Bristol Flog It!


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Today, Flog It is in its home town. Everything you see on screen is put together inside this building.

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Welcome to Bristol.

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Bristol's probably most famous

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for its dubious history of slavery and tobacco,

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but it's become one of the best cities in Europe to live in.

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Bristol boasts an array of artistic talent from Portishead to Roni Size,

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JK Rowling of the Harry Potter books

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and the world famous graffiti artist, Banksy.

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They are all connected to this magical wonderful city.

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'Flog It is at the Council House on this snowy day

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'to see if the people of Bristol have any antiques or collectables to sell.

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'These will be valued by experts David Barby and Philip Serrell

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'then taken to auction to put the valuations to the test.

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'Phil has been in the business for over 30 years and has an obsession with wooden shovels -

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'to dig himself out of the holes he gets himself in!'

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So, Angela...

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Angela! I was coming round to Angela. It was just a slight move.

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'David is a fan of New Hall pottery and William Morris designs.

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'If you don't know what they are, you haven't been watching enough Flog It.'

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Put them in the attic then bring them out in 30 or 40 years' time.

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'Today, Tony goes to extreme measures to get to his valuation.'

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-Did you fly in?

-Yeah. The rest of it's outside!

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'David lets slip some tricks of the trade.'

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We put a sensible "come and get me" price.

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'Diane has second thoughts about her grandfather's medals.'

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Well, I don't know now... You've got me going now.

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Everybody is safely seated inside and David is first at the table.

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Unfortunately, the weather has kept a lot of people away,

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but Flog It fan Jude has brought in these marvellous paintings.

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These are so evocative of a certain period of art

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appealing to tourists.

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Where did you get them from?

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-I bought them in Greenwich market in London in 1986.

-Right.

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And they cost me, I think it was a fiver for the two.

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The reason I say these are tourist pieces is because there were artists painting in this manner.

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This is Herbert William Hicks born in 1880 and he died in 1944.

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But he was painting in the manner of another artist called Edward Whymper.

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With that sketchy heavy gouache

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application of paint onto the surface.

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You get brilliant touches of colours like these heathers.

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Most of the pictures are named.

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This is Vixen Tor near Princetown.

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And the other one is Picton, is it? It's rather rubbed off.

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So, these were local beauty spots.

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That area of the country was being opened to tourists.

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Cyclists, certainly cars at that time for the more wealthy,

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would visit the area and then purchase objects.

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Pictures like this were very desirable.

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They'd take them back to suburbia London

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and hang them as a memento of their holiday.

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-Did you have them hanging at home?

-I had them hanging on my wall

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in a flat I lived in in London.

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-How appropriate! Back to London.

-Yes. They reminded me of childhood holidays.

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-Right.

-In Dartmoor.

-Same idea.

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Since then, they've been in my attic so I'll be happy to flog 'em!

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A lot of these paintings have gone to auction.

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Single ones will sell between £30 and £55.

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-Pairs go up to £120 and £155.

-Right.

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So your £5 investment has brought in a good return.

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I think the condition is excellent.

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-Oh, good.

-The colours are still vibrant.

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These are towards the top end of the market.

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We've got to put a reserve on them.

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I would suggest a reserve about 80. Do you agree?

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-£80 sounds very good.

-OK, £80 we'll accept as a reserve.

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Let's say if we get over £80,

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say £100, are you going to buy a more contemporary work of art?

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-I might well do.

-That's a good idea.

-Maybe by a local artist.

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-Local artists need all the support they can get.

-Yes. I'm one myself.

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-Really? Jude, thank you very much. Lovely meeting you.

-You're welcome.

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'David's sure someone else

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'will appreciate these landscapes of Dartmoor.

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'He's not the only one interested in pictures.'

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-Look at that! Everyone uses a mobile phone nowadays.

-Yeah.

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Just taken one of our cameraman.

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Unfortunately, there are so many of those around, the Bakelite ones.

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I doubt if you'd get more than £15 for that in an auction.

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'Some things are better left in the attic for the time being.

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'This next item is fresh out of the attic -

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'an intricate cut-out wooden design.

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'Fretwork usually adorns furniture or architecture.

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'In this case, it's a work of art in itself. Philip's not convinced.'

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-Why?

-He's been looking down on us!

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-Has he?

-Absolutely.

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It's a fabulous example of fretwork.

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Quite what you'd do with it, I really don't know.

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It's the Lord's Prayer and I wonder whether it's to demonstrate

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either someone's work of fretwork,

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or to demonstrate an early machine.

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Because you've got different scripts.

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This comes in here.

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It's as fresh as the day it was done.

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From this side, it almost looks like it's 1930s, 1940s.

