060:55:08

I had a chat to Ian, the auctioneer, just before the sale started.

0:55:080:55:11

He agreed with the valuation. It's still speculative, because...

0:55:110:55:15

with two people interested on the phone from overseas, who knows?

0:55:150:55:19

These things are so esoteric. They really are.

0:55:190:55:22

And it's an academics thing, and if they get stuck in and they

0:55:220:55:24

want to buy something, they're prepared to pay lots of money.

0:55:240:55:28

So you could be going to Barcelona for that photography trip,

0:55:280:55:31

couldn't you? So, what's this all about, then, the trip?

0:55:310:55:34

It's for my graphics course, photography, so we're going to

0:55:340:55:38

go and do some work over there.

0:55:380:55:41

Ooh! Cos we were saying, students haemorrhage money.

0:55:410:55:45

Don't they, Dad? Eh?

0:55:450:55:47

I just hope we get the top end of the estimate.

0:55:470:55:49

Whatever happens, that's still £500.

0:55:490:55:51

But you never know, we could be in for a real surprise, couldn't we?

0:55:510:55:55

We see it happen in auction rooms all the time. I hope it happens.

0:55:550:55:58

-Fingers crossed.

-Fingers crossed. Please! Don't go away. Watch this.

0:55:580:56:02

This is going under the hammer right now. Let's see what it does.

0:56:020:56:05

Lot 417, the hardwood tribal gunstock war club

0:56:050:56:11

with carved handle there.

0:56:110:56:15

Good-looking piece, nice patina, lovely carving. Lot 417.

0:56:150:56:20

What am I bid on this? £300?

0:56:200:56:22

250? 200 I have. Thank you. £200.

0:56:240:56:28

-He's starting low, Eleanor.

-225. 250.

0:56:280:56:31

250. 250.

0:56:310:56:33

275? 250. 275 in the room. £300. At £300. £300.

0:56:330:56:38

£300. At 325, do I see? 325.

0:56:380:56:41

Got a phone bid. There's somebody on the phone.

0:56:410:56:44

350. 375 on the phone. At 400 in the room. £400.

0:56:450:56:49

-Stuart, it's starting to get exciting.

-450 in the room. 450.

0:56:500:56:55

475 on the phone. £500 in the room. £500.

0:56:570:57:02

-Top end now.

-525 on the phone. 550, sir? 550.

0:57:040:57:08

575. At £600 in the room. £600.

0:57:100:57:14

-This is good.

-625 on the phone. 650 in the room.

0:57:170:57:22

-Barcelona, here we come.

-Barcelona, here we come!

0:57:220:57:26

675 on the phone. I've 675 on the phone. Any further bids?

0:57:260:57:32

At 675, then.

0:57:320:57:35

Yes! The hammer's gone down. £675. We're happy with that, aren't we?

0:57:350:57:40

-Well over the top end.

-Sure.

0:57:400:57:42

-And to think, this was in the garage!

-Yes!

0:57:420:57:45

And only two weeks before the valuation,

0:57:450:57:48

the garage got broken into.

0:57:480:57:50

They went through everything in the garage,

0:57:500:57:53

left that and took a mountain bike.

0:57:530:57:55

-So thanks very much.

-It's enough for a new mountain bike!

0:57:550:58:00

It's enough for the new mountain bike and the air fare to Barcelona.

0:58:000:58:03

-Yeah.

-Yeah?

-Great!

-Well, congratulations, both of you.

0:58:030:58:06

Thank you so much for bringing that in. You've made my day,

0:58:060:58:09

and I think you've made everybody else's here as well.

0:58:090:58:12

We've had a fabulous time. I hope you've enjoyed watching.

0:58:120:58:14

Do join us again for many more surprises,

0:58:140:58:16

but for now, from the Calder Valley, it's goodbye from all of us.

0:58:160:58:19

Flog It! visits Todmorden, a town in Yorkshire bordering Lancashire. Lots of local people bring their forgotten or unusual items along to be valued, and amongst them Adam Partridge spots a bit of local history made from cast iron. Catherine Southon gives starters orders with an old horse-racing game, but will it be a winner at auction? Presenter Paul Martin gets out and about around the Pennines, looking at striking modern landmarks called panopticons.