Malvern Flog It!


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Malvern

Paul Martin is joined by experts Kate Bateman and Adam Partridge in Malvern. The star item is a painting by renowned artist Robert Lenkiewicz.


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Welcome to Malvern,

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famous for its ancient hills and beautiful clear spring water.

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Today, Flog It! is drinking up the atmosphere as we head into town.

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The magnificent ancient Malvern Hills and Malvern pure spring water

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go hand in hand, really, because, let's face it,

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without the hills there wouldn't be any water

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and the hills are a mind boggling 600 million years old

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and they consist of a very hard rock formation

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which have formed into a network of fractures.

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And the rainwater runs down through these fractures and, eventually,

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out into a series of springs which are dotted all around the town.

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Now, because of the unique hardness of the rock in the Malvern Hills,

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the spring water is quite pure actually, which is good news -

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not a lot of minerals filter into the water.

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And the great news is, if you're a local,

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you don't have to buy this stuff at the supermarket,

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it's absolutely free.

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Just queue up and help yourself...

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and get fully refreshed.

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But I'm going to now join up with our experts

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over at the valuation day and see what antiques and collectables

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are springing up over there. Join me later.

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And this is where we're valuing all the antiques and collectables

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today, the Malvern Theatres, which host many different events

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throughout the year, from pantos to musicals

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and even highbrow theatre.

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But topping the bill today for one day only

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the fantabulous Adam Partridge and the glamorous Kate Bateman.

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Well, it is now 9:30, it's time to get the curtain up,

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get everybody in the seats and let's start the show.

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Our team of experts are raring to go.

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Leading the way are Adam and Kate.

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Adam's first-ever job was as an auction porter.

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Since then he's risen to the dizzy heights

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of owning his own saleroom in Cheshire.

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-Do you do any needlework yourself?

-No.

-She can't even sew a button on!

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-Really?

-Shocking.

-We've got something in common there then.

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And Kate nearly became a ballet dancer,

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but instead fine art and antiques won her heart

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and now she runs a successful saleroom

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with her father in Lincolnshire.

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Show and tell, what have we got at the back here? Oh, pictures!

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While everybody's getting seated, let's have a sneak preview

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of what's coming up on today's show.

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A father and daughter team bring Kate a curio.

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You just basically focus it so your eye focuses

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and then look through here and it actually looks like

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the girls are, like, standing out at you.

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'And I'm lucky enough to stumble across a real treasure.'

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And I'm very envious, June, very envious.

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But, first, Adam is curious to see what Richard has

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in his Moroccan red leather box.

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-Can you open it up for me, please?

-Certainly, my pleasure.

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-There we are.

-You've got a lovely silver jug.

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A lovely silver tankard there. A christening tankard.

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-Can I take the tankard out?

-Sure.

-Let's have a look at it.

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This belonged to my step-grandfather,

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so my father's stepfather.

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It's an interesting link, because it's been in your family

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for a long time then, hasn't it?

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Well, one would assume so, a couple of generations at least.

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We see these initials and monograms

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on lots of pieces of silver, and you always think,

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"I wonder who owned that?"

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But you can actually tell us, so what are the initials on here?

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Well, we have four initials.

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My step-grandfather's name was Edward Graham Frazier Thompson.

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He sounds like a dashing character just from the name!

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What can you tell us about him?

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I suppose his major contribution was that he was a pilot

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during World War I, and a reconnaissance pilot, a specialty.

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We actually have some old photographs of his

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-where he's actually photographed the trenches...

-Oh, really?

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..and some of the artillery placements and things of that nature.

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He actually even went on to write a book about his experiences

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as a pilot under the pseudonym Spin.

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-Really?

-So if anybody comes across...

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-There we go.

-..an author named Spin, that was my step-grandfather.

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Your step-grandfather.

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These photographs of the trenches sound fascinating.

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I mean something like that, that's more personal to me,

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whereas this is not necessarily of sentimental...

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-Yeah.

-..or important history, family history.

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You've helped answer my question -

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isn't it a shame that you're selling it? But now you've explained that...

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I have so many other memories I'm able to keep of him.

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Well, it must have been quite an affluent family,

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because this is quite a posh...

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Unfortunately, I don't know too much about the Thompson family.

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-Do you know when he was born?

-I couldn't tell you that, even.

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Well, the hallmarks on the cup may help.

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Right, yes, I was wondering about that.

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Typically late Victorian in its packaging, late 19th century,

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and then we've had a look at the marks.

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We've got the M and W, of course, for Mappin and Webb,

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the Sheffield crown, the lion, of course,

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-and that date letter is for 1895.

-Right, OK.

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So, christening mug -

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-we may presume he was born in 1895.

-That certainly would fit.

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So, it's a lovely object, but I think the story really makes it

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because, commercially, it's not hugely valuable.

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-No, no.

-Any ideas yourself?

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I was thinking anywhere sort of between £40 and £80.

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Bang on, Richard, well done. Absolutely great.

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I think that on its own, 40-60.

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With the box, it might improve it to maybe 60-80.

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-Fine, yeah.

-Put a reserve there at 50,

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stop it from underselling, because it must be worth £50.

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-So, thank you very much for bringing it.

-You're very welcome.

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-Lovely object.

-Glad to have shared the story.

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As silver christening mugs go, that one's a real beauty.

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Good find, Adam, but there's no resting on your laurels -

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there's still plenty of people to see.

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What have we got in here?

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LAUGHTER

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Oh, you've got...some pets in there!

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-Yeah.

-You've got your cat, a little pig.

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Kate is examining a stereoscopic viewer

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belonging to father and daughter James and Molly.

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-I've brought a stereoscope.

-Did you inherit it, or you bought it?

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I bought it from a house sale in Aberdeenshire about 30 years ago.

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Can you remember what you paid for it all those years ago?

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I just can't remember. It...

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I didn't have a lot of money at the time, so it'd have been very little.

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-£15, £20 I suppose.

-Oh, that's quite a lot back then I suppose.

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-I just can't remember.

-You splurged.

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What we've got is "Trip Around The World Through The Stereoscope."

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And it's nice to have the box, cos we often see the cards loose,

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but you have the box, as well.

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Made to look like a book.

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And, if we open it up, we've got all of these cards.

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Do you know how it works?

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Yeah. Well, this is my favourite one. The two little girls.

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-OK.

-So, if you put it in here...

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and then you look through this bit,

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so then you just basically focus it so your eye focuses,

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and then look through here and it actually looks like

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the girls are, like, standing out at you.

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-So it's 3D.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, and you have to adjust it to get it to work.

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Yeah, so your eyes focus to it.

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Yeah, it's a lovely thing.

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You've got a whole load of very interesting different views.

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So I presume you've looked through all of them?

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Yeah, there's some fantastic images of the Boer War,

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the San Francisco earthquake,

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and just various pictures from around the world.

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That is quite sweet, that one, with the girls at tea, that's quite cute.

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I suppose girls today do still have dollies' tea parties,

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but it's a bygone era, isn't it?

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Look how they're dressed, with perfect dresses

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-and little bows in their hair. It's really sweet.

-Yeah.

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Any ideas on price?

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Well, I wasn't sure.

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-About 80-100?

-It's hard to know. You've got a whole mixed lot.

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Maybe put it slightly lower, 60-100, a slightly wider estimate

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for the auction, maybe a £50 reserve.

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Yes, that's fine. 60-100 estimate for the catalogue. Yeah.

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I think it should go. I mean, it's one of those things, there are collectors out there.

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It'll depend if they're interested in the particular cards you've got.

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Apparently you're getting the money when it sells, is that right?

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Yeah, I'm going on a ski trip next year with the school, so it'll go...

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The money will go to, like, the hat and the salopettes to go...

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OK. An expensive business, then!

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We might be able to get you one ski pole or something, but we will try!

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I think that's a really good thing to aim for,

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-so hopefully it will sell in the sale.

-Yes.

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Send you off whizzing down a mountain!

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-Thanks very much.

-Thanks.

-Thank you.

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This is the bit I love about Flog It!,

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dipping in and out of the crowd, joining up with them

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before they get to the tablecloths

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and having a chat to people like June, who brought in

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something that I recognise instantly

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because it's a Robert Lenkiewicz, it's a watercolour.

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I had the good fortune of filming at the Plymouth Museum recently,

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the Lenkiewicz retrospective,

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and I was thoroughly impressed and I learnt a lot.