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1950s, but when you turn it over...

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..you'll see there. That and over this side here,

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it's been in there from day one.

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And this frame is going to date from about 1900.

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If you get a painting and want to know if it's original, look at the back.

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A piece of furniture, turn it upside down.

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Let's turn it round again. So...

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If lots of people want to compete in the marketplace to buy something

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that pushes the price up.

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I might be a heretic here,

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but I don't believe we'll have loads of people competing to buy this.

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Because if you buy it, what do you do with it?

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-Would you want it in your front room?

-No.

-Sorry, Lord!

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It's one of those things that, I think, you'd buy cos it looks an intricate piece of work.

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And you'd be thinking, "What do I do with this?"

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I think we've got to put a "come and buy me" estimate on of £30 to £50.

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-Where did you find it?

-It's been in the loft. 40 years.

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I'm tempted to ask why you want to sell it but that's fairly obvious.

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-I don't want to sell it but...

-Why don't you want to sell it?

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-Because of the workmanship.

-Where would you put it?

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-In the loft!

-In the loft!

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-It just lives in the loft.

-Counselling. You can get help here.

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-Flog it?

-Flog it, please.

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We'll put a fixed reserve on it of £20.

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I suggest, on the way home you start reciting this.

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I just hope that it goes and if it doesn't, I'm terribly sorry,

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-but it's back in your roof again.

-Ooh!

-Yeah.

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'I think that's a good decision, although Mike doesn't seem to agree.

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'Our next valuation is under way.

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'It's an item with a mystery, which also caught my attention.'

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There's David Barby in that monitor, waxing lyrical, as only David can.

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To this lady. He's found something quite special. I'm going to keep my eye on her.

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When they've finished,

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I'm going to have a chat and see if she's happy with the valuation, and why she wants to sell.

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Could be interesting.

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-Margaret, I find watches quite intriguing.

-Yes.

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Not from the point of view of a just a timepiece.

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This timepiece dates from the latter part

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of the 19th century, because it has a top wind.

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-Oh, I see.

-So it doesn't have a key.

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This was an innovation that came about in the latter part of the 19th

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so you can immediately date it to that period.

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Also, I love the white enamel face

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with the Roman numerals and the little second hand.

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What is intriguing about this watch...

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-..is the engraving on the back.

-Yes.

-Do you know anything about that?

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No, I don't. I tried to find out but I couldn't.

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We have a date here of 1829, 1879

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and 11th June.

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So we might be able to research as to which monarch celebrated

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-50 years of marriage.

-Oh!

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I misread the dates!

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-Because I think this is a golden wedding.

-That makes sense.

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You've got a golden watch.

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This gold watch is 14 carat,

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which would also tell me,

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14 carat, you'd expect to find in a Continental model.

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So I find this quite intriguing, the design, but equally so...

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we have an inscription inside the case.

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What's the significance?

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Henry was my late father-in-law and Dick was his father-in-law.

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But what happened on 8 November?

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I'm sorry. I have no idea!

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I know it wasn't Henry's birthday, but I don't know Dick's birthday.

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This is quite a nice little pocket watch.

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-Did your husband use it?

-No. He's never used it.

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-So you've got no lovely watch chain.

-No.

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-Or a waistcoat it would hang on?

-No. He doesn't wear waistcoats.

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The value, I will be quite honest with you, is in the gold.

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If that goes up for auction, for a very plain simple watch

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with the intriguing engraving, it'll probably go 100 to 120.

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-Yes.

-As gold rises, goes down,

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it may alter by the time we go to auction.

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Perhaps a minimum price of £100, reserve price.

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I shall be happy with that. I'm sure the auction house will be as well.

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'Now David has finished, I'm keen to find out what Margaret thought.'

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-Why have you decided to sell it?

-It doesn't have sentimental value.

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We've got other items which belonged to my father-in-law.

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And we never saw it. We only found it after he died.

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He must have kept it in a drawer.

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It's nicely preserved in this little box.

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I'll look forward to the auction, and hopefully we'll get more.

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'So, that's three lots ready to see how they fare at auction.

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'We've got Jude's paintings of Dartmoor,

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'Mike and Jan's fretwork Lord's Prayer that divided opinion

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'and Margaret's watch with a mysterious provenance.

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'And we're taking all of our items to the Clevedon salerooms,

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'where Mark Burridge, will be working hard to get the best results.

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'Both buyers and sellers pay commission.

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'Here in Clevedon,

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'if an item is less than £1,000:'

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Under the hammer now, two paintings of Dartmoor belonging to Jude.

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Unfortunately, Jude can't be with us but we've got our expert Mr David Barby.

