Bristol Flog It!


Bristol

In Bristol, Paul Martin and antique experts David Barby and Philip Serrell find a very rare gold coin and a necklace that was hidden under the floorboards for decades.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Bristol. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello. This is the show that turns your unwanted antiques and collectables into cash.

0:00:020:00:08

We're in Bristol, home to Wallace and Gromit, Concorde and Brunel's amazing suspension bridge.

0:00:080:00:13

Welcome to Flog It.

0:00:130:00:15

Like the rest of the country, Bristol is covered in a thick blanket of snow.

0:00:370:00:42

The city has come to a standstill, but a few hardy Bristolians have braved the weather

0:00:470:00:53

to get to College Green for their Flog It valuations.

0:00:530:00:57

It is freezing cold outside the Council House.

0:00:570:01:00

People can't queue down that slope. They're all huddled here.

0:01:000:01:04

It's early in the morning, but hopefully, many more will turn up.

0:01:040:01:08

I know you're eager to sell some things and if you're happy with the valuation, what will you do?

0:01:080:01:14

-Flog it.

-Definitely. I think we should get inside and get the show on the road.

-Yes.

-Come on.

0:01:140:01:20

'There might only be a few people here at the moment, but our experts David Barby and Philip Serrell

0:01:220:01:28

'will be valuing everything they've brought along.

0:01:280:01:32

'He has a special interest in English ceramics, but David will cast his expert eye over anything,

0:01:320:01:38

'especially if he finds a little gem before his fellow experts can.'

0:01:380:01:43

And thanks for not giving me a hard time.

0:01:430:01:46

'Phil is not one for being left behind though and after giving up an early career as a PE teacher,

0:01:460:01:52

-'he now runs his own saleroom, so he obviously knows what he's talking about.'

-Flog it?

-Flog it. Please.

0:01:520:01:59

'Coming up, Ron's pug dogs get a grumpy response from Phil.'

0:01:590:02:03

What do you think of it so far? Rubbish.

0:02:030:02:06

'Rachel's coin gets a shocked response from David.'

0:02:060:02:11

-This is extraordinary.

-'And I get a response of my own from the Lord Mayor of Bristol.'

-I won't flog it.

0:02:110:02:17

'But it's nothing compared to the bidders' response when our owners' items go under the hammer.'

0:02:170:02:23

-Shocked?

-Very.

-We are.

-We are.

0:02:230:02:26

'People are still trickling in with their bags and boxes and first up to the valuation table is Ron

0:02:280:02:34

'who is keen to see if Philip thinks his two porcelain pugs will make him some cash.'

0:02:340:02:39

-Do you like these two old dogs?

-Yes, I do.

-Yeah?

0:02:390:02:44

-Are you a doggy man?

-Yes. We breed and show dogs and judge them.

0:02:440:02:48

I'm due to judge Crufts in 2012.

0:02:480:02:51

-That's a huge honour.

-Yes, it's the top honour you can have as a private breeder.

0:02:510:02:56

They come from that Victorian era and almost every Victorian parlour,

0:02:560:03:00

either on the floor by the fireplace or up on the mantelpiece,

0:03:000:03:05

you'd have a pair of spaniels, wouldn't you?

0:03:050:03:08

Dogs were made because they were the popular dogs of the era,

0:03:080:03:13

pugs and King Charles spaniels in particular.

0:03:130:03:16

The differing breeds, I think, are much more interesting.

0:03:160:03:20

-These have got glass eyes. There's a significance there.

-Yes.

0:03:200:03:24

It's a small pottery. If I've got it right, it should be Bo'ness which is in Edinburgh in Scotland.

0:03:240:03:31

-I think they're quite nice, aren't they?

-Well, they're unusual.

0:03:310:03:35

They're different from the traditional spaniels.

0:03:350:03:39

Pug dogs have that premium over the ordinary, plain, white spaniel.

0:03:390:03:46

-These are about 1885, 1890?

-Something like that.

0:03:460:03:49

-And you bought these as part of your dog collecting?

-Correct.

0:03:490:03:53

-What did you pay for them?

-£15.

0:03:530:03:56

-At a car boot sale.

-How long ago?

-Six years ago.

0:03:560:03:59

-How much are they going to make at auction?

-I don't know.

0:03:590:04:03

I've heard a number of things. I've seen a number of valuations.

0:04:030:04:07

It just depends, I think, on their condition and also their size

0:04:070:04:12

and maybe if you get two people who want them.

0:04:120:04:16

-You've told me how old they are, where they were made and what they're worth.

-Correct.

0:04:160:04:22

You're making me redundant, Ron.

0:04:220:04:24

There's always a chance of a new initiative and employment in TV.

0:04:240:04:29

-A new initiative for you or me?

-Either.

0:04:290:04:32

I think we put 80 to 120 on them as an estimate.

0:04:320:04:36

We can reserve them at £60 fixed for you.

0:04:360:04:39

I mean, if you have a good day, you could make perhaps 150, 200.

0:04:390:04:44

-Are you happy to sell them?

-Yes.

-Happy to flog it?

-Yes.

0:04:440:04:48

-Are you going to leave them with me now?

-Yeah.

0:04:480:04:51

-If you brave that snow out there, I'll look after my two new friends and we'll get them sold.

-Thank you.