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I'm very envious, June, very envious!

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How did you get to own such a wonderful thing like this?

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It was in 1978, I was travelling with my late husband,

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-who was also an artist, to sell paintings in Cornwall.

-Right.

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-And we stopped at the Barbican...

-In Plymouth.

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..at Plymouth, and we met Robert Lenkiewicz, spent the day with him...

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Oh, lovely.

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..and he was telling us all about his work and his books and his writing.

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Oh, I wish I'd met him, I really do.

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And we also met Diogenes.

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-Yes, the tramp, the down and out that he used to paint.

-Yeah, yeah.

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I particularly like the works that he did,

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the sort of social history aspect of Plymouth,

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because he embraced all those down and outs,

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-and I know at one stage he had about 20 living in his studio!

-I know.

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£25 you paid for this.

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£25!

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Well, do you know what it's worth today?

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Is that what you're here for, to ask?

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-Just as an enquiry, just to see.

-OK.

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Because it holds great sentimental value for me.

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If you put this into auction, it would have a price tag of around...

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3,000, possibly £4,000.

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I think if you had to buy it in a gallery, maybe just over that.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

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It's got very happy memories for me.

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Well, it's put a smile on my face.

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It's a watercolour and it's signed. Well, look, enjoy it.

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Put it on the wall, and thank you for bringing it in.

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You look really colourful, as well. In fact, you match, look at that!

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-I can see why you gravitated...

-I look like him, do I?

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No, no, no! You've got the same lime green.

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Let's catch up with Kate.

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She's with Jan, who's put in a little gem in mint condition

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belonging to her husband, John.

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I'm sure this will bring back memories for most of us.

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He's had it since he was very, very small,

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but he was very careful.

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-He never, ever played with it.

-Right.

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I can see it is in perfect condition in terms of the actual car.

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The box has seen better days, but it is boxed, which is brilliant.

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And it's Chitty Chitty Bang Bang - was he a fan of the film?

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-I think he was, yes.

-We're going to date him horribly

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by saying the date here is 1967.

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We shan't mention how old he is to have been a child when it came out.

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But it's a great thing. It's so unusual to get them in their boxes.

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Children get it for Christmas, rip open the box,

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throw it away, play with it.

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So it's nice to see it in working condition with all its bits.

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Do you know it's secret and what it does?

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Yeah, the wings pop out.

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-Do you want to give it a go?

-No, you do it.

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So if I break it that's fine!

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This is your item, you've said it live now, we can't go back.

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I'm petrified. Do we pull it forward?

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And there we go! So it works,

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and presumably flies off into the distance.

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I think it's a really fun thing. Why are you selling?

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Well, we've got four boys

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and you can't really divide it between the four of them.

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The general census is to sell it and it'll go towards our holiday fund.

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OK, flying off in a motorised car somewhere!

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Well, no, not quite, I don't think, but...

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In this condition I would have thought

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estimate for auction is £80-£120.

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I think we'd reserve it at perhaps slightly lower than that,

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maybe a £60 reserve, but 80-120 estimate.

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-Is that the kind of thing you'd be happy with?

-Yeah, fine, lovely.

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-I take it you don't have an attic full of other boxed toys?

-We do.

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-You do!

-We do.

-Wow.

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My husband had two brothers,

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so whenever one was bought something all three of them were.

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He used to hide his and put them away and play with his brothers'.

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So his were never touched.

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-So the brothers' are completely ruined...

-Totally wrecked.

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Well, he can have the last laugh if this sells for £100,

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cos that would be brilliant, wouldn't it?

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-So we'll take it to the sale and see if it goes.

-Lovely.

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-Thanks for bring it in.

-Thanks.

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Adam's chatting to Maxine, who's brought in

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her ten Wedgwood plates with a nautical theme.

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There's shipping in the family?

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There is. My father was a sailor.

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He was a captain on oil tankers out of New York.

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So were these your father's plates?

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-No, he bought for me as a birthday present.

-OK. What every girl wants!

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Yeah, well, he didn't have any sons, he had four daughters.

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So birthdays we'd have plates or ships in bottles

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or something that had a nautical feel.

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And I suppose sometimes that was nice

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-and sometimes perhaps you'd have liked...

-Oh, no, I liked it, yes.

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-Is this your father's address in New York?

-Yes. He was living in New York

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so he wrote to Wedgwood in England to see -

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he'd heard about them, I suppose - to find out how much it would be

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to ship them and how much they were.

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And, in 1969, they were £11/11s.

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"Sailing ships and clipper ships in fine earthenware by Wedgwood."

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So they did two sets, they did a set of 12 of sailing ships

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-and a slightly smaller set for clipper ships.

-Yes.

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-So, it was a set of 12?

-Yes, and unfortunately two got broken.

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The cat knocked them off the dresser.

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They're a printed design on an earthenware plate.

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-So they were of a mass-produced type.

-Yeah.

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-They were probably run off in quite large quantities.

-Yeah.

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They were all designed by a chap called George Whales.

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Really nice things for the collector

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-because all the information about every plate is on the back.

-Yes.

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So we could pretend to be great experts here

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and say, well, the Mayflower...

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"The Mayflower brought the pilgrims to Plymouth.

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"Based on the model built in 1922 by Anderson

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"for the Pilgrim Society in Plymouth."

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-So, you can learn from your antiques, as well.

-Yes!

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-Did you ever have them on display?

-Yes, I had them on a Welsh dresser.

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I've recently moved now to a smaller house, no dresser, so...

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-The dresser's gone.

-So they're just sitting in the cupboard, which seems a shame, really.

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Now, to value. I'd like to think they'd make £100 plus.

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Oh, that would be good.

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I think, perhaps, we should go with our old 80 to 120 estimate.

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The auctioneer's favourite, which is around £100 mark,

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-and then pop the reserve in at about £80.

-Yeah, that'd be great.

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-Does that sound all right?

-Yes.

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Maybe put a little bit of discretion on there in case it gets to 75.

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-You don't want them going for nothing, do you?

-No.

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-OK, thanks for coming.

-Thank you.

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Let's hope they sail off!

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I'm at the Ruskin Mill Glasshouse College

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right in the heart of the historic glass quarter of Stourbridge.

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This whole area was the Royal Doulton factory,

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but now this site provides studio space and workshops

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for many Artisans both in traditional and contemporary glassmaking,

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but also many other crafts.

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For the last 400 years, they've been making glass in Stourbridge.

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It's one of the great names world-renowned for its cut crystal.

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Not only have the factories in the Stourbridge area

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created some of the finest glass ever made,

0:16:120:16:14

but the craftsmen from here have influenced

0:16:140:16:16

the most famous international makers.

0:16:160:16:19

The golden era was in the Victorian period,

0:16:210:16:23

where everybody wanted cut glass crystal.

0:16:230:16:25

It was hugely fashionable, but, sadly, tastes do change

0:16:250:16:29

and many of the big manufacturers went out of business.

0:16:290:16:32

Stourbridge today is well and truly alive and kicking in glass.

0:16:320:16:35

Many of the traditional methods are still going on around me now,

0:16:350:16:39

but there's also a new wave of creative artisans providing

0:16:390:16:43

the most wonderful, exciting and contemporary studio class.

0:16:430:16:48

This is also the site of the International Festival of Glass,

0:16:480:16:51

which attracts as many as 15,000 visitors every two years.

0:16:510:16:55

It hosts a huge programme of events, demonstrations,

0:16:550:16:58

talks, activities and exhibitions.

0:16:580:17:01

Including the prestigious British Glass Biennale,

0:17:030:17:05

which part of the dynamic celebration of British modern glassmakers,

0:17:050:17:09

and I'm here to meet Martin Andrews, who's part of this revival.

0:17:090:17:12

Martin, you've got some fabulous pieces here.

0:17:170:17:19

How did you get started in glassmaking?

0:17:190:17:21

I did degree at Westferry College of Art and Design in Farnham in 1991,

0:17:210:17:27

and then after that I went to Sweden and I was very fortunate

0:17:270:17:30

to work with Asa Brandt, who was one of the first studio glass artists.

0:17:300:17:36

She set up in 1968.

0:17:360:17:38

Do you still use traditional methods, but put your own slant...?

0:17:380:17:42

Yes, the methods, traditional glassblowing has not really changed

0:17:420:17:46

for 400 years, same sort of tools, same benches.

0:17:460:17:49

What I want to know is how do you go about making something like that

0:17:490:17:52

and how do you get all the colours?