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They are local.

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West Country. It's only a county away. We are in Somerset.

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-I love the soft shades.

-Yes.

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Hopefully, somebody's going to be like-minded in the saleroom right now, let's see some hands go up.

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Herbert Hicks, a pair of gouache studies, Dartmoor landscapes.

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Nicely displayed. I've got 80, 90, 100.

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110. 120 on the book...

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Straight in.

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..130 now? 130 now?

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130 now? 130. 40.

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50?

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Against you, sat down. With me, still, then at £140...

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-Great price. Well done, David.

-I feel vindicated.

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I just wish Jude could be here but she can't make it today.

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We'll get on the phone and tell her.

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'Jude was very pleased and I hope Jan and Mike say the same,

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'as Mike didn't want to sell his picture.'

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-This little panel has gone from house to house.

-It has, yeah.

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-Why are you selling it now? Have you decided to stop moving?

-Yes.

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But it's a shame that it's not...

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It's in the loft. No-one's able to see it.

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-Imagine the guy with his fret saw.

-It's a massive amount of work.

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-It isn't really that sought after.

-Religious things aren't commercial.

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It's got some angels and a sun. Hopefully, this is going to sell.

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Lot 80 there is the fretwork Lord's Prayer picture.

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Interest here on the book.

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20. Five. 30. Five. 40 on the book.

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45?

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45. 50. And five?

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£55 bid in the room. 60, anyone else?

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All done? Selling, then, at £55...

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Hammer's gone down. £55.

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I think that's well sold.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

-Hopefully that goes on a wall now.

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'That's more than they'd hoped for.

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'At least it'll go somewhere other than the loft.

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'Time for Margaret's engraved pocket watch.'

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-This was given to your father-in-law.

-Yes.

-It's a good item.

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I know the money is going to charity.

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Yes. It's going to Help For Heroes.

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He was a soldier in the Second World War.

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It's a commemorative piece.

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People interested in royalty will go for it,

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as opposed to just a pocket watch.

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-And it's 14 carat.

-Yes.

-Better than nine!

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And it's going under the hammer right now.

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Lot 400 is a gold coloured metal top white pocket watch, stamped 14k.

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We're selling. £100 I'm bid...

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He's got 100.

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..30, 40. £140 with me.

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150, now?

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150. 60. 70. 80. 90.

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200. 220...?

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This is fabulous! They love it.

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..220 in the room. 240? 240...?

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My goodness!

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..£220. Selling on 220, then.

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-Yes! £220!

-Oh, that's good.

-All going to Help The Heroes.

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-Thank you for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

-What a fabulous result.

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-Totally shocked. Are you surprised?

-I'm not shocked.

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We put a sensible "come and get me" price.

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-Wasn't that exciting?

-I'm very pleased.

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'One of Bristol's adopted sons

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'is the celebrated engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

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'We have him to thank for the Clifton suspension bridge,

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'the SS Great Britain, the docks and Temple Meads station.'

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At 27, Brunel was Chief Engineer of the Great Western Railways.

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He had a vision that a passenger would buy a ticket

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from London to New York via train to Bristol

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then onwards by steam ship across the Atlantic.

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As well as the tunnels, bridges and viaducts,

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he designed the terminus buildings at Paddington and at Temple Meads,

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which was the first to be built, in 1840.

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If you get off at Bristol Temple Meads today,

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you arrive in this section, which wasn't designed by Brunel.

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This extension was added a little later.

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The success of the railway put pressure on Brunel's two platforms,

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so extensions were added to the station, first in the 1870s

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and then in the 1930s, both of which give us the station we see today.

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Down there is the entrance to the main station.

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A wonderful piece of Victorian architecture in the gothic revival style

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added after Brunel's death by his understudy Digby Wyatt.

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You can see where Victorian architecture meets

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Brunel's original terminus.

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You can see the coloured stitching of the brickwork.

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Brunel's style is softer, more in the Elizabethan manner.

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Brunel's original design is just as it was when it was built.

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The platform has been filled in

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but the structure with the hammer-beamed roof

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and windows for the steam from the trains to escape, is still all here.

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It's a shame we can't go inside because there's a conference.

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Believe me, it's absolutely stunning.

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You can see where Brunel's station stops

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and the Victorian extension starts.

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You get a sense of the massive scale of this building.

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Gorgeous hammered beams. Great big robust pieces of wood!

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I know they look a little shabby but they're in total contrast

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to the lightweight classic Victorian engineering.

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Brunel's unique design is no more evident than on the facade,

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which is now somewhat overshadowed

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by a main arterial road in and out of Bristol.

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This was symmetrical but the arrivals archway, on the right,

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was demolished.