0:04:510:04:57

-Thank you for bringing them along.

-You're welcome.

-What do you think of it so far? Rubbish!

0:04:570:05:03

-What have you got in here?

-Aagh!

0:05:080:05:11

-LAUGHTER

-I'm not that scary, am I?

0:05:110:05:14

'Thankfully, not all the kids are scared of me.'

0:05:140:05:18

This one's definitely not for sale. This is little Jamie, the son of our cameraman.

0:05:180:05:23

He's pointing at Daddy now. Daddy's got to get on with his work. Oh, bless him!

0:05:230:05:28

'Another gentleman and his wife have arrived with some gold necklaces,

0:05:320:05:36

'although these will definitely not be going to auction.'

0:05:360:05:41

-This is the Mayor of Bristol.

-Hello, Paul.

-Chris, hi, and Sue, the Mayoress. Can I say Mayoress?

0:05:410:05:46

-Of course you can.

-Have you come for a valuation?

0:05:460:05:50

I'm not going to flog this. I know the programme's Flog It, but this is £100,000-worth of gold round here.

0:05:500:05:55

Sue has got about an equal amount, but this is diamonds and sapphires.

0:05:550:06:00

That is really, really special.

0:06:000:06:02

And bought by subscription by the ladies of Bristol, which is nice.

0:06:020:06:06

And made in Bristol, so it's particularly precious to Bristol.

0:06:060:06:10

'Let's get back to the items that people can and do want to sell,

0:06:100:06:15

'such as Alan and Jane's glass walking sticks.'

0:06:150:06:18

I think they were produced in glass factories,

0:06:180:06:22

-initially to use up wasted metal at the end of the day.

-Oh, yeah.

0:06:220:06:28

They'd have the furnaces on and they might not have used all the metal which was the molten glass.

0:06:280:06:34

-If you rub your hand along that...

-Yes.

-Do you feel it?

0:06:340:06:38

-It's ribbed, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Yes, it is.

0:06:380:06:42

-Ribbed, I can feel it.

-So you can sense how this was produced.

0:06:420:06:46

-You'd have the coloured inclusions and then this was stretched and twisted.

-Was it?

0:06:460:06:52

Whilst it was still in its molten form.

0:06:520:06:55

Now, these were given to young couples

0:06:550:06:58

-when they were embarking on a marriage.

-Really?

0:06:580:07:02

-And they were often placed above a door.

-I've heard of that, yes.

0:07:020:07:07

-As long as these remained intact, so would the marriage.

-I see.

0:07:070:07:11

-We'd better not get rid of them then.

-No.

0:07:110:07:15

So, these are quite nice pieces.

0:07:150:07:18

You've got a problem at that end on one of them because you're missing the stopper at the bottom.

0:07:180:07:24

And the market for this type of ornamental ware has dropped slightly.

0:07:240:07:29

So, if these go up for sale, I think you will be lucky...

0:07:290:07:33

..to get £40 to £60 on them.

0:07:340:07:36

-Oh, well...

-All right. OK.

-That's it.

0:07:360:07:40

-I thought you might have ranted and raved, "They cost me a fortune when we bought them!"

-No.

0:07:400:07:46

-Let's protect ourselves with a £30 reserve.

-Thank you.

0:07:460:07:49

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed. And thanks for not giving me a hard time.

0:07:490:07:55

'Why would they give you a hard time, David? Although Dorrie and Pat might do just that to Philip

0:07:550:08:01

'as they've brought in something that does what it says on the box.'

0:08:010:08:05

It's a magneto-electric machine.

0:08:050:08:08

And it says here, "For nervous..." That's me. "..and other diseases.

0:08:080:08:12

"This machine has been designed expressly for the use of the medical profession and for invalids

0:08:120:08:18

"who are unable to take exercise, suffering from rheumatism and various nervous complaints."

0:08:180:08:24

You've got this huge, great magnet there

0:08:240:08:28

and then you've got this lovely little...almost like a flywheel that's cranked here and that...

0:08:280:08:34

You turn that round and round and round, but with this magnet, it creates an electric shock.

0:08:340:08:41

You see, that there completes the circuit.

0:08:410:08:44

-I see.

-Do you see? When it's there, it's completed and when it's not there, it isn't.

0:08:440:08:50

And then you plonk that... down in there,

0:08:500:08:55

and you plonk that in there...

0:08:550:08:58

..and then you hold it...

0:08:590:09:01

-I don't want my finger in there.

-Look, do I look like I'd hurt you?

-Well, I'm not sure.

0:09:010:09:08

Hold it. Come on.

0:09:080:09:10

This'll make you laugh, Dorrie.

0:09:100:09:13

-I hope it makes ME laugh.

-Are you ready for this?

0:09:130:09:16

-No.

-It's no more than about 100 volts, honestly.

-No more than 100? That's all right(!)

0:09:160:09:21

-Ready?

-Yes.

-You won't feel a thing.

0:09:210:09:24

-It doesn't do anything.

-Nothing's happening, no.

0:09:240:09:27

-I'm frightened more than anything.

-Concentrate.

-I am.

-This is serious.

-This is fear.

0:09:270:09:32

What happens is you spin that round and round and it gives you a shock.

0:09:320:09:37

-Right.

-And I would think this probably dates to 1920, 1930.