0:17:520:17:54

In the furnace, I have clear glass.

0:17:540:17:55

All the colour is added while it's still a solid blob.

0:17:550:17:58

Once the design is on then you start to actually blow the shape.

0:17:580:18:02

Let's talk about techniques.

0:18:020:18:03

If you were going to make, say, a bowl like that,

0:18:030:18:06

how would you start and what would you do?

0:18:060:18:08

Any piece of glass that you blow starts off round,

0:18:080:18:11

and if you're going to make a flattened shape,

0:18:110:18:14

such as a vase like this,

0:18:140:18:15

you literally are using wet newspaper to shape the glass,

0:18:150:18:18

so it starts off round and by flattening it on each side

0:18:180:18:21

you can actually start to flatten the shape.

0:18:210:18:24

Gosh, it sounds hit and miss to me, do you know that?

0:18:240:18:26

-It's quite specific.

-It's experimental!

0:18:260:18:29

With glassblowing, you know, you have no second chances.

0:18:290:18:32

It's not like clay, you can't go back and patch it up.

0:18:320:18:35

Glass - you get one chance and you have to get it right.

0:18:350:18:38

The skill of the glassmaker is working as fast as possible.

0:18:380:18:41

You are literally chasing it.

0:18:410:18:44

The working temperature of the glass is between 600 and 1,000 degrees,

0:18:440:18:48

and it will go through that temperature barrier

0:18:480:18:50

in about 40 seconds, so every time you reheat it

0:18:500:18:53

you've got about 40 seconds to work with it, then you reheat it.

0:18:530:18:57

-Got you.

-So you're up and down the bench a lot.

0:18:570:19:00

I do love that, I love the colours in that, the golden hues.

0:19:000:19:04

Could I ask you to show me how you make something like that,

0:19:040:19:07

for a novice like me to attempt something that?

0:19:070:19:09

I'd like to have a go at that, I really would,

0:19:090:19:11

-cos that looks like a big challenge.

-OK, let's have a go.

0:19:110:19:14

-How long will that take?

-It will take, about an hour. With my help.

0:19:140:19:18

-Come on then!

-OK.

0:19:180:19:20

This is actually for real, we're going to take an hour to do this.

0:19:240:19:27

And I don't know what to do. So just talk me through it.

0:19:270:19:30

-OK, if you start by heating that up, get it hot, just keep it there.

-OK.

0:19:300:19:34

We just want to keep the tip up

0:19:340:19:35

so it's hot enough for the glass to stick to it when we gather.

0:19:350:19:38

I'm actually feeling quite nervous, to tell you the truth,

0:19:380:19:41

cos I want this to really work well.

0:19:410:19:43

OK, I think we can take that out, that's fine.

0:19:430:19:46

Now you're going to gather from the furnace. So we do the first gather.

0:19:460:19:51

Gosh, that's hot!

0:19:510:19:52

And you need to be in and out in about seven seconds.

0:19:520:19:55

OK, keep turning, keep turning, and go to the bench.

0:19:550:19:59

Don't touch.

0:19:590:20:01

Roll it forward, use all of your arm.

0:20:010:20:03

OK, we're going to reheat that, so put the paper down.

0:20:050:20:08

We'll reheat it in the glory hole.

0:20:080:20:11

-Keep turning?

-Keep turning it.

0:20:140:20:16

-It's not easy, is it?

-No.

0:20:160:20:18

I'm actually quite frightened!

0:20:180:20:20

I can't believe this hot blob's going to be a glass charger.

0:20:210:20:25

Put your forearm forward, first arm forward.

0:20:260:20:29

If you wet... Put that back into the water.

0:20:330:20:36

This is all by feel, you just know, don't you, by instinct?

0:20:360:20:39

It's all by touch.

0:20:390:20:40

I'll put some of the other colour out, as well.

0:20:400:20:44

And this is cooling all the time.

0:20:440:20:45

It's cooling, but the coloured glass is still sticking to the clear glass.

0:20:450:20:49

-Pulling back all the time?

-Yeah, that's good. Take it off. OK.

0:20:520:20:56

Now, the hard bit is actually the technique called thumbing.

0:20:560:21:01

So what you need to do is blow down,

0:21:010:21:04

with this in your mouth,

0:21:040:21:06

put your thumb over it and trap the air so the air expands in the pipe.

0:21:060:21:10

-Like that, ready? One big blow?

-Yes.

0:21:100:21:13

HE BLOWS

0:21:130:21:15

That's good.

0:21:150:21:17

It's got a little bit larger, but you now need to reheat it...

0:21:170:21:20

-Keep my thumb on the end?

-No.

-No.

0:21:200:21:22

I see, you could do this several times, you could keep going

0:21:260:21:28

-until you are happy with the size of the air bubble?

-Yeah.

0:21:280:21:33

And roll, turn...

0:21:330:21:35

-Oh, wow!

-And then back the other way.

0:21:350:21:37

-That's good.

-That's better.

0:21:430:21:45

It's looking more like a light bulb at the moment.

0:21:450:21:48

It's getting bigger and bigger,

0:21:480:21:49

it's getting harder to come out that glory hole.

0:21:490:21:52

-OK, Martin?

-Out you come, yeah.

0:21:520:21:55

Ah! Nearly, nearly...

0:21:550:21:59

-Oh, that's it...

-Hang on, hang on!

0:21:590:22:02

-Argh!

-Aw.

0:22:020:22:04

That's it, I've just ruined it.

0:22:040:22:07

Nearly had it, that was about 55 minutes work, wasn't it? Sorry.

0:22:070:22:11

-That's all right, never mind.

-What happens to that now?

0:22:110:22:14

Well, we'll just put that into the bin.

0:22:140:22:17

Unfortunately, you caught the side and it collapsed.

0:22:170:22:20

-It's so difficult, isn't it?

-it's very, very difficult, it is.

0:22:220:22:25

Thank you so much, you've been brilliant.

0:22:250:22:27

We were so close, ten minutes away from seeing that dish open up.

0:22:270:22:32

But I said we'd only do it once, I said we'd have an hour on this.

0:22:320:22:36

I knew it, I just knew it would go wrong, do you know that?

0:22:380:22:41

So close, yet so far.

0:22:480:22:49

I was five minutes away from creating a wonderful glass charger,

0:22:490:22:53

and it all went wrong.

0:22:530:22:55

That is the most stressful thing I've ever done on Flog It! in nine years.

0:22:550:22:59

Not only is Martin Andrews a wonderful glass designer and blower,

0:22:590:23:02

he's also a great teacher, teaching traditional skills and methods,

0:23:020:23:06

and that was really difficult, please believe me.

0:23:060:23:09

And if you don't, have a go yourself - you'll see.

0:23:090:23:12

Our items haven't got far to travel.

0:23:180:23:20

They're being sold down the road in Malvern at Serrell's Auctioneers and Valuers.

0:23:200:23:24

Here's what is going under the hammer.

0:23:250:23:28

Let's hope Richard's christening mug will fly away.

0:23:280:23:31

We'll find out shortly.

0:23:310:23:33

As well as the mug, we've got Maxine's ten plates,

0:23:340:23:37

two short of a dozen, thanks to her cat!

0:23:370:23:39

Let's hope that doesn't put the bidders off.

0:23:390:23:42

Kate's truly scrumptious find - the little toy car in excellent

0:23:440:23:47

condition, which should grab the bidders' interest.

0:23:470:23:50

James and Molly also have high hopes for their stereoscopic viewer.

0:23:520:23:55

Let's find out now how it does as it's the first of our items to go under the hammer.

0:23:550:23:59

Is there any more at all for it?

0:24:010:24:02

I have £100.

0:24:020:24:04

Did you not want to persuade Dad to hang on to them and not sell them?

0:24:050:24:10

-Well, we've had them a long time.

-Yeah, we need the money.

-What's the money going towards, then?

0:24:100:24:14

I'm going skiing with the school,

0:24:140:24:17

so to get a new hat or something like that.

0:24:170:24:19

Oh, are you? Sounds really exciting. Are you on study leave right now?

0:24:190:24:24

-Yes.

-So that's why you're here.

-Yeah.

0:24:240:24:26

-Yeah. And what do you think of the auction room?

-Good.

0:24:260:24:28

It's good, isn't it? Jam-packed.

0:24:280:24:30

-It's exciting.

-Full of electricity and excitement.