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The departures archway is now the entrance to the car park.

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This is where the people would have entered the original station.

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It's hard to imagine. Off the road, through that archway.

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It's a car park, full of wheelie bins and doesn't look that exciting.

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But it would have been a hustle and bustle of activity.

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People arriving on foot with their bags to catch the steam train,

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or by horse drawn carriages.

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The carriages would drop people here

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so they could enter the platform there.

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The carriages would go through that archway, through the other arch, back onto the road.

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You can see one or two massive stone troughs.

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They'd be full of water so the horses could drink.

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This is the grand entrance.

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The interesting thing is the train isn't at this level.

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You had to climb a staircase to get up to the platform level

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which is where that row of windows on the first floor is.

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This is the level the trains would have entered the building.

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They'd go to the end of Brunel's terminus, and back the way they came.

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When the extension was built in the 1870s, the focus was on the right-hand side.

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So this part of the station changed from being the front to the back.

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That can be clearly seen in the difference of Brunel's design

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and the Victorian extension.

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It's a lot more simple. It's quite crude, in fact.

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Trains finally stopped using Brunel's terminus in 1955.

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Even in slightly bleak surroundings, Brunel's brilliance shines through.

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Bristol is home to some of his greatest engineering feats,

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and also to an extensive Brunel collection.

0:22:380:22:42

It was donated to Bristol University's arts and social sciences library

0:22:430:22:49

by Brunel's granddaughter, Lady Celia Noble, in 1950.

0:22:490:22:53

It's been added to in various ways.

0:22:530:22:56

I'm lucky enough to look at some of the thousands of drawings

0:22:560:22:59

and personal effects, and I'm very excited about that!

0:22:590:23:04

Here are Brunel's technical drawing instruments

0:23:040:23:07

in a lovely a mahogany case.

0:23:070:23:10

They've all been stamped with his initials IKB.

0:23:100:23:15

This is the best thing in the collection, as far as I'm concerned.

0:23:180:23:23

Brunel did these drawings when he was just 23 years old.

0:23:230:23:28

This won him the competition to build, to design,

0:23:280:23:32

Clifton suspension bridge.

0:23:320:23:35

Sadly, Brunel never saw it finished.

0:23:350:23:38

It was completed by a chap called Hawkshaw.

0:23:380:23:41

This is the next stage on from that.

0:23:410:23:44

This is almost how it is today.

0:23:440:23:47

He wasn't just a creative genius, he was also a technical genius,

0:23:470:23:52

an accomplished draughtsman.

0:23:520:23:55

The people of Bristol are proud of Brunel's achievements,

0:23:580:24:02

which are what makes this city so special.

0:24:020:24:06

He revolutionised transport and many things he built are used today.

0:24:060:24:10

That is the work of a true, true genius.

0:24:100:24:15

'The Bristol valuation day might be quiet,

0:24:260:24:30

'due to the cold weather,

0:24:300:24:32

'but Philip has discovered an amazing set of personal medals.'

0:24:320:24:37

-Are these all from the same person?

-Yes. They're from my grandfather.

0:24:400:24:45

-He was born in north Wales...

-Are you Welsh or English?

-English.

0:24:450:24:49

-And he was Welsh.

-Definitely Welsh.

-Very Welsh.

-He was a Welsh speaker.

0:24:490:24:54

-English as well?

-He didn't speak English until he left the village

0:24:540:24:59

to join up for the First World War.

0:24:590:25:03

-These, in a way, track the history of your grandfather.

-Yes.

0:25:030:25:08

From his Welsh speaking days

0:25:080:25:10

-to when he first joined up.

-Yes.

0:25:100:25:13

They were medals awarded for serving in the First World War.

0:25:130:25:18

-Presented to Private Roberts? JE Roberts?

-John Edward. Yes.

0:25:180:25:25

He was ASC, the Army Service Corps. Served in the war.

0:25:250:25:28

And then we've got other things he did.

0:25:280:25:32

Joined the Royal Ancient Order of Buffaloes in the Grand Lodge of England.

0:25:350:25:40

GLE is the Grand Lodge of England.

0:25:400:25:42

He had the title City Minstrel because he was a fantastic pianist.

0:25:420:25:48

-The lodge organist!

-Yes. He was the church organist in his village.

0:25:480:25:54

-At 14.

-Sounds a fascinating man.

-He was. Yes.

0:25:540:25:58

We've got John Roberts' war medals.

0:25:580:26:01

For recreation, he joined the Ancient Order of Buffaloes.

0:26:010:26:06

There was quite a lot of recreation.

0:26:060:26:09

And the way he earned his living was working on the buses.