0:09:370:09:42

-Really?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:09:420:09:44

There were some bizarre medical beliefs as to how you got better.

0:09:440:09:49

I mean, they used to have things called trepanning sets.

0:09:490:09:53

-And these things were... You know like a brace and bit?

-Yeah.

0:09:530:09:57

It was like a huge brace and bit and if you had a headache,

0:09:570:10:01

they bored a hole in your head to relieve the pressure.

0:10:010:10:04

-There's a lot to be said for the National Health.

-How did people get this? Did a doctor recommend it?

0:10:040:10:11

I imagine you'd just go and buy it 80 or 90 years ago.

0:10:110:10:15

A lot of this stuff is coming back.

0:10:150:10:17

-I read somewhere that they still use leeches and maggots to clear up wounds.

-Yes.

0:10:170:10:23

So your magneto-electric machine might come back to the fore. But it's a real good bit of fun.

0:10:230:10:28

-Oh, yes, yes.

-But value-less?

0:10:280:10:31

I think, girls, this will make between £20 and £30.

0:10:310:10:34

-Put a reserve on it of a tenner and somebody will have a bit of fun with it.

-I think so.

0:10:340:10:39

-It's a great talking point after a dinner party.

-Absolutely.

0:10:390:10:44

I think if we can get a proper band on there, I reckon we could get it going.

0:10:440:10:48

-Dorrie, we could give her a bit of a jolt later on.

-Yeah.

0:10:480:10:52

Monday morning, I need one to get to work!

0:10:520:10:55

Before we see more valuations here in Bristol, we're taking our first batch of items off to auction.

0:10:550:11:02

We've got Dorrie and Pat's quirky electric shock machine,

0:11:020:11:06

animal lover Ron's pair of porcelain pug dogs,

0:11:060:11:11

Alan and Jane's glass walking sticks.

0:11:110:11:15

This is where all the action takes place - the Clevedon Salerooms.

0:11:200:11:25

Auctioneer Marc Burridge knows his local market and we have a packed saleroom, wonderful antiques -

0:11:250:11:30

the ingredients of a classic sale.

0:11:300:11:33

-I just hope the bidders aren't going to sit on their hands. Are those hands going up today?

-Yes!

0:11:330:11:38

Brilliant! We've got some eager bidders today, but a word of advice.

0:11:380:11:43

At auction, buyers and sellers have to pay commission.

0:11:430:11:47

Here in Clevedon, if an item is less than £1,000,

0:11:470:11:50

the commission is 15%, plus VAT.

0:11:500:11:53

These amounts vary from saleroom to saleroom, so make sure you take this into account.

0:11:530:12:00

The bidders are raring to go, so let's get our owners' items under the hammer,

0:12:020:12:07

starting with the pair of pugs.

0:12:070:12:10

Who let the dogs out? Ron did and he's standing next to me. We've got two pug dogs going under the hammer,

0:12:100:12:16

a valuation of 80 to 120, but this guy has eight real dogs at home.

0:12:160:12:21

-Do you breed from them?

-Yes.

-You must know your stuff.

-I hope so.

0:12:210:12:25

-I'm due to judge Crufts in the breed in 2012.

-Good for you. How can you judge Philip's valuation today?

0:12:250:12:31

-We'll wait and see.

-I think 80 to 120 is spot-on. We've got to get them away at that.

0:12:310:12:36

I hope so. It's interesting how your enthusiasm for an animal leads you off into a collecting field.

0:12:360:12:42

I think that's really good. Good luck at Crufts and good luck right now. It's going under the hammer.

0:12:420:12:49

Lot 160, the Staffordshire pottery figures of seated pug dogs.

0:12:500:12:55

Glass eyes. Interest in these. 60 I'm bid.

0:12:550:12:59

-And 5.

-We're off.

-We've sold them.

0:12:590:13:02

And 70. And 5. And 80.

0:13:020:13:04

5. £90 on my book. And 5 in the room.

0:13:040:13:08

And 110 I am...

0:13:080:13:10

-They're dog lovers.

-120.

0:13:100:13:13

130. 140?

0:13:130:13:15

£130 with me. 140, anyone else?

0:13:150:13:18

Are you all done? Selling then at £130...

0:13:190:13:22

-We like that.

-Great.

-We like that.

-Great.

0:13:220:13:26

-That's very good.

-It is, considering we bought them at a car boot sale.

0:13:260:13:30

The money's going towards the dogs?

0:13:300:13:33

It is going towards the dogs, but the donation is going to the rescue...

0:13:330:13:37

-Oh, brilliant.

-I'm glad they sold.

0:13:370:13:39

'The pugs are off to a new home and the money could help some real animals find a new home too.

0:13:390:13:46

Things are running smoothly.

0:13:510:13:53

Let's hope this next lot walks out the saleroom - Alan and Jane's two glass walking canes.

0:13:530:13:58

-They're beautiful with the glass coloured beads.

-Little hundreds and thousands.

0:13:580:14:03

You can imagine them sprinkled on a trifle!

0:14:030:14:06

We did have a valuation put on by David, our expert here, of around sort of £50

0:14:060:14:12

-with a fixed reserve of 30.

-It was a "come and get me".

0:14:120:14:15

-But since the valuation day, you've upped the reserve now to 50.

-50.