0:24:300:24:33

-Yeah.

-Kate, feeling any pressure?

0:24:330:24:35

-No, none whatsoever.

-None at all.

0:24:350:24:36

Wildly confident about this one!

0:24:360:24:39

Good luck. Let's hope we turn that into a couple of hundred.

0:24:390:24:42

Here we go.

0:24:420:24:43

Great things these.

0:24:450:24:47

The stereoscopic viewer, lot number 310.

0:24:470:24:49

There we are. Bid me.

0:24:490:24:51

50 or £60 to start.

0:24:510:24:54

20 I'm bid. At 20. And five. 35.

0:24:550:24:57

-There we go.

-40. Bid five.

0:24:570:25:00

50. 50, bid five. Anywhere five? 60.

0:25:000:25:01

Five. 65. Any more?

0:25:010:25:04

At 65. Your bid, sir, at 65. 70.

0:25:040:25:08

Five. 80.

0:25:080:25:11

Five. 90. Five.

0:25:110:25:13

This is more like it.

0:25:130:25:15

95. 100, is it?

0:25:150:25:17

100. 110 now, sir?

0:25:170:25:19

At £100 only. At 100. Any more?

0:25:190:25:21

110. 110.

0:25:210:25:23

Fill it up, sir, at 20 now. At £110.

0:25:230:25:26

And I sell then at £110 and done.

0:25:260:25:29

Oh, I'm ever so pleased we got 110.

0:25:290:25:31

-Brilliant!

-Well done, Kate.

0:25:310:25:32

A lot of these images find their way back to the States

0:25:320:25:34

because the Americans love buying these.

0:25:340:25:37

-So I hope you enjoy the trip.

-Thank you!

0:25:370:25:39

Well, that might get two ski poles or something!

0:25:390:25:42

I don't know the cost of things, but that sounds like a good sum.

0:25:420:25:46

Well! That got us off to a very good start.

0:25:460:25:48

Let's hope the result is a taste of things to come.

0:25:480:25:51

Next it's Maxine's Wedgwood plates.

0:25:510:25:54

They've got our valuation of around £100, which is good!

0:25:540:25:57

-We've got the old 80 to 120, haven't we?

-You have, yes.

0:25:570:26:01

However, I'm not very confident.

0:26:010:26:03

-Aren't you?

-I'm sorry.

0:26:030:26:05

-Adam should know.

-I've got a gut instinct.

0:26:050:26:07

They are a bargain if someone picks them up for £10 each.

0:26:070:26:11

We might just get them sold, but I don't think we're going

0:26:110:26:13

-to be having any jumping and screaming.

-OK, OK.

0:26:130:26:16

Wise words. Here we go, Maxine.

0:26:160:26:18

Good luck, Adam.

0:26:180:26:19

A set of ten Wedgwood plates.

0:26:210:26:24

Start me off for them. The ten Wedgwood plates.

0:26:240:26:26

£100 for them.

0:26:260:26:28

£50 for them.

0:26:280:26:30

-£20 for them.

-Oh, no!

0:26:300:26:32

There's no hands going up.

0:26:320:26:34

At 20. 20 bid. And five. 25. 25.

0:26:340:26:36

30. 30 bid. And five. 40. 40 bid.

0:26:360:26:40

At £40 only. At 40. 40 bid.

0:26:400:26:44

At 40. Five.

0:26:440:26:48

50. 50 bid. At £50 only. And five.

0:26:480:26:51

60. 60 bid. Five. 70. 70 bid.

0:26:510:26:53

We're looking at £80 with discretion, aren't we?

0:26:530:26:56

Any more at all?

0:26:560:26:58

At £70. At 70. Is there any more?

0:26:580:27:00

At £70. Any more at £70.

0:27:000:27:03

No? I'm sorry, I can't do those.

0:27:030:27:05

Sorry, Maxine.

0:27:050:27:07

Are they going home or will you leave them for another sale?

0:27:070:27:10

I like might leave them.

0:27:100:27:12

You're selling them because you sold your Welsh dresser...

0:27:120:27:15

-That's right, so I've nowhere to put them...

-Yeah.

0:27:150:27:18

-Leave them with Philip and see what happens there.

-Yeah.

0:27:180:27:22

That was disappointing. So close!

0:27:230:27:26

Hopefully Maxine will have better luck on another day.

0:27:260:27:28

Next, it is Jan, who's selling her husband John's toy car.

0:27:280:27:32

-He's a good boy, because he kept the box.

-He always did, yeah.

0:27:320:27:35

-I never did. Bad boy.

-It's unnatural!

0:27:350:27:38

-It's unnatural not to keep it.

-You rip the box up,

0:27:380:27:41

-and you play with the toys, don't you?

-Christmas Day!

0:27:410:27:43

-Or birthdays.

-Normal children do.

0:27:430:27:46

-What are you saying about him, then?!

-And it's got all the bits!

0:27:460:27:50

There's all those bits to lose and break and everything on it.

0:27:500:27:52

-That's why it should sell.

-And we've got 80-120, haven't we?

0:27:520:27:55

-Yep.

-It's a really iconic car, I think every schoolboy knows it.

0:27:550:28:00

-They love the film.

-We won't sing.

-No, I won't embarrass myself.

0:28:000:28:04

I can't sing anyway. Have you got a good voice?

0:28:040:28:07

-Er...no.

-I won't put you to the test then. Good luck.

0:28:070:28:10

-Thanks very much.

-This is it.

0:28:100:28:12

A very collectible Corgi Chitty Chitty Bang Bang model,

0:28:130:28:17

complete with its plastic insert, and nobody should be without theirs.

0:28:170:28:20

I'm bid on the book, £40 only and 5.

0:28:220:28:25

45, 50, and 5.

0:28:250:28:26

And 60, and 5. And 70, and 5.

0:28:260:28:28

Go on!

0:28:280:28:30

The bid's with me at 75. One more.

0:28:300:28:33

80, and 5. 85, 85, 85.

0:28:330:28:36

The bid's with me, on the book.

0:28:360:28:38

The net's out, the room's out.

0:28:380:28:40

£85 on the book,

0:28:400:28:41

and I sell then at 85 and done. Thank you.

0:28:410:28:45

It's gone, it's gone.

0:28:450:28:46

-He'll be pleased.

-Yeah.

-He'll take you out for supper now.

0:28:460:28:50

-Oh, it's mine.

-It's yours!

0:28:500:28:51

-My money.

-You'll have to dig out the other ones now!

0:28:510:28:54

-He has got lots?

-Oh, he's got loads.

0:28:540:28:57

-All boxed?

-Yeah, every single one of them.

0:28:570:29:00

That's enough to make an auctioneer's heart start to race.

0:29:000:29:03

It just goes to show, it's worth looking after things.

0:29:030:29:08

Next it's Richard's silver christening mug.

0:29:090:29:12

This should do well.

0:29:120:29:14

-I hope it does really well.

-I hope so too.

-Because in a way, you shouldn't be selling it.

0:29:140:29:19

-No, I have a lot of other items that belonged to my step-grandfather which are more personal.

-OK.

0:29:190:29:25

And this will actually help to maybe refurbish the photo album that I have of his.

0:29:250:29:30

-Oh, brilliant!

-It'll contribute to his legacy even further.

0:29:300:29:33

OK, we're going to find out what the bidders think right now.

0:29:330:29:36

Silver's up in value, let's hope it's working for us now. Here we go.

0:29:360:29:40

Lovely christening mug in its little leather case.

0:29:430:29:47

Mappin & Webb. Bid me for that. £100 to start me.

0:29:470:29:50

Come on, Philip.

0:29:530:29:55

Bid me 50 to go, someone. 50 I'm bid. At 50. 60. 70. 80.

0:29:550:29:59

Good, it's gone! Quickly as well, how about that?

0:29:590:30:02

-They like it.

-110 with me. At 110.

0:30:020:30:05

-110. 110.

-More than double.

0:30:050:30:08

If you're all out in the room at £110. The bid's with me.

0:30:080:30:12

At £110. And I...

0:30:120:30:15

20. Hello! At 120. 120. 120.

0:30:150:30:20

The bid's just there at £120 only.

0:30:200:30:22

Any more? At £120 and I sell then at £120 and done.

0:30:220:30:27

Superb. That's real quality, and well worth £120.

0:30:270:30:32

What can you buy in a modern jeweller's now for £120?

0:30:320:30:35

-You wouldn't catch me in a modern jeweller's!