0:26:090:26:13

They're going to make between £40 and £60. Put a reserve on of £30.

0:26:130:26:19

This is your granddad.

0:26:200:26:22

-Yes.

-This is your granddad's life.

-Yes.

0:26:220:26:25

It's all his social history and you want to flog 'em?

0:26:250:26:29

Don't!

0:26:290:26:31

Um...I'm the only one left in the family who actually remembers him.

0:26:310:26:37

My cousin was quite young when my grandfather died.

0:26:370:26:42

I don't think he remembers an awful lot about my grandfather.

0:26:420:26:47

So once I'm gone... Well, I don't know. You're now...

0:26:470:26:52

-You've got me going now.

-Family heirlooms can become a liability.

0:26:530:26:57

The next generation haven't got the first idea of what they've got, just that they can't sell them.

0:26:570:27:05

It was only because of today that I got them out.

0:27:050:27:08

Nobody else would want them after me. But now you've said it...

0:27:080:27:14

It's a conundrum for everybody. Do you keep these things?

0:27:140:27:17

And then when you've gone, they're just stuffed in a drawer?

0:27:170:27:23

-It's nice that we have told his story.

-Yes.

-Shall we do him proud?

0:27:230:27:28

-I think I'll take them home.

-Really? That's fine.

-I think I will.

0:27:290:27:33

-I'm happy with that.

-You don't think about things stuffed in drawers.

0:27:330:27:38

Then you get them out.

0:27:380:27:40

All I would urge you to do is don't put them back in the drawer.

0:27:400:27:45

No. Absolutely. I need to talk to my cousin, who is part owner.

0:27:450:27:51

-God bless John Roberts, I say.

-He was lovely.

0:27:510:27:54

-Thank you for coming along.

-Thank you so much.

0:27:540:27:58

'I'm sure Diane won't regret that decision.

0:27:580:28:01

'Sentimental value outweighs monetary value

0:28:010:28:04

'but our experts value every item, whether you sell it or not.'

0:28:040:28:09

-This is nice.

-It's from Pitcairn Island.

0:28:090:28:12

It was inherited by my wife from her grandfather.

0:28:120:28:15

He was stationed in the southern hemisphere in the Second World War.

0:28:150:28:20

He wrote an account of the expedition.

0:28:200:28:23

Is this something you're thinking of selling or is it too precious?

0:28:230:28:28

I like it. It's one where... I don't know what we'd do with it.

0:28:280:28:32

-If the price is right...

-Yeah.

0:28:320:28:34

I think, on the market, it's only going to realise about £100.

0:28:340:28:39

-OK.

-I think you should hang on to them.

-OK.

0:28:390:28:43

-Put it this way. Do you have kids?

-Yes.

0:28:430:28:46

-I've got one boy. He's nearly two.

-He's going to want them one day.

0:28:460:28:51

That's part of his heritage, his social history.

0:28:510:28:54

Keep them together and on display. They do put a smile on your face.

0:28:540:28:59

'That's a collection that Patrick's son really might treasure.

0:28:590:29:03

'This isn't the case for David, who brought a book of musical scores.'

0:29:030:29:09

Tell me about it. How did you acquire this?

0:29:090:29:12

I acquired it when setting up a book shop

0:29:120:29:15

with my then young lady.

0:29:150:29:17

They didn't specialise in music but they sold a lot of music.

0:29:170:29:23

-Do you play yourself?

-I tinkle the piano for my own amazement!

0:29:230:29:28

It's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:29:280:29:31

A beautifully written manuscript. This is dated August 1820.

0:29:310:29:36

Yes. We noticed, talking about them,

0:29:360:29:39

that they're probably all waltzes.

0:29:390:29:43

So we were wondering, perhaps,

0:29:430:29:45

-if this lady...

-Had a favourite song book.

0:29:450:29:49

..she went round to friends' houses and actually entertained.

0:29:490:29:55

She was the disc jockey of the age!

0:29:550:29:59

-She's handwritten all this.

-It's fantastic. I'm a draughtsman.

0:29:590:30:03

-So I've had to draw to under 10,000th of an inch accuracy.

-Yeah.

0:30:030:30:09

And I couldn't maintain this sort of accuracy

0:30:090:30:13

for more than a page or two.

0:30:130:30:16

-Is this something you're thinking of selling?

-Yes.

0:30:160:30:19

It's hanging about in my home. I've recently lost my wife.

0:30:190:30:24

This was one of the things of mine there.

0:30:240:30:28

I've got all the music that I love to play.

0:30:280:30:31

Absolutely fabulous.

0:30:310:30:34

-As to a value?

-Well, it's in a class of its own.

-It is, really. Yes.