0:14:150:14:20

Fixed at 50. £25 a cane. I still think that's good value for money.

0:14:200:14:24

-Marc Burridge, the auctioneer, said they should just sell.

-Good.

-Good.

0:14:240:14:29

Lot 140,

0:14:290:14:31

Nailsea type glass sticks,

0:14:310:14:34

two of them there together for you. I have 30 on the book.

0:14:340:14:39

-Good.

-Brilliant.

0:14:390:14:42

35. Who's got 40? 40? 40? 40?

0:14:420:14:46

40?

0:14:460:14:47

Are you bidding sat down there? 40? No?

0:14:470:14:50

At £35 only... 40. 40 bid.

0:14:500:14:53

And 5. And 50? 50...?

0:14:530:14:57

You won't go 50? 50?

0:14:570:15:01

It's against you all at £45. Anyone else, 50?

0:15:010:15:04

Yes or no? No.

0:15:040:15:06

-I don't mind, I'm taking them home.

-I can see a big smile on your face.

0:15:060:15:11

-You like them.

-I do like them.

0:15:110:15:13

-Are they going back on the wall?

-I may let my grandson have them. He's ten.

0:15:130:15:18

-They might be better for him.

-As long as doesn't play with them - fencing!

0:15:180:15:23

'That was a shame, but it's better Alan and Jane upped the estimate

0:15:230:15:27

'than sold it for less than they were happy with.

0:15:270:15:30

'Luckily, no-one has upped the estimate on our next lot - Dorrie and Pat just want to get rid of it.'

0:15:300:15:36

I've just been joined by mum and daughter, Dorothy and Pat, and we've got that electro machine.

0:15:370:15:43

This came from a house clearance?

0:15:430:15:46

-Yes, a very elderly friend died last August.

-I'm sorry.

-It was very sad, but we were left to clear the house.

0:15:460:15:52

-We found this interesting box.

-We've seen items like this before.

-We've had a few on Flog It.

0:15:520:15:57

What intrigues me is the things they did in olden days to make you feel better.

0:15:570:16:02

Let's find out what the bidders think of this. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:16:020:16:08

Lot 180, a pine cased magneto-electric machine,

0:16:120:16:16

which will cure all your ills.

0:16:160:16:19

Lot 180. What can we say?

0:16:190:16:21

10. 12. 15. 18. 20.

0:16:210:16:24

20. 20. 22. 5. 8. 30.

0:16:240:16:27

£30...

0:16:280:16:31

And bid 2. 32?

0:16:310:16:34

£30, the bid in the room, and selling on £30 then...

0:16:340:16:38

-Yes, £30. Well done.

-Yeah.

0:16:380:16:41

-Shocked?

-Very.

-We are.

-We are.

0:16:410:16:44

In the midst of the bustling Broadmead shopping centre in Bristol, something stirs.

0:16:510:16:57

The spirit of the Lord is upon me,

0:16:590:17:01

for He has anointed me to preach the Gospel to the poor.

0:17:010:17:05

He has sent me to heal the broken-hearted.

0:17:050:17:08

This is where 250 years ago,

0:17:080:17:11

the powerful preacher and campaigner for social justice, John Wesley,

0:17:110:17:16

held open-air meetings before thousands

0:17:160:17:19

and eventually set up the headquarters of what became the Methodist Church.

0:17:190:17:25

John Wesley's New Rooms are right through these two arches.

0:17:250:17:29

It's an oasis of calm tucked away from the hustle and bustle of the shops just there

0:17:290:17:34

and here's the man himself shown on horseback

0:17:340:17:37

because he is said to have travelled some 250,000 miles back and forth across Britain and Ireland,

0:17:370:17:44

preaching some 40,000 sermons.

0:17:440:17:47

And he once famously said, "I look upon the whole world as my parish."

0:17:470:17:52

He campaigned tirelessly to encourage people

0:17:520:17:55

to become Christians and to serve the needs of others.

0:17:550:17:58

He was especially keen to help those in prison, to offer free medical care to the poor

0:17:580:18:04

and universal education.

0:18:040:18:07

This is the oldest Methodist chapel in the world.

0:18:070:18:11

Building work started in 1739.

0:18:110:18:13

It was later extended and finally completed in 1748.

0:18:130:18:17

The building is exactly the same today as it was back then.

0:18:170:18:22

And up there is the very pulpit where Wesley preached his sermons.

0:18:220:18:26

You could say it's the cradle of the early Methodist movement.

0:18:260:18:30

Bristol was a city built on international trade and that included the slave trade.

0:18:300:18:36

So it's fitting that it was here in 1788 that Wesley preached to a packed house

0:18:360:18:42

against this "execrable villainy".

0:18:420:18:44

This equally concerns every gentleman that has an estate on our American plantations.

0:18:460:18:52

Yea, all slave-holders of whatever rank and degree,

0:18:520:18:57

seeing that men-buyers are exactly on a level with men-stealers.

0:18:570:19:05

Now, it is your money that pays the merchant

0:19:050:19:10

and through him the slave captain.

0:19:100:19:14

Spill no more the blood of the innocent.

0:19:140:19:17

Do not hire another to shed blood. Do not pay him for doing so.

0:19:170:19:22

Away with all whips, all chains, all compulsion!

0:19:230:19:27

Be gentle towards all people.