-No.

0:30:350:30:38

But what could you buy? Nothing.

0:30:380:30:40

-Not much.

-Nothing as good as that.

-A battery powered clock, probably.

0:30:400:30:45

-At best.

-At best, yeah.

-Certainly nothing of this quality.

0:30:450:30:49

-I hope that can, you know, give you the chance to compete that album.

-It certainly will.

0:30:490:30:54

-Go a bit further than that I think.

-That's a good price.

-Yes, thanks.

0:30:540:30:59

Good result. I love it when things sell well over the estimate.

0:30:590:31:03

It shows there's a real market for them.

0:31:030:31:06

Later, Adam finds an item which is bound to get a good return.

0:31:060:31:11

So it cost you how much? £2. £2!

0:31:110:31:13

We can improve on that.

0:31:130:31:15

Stick a couple of noughts on that.

0:31:150:31:17

It's this eight-mile ridge of some of the oldest rocks in Britain

0:31:250:31:28

which give us spring water that's world-famous for its purity.

0:31:280:31:33

I've come here to find out more about the unique relationship

0:31:340:31:37

between the town of Malvern and its refreshing spring water.

0:31:370:31:40

It's the cold water that sprouts from the fissures in these hills

0:31:400:31:44

that's made the fortunes of that town.

0:31:440:31:47

You could say, in fact, that Malvern was built on water

0:31:470:31:50

and the development of two very different water-related industries.

0:31:500:31:55

Now, in both cases Malvern was the first place in the UK to start both of these industries.

0:31:590:32:05

The first sounds a little bit like a form of medieval torture -

0:32:050:32:09

the cold-water cure. More about that later.

0:32:090:32:11

The second business to put Malvern on the map was the commercial bottling of its spring water.

0:32:110:32:17

The lucky locals have always been able to pop along and collect their water for free,

0:32:220:32:27

because there's around 100 wells and springs all around this area, but what about people further afield?

0:32:270:32:35

How could they get to drink some of this refreshing water?

0:32:350:32:37

Well, the answer is crystal clear -

0:32:370:32:40

look at that - bottle it and sell it to them.

0:32:400:32:43

And this is where water was first commercially bottled.

0:32:430:32:47

The Holywell Spring.

0:32:470:32:49

So, Malvern was the first place in the UK to bottle water.

0:32:560:33:00

This started around the early 1600s and experts reckon that some of these 17th-century bottles of water

0:33:000:33:06

were sold as far away as Berwick, London and Kent. I mean, the mind boggles, doesn't it?

0:33:060:33:12

Strangely, this water has been so highly valued not for what's in it, but for what's not in it.

0:33:120:33:19

And it's this same pure water that, back in the Victorian era,

0:33:220:33:25

enticed many visitors to Malvern when the cold-water cure arrived.

0:33:250:33:29

Argh!

0:33:290:33:31

The cold-water cure, or hydrotherapy, was an alternative treatment which two doctors -

0:33:330:33:39

Dr James Wilson and Dr James Gully - brought to the town in 1842.

0:33:390:33:43

Dr Wilson had tried the treatment at the Silesian spa in Grafenberg in Central Europe

0:33:430:33:48

before persuading his friend, Dr Gully, to set up an establishment in the UK and Malvern fitted the bill.

0:33:480:33:54

To find out exactly what the terrifying sound of the cold-water cure is,

0:33:560:34:00

I've come to meet up with retired GP and Malvern resident Dr John Harcup, who's a bit of an expert.

0:34:000:34:06

And I'm meeting him in the building which began life

0:34:080:34:12

as Britain's first purpose-built water-cure establishment.

0:34:120:34:17

John, we're sitting in the bow window of the original building where all this treatment went on.

0:34:170:34:23

Yeah, it is, and you can see the bay window where we are.

0:34:230:34:27

Incredible, absolutely incredible! And that's a lovely view, as well.

0:34:270:34:31

What was this cold-water cure all about?

0:34:310:34:33

It was a Victorian health package. It was very popular.

0:34:330:34:38

Everybody was woken between five and six in the morning, stripped naked,

0:34:380:34:43

wrapped in a cold, wet sheet for an hour.

0:34:430:34:46

So people from all over the country would come here to this building...

0:34:460:34:49

be woken up at six in the morning?

0:34:490:34:52

Yes.

0:34:520:34:53

It wasn't a good start.

0:34:530:34:55

No, a wet start and a cold start, but you relaxed. It was amazing the effect of the cold, wet sheet on you.

0:34:550:35:02

Then you were unwrapped by your bath attendant,

0:35:020:35:04

who popped you in a shallow bath and poured cold water over you and rubbed you down with a rough towel.

0:35:040:35:10

It was called a friction rub, and you went up the hills before breakfast...

0:35:100:35:17

drinking at every spring.

0:35:170:35:18

-You must have been exhausted by ten o'clock in the morning!

-Yeah!

0:35:180:35:22

And then after you'd been here for about three weeks, you were fit enough to have the douche, which...

0:35:220:35:28

-This is the big one!

-This is the big one, yes.

0:35:280:35:30

Water falling 20 feet from a pipe 2½ or 3½ inches in diameter for about three minutes.

0:35:300:35:38

And about 150 gallons of water fell on you at that time.

0:35:380:35:44

Gosh! If that's freezing cold, that would have hurt.

0:35:440:35:48

Yes. In winter, you got icicles coming down

0:35:480:35:51

and people were scored by icicles

0:35:510:35:54

and there was blood on the floor, as you can imagine.

0:35:540:35:57

-But no complaints, everybody loved it.

-Oh, yes.

0:35:570:36:00

It was a social occasion, to put it mildly.

0:36:000:36:03

So what inspired the two doctors to bring the cure back to Malvern?

0:36:030:36:07

It was the very poor treatment in Victorian medicine.

0:36:070:36:12

Remember that we were still in the age where we bled people, we purged people

0:36:120:36:18

and we added heavy metal poisons. There was lead, arsenic and mercury.

0:36:180:36:24

And then the recently discovered opioids,

0:36:240:36:27

and opium was freely available, so we got addiction problems.

0:36:270:36:31

So, this was completely different.

0:36:310:36:34

It was non-invasive, it didn't kill anybody

0:36:340:36:36

and it certainly worked because the Victorians over-ate, they over-drank, they didn't have enough exercise.

0:36:360:36:43

And Malvern catered for all that because alcohol was banned, for instance.

0:36:430:36:49

And there was a special diet.

0:36:490:36:51

You couldn't have pastries, they didn't like spicy food, you couldn't have tea and coffee.

0:36:510:36:56

-There wasn't much you could have, actually.

-The list goes on!

0:36:560:36:59

Well, water, of course!

0:36:590:37:00

What sort of ailments was this cure going to solve?

0:37:000:37:05

Well, rheumatism and gout were premier things.

0:37:050:37:09

-Yeah.

-Neuralgia, TB.

0:37:090:37:12

Virtually everything, you know?

0:37:120:37:15

"You name it, we can cure it," was the motto here.

0:37:150:37:18

-It's fascinating, isn't it?

-Absolutely, yes.

0:37:180:37:21

It was amazing who came here -

0:37:210:37:24

Charles Darwin, Florence Nightingale, Alfred Lord Tennyson came here.

0:37:240:37:29

-Some big names.

-Yes.

0:37:290:37:31

Tennyson said he was half-cured, half-destroyed by the cure.

0:37:310:37:35

-Wow. In your expert opinion, obviously, it does work.

-Yes.

0:37:350:37:40

In the context of Victorian medicine, this is the important thing,

0:37:400:37:44

because treatment was so bad in those days.

0:37:440:37:47

How long did you have to be here for, then?

0:37:470:37:49

Well, about three weeks, three to four weeks.

0:37:490:37:51

I mean, Darwin came for three weeks and stayed for 16

0:37:510:37:56

and he got on so much better.

0:37:560:37:59

He was depressed and he was...

0:37:590:38:01

He went back to Down House a new man, basically.

0:38:010:38:07

He was writing a book on barnacles and he went back to the barnacles.

0:38:070:38:10

Yeah. I don't know about 16 weeks here, though!

0:38:100:38:14

-One day with that cold water!

-Malvern grows on you, so you'll stay!

0:38:140:38:18

So, there you have it. Some British towns are built on coal,

0:38:220:38:26

some on steel and some on the farming industry, but the majestic town of Malvern is built on water.