0:30:360:30:41

-Name your own price.

-It definitely needs somebody who really wants it.

0:30:410:30:46

-Do we know her name, anything about her?

-Nothing about her whatsoever.

0:30:460:30:51

Was she a celebrity of the day? That would add value.

0:30:510:30:55

-There's initials there, but nothing more.

-The condition is fabulous.

0:30:550:31:00

It's been well looked after by somebody that appreciated it.

0:31:000:31:05

30-odd years, nearly 50 years, I've had it in my keeping.

0:31:050:31:10

As I say, it's just tucked away and nobody sees it.

0:31:100:31:17

This will appeal to a musician or a collector.

0:31:170:31:20

It's got the look, the decorator's look. It's a prop on a desk.

0:31:200:31:24

Even in a bygone museum somewhere.

0:31:240:31:27

I don't think it'll be used by a musician to actually play. You need terrific eyesight.

0:31:270:31:33

-I have tried it.

-Your eyesight's very good, then!

-It was then!

0:31:330:31:38

Shall we put it into auction with a value of around £40 to £60?

0:31:380:31:43

-I think that would be fair.

-Would you be happy with that?

-Yes.

0:31:430:31:47

A bit of discretion on £40 reserve.

0:31:470:31:51

I'll see you at the auction room. I'll look forward to this.

0:31:510:31:55

-Let's make some music!

-Let's make some music.

0:31:550:31:58

'Next up is our own David with Jane

0:31:580:32:00

'and her collection of Doulton porcelain.'

0:32:000:32:03

Jane, you've got an accumulation

0:32:030:32:06

-of Royal Doulton.

-Yes.

0:32:060:32:09

-Did you collect Royal Doulton?

-My main collection was Worcester.

0:32:090:32:13

-Ah, right.

-Royal Worcester.

-So did you buy these...?

0:32:130:32:17

-Along the way.

-Along the way.

-Yes.

-It's difficult as a collector.

0:32:170:32:22

You sometimes get another branch line to your main collecting.

0:32:220:32:26

I do exactly the same.

0:32:260:32:28

I collect one thing but something intrigues me so I buy that.

0:32:280:32:32

-That's right.

-Why did you buy the large vase?

0:32:320:32:36

Because it was quite reasonable at the time.

0:32:360:32:39

-I thought, "That seems quite a bargain."

-How much did you pay?

0:32:390:32:44

-£120.

-£120. How long ago did you buy that?

0:32:440:32:48

-About ten years ago.

-You bought top end of the market.

0:32:480:32:53

Since then, this type of vase, this shape, this richness of gilding,

0:32:530:32:59

has tended to wane slightly.

0:32:590:33:01

Then I look at the condition of this.

0:33:010:33:05

The gilding is excellent.

0:33:050:33:08

But this duck egg blue greenish finish,

0:33:080:33:12

if you look carefully, there's marks on it.

0:33:120:33:15

Scratches. The saving grace is the image on the front.

0:33:150:33:22

-I love those sepia tones against this duck egg blue.

-Yeah.

0:33:220:33:27

-It's missing something, isn't it?

-The lid.

-It's missing its lid.

0:33:270:33:31

You can tell because there's a groove all the way round there

0:33:310:33:37

where the lid would have sat.

0:33:370:33:39

The mark on the bottom is the Doulton mark.

0:33:390:33:42

It has England underneath it.

0:33:420:33:45

When you see that, you associate it with American legislation.

0:33:450:33:50

Anything from a foreign country had to have the place of origin.

0:33:500:33:55

That will date it after 1891.

0:33:550:33:59

I think we're looking at the beginning of the 20th century.

0:33:590:34:03

-So it's quite old, then.

-Over 100 years.

0:34:030:34:06

In complete contrast,

0:34:060:34:08

there's this coffee service, but we're missing two cups and saucers.

0:34:080:34:13

-Are we? I bought it like that.

-It would be for six.

0:34:130:34:17

And I notice there's slight damage on the jug there.

0:34:170:34:21

-You didn't pay a lot for it, did you?

-No. £40, I think it was.

0:34:210:34:26

I like this design. It's very typical 1950s design.

0:34:260:34:31

It reflects the hunting, shooting, fishing interest at that time.

0:34:310:34:38

They're both flawed. One without the lid and scratches.

0:34:380:34:43

The other one, not a complete service and one piece is cracked.

0:34:430:34:49

I'm going to put a price for all of this Doulton.

0:34:490:34:52

The auction house may decide to separate them

0:34:520:34:56

and offer the coffee service from the vase.

0:34:560:35:00

-Right.

-The price, at the present state of the market, is 80 to 120.