0:19:280:19:32

And see that you invariably do unto everyone

0:19:320:19:36

as you would he should do unto you.

0:19:360:19:39

That sermon was so controversial at the time, it nearly caused a riot here in the chapel.

0:19:410:19:47

Chaos broke out all over the place.

0:19:470:19:50

It not only marked out Wesley to be a great public speaker,

0:19:500:19:53

but also a man who used his gift in a fair-minded and forward-thinking way,

0:19:530:19:59

qualities which probably helped secure this church's future, the church that he started.

0:19:590:20:04

Preaching services took place at 5am, so working people could attend

0:20:070:20:12

and every service began and ended with him singing.

0:20:120:20:15

Very handy then that John Wesley's brother Charles became one of the world's greatest hymn writers.

0:20:150:20:22

John Wesley was so revered by his followers that they even wanted to commemorate him during his lifetime.

0:20:220:20:29

What they could buy would have been this.

0:20:290:20:32

This was the first item, a teapot,

0:20:320:20:34

which was made in 1775 by Wedgwood of Stoke-on-Trent.

0:20:340:20:38

Now, Wesley was alive at the time and he and Wedgwood were good friends.

0:20:380:20:44

And this bust is a 19th century copy of the original bust,

0:20:440:20:48

modelled by Enoch Wood who was Wedgwood's apprentice.

0:20:480:20:52

This was made ten years before Wesley died

0:20:520:20:55

and Enoch Wood is described as saying, "Every vein and every wrinkle is as of nature."

0:20:550:21:01

It's so beautifully modelled.

0:21:010:21:04

It's no wonder he went on to be the most successful modeller in his day.

0:21:040:21:09

Today, there are 300,000 members of the Methodist Church in Britain...

0:21:090:21:14

..and an estimated 75 million worldwide.

0:21:150:21:18

The wonderful thing about John Wesley's New Room here in Bristol

0:21:180:21:22

is that it's open six days a week, not just as a chapel,

0:21:220:21:26

but as a celebration of Wesley's life and work,

0:21:260:21:29

as a sanctuary, an oasis from the frenzy of the shopping just yards away.

0:21:290:21:34

'We might not have the weather on our side at our Bristol valuation day,

0:21:480:21:53

'but still people are braving the snow-filled streets to get their antiques and collectables valued.'

0:21:530:21:59

It's time to kick off with Gwen's item. Thank you for bringing them in and braving the snow.

0:21:590:22:05

Could this be Bristol City or Bristol Rovers? "Eether" or either?

0:22:050:22:09

-Who's Bristol City?

-Me.

-Yes.

0:22:090:22:11

-Who's Rovers?

-They wouldn't like to say.

0:22:110:22:14

OK, so how did you come by these?

0:22:140:22:17

They were given to me by a lady called Ada Vickers

0:22:170:22:20

whose father was a yachtsman

0:22:200:22:22

-and he was presented with these in a yachting...

-Regatta?

0:22:220:22:27

A regatta in Plymouth.

0:22:270:22:29

Looking at the clothing, the long shorts, I would say this is early 1900s.

0:22:290:22:33

-Does that correlate with when these were given?

-I believe it was in 1920-ish that they were given.

0:22:330:22:40

-What have you been doing with them?

-They've been on our mantelpiece and on the hearth watching us for years.

0:22:400:22:47

They've got the look of bronze. Unfortunately, they're not.

0:22:470:22:50

It's a mixed metal, a sort of base metal. There's a lot of lead content and a bit of tin as well.

0:22:500:22:56

And there is a bit of weight there.

0:22:560:22:59

And they're well cast. I like the faces. They've got a good feel and a good touch.

0:22:590:23:04

They're taking on that nutty, variegated hue

0:23:040:23:07

that bronze gives you with wear, the sweat and grease of the palm and the hand.

0:23:070:23:12

I like that. Bronzes or any figures like this made of spelter or lead or pewter should always be handled.

0:23:120:23:19

It's that discolouring that gives them that sort of decorator's quality.

0:23:190:23:24

You know the look that you get with age? They're very good.

0:23:240:23:28

Why do you want to sell them?

0:23:280:23:31

Well, I'm not a great football fan and they don't really go with anything I have.

0:23:310:23:37

And I don't think anybody in my family wants them either.

0:23:370:23:42

I think these would be a great trophy for a young boys' club.

0:23:420:23:45

If you've got a local football team and they want to win a cup, giving them something like this is a bonus.

0:23:450:23:51

If you put them into auction, you could realise around £100. I think £50 each is pretty good.

0:23:510:23:58

I love the goalie with his gloves on, ready to throw the ball out.

0:23:580:24:02

-A reserve of 80 and hopefully, you'll get the top end.

-Fantastic.

0:24:020:24:07

-Happy with that?

-Absolutely.

-I just hope we hit the back of the net.

0:24:070:24:12

It looks like David Barby and Michael Baggott have spotted something rare over there.

0:24:170:24:22

There's a big buzz in the room.

0:24:220:24:24

'After some research and consultation with other experts,

0:24:240:24:29

'David is ready to tell Rachel why her coin has caused such a buzz.'

0:24:290:24:33

Rachel, how on earth did you get your hands on this?

0:24:330:24:37

My grandad gave it to me.