0:38:260:38:32

Back at our valuation day, there's still a huge queue

0:38:380:38:42

and the great thing about my job is I never know where the next antiques will be lurking.

0:38:420:38:46

-Oh, my gosh, look at this!

-This is...

0:38:480:38:51

And some items are just too big to fit in a box.

0:38:510:38:54

It's so nice to see furniture brought in to Flog It

0:38:540:38:58

because you do have to make a bit of an effort to get this in the car.

0:38:580:39:02

That's why we always get lots of ceramics, but whoever brought this,

0:39:020:39:07

I'm going to go and shake their hand because this is what we need to see - more furniture.

0:39:070:39:11

Please bring us in more furniture.

0:39:110:39:13

Adam's talking to Simon, who's brought along an item that we see often on Flog It.

0:39:130:39:18

Yes, it's a piece of Troika!

0:39:180:39:20

This is quite an interesting one for a number of reasons.

0:39:200:39:24

Firstly, because of where you got it from.

0:39:240:39:26

Well, a car boot sale, yeah.

0:39:260:39:29

Not a bad little earner, there.

0:39:290:39:31

-And did you recognise it as a piece of Troika?

-No.

0:39:310:39:34

-Basically, we just liked the look of it, the bits and bobs on it and...

-Do you still like?

0:39:340:39:38

I don't know, I've gone off it a bit now. It's...

0:39:380:39:42

We'd seen the markings on the bottom of it. I'd never heard of it.

0:39:420:39:47

I thought, "Yeah, somebody's written that on in marker pen."

0:39:470:39:50

-Well, it does look like that, doesn't it?

-It does, yeah.

-Look at that.

0:39:500:39:53

-Kind of crude, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:39:530:39:56

Pretty... Pretty good condition, isn't it?

0:39:560:40:00

I've noticed one little bit of damage. Where is it? There.

0:40:000:40:03

A little bit of a chip, there.

0:40:030:40:05

But that's nothing too major. So you didn't know about Troika at all?

0:40:050:40:10

No, not until I spoke to my brother and he watches your show.

0:40:100:40:12

I don't get a chance to because you have to watch CBeebies with the kids.

0:40:120:40:17

He's obviously seen that show where you've done the Troika.

0:40:170:40:21

I showed it him, showed him the marks on the bottom and he said, "Well, there, that's what they do."

0:40:210:40:27

-So you're going to sell it, take the money.

-Yeah, take the money and run!

-It cost you how much? £2. £2.

0:40:270:40:32

We can improve on that. Stick a couple of noughts on that.

0:40:320:40:36

-That's not bad.

-This is what is called the large rectangle vase.

0:40:360:40:40

On the bottom, you've got that decorator's mark there, which is RGB for Roland Bence.

0:40:400:40:46

Roland Bence was one of the main men at Troika.

0:40:460:40:49

He was the manager there for all of the '70s.

0:40:490:40:51

He is one of your premier names. So not only have you chanced upon a two-quid vase worth 200 or 300...

0:40:510:40:58

-I've got the main man on it, yeah.

-You've got one of the main men.

0:40:580:41:01

-I think we should put it in at 200 to 300.

-Yeah, sounds good, yeah.

0:41:010:41:04

Put a reserve in of £180. If it doesn't make that,

0:41:040:41:08

-it's worth hanging on to.

-Yeah.

-Well done. Good eye!

0:41:080:41:11

-Not only have you got a good-shaped Troika vase, you've got one of the main men on it too.

-Thank you.

0:41:110:41:16

Kate's been bedazzled by something rather glamorous

0:41:200:41:23

that Erica inherited.

0:41:230:41:25

Erica, you've brought in something sparkly which has caught my eye.

0:41:250:41:29

What can you tell me about it?

0:41:290:41:31

Well, it originally came from Germany.

0:41:310:41:34

It belonged to my mum's great-aunt,

0:41:340:41:38

and it was passed to my mother when she died,

0:41:380:41:41

and then when my mother died, it was passed on to me.

0:41:410:41:43

-So family history.

-It is, yes, but my mother didn't like it.

0:41:430:41:47

As soon as she picked it up, it went in her jewellery box.

0:41:470:41:50

She didn't wear it.

0:41:500:41:51

I like it, but I'm not...

0:41:510:41:53

-I don't wear it very often.

-Not that attached to it.

0:41:530:41:56

Probably a couple of times a year.

0:41:560:41:58

It's what you'd call a dress ring, it's very sort of...

0:41:580:42:01

-Exactly that, dressy.

-Yeah.

-I'm going to give it a go.

0:42:010:42:05

I might just have a bit of a Cinderella fantasy

0:42:050:42:07

and give it a go. I can see that on my finger...

0:42:070:42:10

if my husband's watching! It's very attractive.

0:42:100:42:13

I think date-wise you're talking between...

0:42:130:42:17

Probably between the wars, so 1930s.

0:42:170:42:19

Does that fit in with the family background?

0:42:190:42:21

Or maybe a bit earlier? '20s?

0:42:210:42:23

Probably a bit earlier, '20s, probably, yeah.

0:42:230:42:26

It's a classic dress evening ring.

0:42:260:42:28

You've got diamonds and then an oval-cut sapphire in the middle.

0:42:280:42:32

And it's on continental, so 14-carat gold,

0:42:320:42:34

which again is not something we usually get in England.

0:42:340:42:37

But it's quite a pretty thing.

0:42:370:42:39

Very sparkly, you can see.

0:42:390:42:40

This is an old-cut brilliant, on the diamond,

0:42:400:42:42

so it makes it this lovely sparkly colour.

0:42:420:42:45

The diamonds aren't very big but they are nice and clean.

0:42:450:42:49

And they're a good colour to them.

0:42:490:42:51

I suppose at auction you'd be talking between

0:42:510:42:54

maybe £300 and £500 for it?

0:42:540:42:55

Is that the kind of figure you'd be happy to get?

0:42:550:42:58

I... I think so, yeah.

0:42:580:43:00

I would like to think I would get more than £400 for it.

0:43:000:43:04

-Right.

-I think.

0:43:040:43:06

-It depends on the day.

-Yeah.

-If you don't wear it,

0:43:060:43:08

you've got to think of who the buyer's going to be,

0:43:080:43:10

and who would wear it. And I suppose if a dealer's buying it,

0:43:100:43:13

they would make a mark-up if they're selling it in a shop.

0:43:130:43:17

So I think probably... You could maybe reserve it at 350,

0:43:170:43:20

if you want to, and put £400 to £500 guide price.

0:43:200:43:23

And then if it doesn't reach 350, it hasn't sold, so at least

0:43:230:43:26

-you're not disappointed if it only gets £300.

-That's fine, yeah.

0:43:260:43:29

-Would you be OK with that?

-Fine, yeah.

0:43:290:43:32

Right, next it's Jim, who's brought along a collection of First World War postcards.

0:43:350:43:40

So, what's the history here?

0:43:410:43:43

They belonged to my wife's uncle who was a private in the Medical Corps

0:43:430:43:49

and he served on the hospital ship the Letitia, and they went all around the Mediterranean.

0:43:490:43:55

-During the First World War?

-During the First World War.

0:43:550:43:59

And this is basically postcards to and from him and his wife.

0:43:590:44:04

We've seen lots of First World War postcards, especially in the embroidered silks,

0:44:040:44:10

for the guys to send home to their wives, but these are slightly different.

0:44:100:44:14

You've got more topographic scenes.

0:44:140:44:17

He obviously was travelling, going all over the place.

0:44:170:44:20

He's in the Middle East here.

0:44:200:44:21

He's at the Sphinx in the Pyramids.

0:44:210:44:24

It's like a diary of his journey. Has he written messages on the back?

0:44:240:44:28

-He has, yeah.

-Oh, how lovely. Is it something you really want to sell?

0:44:280:44:32

Basically, it's lying in the bedroom, we don't look at it that often.

0:44:320:44:37

We'll maybe go and see our grandchildren, perhaps buy them a present out of it.

0:44:370:44:42

Oh, well, that's a nice idea.

0:44:420:44:43

-Yes.

-This is nice. That's George IV, isn't it?

0:44:430:44:46

Yeah.

0:44:460:44:48

It's personally addressed to him.

0:44:480:44:50

"With our very best wishes for Christmas, 1914.

0:44:500:44:54

"May God protect you and bring you home safely. Mary and George."

0:44:540:44:59

Oh, that's lovely, isn't it? That really does complete this book.

0:44:590:45:05

I'm pleased that's on the last page.

0:45:050:45:06

Well, look, if you're happy to let this go and you want it to go...

0:45:060:45:10

-Yes, we do.

-Let's price it to sell.

0:45:100:45:13

-Let's put 100 to 200 on it.

-Yeah.

0:45:130:45:15

Fixed reserve at £100 because you're not going to give this away.

0:45:150:45:18

-No.

-You'll have to keep it otherwise, but on a good day I think this boat will float.

0:45:180:45:23

I just loved Jim's postcard collection.

0:45:240:45:26

Fingers crossed it's going to do well.

0:45:260:45:29

But before that, Kate's valuing the biggest lump of gold

0:45:300:45:34

I've seen in a while, and it belongs to husband and wife Bill and Jan.

0:45:340:45:39

-How have you come by it?

-It was my second cousin's.

0:45:390:45:43

-She was very, very elegant.

-We remember Frances very well.

0:45:430:45:46

We can remember her smoking Woodbines out of that.

0:45:460:45:50

-Brilliant.

-But we have other things that she's left to us, so we would like other people to enjoy it.

0:45:500:45:56

Well, it's a classic case of very elegant Roaring Twenties gold,

0:45:560:46:01

set with what looks to be rubies.

0:46:010:46:05

If we open it up, what have we got inside? There we go.

0:46:050:46:09

So it is hallmarked gold and the hallmark's Chester and it's 1923.

0:46:090:46:15

So, exactly that sort of Roaring Twenties.

0:46:150:46:18

You would have had very small, thin ladies cigarettes in it,

0:46:180:46:23

possibly with a holder.

0:46:230:46:24

But it's a lovely thing. You're not keen on keeping it?

0:46:240:46:30

Not particularly.

0:46:300:46:32

Well, gold prices are quite high at the moment and you've got the inset rubies to add a little bit of value.

0:46:320:46:38

You've also got machine decoration on the top and then this Greek key pattern along the edge.

0:46:380:46:43

So it's a very attractive thing. Any ideas on value?

0:46:430:46:47

-No.

-No.

0:46:480:46:50

Your estimate for the auction would be maybe between £550 and £650,

0:46:500:46:55

something like that, which for quite a small thing is quite a high price.

0:46:550:46:59

-It is indeed.

-Is that the kind of figure you'd be happy with?

0:46:590:47:02

-Yes, certainly.

-OK.

0:47:020:47:04

What sort of reserve would you suggest?

0:47:040:47:05

I would say just below that, so maybe a 450 reserve.

0:47:050:47:08

-Sounds very good.

-A lovely thing to have been passed down, isn't it?

0:47:080:47:13

-Indeed, yeah.

-Let's hope it sells.

-Oh, yes. Thank you.

-OK.

0:47:130:47:16

Well, that's our final items ready to take off to auction

0:47:200:47:24

and going under the hammer is Simon's Troika vase which he paid just £2 for at a car boot sale.

0:47:240:47:28

If the bidders like Erica's dress ring as much as Kate does,

0:47:280:47:32

it should do very well.

0:47:320:47:34

Next, it's time for Jim's collection of inherited World War I postcards to find a new home.

0:47:360:47:42

Finally, Bill and Jan's elegant gold cigarette case with inlaid rubies

0:47:420:47:46

will be testing the current gold prices.

0:47:460:47:49

We're now back at Philip Serrell's auction rooms in Malvern.

0:47:540:47:58

Before we see how our items do, I want to show you something rather special.

0:47:580:48:03

Yeah, I like the look of that, I really do. It says it all.

0:48:040:48:08

That chair has come fresh from some old boy's cottage somewhere, locally I would imagine.

0:48:080:48:14

There's all these greasy sweat marks, you know, evidence of wear.

0:48:140:48:18

This hasn't been through the trade, this is fresh on the market,

0:48:180:48:21

and that's the sort of kit that does sell so well.

0:48:210:48:25

Upholsterers like to get their hands on stuff like this.

0:48:250:48:28

Looking at the style of it, it's a Regency period, 1805 to 1815,

0:48:280:48:34

right on the turn of the 19th century

0:48:340:48:38

and that shape, that scrolling top coming down in the shape of a lyre like that, that's all in rosewood.

0:48:380:48:45

I know it looks disgusting, but I've got to sit on it.

0:48:450:48:48

Oh, do you know what? That's very generous and it's very comfortable.

0:48:480:48:51

Very, very nice.

0:48:520:48:54

The squab cushion needs refilling,

0:48:540:48:57

it needs packing out and probably the springs need tightening up,

0:48:570:49:01

but let me show you something to look for.

0:49:010:49:05

Gosh, the weight of this chair!

0:49:050:49:07

That's solid mahogany and rosewood,

0:49:070:49:09

that's a combination of two very exotic hardwoods. This is nice,

0:49:090:49:14

this is in the manner of Gillows, these fluted legs,

0:49:140:49:17

and look at this cast foot, that's really nice. Brass-cast rollers.

0:49:170:49:22

This is a very, very nice chair

0:49:220:49:24

and Philip's got this in the catalogue at £100 to £200!

0:49:240:49:29

That is a come-and-buy-me and Philip knows that,

0:49:290:49:32

but, for me, that's really got the decorators' look.

0:49:320:49:35

It's a timeless quality. You're buying a period piece.

0:49:350:49:38

This is circa 1805.

0:49:380:49:40

All you've got to do is hopefully get it for around about £700 to £900 in auction,

0:49:400:49:45

take it to an upholsterer and that will adorn any room.

0:49:450:49:49

It will go in a stately home, it will go in a studio apartment,

0:49:490:49:53

it'll go in a contemporary flat, it'll go in a cottage.

0:49:530:49:55

It's just a wonderful stand-alone chair.

0:49:550:49:57

All in all, really, it might set you back £1,200,

0:49:570:50:01

but that's what a modern reproduction copy will cost you in a department store,

0:50:010:50:06

and that would be a great investment.

0:50:060:50:10

In a moment, we'll find out just how much the Regency chair sells for.

0:50:100:50:14

Before that, though, let's find out how much profit Simon will make.

0:50:140:50:18

I think this is a great lot, Roland Bence.

0:50:200:50:23

-What's great is it was bought for £2 in a car boot.

-Yeah.

0:50:230:50:27

It is unbelievable, isn't it? I would love to have a bit of time to go to a car boot once every...

0:50:270:50:33

-You and me would never get anything.

-You'll never pick a bargain out.

0:50:330:50:36

-They'd put the price up, wouldn't they? Good luck.

-Thank you.

-And well spotted. Here we go.

0:50:360:50:41

The Troika vase, hugely popular.

0:50:440:50:48

Bid me.

0:50:480:50:50

£50 I'm bid. At 50. 60. 60 bid.

0:50:500:50:51

70. 80. 90.

0:50:510:50:54

100. 110. 120. 130. 140. 150.

0:50:540:50:58

160. 170.

0:50:580:51:01

Yes? 180. At 180 bid seated.

0:51:010:51:04

At 180. At 180. At 180. At £180 only. Any more at all?

0:51:040:51:10

-We're struggling at 180 right now.

-I can't believe that.

0:51:100:51:14

-£180 and done. Thank you.

-Just!

0:51:140:51:17

-I thought it'd do better.

-Yes, so did I.

0:51:170:51:22

-But, it's gone. That's the main thing.

-Yeah, it's gone.

-It's gone.

0:51:220:51:25

-And it's an improvement on the two quid.

-A vast improvement.

0:51:250:51:29

Yeah, big improvement. Are you back at the car boots at all?

0:51:290:51:32

Oh, I might have a pop round to see if there's any more out there!

0:51:320:51:35

-And what will you put this money towards?

-Something for the kids.

0:51:350:51:38

-How many have you got?

-Three.

0:51:380:51:40

-Go on, name check them, what are they?

-Brandon, Harrison and Roly.

0:51:400:51:43

-OK. Enjoy the money.

-Thank you very much.

-Well done, Simon.

0:51:430:51:46

We just got Simon's Troika away. Still, it was a very good return on the £2 he paid for it.

0:51:460:51:52

Remember that Regency chair that I thought would sell for around £700 to £900?

0:51:520:51:57

Well, here are the final moments of the auction and you won't believe what's happening.

0:51:570:52:02

-Four-five.

-Yes, that's it, £4,500!

0:52:040:52:10

-Four six. Four seven.

-Several people really want this, and I said earlier it's in the manner of Gillows.

0:52:100:52:16

Maybe there's a Gillows' stamp,

0:52:160:52:18

then it is worth around 5,000-7,000.

0:52:180:52:22

Five one. Five two.

0:52:220:52:26

£5,300.

0:52:260:52:28

There's the bid on that telephone.

0:52:280:52:29

At £5,300 once.

0:52:290:52:32

Twice.

0:52:320:52:35

Third and last time at 5,300.

0:52:350:52:37

Don't you just love auctions?

0:52:390:52:41

What an incredible result!

0:52:410:52:43

Everybody just wanted to own that.

0:52:430:52:45

I wonder what it'll look like when it's restored.

0:52:450:52:47

Anyway, now for Jim, the owner of that brilliant postcard collection.

0:52:490:52:53

Hopefully, for not much longer

0:52:530:52:55

because this lot should put their hands up and bid.

0:52:550:52:58

I see you've brought the wife along. Hello.

0:52:580:53:00

I know you're getting really excited because you want to see your daughter out in New Zealand.

0:53:000:53:05

Well, I hope we get you there.

0:53:050:53:06

I hope this is part of the airfare. I don't want to let them down.

0:53:060:53:09

I hope it's not return to sender, it's going under the hammer now.

0:53:090:53:13

Lot number 300 is the Victorian postcard album. Bid me for it.

0:53:130:53:19

Where do you want to start me?

0:53:190:53:21

Give me £100 to start straight off.

0:53:210:53:23

100 I am bid. At 100. And ten now?

0:53:230:53:26

100. 100. £100 for the postcard album.

0:53:260:53:29

At 100. 100. 100.

0:53:290:53:31

It's your bid, sir.

0:53:310:53:33

At £100. The maiden bid's got it at 100.

0:53:330:53:36

I'll take ten anywhere.

0:53:360:53:39

At £100 only. At 100. At £100.

0:53:390:53:41

And I sell then at 100 and done.

0:53:410:53:45

Yes, we just got it away within estimate, £100,

0:53:450:53:49

but I guess it's better than nothing.

0:53:490:53:51

-That'll cover the airport tax.

-Just about!

0:53:510:53:55

Well, I think some lucky buyer got a real bargain with those postcards.

0:53:550:54:00

Erica's brought her son Kurt to the auction room.

0:54:000:54:02

Let's hope the bidders give them

0:54:020:54:03

a good price for their diamond and sapphire ring.

0:54:030:54:05

Why have you decided now is the best time to sell this?

0:54:050:54:09

Well, I just... I don't wear it,

0:54:090:54:12

and my mum didn't like it either.

0:54:120:54:14

She had it in her jewellery box and never wore it.

0:54:140:54:17

And I just thought I might as well sell it

0:54:170:54:19

and then use the money to get something that I'd like.

0:54:190:54:22

OK. Hopefully the money might go to something

0:54:220:54:24

that you might like as well, Kurt. But you really like this, Kate.

0:54:240:54:27

Oh, yeah. It's a bit of sparkle, it's a girly lot.

0:54:270:54:30

-Something you could wear?

-I like to think so.

0:54:300:54:33

Well, let's hope this lot want a bit of sparkle as well, shall we?

0:54:330:54:36

Here we go. Let's find out.

0:54:360:54:37

The diamond sapphire cocktail ring,

0:54:370:54:40

set with a central sapphire.

0:54:400:54:42

Come on!

0:54:420:54:45

I'm bid £250 bid, at 250. 260.

0:54:460:54:49

At 260 bid. 260.

0:54:490:54:52

260, selling at 260.

0:54:520:54:54

270.

0:54:560:54:57

270, 280. 290.

0:54:570:55:01

At 300 bid. At £300 only.

0:55:010:55:03

At 300. At £300. At 300 on my left.

0:55:030:55:06

At £300 only. Any more?

0:55:060:55:09

Had £300.

0:55:090:55:10

Is there any more at all?

0:55:100:55:11

At £300 only, on my left, any more?

0:55:110:55:14

At 300. There it is.

0:55:140:55:17

At 300. Your bid at £300. And done, then,

0:55:170:55:20

or not, at 300.

0:55:200:55:22

Well, I'm sorry, I can't do that.

0:55:220:55:24

-Oh, no!

-That was close, wasn't it?

-Another day, eh?

0:55:240:55:27

We had a fixed reserve of 350.

0:55:270:55:29

Yeah. So it didn't quite make it.

0:55:290:55:31

-At that, I'd rather take it home and try another time.

-Hang on to it.

0:55:310:55:35

-Yeah.

-You're stuck with it, Kurt! Better start liking it!

0:55:350:55:38

He'll have to wear it!

0:55:380:55:40

Now it's time to see if Bill and Jan's gold cigarette case will tickle the bidders' fancy.

0:55:400:55:44

We've got some real quality going under the hammer right now.

0:55:470:55:50

It's that gold cigarette case. Absolutely love it.

0:55:500:55:54

We're looking for top money here, somewhere around £500 to £600, Kate.

0:55:540:55:58

I hope so. Gold's high though at the moment, so fingers crossed.

0:55:580:56:00

And these are real collectables. They look great in display cabinets.

0:56:000:56:04

All the waiting is over because they're going under the hammer, literally, right now!

0:56:040:56:10

Lot number 466 is the nine-carat gold cigarette case

0:56:110:56:16

and I'm bid £400 for that. 410.

0:56:160:56:18

420. 430. 440. 450.

0:56:180:56:23

£450 bid.

0:56:230:56:26

Come on, Philip, work 'em!

0:56:260:56:29

470. 480. 490. 500.

0:56:290:56:33

520. 550 on the net, is it? 550.

0:56:330:56:36

£100 over the reserve already.

0:56:360:56:38

580, is it?

0:56:380:56:40

Is there any more?

0:56:400:56:42

At £550 and I sell, then.

0:56:420:56:46

-At 550 and done.

-He's selling. Yes.

0:56:460:56:48

-Yes.

-Very nice.

-That was short and sweet, really.

0:56:480:56:51

-There was a lot of competition straight away, wasn't there?

-Yes.

0:56:510:56:55

Smoking is not so fashionable.

0:56:550:56:57

-Why have you decided to sell now, though?

-Oh, I don't really...

0:56:570:57:02

-We wanted to come to Flog It, didn't we?

-Did you, really?

-Yes!

-You could have come just to say hello!

0:57:020:57:07

-Well, we could have done, yes.

-I'm glad they didn't though!

0:57:070:57:11

-Jolly good.

-We've enjoyed it.

-I hope you've had a great day here.

0:57:110:57:14

-We have indeed, thank you, Paul.

-We have, we've enjoyed it.

0:57:140:57:17

-And you got a bit of spending money now.

-Oh, yes.

0:57:170:57:20

-Cheers. Thank you very much.

-Yes.

0:57:200:57:22

Oh, thank you!

0:57:220:57:24

Well, that's brought us to the end of another show.

0:57:300:57:33

As you can see, people are still eager to bid.

0:57:330:57:35

There's plenty more lots going under the hammer, but all credit to Philip Serrell, he did us proud today.

0:57:350:57:39

It's wonderful being back here in this lovely old saleroom in Malvern.

0:57:390:57:43

Now, if you've got any antiques or collectables you want to turn into cash, we would love to see you,

0:57:430:57:48

and hopefully we're coming to an area to do a valuation day very near you soon, so keep an eye out for us.

0:57:480:57:53

So, until then, from Malvern, it's cheerio.

0:57:530:57:56

And you can find out details of up-and-coming valuation days

0:57:590:58:03

by logging on to the internet and going to bbc.co.uk/programmes

0:58:030:58:07

Click F for Flog It and then follow the links and you can find a list of the towns we're coming to.

0:58:070:58:12

Flog It visits the beautiful Spa Town of Malvern, and presenter Paul Martin is joined in his search through the local antiques and collectibles by a team of experts headed up by Kate Bateman and Adam Partridge.

A father and daughter produce a stereoscope for Kate's inspection, and Adam takes a look at some impressive Troika, purchased by its owner for only £2. But Paul finds the star item of the show when he stumbles across a painting by renowned artist Robert Lenkiewicz.

Taking a break from the antiques, Paul finds out how the town of Malvern owes its fortunes to the spring water which comes from the nearby Malvern Hills.