0:35:000:35:05

That's fine.

0:35:050:35:08

-Are you saying you've had your enjoyment and can put the money to something else?

-Yes. A holiday.

0:35:080:35:15

It wouldn't go far on a holiday, but it'll help.

0:35:150:35:19

-A night's accommodation somewhere.

-Yes.

-In Bristol!

0:35:190:35:22

Yes!

0:35:220:35:24

'The Youth Hostel's much cheaper than 80 to 120. Some people discover they won't even get that.'

0:35:240:35:31

-Are you going home rich?

-No.

0:35:310:35:34

Well... Sort of knowledgeable.

0:35:340:35:37

That's what it's all about really.

0:35:370:35:40

'And Philip is just about to impart his knowledge to Tony about his wooden propeller.'

0:35:400:35:47

-Did you fly in?

-Yeah. The rest of it's outside.

0:35:470:35:50

I think this is lovely.

0:35:500:35:52

It's one of those bizarre instances of the way

0:35:520:35:57

the antique world has progressed.

0:35:570:36:00

When I started...30 years ago, people bought chairs and tables,

0:36:000:36:06

and as time's progressed, people have become much more decorative.

0:36:060:36:12

You find yourself looking at this,

0:36:120:36:15

and it's got possibilities in the antique world.

0:36:150:36:21

You could fit a clock in there

0:36:210:36:23

and it would be wonderful in a flying club.

0:36:230:36:27

Or decorating someone's house. You could fit a barometer in there.

0:36:270:36:31

I'm not an aviation expert. I would guess that this dates to between

0:36:310:36:37

1915 to 1930. As a guess.

0:36:370:36:40

It's made out of mahogany.

0:36:400:36:43

And it's laminated so that you've got almost like layers.

0:36:430:36:48

You can see that there.

0:36:480:36:51

You can see these lines.

0:36:510:36:53

It's small in size.

0:36:530:36:56

Other propellers that I've seen,

0:36:560:36:59

you can add that much more on to them.

0:36:590:37:02

What do you know about it?

0:37:020:37:04

My grandfather acquired it, probably 1930s.

0:37:040:37:09

He was a bit of a collector of antiques - more nautical,

0:37:090:37:15

-than from the air.

-Ahead of his time, collecting this 70 years ago.

0:37:150:37:19

He was actually a manager of a local oxyacetylene company.

0:37:190:37:24

He had a contract to run to Southampton and Portsmouth docks.

0:37:240:37:28

They were breaking up boats.

0:37:280:37:30

-He then acquired or bought this.

-I bet he's got fascinating stuff.

0:37:300:37:36

I think it's a really good decorative thing.

0:37:360:37:40

-Have you thought about its value?

-Not a clue.

0:37:400:37:43

I think you could put £120 to £180 as an estimate on it.

0:37:430:37:47

A fixed reserve of £100.

0:37:470:37:50

I think if you have a good result it could top the £200 mark.

0:37:500:37:56

I think it's good. Don't ask me why, but I'd love to own it!

0:37:560:38:00

It's a good, fun, cool thing. Why do you want to sell it?

0:38:000:38:04

I wanted to come to the programme and Mum said, "Take the propeller!"

0:38:040:38:09

'We're very glad you did, Tony, and that's our last valuation.'

0:38:090:38:15

It's time to put those valuations to the test.

0:38:150:38:18

Will our experts be on the money?

0:38:180:38:21

We're going to leave you with a few items going under the hammer.

0:38:210:38:26

Hopefully, some of them will fly away!

0:38:260:38:29

'Along with Tony's propeller, we're taking David's musical scores

0:38:310:38:36

'and Jane's collection of Royal Doulton, which is first up.

0:38:360:38:40

'Since valuation day, the tea set has been withdrawn, so it's just the vase going to auction.'

0:38:400:38:46

-Thank you for coming. You look very smart.

-So do you.

0:38:520:38:56

-This came in with something else.

-Yes. A coffee set.

-But that's been withdrawn.

0:38:560:39:02

-We've got 80 to 120 on this, David. Happy?

-We should do it.

0:39:020:39:07

It's a nice piece of porcelain.

0:39:070:39:11

You know what we bang on about. Quality always sells.

0:39:110:39:14

-Let's watch this one fly away. Here we go.

-Thank you. I hope so.

0:39:140:39:19

Lot 200 now. The Doulton two-handled urn shaped vase.

0:39:210:39:26

Signed.

0:39:260:39:28

What can we say on this? Nice piece at 45. Who's got 50?

0:39:280:39:34

At five here. 60 bid. Five now? Five, five, five now?

0:39:380:39:42

It's £60. Who's got the five...?

0:39:420:39:45

We're struggling.

0:39:470:39:49

..Five, five, five? All done? £60. Selling on the 60, then.

0:39:490:39:53

The hammer's gone down. Only just. We had a reserve of £60.

0:39:530:39:57

We were hoping for 80 to 120, plus a bit more.

0:39:580:40:02

-Yes.

-That was quality. Someone picked up a bargain.

0:40:020:40:05

-It was.

-That's the name of the game.

-That's auctions for you.

0:40:050:40:10

'They sure can go either way, but hopefully we'll see this beautiful book go the right way.'

0:40:100:40:17

This for me, David, is the best thing, not just on Flog It but also

0:40:170:40:22

in the saleroom.

0:40:220:40:24

-It's exquisite.

-It is. Absolutely.

-I had a chat to Mark,

0:40:240:40:28

the auctioneer, and he agreed with me.

0:40:280:40:32

-We're both hoping for £60 plus.

-Yeah.

-On a good day, it could do anything.

0:40:320:40:38

You can't do comparables. That's the beauty of antiques like this.

0:40:380:40:42

-And curios.

-Yes.

0:40:420:40:45

-Let's find out what the bidders think.

-Yeah.

-Here we go.

0:40:450:40:48

Lot 260 is the leather bound album. Finely inscribed music. 1820s.

0:40:510:40:57

1830s. All hand-written.

0:40:570:41:00

Interest in this at 40. Thank you. Five? 45? 45? 45? 45?

0:41:000:41:06

45? 45? 45...?

0:41:060:41:09

-Oh, come on!

-..Maiden bid of £40.

0:41:090:41:12

And five? 45? 45...?

0:41:120:41:15

It's going to sell.

0:41:160:41:19

..Bid's still with me on the book. Selling on the 40.

0:41:190:41:22

Nobody was there to push...? That was lovely.

0:41:230:41:27

-That's it.

-I'm sorry we couldn't do any more.

-No.

0:41:270:41:30

-You needed a couple of musicians in the room.

-It's not a disappointment.

0:41:300:41:35

-They might just enjoy it.

-That's the ideal situation.

0:41:350:41:39

It's a lovely talking point.

0:41:390:41:41

That's the beauty of antiques. They create wonderful topics at dinner parties.

0:41:410:41:47

Yeah. And amongst friends. LAUGHS

0:41:470:41:51

'That's a good result. A quirky lot that got someone's attention.

0:41:510:41:55

'It's chocks away!'

0:41:550:41:57

We're flying along now to Tony and the wonderful four-bladed propeller.

0:41:570:42:02

Wonderful bit of laminated mahogany. Why are you selling this?

0:42:020:42:06

-It should be on your wall at home.

-It has been for 80-odd years!

0:42:060:42:10

-My mother decided she wanted a change.

-I'd like to own it.

0:42:100:42:15

So would I.

0:42:150:42:17

We see hundreds of things a year, but I'd really like to own this.

0:42:170:42:22

The good thing is that it's a good size.

0:42:220:42:26

A lot of propellers are six foot six and really hard to display.

0:42:260:42:31

This little one, perfect.

0:42:310:42:33

-It wouldn't get us airborne.

-No, it wouldn't!

0:42:330:42:36

Interest here on the book. Four-blade propeller.

0:42:380:42:41

-I've got 12 bids on the book...

-Ooh!

-12 bids!

0:42:410:42:45

-..Starting 200. 220...

-They love it, Tony.

0:42:450:42:49

..240. 260. 280. 300.

0:42:490:42:52

320? 320, will you...?

0:42:520:42:56

I meant per blade, Paul, my valuation!

0:42:560:42:59

..£300 on the book. 320?

0:42:590:43:02

320. 340. 360?

0:43:020:43:05

380. 400? 420.

0:43:060:43:08

440?

0:43:100:43:12

£420 commission bid. 440?

0:43:120:43:15

All done at £420, then?

0:43:150:43:17

Yes! £420! You've got to be happy with that.

0:43:180:43:22

-Your mother will be over the moon.

-She will be.

0:43:220:43:25

Excellent. Great result.

0:43:250:43:28

If you've got anything like that, bring it to our valuation day.

0:43:280:43:32

From Philip and Tony and everybody in the saleroom, I hope you've enjoyed today. See you soon.

0:43:320:43:38

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:570:44:00

Paul Martin is joined by antique experts David Barby and Phillip Serrell at the Council House in Bristol. They find a gold watch with a mysterious history and a collection of medals that leaves the owner unsure whether she wants to sell. Paul explores the legacy of Bristol's adopted son Brunel, with a visit to Temple Meads station and Clifton suspension bridge.


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