0:24:370:24:40

He gave it to me about four years ago.

0:24:400:24:43

He was very poorly and he was on his last legs and he just said to take care of it for him

0:24:430:24:49

or do whatever's best, whatever I want to do with it.

0:24:490:24:53

-Did he survive?

-He's passed away.

-He's passed away.

0:24:530:24:57

-Where did you keep this?

-I've just kept it in a pot in the cupboard.

0:24:570:25:01

-What do you mean, "in a pot"?

-Just with my spare change.

0:25:010:25:06

You kept this in spare change?

0:25:060:25:09

Yes, with all my coppers.

0:25:090:25:12

This is extraordinary.

0:25:120:25:15

-It's about 1528, that sort of period.

-Ah!

0:25:150:25:18

But I was looking very carefully on this

0:25:180:25:22

-to see whether there was the initials "WS".

-Oh, right.

0:25:220:25:26

Because that would have been for William Sharington who was Master of the Mint in Bristol.

0:25:260:25:31

And it was minted, we think, at the Tower Mint.

0:25:310:25:36

There were five places - the Tower,

0:25:360:25:39

Canterbury, York,

0:25:390:25:42

Durham and here at Bristol.

0:25:420:25:45

And there were only five occasions when these were actually minted.

0:25:450:25:50

And they're called angels.

0:25:500:25:53

-Angel coins. And they are gold.

-Oh!

0:25:530:25:56

23-carat gold.

0:25:560:25:58

And you kept this in a pot with loose change!

0:25:580:26:03

-Yes.

-That is absolutely extraordinary.

0:26:030:26:06

If you look at it in detail, there's the most exquisite, exquisite modelling

0:26:060:26:12

-of an angel on the surface. Can you see that?

-Yes. It's beautiful.

0:26:120:26:16

It's probably St George and the dragon. We know it's Henry VIII

0:26:160:26:20

because if I turn it upside down, on the back...

0:26:200:26:23

Can you see that there? We have a boat.

0:26:230:26:26

-Yes.

-The royal shield, the cross,

0:26:260:26:30

and just by the side of the cross, we have the initial H.

0:26:300:26:35

For "Henri - Henry". All the way round, you have lettering

0:26:350:26:40

which states that Henry was King of England and France.

0:26:400:26:45

But somewhere along the line,

0:26:450:26:48

-somebody has clipped all the way round the edge, rather like clipping your nails.

-OK.

0:26:480:26:55

They clipped it for gold.

0:26:550:26:57

Now, in Georgian times, to stop that happening, they serrated all the edge.

0:26:570:27:02

-They didn't do that during the time of Henry VIII because the coins were fairly thin.

-Right.

0:27:020:27:08

But people took advantage of this thinness and took a little slither of gold away. It's remarkable.

0:27:080:27:14

-It's beautiful.

-It is beautiful, but what would you do with it?

0:27:140:27:18

-Not much. Probably put it back in the pot.

-That's terrible.

0:27:180:27:23

If I said it's worth between £400 and £600...

0:27:230:27:27

-It's amazing.

-Now, what I want from you

0:27:270:27:31

-is whether you're going to flog it or not.

-Yes, I'll flog it.

0:27:310:27:36

-That's good. That was quite determined.

-Yes.

0:27:360:27:39

-We'll put a reserve of £400 on it.

-Yeah.

0:27:390:27:42

Thank goodness you kept that! It's quite interesting.

0:27:420:27:45

This is so old and the oldest piece...

0:27:450:27:48

-And I note that you're pregnant.

-Yes.

0:27:480:27:51

Hopefully, this will be sold just prior to the birth.

0:27:510:27:55

-Thank you for bringing this along.

-Thank you very much.

0:27:550:27:58

'It's a really important find

0:27:580:28:01

'and I'm going to ask the auctioneer to do some more in-depth research when it gets to the saleroom.

0:28:010:28:07

'I've been invited into the Lord Mayor's parlour to look at some of the treasures in there,

0:28:070:28:13

'including a rare Gainsborough painting.'

0:28:130:28:17

The two cases we have either side, maces of Bristol, the city maces and also quite a few swords.

0:28:170:28:23

Gosh, I really do like those! And they are so early, aren't they?

0:28:230:28:28

-I like the maces.

-The maces are about 1722.

0:28:280:28:30

I've just got to do this while I'm in here.

0:28:300:28:33

-Sit yourself down.

-Here we are, look at this.

0:28:340:28:37

-Does it feel very powerful?

-It does, actually,

0:28:370:28:40

especially looking at a Gainsborough

0:28:400:28:43

Now I want to talk about wheelie bins!

0:28:430:28:46

'I'm not interested in rubbish today as there are some fabulous things coming through the doors,

0:28:490:28:55

'like this silver cross that Lesley has brought in.'

0:28:550:28:59

This is interesting. Very much 19th century.

0:28:590:29:02

-Probably 1880s?

-OK.

-No hallmark there.

0:29:020:29:06

But English.

0:29:060:29:08

-How did you come by that?

-My parents bought a Victorian house about 38 years ago.

0:29:090:29:15

It had never been modernised. It had gas chandeliers, gas fittings, no electricity.

0:29:150:29:20

There was a very, very large Bible. You know, a very, very big one with metal edges.

0:29:200:29:26

And they found this under the floorboards. That's all I know.

0:29:260:29:30

-And the Bible as well under the floorboards?

-I'm not sure, but this was definitely under the floorboards.

0:29:300:29:37

-Do you think it was lost or put there intentionally?

-Absolutely no idea.

0:29:370:29:42

-How old was the house?

-It would have been a Victorian house.

0:29:420:29:46

All the other fittings, all the gas chandeliers and fittings were sold.

0:29:460:29:50

They modernised it and put electricity in.

0:29:500:29:53

And now people are turning it all back to the old fittings!

0:29:530:29:56

So you've brought this with you for the last 30-odd years?

0:29:560:30:00

I've had it for 38 years stuck in a drawer.

0:30:000:30:03

I was quite interested in finding out details about it. I didn't have a clue.

0:30:030:30:08

It's quite nice. It's very ecclesiastical.

0:30:080:30:11

You've got this engraved decoration on the front, a big, bold chain, no hallmarks, but it is English.

0:30:110:30:18

-Any idea on values?

-I don't have a clue, no.

0:30:180:30:22

You're selling it at a good time, I think.

0:30:220:30:25

-I think we'll put an auction estimate on this at £60 to £90.

-OK.

0:30:250:30:29

We'll put a reserve of £50 on it and give the auctioneers 10% discretion to sell it for you.

0:30:290:30:34

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes. It's better that somebody wears it than it's in a drawer.

0:30:340:30:40

-It's a big, bold thing.

-Yes.

-If it makes £50, what will you spend that on?

0:30:400:30:45

-A piece of jewellery that I'll wear.

-Really?

-Yes.

-You're not really going to wear that, are you?

-No.

0:30:450:30:51

-We better had get it sold.

-Yes.

0:30:510:30:53

You know what they say, don't you? Football is a game of two halves.

0:31:010:31:05

So is Flog It and just as exciting because you never know what will happen in the auction room.

0:31:050:31:11

It's time for our second visit, so let's see what's going under the hammer.

0:31:110:31:16

'Let's hope these two metal football figures sell well for Gwen.

0:31:160:31:21

'I think this lot will sell very well.

0:31:210:31:24

'Rachel's 16th century gold coin is the oldest lot in the entire auction.

0:31:240:31:29

'And the last lot we're taking is Lesley's silver cross.

0:31:290:31:32

'Remember, there's commission to pay if you buy or sell at auction.

0:31:320:31:36

'Here at the Clevedon Salerooms,

0:31:360:31:39

'if an item goes for under £1,000, the commission is 15%, plus VAT.

0:31:390:31:43

'If it fetches more than £1,000, it's 10%, plus VAT.

0:31:430:31:47

'This commission is how the saleroom makes money and they'll market your item and do any extra research.

0:31:470:31:54

'The man in charge, Marc Burridge, did just that with Rachel's coin

0:31:540:31:58

'and has discovered that it was minted earlier than first thought.

0:31:580:32:02

'Not during the reign of Henry VIII, but of his father.'

0:32:020:32:05

I've never seen one of these before on Flog It in all my years.

0:32:050:32:10

This belongs to Rachel. It's a gold coin in the reign of Henry VII.

0:32:100:32:14

We've put £400 to £600 on this.

0:32:140:32:16

It has been clipped around the edges, so it's been used as payment.

0:32:160:32:20

And there's a ship on the other side.

0:32:200:32:23

Isn't that fabulous? Heads or tails?

0:32:230:32:26

It's a very nice coin,

0:32:260:32:28

the ship on the other side there.

0:32:280:32:31

And this side is St Michael with a spear slaying a dragon.

0:32:310:32:36

Not St George, St Michael.

0:32:360:32:39

And the dragon there is depicting Satan,

0:32:390:32:43

so it's Satan getting his worth.

0:32:430:32:45

-A 500-year-old coin.

-It's fabulous.

-In pretty good condition.

0:32:460:32:51

It's in exceptional condition. The image is really, really clear. Apart from the clipping.

0:32:510:32:57

-So is it worth that sort of money?

-It's certainly worth that.

-And a bit more?

0:32:570:33:02

-Spot-on. I would say spot-on.

-OK.

0:33:020:33:05

That's one of the nicest things I've seen on Flog It in a long time.

0:33:050:33:09

If you've got anything like that, we'd love to see it and I can't wait to see this go under the hammer.

0:33:090:33:15

But that's not happening just yet. First up are the two football figures.

0:33:150:33:20

It was my valuation and I've been joined by Gwen. We're talking about the two spelter figures.

0:33:210:33:27

-I said, "Are you Bristol Rovers or Bristol City?"

-That's right. Not at all.

-We're neither, are we?

-No.

0:33:270:33:33

I pitched the same question to Marc, our auctioneer.

0:33:330:33:37

-He said he doesn't like football, but he agreed with the valuations.

-Oh, good.

0:33:370:33:42

-That's OK.

-Really good.

-We're going under the hammer now.

0:33:420:33:45

Lot 220, an interesting pair of bronze, base metal figures there,

0:33:480:33:52

footballers or soccer players, as in the catalogue.

0:33:520:33:55

Interest in these.

0:33:560:33:58

I've got 80, 90, 100, 110 with me.

0:33:580:34:02

-Sold straightaway.

-120 now? 120?

0:34:020:34:06

A pair of figures there at £110. 120. 130.

0:34:060:34:10

140. 150.

0:34:100:34:12

160? The bid's still with me at £150.

0:34:120:34:16

160 if you want 'em? With me then selling, make no mistake.

0:34:160:34:20

All done on £150... Commission buyer.

0:34:200:34:23

-£150. Back of the net, that's what I say!

-Wow!

0:34:230:34:28

-Isn't that good?

-That's fantastic.

-Paint splats and all.

-Absolutely.

0:34:280:34:32

-It wasn't me!

-I'm ever so pleased with that.

-I am too. Really pleased.

0:34:320:34:36

That's great news and comfortably above the reserve.

0:34:370:34:41

Next up, it's Lesley and her silver necklace.

0:34:410:34:45

Good luck, Lesley. It's getting exciting, the tension's building.

0:34:470:34:51

Hopefully, this will go for a lot of money.

0:34:510:34:54

We've got £60 to £90 on this silver cross that Philip valued.

0:34:540:34:58

-I like it.

-It's a big, old chunky thing.

-Yes.

-And probably quite fashionable today.

0:34:580:35:04

-For Goths.

-For Goths, yeah. Why are you selling it?

0:35:040:35:07

-That would suit you.

-I wore it as a rebellious teenager. I haven't worn it since.

0:35:070:35:12

Let's see what the bidders think. It's now down to them to decide.

0:35:120:35:17

360, the engraved, white metal cruciform

0:35:180:35:23

and a fancy link chain. Lot 360.

0:35:230:35:27

Very Victorian, High Victorian.

0:35:270:35:29

Very nice indeed. I've got 50, 5, 60 on the book.

0:35:290:35:33

We're off.

0:35:330:35:35

And 5? 65? 65? 65?

0:35:350:35:38

At £60. Selling with me at £60 now...

0:35:400:35:44

-Commission buyer.

-Straight in and straight out, sold at £60.

0:35:440:35:48

You've got to be pleased with that.

0:35:480:35:51

Yeah, it's my daughter's birthday today. We'll buy her a present.

0:35:510:35:55

'That's just fabulous, although Lesley and her birthday girl might not be the only ones celebrating.

0:35:550:36:01

'It's time for the lot we've all been looking forward to.'

0:36:010:36:05

I've been waiting for this one. There's tension in the air. I've been joined by Rachel and David.

0:36:050:36:11

We're talking about that gold coin in the reign of Henry VII, £400 to £600.

0:36:110:36:16

Marc the auctioneer loves it and it's wonderful just to hold something like that.

0:36:160:36:21

Particularly if you love Tudor history, to have something from Henry VII's reign.

0:36:210:36:26

The history of the Tudors has been on TV, so this is superb.

0:36:260:36:30

When you hold this in your hand, you can see it's been nibbled around the edges.

0:36:300:36:34

-They've clipped it.

-It's been clipped as part payment for things.

0:36:340:36:38

Gorgeous. All the money is going towards...?

0:36:380:36:42

-My new child.

-The little one, look.

0:36:420:36:45

-Are you having a boy or a girl?

-A boy.

-Have you chosen a name?

0:36:450:36:49

-Yes, Theo.

-Little Theo. What a lovely little present!

0:36:490:36:53

-It would be, yes.

-Let's hope we get more than £600.

0:36:530:36:57

And Lot 420 is the oldest thing here today.

0:36:580:37:02

It dates between 1495 and 1498,

0:37:020:37:06

the Henry VII gold angel.

0:37:060:37:08

And I have interest here, starting at my £400 on the book.

0:37:080:37:13

400. 420. 450. 480.

0:37:130:37:16

480. 480. 500. 520.

0:37:160:37:20

550. 580. 600. 620.

0:37:200:37:23

650. 680. 700.

0:37:230:37:26

720. 750. 780. 800.

0:37:280:37:31

820. 850.

0:37:310:37:33

-Wow!

-Oh, wow!

-I'm tingling.

0:37:330:37:36

880. 900. 920.

0:37:360:37:39

950. 980? 980?

0:37:390:37:42

Oh, my God!

0:37:430:37:45

-1,000 on the book.

-Oh, 1,000!

0:37:450:37:47

I'll take £50 more...?

0:37:470:37:50

1,050 in the room. 1,100?

0:37:500:37:54

Anyone else? 1,100?

0:37:540:37:57

1,100?

0:37:570:38:00

Brilliant.

0:38:000:38:01

All done then at £1,050...

0:38:010:38:05

-Yes, the hammer's gone down at £1,050!

-Oh, I feel all nervous.

0:38:050:38:09

Rachel, that was a wonderful thing. That's all down to your grandad.

0:38:090:38:14

-I'm excited for Theo and for you. I hope it all goes well.

-Thank you very much.

0:38:140:38:20

-Thank you as well.

-Thank you.

-I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:38:200:38:23

That's the end of another wonderful session in the auction room.

0:38:230:38:27

There's more surprises to come in future shows, so keep watching. From Bristol, it's cheerio.

0:38:270:38:33

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:38:500:38:54

In a snow-covered Bristol, presenter Paul Martin and antique experts David Barby and Philip Serrell find a very rare gold coin and a necklace that had been hidden under the floorboards for decades.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS