Christina Trevanion v Mark Stacey - Auction Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is


Christina Trevanion v Mark Stacey - Auction

Antiques challenge. Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey face off at an auction house in Sevenoaks. Christina ignores her own advice and Mark falls in love with a painting.


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Transcript


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This is Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is,

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the show that pitches TV's best-loved antiques experts

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against each other in an all-out battle for profit.

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Let's make hay while that sun shines.

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Each week, one pair of duelling dealers

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will face a different daily challenge.

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I've got a heavy profit here.

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Putting their reputations on the line.

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Who's there?

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They'll give you the insider's view of the trade.

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Rawr!

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Along with their top tips and savvy secrets.

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That could present a problem.

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Showing you how to make the most money...

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Ready for battle.

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..from buying and selling.

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Get in there!

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Coming up: Mark is panicked by the saleroom...

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It's all a bit pear-shaped. I don't want to look any more.

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..Christina shows a flair for the artistic...

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They're after an incredibly famous artist called Angelica Kauffman,

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and they're all stipple engraving

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and they've all got hand-coloured highlights to them as well.

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..and there's straight talking in the selling.

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-So what do you think of 40-60?

-I don't like it at all, really.

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This is Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is.

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Ladies and gentlemen,

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welcome to the best seats in the house for

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this clash of the titans.

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A pair of the antiques world's finest dealers

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go head-to-head and heel to toe in a bid for profit.

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Our male lead has marched all the way from

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his Brightlingsea home.

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Let the battle commence.

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He's profit-hungry, but don't trust him.

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He's a wolf in sheep's clothing.

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Baaa!

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Yes, it's Mark "The Maverick" Stacey.

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What's that smell? Profit!

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Sharing the stage with Mark is the shiniest star

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in the northern hemisphere.

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Hello, have we met yet?

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An auctioneer by trade, no-one takes it more seriously.

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I'll get my bidding face ready.

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From Shropshire, it's Christina "The Magpie" Trevanion.

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I will be bidding, and bidding furiously.

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The setting for today's battle is Sevenoaks

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and Ibbett Mosely Auction Rooms,

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where our tussling two will be bidding for victory.

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Hold on to your seats. It's going to be a bumpy ride.

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This could be quite an interesting battle.

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They've each got £1,000 of their own money to spend,

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and all the profits go to their chosen charities.

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So, Mark Stacey and Christina Trevanion,

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it's time to Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is.

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-Good morning, Christina.

-A vision in blue!

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-And a vision in tangerine and cream!

-Why, thanks!

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-Sunny Sevenoaks!

-Isn't it glorious? Feel the heat.

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-But I'm so excited.

-This is my natural environment.

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I'm a happy girl.

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But you get a buzz, you see, out of cataloguing it and then selling it.

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And research.

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And I get a buzz from trying to find that little nugget that maybe other people have missed.

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Well, if you find the nugget and I do the research, we're a dream team.

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We are, but then that really isn't the competition side, is it?

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-Slightly defeats the object?

-I like the idea, though.

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-And we've got £1,000 to spend.

-£1,000.

-£1,000!

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-Burning a hole in our pocket.

-It really is, yeah. Let's do it!

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Shall we get in there and start spending?

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Yes, our brave bidders are full of beans

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and up for the challenge ahead, but this path

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will not be an easy one.

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What's to be worried about?

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Well, Mark, although there may be a wide selection of goodies here,

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with the auctioneer's commissions on top, it's not always easy to

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get those low prices. So does Christina have a plan up her sleeve?

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My strategy for today is, basically, at auction,

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you tend to get jewellery a little bit cheaper than you would

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have to pay in a retail environment.

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So I'm going to go for a little bit of jewellery

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and there's also some really nice, good-quality pieces

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that I might have to splash out quite a bit on.

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Christina is displaying a cautious, strategic approach to proceedings.

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Mark, well, he's already getting stuck in.

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There's so much to see here and it's all rather cramped

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so I'm knocking into everybody.

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But I've got to look, cos I'm going to find the treasures that way.

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Indeed you do, Mark!

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And, across the saleroom, Christina is mirroring his behaviour,

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and has spotted something she likes the look of.

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We've got three mirrors here.

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The one that I'm interested in is at the front.

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It's a giltwood mirror, an early 19th-century piece.

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I'm sort of hoping that it might be quite affordable

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because we have got some damage.

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We've got a piece there that's come off.

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There is a little bit of damage to this corner, sadly.

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So it would have been an over-mantle mirror originally,

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and you can see that by the little bun feet that

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are on the bottom there.

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So often, you find these, and they're just carved

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with leaves and flowers and they're fairly standard,

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but this one, with its rope twist

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has got quite a nautical theme to it.

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I think it's really quite fun, and quite unusual.

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Oh, sailor!

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Christina is hoping the mirror will help her traverse the ocean of loss

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and uncover the distant land of profits.

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While Mark is considering a somewhat smaller body of water.

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This is a Staffordshire pottery footbath.

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Now, in the 19th century, if you were quite well-off,

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you had wash jug and bowl sets in every bedroom.

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This is a transfer-printed pattern,

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and I suppose it dates from about 1870, something like that.

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There's a little bit of staining and crazing,

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but, you know, it's been around since 1870.

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I've got quite a lot of crazing on me

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and I haven't been around that long.

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No, not quite that long.

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But it seems he's not the only one to have noticed the footbath.

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There may be trouble ahead with that one.

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But now, Mark is on to his next target - a very small chair.

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This is a chair I suppose you would use for a doll,

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if you were a doll collector.

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It's nicely carved to simulate bamboo.

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It is, in fact, beechwood or something like that.

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It's got the original sort of carpet-type upholstery on it.

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It's got some very bad repairs.

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Those are quite modern, I would say,

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and there's quite a lot of people

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who collect these miniature pieces of furniture.

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And, I suppose, if you can pick that up for sort of £40-£50,

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there should be quite a good profit at that.

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On the other side of the auction room,

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the Magpie is living up to her name,

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as she is inexorably drawn to all that sparkles and shines.

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This is a case set of six napkin rings.

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Each of them are silver,

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each of them is hallmarked here, you can see.

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So often, you find that these have been split throughout the generations.

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Two have gone off to one member of the family, another's gone off to someone else.

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It's really quite unusual to find a whole set that is still intact, still together.

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So that's going to get marked down in my catalogue.

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So, with their items earmarked,

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Christina and Mark take their carefully chosen positions

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from which they hope to conduct their victorious campaigns.

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I'll have to keep everything crossed.

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With catalogues in hand and hearts in mouths,

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the auctioneer takes his place...

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and we're off.

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Auction started - here we go!

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And they don't have to wait long for their first item,

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as the footbath goes under the hammer.

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Both of them were sizing it up beforehand,

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so who's going to get it?

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Well, we can't cut it in half and have half each, can we?

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Not really, Mark, no.

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Lot number 11.

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So, as the auctioneer kicks off the bidding,

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Mark is quick to get the first bid in.

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Is that worth £10?

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-Oh, he's bidding.

-Ten, I'm bid, at the top end, guy here, 12 now.

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-Do I hear 12 to you?

-Christina ups the price.

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15.

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But Mark is sticking to his guns.

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-18.

-So, once again, she goes for it.

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£20.

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Yes.

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But drops out at £20.

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It's the gentleman's bid.

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And Mark wins the footbath.

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Mark just bought that. I ran him up by £10.

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He's going to be so cross!

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And, once the commission is added,

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Mark pays £23.60 for the footbath.

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Which also comes with a sugar bowl, in case you need sugar.

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On your feet.

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I'm very happy. One down, lots more to go.

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Or more lots to go, to be precise.

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Now, things aren't going so swimmingly for Christina,

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as it is not just the footbath she's lost out on.

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190.

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-180 then.

-That's fine.

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55, 60.

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Too expensive!

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On my left at £90, then.

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64 lots in,

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and I have nothing.

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Oh, dear, it looks like Christina is showing signs of ABS -

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auction bidders' syndrome.

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Symptoms include...

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He can see me bidding from here.

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(So I might stand here instead.)

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Because I have a feeling he might be out for some vengeance.

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Something's happening.

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She's trying to hide over there.

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Hmm, waving in the middle of an auction is not the best idea, chaps.

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You may go home with something you didn't want.

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Hopefully, the napkin rings Christina saw earlier

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will help her get back in the game.

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I've got an estimate of £40-£60, so I've got to find somebody

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that is going to hopefully buy them from me

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that regularly has six people for dinner.

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And I'm bid £90, do I hear 100 to you?

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110 here, 120. With you at 120.

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At 120, then.

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I'm in shock.

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A terrible shame, isn't it?

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Awful, really.

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Mark's looking a bit smug about Christina's dilemma,

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but how will he get on when it's his turn to bid

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on a selection of cow figures?

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40 to you, 45.

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50, 55, 60, 65.

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Oh, he's not got it.

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110, 120, 130, 140, 150.

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160, then.

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It's all a bit pear-shaped, I don't want to look any more.

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Both our experts are struggling now, but, up next,

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it's an Edwardian armchair that Christina has her eye on.

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Worth £10?

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She's getting ready to bid.

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15 now.

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15 to you, thank you.

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She's off.

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30. 35. 40.

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-She's still bidding.

-45. 50. 55. 60.

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65. 70.

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65, back right?

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All finished at 65, then?

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(And I've got a lot!)

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CROWD CHEERING

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Yaay!

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Oh, I can breathe now! I can breathe!

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Her pink-upholstered armchair cost her £76.70 after commission,

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so she takes the weight off her feet to get a closer look.

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This chair is effectively wearing a badly fitting pair of trousers.

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Reupholstered, beautifully upholstered,

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this chair has a great, great shape to it.

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But it's just not been upholstered particularly well.

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At the moment, it's a bit of an ugly duckling,

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but one day, quite soon, it will be the most beautiful swan.

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So, Christina finally draws even with Mark.

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But it may not be for long,

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as he has his eye on a small watercolour of a rural scene.

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Is this worth £10?

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Ten I'm bid at the back there, thank you. 15.

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Oh, look!

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Are we all finished at the maiden bid of £10, then?

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At the top end of the room?

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-Yes!

-He wins the picture and then snaps up a second,

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also for the starting price.

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Total: £23.60 for both of them.

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So, what's he got for his money?

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This is a charming little sepia watercolour of a rural scene.

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There's a little villager coming round the corner

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with his oxen pulling the wagon.

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And it is signed down here and dated,

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but there's also another lot next to it,

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of a similar sort of...

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But this is a coaching scene.

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Now, I rather like these.

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They're terribly out of fashion, of course,

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as a lot of the antiques market now

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is based on big, bold and decorative.

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A bit like me, really.

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And these subtle, little drawings are overlooked.

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Don't you think that's charming?

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Yes, he's big, bold and decorative, all right,

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and has a 3-1 lead.

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So Christina is playing catch-up again as she goes for a tea set.

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It's most beautifully decorated,

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so let's hope I can get it for under £1,000.

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118.

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Here we go.

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Davenport paint-and-gilt-decorated tea set. Here we are.

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Showing the front, 118.

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20 to start?

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20 I have. 22 now.

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At 20, looking for two. 22.

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25 now?

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25. 28. 30.

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32.

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35 anywhere else?

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38 now, 38.

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40 now?

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At £40. Anywhere else?

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At £40, all done?

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It'll be fine, it'll be fine, it'll be fine.

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Yes, it seems that bidding battle has our Magpie all flustered.

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And, with commission, she spends a total of £47.20.

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So will this Davenport crockery be worth the stress?

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It's a really, really pretty, typically Victorian, coffee service.

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But the thing for me is, A - the decoration's pretty.

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But it's also got 12 settings.

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We've got, unfortunately, only 11 cups,

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but we've got 12 saucers, 12 plates,

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a little bread-and-butter plate here,

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and the slot bowl, which is really very, very pretty.

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It's got a typical Davenport mark on the bottom there,

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which was used about 1870, 1880.

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And I just think it is absolutely exquisite.

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I love the pattern on it, I love everything about it.

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Mark's probably going to be terribly rude about it, but I love it.

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Christina's crockery brings us to the end of act one,

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meaning it's time to see how our battling bidders

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are braving the elements in today's tussle.

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And, with a budget of £1,000, Mark has bought three items

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and spent £47.20, leaving him with just over £952 to play with.

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Christina has two lots, but has spent much more - £123.90.

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That leaves a little over £876 to spend.

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Now, our experts' cash may not be spent,

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but it appears their nerves are.

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How tough is this?

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Do you need a hug?

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You bought a pink tea set?

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-Oh, it's lovely, did you not see it?

-No.

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-And it was cheap. Estimate of 50-70, £40 bought.

-Well, yeah.

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-How are you getting on?

-Well, it's tough.

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Most lots I'm bidding on, I just can't touch.

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No, exactly, and some I haven't even had a chance to bid on.

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Those have just gone...

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-But you've got a few lots, so...

-Not really very many!

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-I like that.

-Be positive.

-OK, will do.

-Honestly, be positive.

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-You'll get there.

-Thank you, darling.

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Right, go on, go on.

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Oh, dear! In spite of Mark's efforts to cheer her up,

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Christina is looking distinctly browbeaten by this auction.

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Could these be yet more symptoms of ABS?

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Such as...

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Mark Stacey says think positive.

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I didn't even get the chance to uncross my arms.

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Look!

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-MUSIC BOX CHIMES

-Aw!

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Uh-oh, looks like it's contagious.

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It's quite soothing, that music, isn't it?

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Pull yourselves together, there's a competition to be won!

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Next up, Mark is after a Royal Doulton pen stand.

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£20 somewhere?

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20 I have. Two now. At £20, looking for two.

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All done, then, at £20? All done?

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A confident move from Mark there, costing £23.60 with fees.

0:16:280:16:34

And the next item to get him bidding is a romantic rainy day painting.

0:16:340:16:38

80, I'm looking for 90.

0:16:390:16:41

90. 100.

0:16:410:16:43

Going 110?

0:16:430:16:45

110 at the back of the room, everybody else is out.

0:16:450:16:47

With £110, all done at 110?

0:16:470:16:49

I bought it.

0:16:490:16:50

I bought it.

0:16:520:16:53

Hmm, looks like he's regretting it already.

0:16:530:16:56

The romantic scene sets Mark back a heart-wrenching £129.80.

0:16:560:17:01

But, up close, will he fall in love with it?

0:17:010:17:04

I love the subject - the two lovers just leaving a table,

0:17:040:17:09

the rain has started, the umbrella is up.

0:17:090:17:11

It's signed and dated in the corner here.

0:17:110:17:14

It's got very much a sort of Jack Vettriano look about it.

0:17:140:17:17

And I think it will appeal to someone, it's quite impressionistic.

0:17:170:17:20

When you think how much I spent on it, £110 plus the bits and pieces,

0:17:200:17:26

you can't even buy a framed print for that.

0:17:260:17:29

Mark now has a 5-2 lead over Christina,

0:17:290:17:32

but the Magpie has her eye on that shiny mirror she spotted earlier.

0:17:320:17:37

The next lot - wish me luck!

0:17:370:17:40

So, with a look of...trepidation? on her face, Christina goes for it.

0:17:400:17:46

And I have 100 to start on commission. See 110 anywhere?

0:17:460:17:50

110. 120.

0:17:500:17:52

130. 140. 150.

0:17:520:17:55

At £150, all done?

0:17:550:17:57

£150!

0:17:590:18:01

At least she's bought something.

0:18:010:18:03

Christina's third purchase takes £177 including costs.

0:18:030:18:08

And, with the auction now drawing to a close,

0:18:080:18:11

she quickly goes after three framed prints.

0:18:110:18:14

The next lot is these pictures,

0:18:140:18:16

which, hopefully, I'll get a look in.

0:18:160:18:20

288, Thomas Baker after Angelica Kauffman,

0:18:200:18:24

£10 anywhere for the prints?

0:18:240:18:26

£10 I have. 12 now.

0:18:260:18:28

At 10, looking for 12. All done, then, at £10?

0:18:280:18:31

That's cheap.

0:18:310:18:32

Happy days! £10 for three beautiful pictures?

0:18:350:18:38

That's made my day.

0:18:380:18:40

Yes, without a bid against her,

0:18:400:18:42

the three prints set her back just £11.80 in total.

0:18:420:18:46

So, what did she get for her money?

0:18:460:18:48

They're after an incredibly famous artist called Angelica Kauffman,

0:18:480:18:52

who was a female artist in the 18th century.

0:18:520:18:55

And they're all stipple-point engraved, or stipple engraving,

0:18:550:18:58

and they've all got hand-coloured highlights to them as well.

0:18:580:19:01

They're wonderful classical scenes.

0:19:010:19:04

No idea who's going to want them, but I think they're lovely.

0:19:040:19:07

Yes, Christine showing us that, sometimes,

0:19:070:19:09

bidding blind can reap the rewards.

0:19:090:19:11

Meanwhile, the sale is almost over,

0:19:110:19:13

but Mark has one more potential purchase up his sleeve.

0:19:130:19:18

My last lot is coming up.

0:19:180:19:20

In fact, it's the last lot of the sale.

0:19:200:19:22

It's that rather nice 19th-century small chair.

0:19:220:19:26

I'm hoping to get it for £40-£50,

0:19:260:19:30

but who knows?

0:19:300:19:32

293, last lot of the sale, is the little doll's side chair.

0:19:320:19:37

Start me at £20 anywhere. 20 I have, 22 now.

0:19:370:19:40

At 20, looking for two. At £20.

0:19:400:19:42

Two anywhere else? 22.

0:19:420:19:45

25. £28 now? 28.

0:19:450:19:47

30. 32?

0:19:470:19:49

30 at the back of the room.

0:19:490:19:50

Two anywhere else?

0:19:500:19:52

At £30, all done?

0:19:520:19:55

I got it! £30!

0:19:550:19:56

Now, one of the other dealers was bidding for it,

0:19:560:19:59

but I got it below what I thought.

0:19:590:20:01

And I know it's only a miniature item,

0:20:010:20:04

but I hope my profit is not going to miniature at all.

0:20:040:20:08

Mark wins the final lot,

0:20:090:20:11

paying £35.40 for the doll's chair in total,

0:20:110:20:14

and that's it.

0:20:140:20:15

Thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen,

0:20:150:20:17

that's the end of today's sale.

0:20:170:20:20

Or is it?

0:20:200:20:21

I don't feel like I've spent either enough money or bought enough lots.

0:20:210:20:25

So I'm going to go and have a chat with the auctioneer

0:20:250:20:27

and see if there's any lots still up for grabs, maybe do some after sales.

0:20:270:20:31

Yes, Christina, the Magpie, now flutters over to the auctioneers,

0:20:310:20:35

knowing that unsold items can still be negotiated over.

0:20:350:20:38

And she has her eye on something shiny.

0:20:380:20:41

So we've not had that one, which is lot 113,

0:20:410:20:45

which is a little garnet set brooch or pendant, isn't it?

0:20:450:20:48

That's quite nice. Has that got a hallmark on it?

0:20:480:20:50

-It's not hallmarked.

-And it's nine carat, OK.

0:20:500:20:53

-What could that be, what's your best?

-If I said to you £50...?

-No.

0:20:530:20:56

-I won't go lower than 35.

-30, I'd be very happy.

-OK.

0:20:560:21:00

-Would you be able to do it for 30?

-32?

0:21:000:21:04

-I will split the difference with you at 32.

-OK, OK!

0:21:040:21:07

Well done, thank you very much.

0:21:070:21:09

So, it may not have sold under the hammer, but, with auction costs

0:21:090:21:12

included, Christina pays £37.76 for the brooch.

0:21:120:21:17

And that shiny purchase brings us to the end of this buying half.

0:21:170:21:20

So, before we move onto the next act,

0:21:200:21:23

let's see how our experts spent today.

0:21:230:21:25

Our two auction heroes set off on the saga

0:21:280:21:30

with £1,000 of their own money.

0:21:300:21:33

Mark "The Maverick" Stacey bought six items, costing him £236.

0:21:330:21:37

Christina Trevanion acquired five lots at a total cost of £350.46.

0:21:390:21:45

So, with our tremendous buying struggle over,

0:21:450:21:48

our brave bidders take a moment to throw a critical eye

0:21:480:21:51

over each other's lots.

0:21:510:21:53

That was a tough auction.

0:21:550:21:57

It sort of slightly felt like this was a bloodbath.

0:21:570:22:00

LAUGHTER

0:22:000:22:02

Oh, stop it, Christina, that's another rib gone!

0:22:020:22:04

But I do worry a little about the tea set.

0:22:080:22:12

But look how pretty! Look, so pretty!

0:22:120:22:14

Oh, I've never seen a prettier tea service by Davenport.

0:22:140:22:18

SHE LAUGHS

0:22:180:22:20

-But, actually, those were a bargain, Christina, for £10.

-Really?

0:22:200:22:24

As for these, Mark, for goodness sakes, mine are just prints.

0:22:240:22:27

-Yours are originals. Beautiful little pen sketches.

-I couldn't believe those.

0:22:270:22:30

-I love your over mantle.

-Original back, lovely thing.

0:22:300:22:33

No, it's really nice.

0:22:330:22:35

But my favourite, favourite piece that you bought today...

0:22:350:22:38

Is?

0:22:380:22:40

Oh, I know, it really has got that Vettriano look about it.

0:22:400:22:43

It certainly has. I just think it's so romantic.

0:22:430:22:46

-I'm very jealous about that. I think it's fabulous.

-You are too kind.

0:22:460:22:49

And I think we bought really quite well between us.

0:22:490:22:52

Like always, Christina -

0:22:520:22:53

buying, they say, is the easy bit.

0:22:530:22:56

-Yeah, very true.

-It's the selling that's the problem.

0:22:560:22:58

-Well, yeah. Well, very best of luck.

-And to you.

0:22:580:23:01

And so the dust of the final gavel is whisked away

0:23:050:23:08

by the winds of inevitable change,

0:23:080:23:10

and the buying season turns to selling.

0:23:100:23:12

Down in his Brightlingsea digs, Mark is evaluating his valuables.

0:23:120:23:18

I am quite pleased with what I bought,

0:23:180:23:20

particularly the charming pair of watercolours.

0:23:200:23:23

I really do like these.

0:23:230:23:25

They're so sweet.

0:23:250:23:27

I love the carriages,

0:23:270:23:28

the one with the peasants with the cattle coming round,

0:23:280:23:31

the other one with a slightly grander coach and horses.

0:23:310:23:34

The ink stand is quite interesting,

0:23:340:23:36

because this is from the Art Deco period.

0:23:360:23:38

And when I first saw it, I thought this was sharkskin or shagreen,

0:23:380:23:42

but it's not, it's porcelain decorated to look like it.

0:23:420:23:46

I love my little miniature chair.

0:23:460:23:48

I had to wait virtually to the end of the sale to see

0:23:480:23:51

whether I could secure it or not, and I'm jolly pleased I did.

0:23:510:23:55

The footbath, I'm afraid, is not my favourite buy,

0:23:550:23:58

but I might be able to get a profit or at least wash my face.

0:23:580:24:02

And this charming picture called me all through the auction.

0:24:020:24:06

It was in my direct eyeline from where I was standing.

0:24:060:24:09

I hadn't viewed it, I didn't know anything about it,

0:24:090:24:12

and I ended up buying it blind.

0:24:120:24:14

But I'm so pleased I did, because there's a lovely gallery label

0:24:140:24:17

on the back, saying the artist -

0:24:170:24:19

and it's an old gallery from Hove in Sussex, my old stomping ground -

0:24:190:24:23

and I do hope it doesn't rain on my parade.

0:24:230:24:27

Talking of parades, Christina, how are you getting on?

0:24:270:24:30

Well, Christina is in Shropshire, coming to terms with her purchases.

0:24:300:24:35

I always say to clients, when you're looking at things,

0:24:350:24:37

looking for things, always try and buy things

0:24:370:24:40

in perfect condition if you can.

0:24:400:24:41

And I think it's fair to say that I haven't, indeed,

0:24:410:24:44

heeded my own advice, sadly.

0:24:440:24:46

Because, look - I bought a chair, which, it's fair to say,

0:24:460:24:49

has been beautifully upholstered by an enthusiastic amateur.

0:24:490:24:53

It's looking a little bit tired,

0:24:530:24:54

and hasn't been given the best of treatments.

0:24:540:24:57

I'll need to do a bit of work to that.

0:24:570:24:59

My tea service has got some damage throughout,

0:24:590:25:01

but, nonetheless, it's a beautiful thing and very displayable.

0:25:010:25:04

My mirror, over there, appears to have lost a foot

0:25:040:25:07

between the auction house and here.

0:25:070:25:09

And also some of the gilding has come away.

0:25:090:25:11

So, again, I need to do a bit of work to that

0:25:110:25:14

in order to find a buyer for it.

0:25:140:25:16

I have to say, I'm very pleased with these pictures, though.

0:25:160:25:19

I only paid just shy of £12.

0:25:190:25:21

And, to be perfectly honest with you, I think they're gorgeous.

0:25:210:25:25

They're early 19th-century, hand-coloured prints

0:25:250:25:27

depicting these wonderful diaphanously-clad maidens here

0:25:270:25:30

after Angelica Kauffman.

0:25:300:25:32

I'm hoping to find somebody who will love them just as much as I do.

0:25:320:25:35

But, overall,

0:25:360:25:38

I think it's fair to say

0:25:380:25:40

I've got some serious work to do.

0:25:400:25:43

Indeed. Both Mark and Christina must now conduct the research,

0:25:430:25:46

make the calls and cover the ground

0:25:460:25:48

that will lead them on to profit and victory.

0:25:480:25:51

And, lest we forget, a deal is not a deal

0:25:510:25:54

until sealed with a handshake.

0:25:540:25:56

Christina is concerned about her sellables,

0:25:560:25:59

so she must feel heartened when she gets her first whiff

0:25:590:26:02

of a possible profit.

0:26:020:26:04

I'm here in Market Drayton in Shropshire

0:26:040:26:06

to visit a chap called Steve who has his own brewery and pub company.

0:26:060:26:09

Now, he comes into my auction house to buy items to refurbish his pubs.

0:26:090:26:13

So I'm hoping that these might be of interest.

0:26:130:26:16

-Looking busy, as always.

-Christina, how are you?

0:26:190:26:22

-Very well, how are you?

-Of course, busy.

0:26:220:26:24

Oh, my goodness! Right, let me put these up on here.

0:26:240:26:27

Have a little look at those.

0:26:270:26:29

Well, they're interesting.

0:26:290:26:30

I bought these pictures at an auction, you'll be happy to know,

0:26:300:26:34

and they are engravings of pictures

0:26:340:26:36

by an artist called Angelica Kauffman.

0:26:360:26:38

She's an 18th-century artist, and she's one of the first two

0:26:380:26:41

female members of the Royal Academy in 1768.

0:26:410:26:44

So they've got quite a good provenance to them.

0:26:440:26:46

And they've been actually done as etchings,

0:26:460:26:49

copies of her pictures into etchings, and then hand-coloured.

0:26:490:26:52

So they're not, obviously, oil paintings.

0:26:520:26:54

They are effectively reproduction prints,

0:26:540:26:56

but they are 19th-century examples.

0:26:560:26:58

-So they're quite nice, old examples.

-They are lovely.

0:26:580:27:00

Something that's authentic is quite nice.

0:27:000:27:03

I was hoping to get about £150 for them.

0:27:030:27:07

But what would you consider being a fair price?

0:27:070:27:10

-I could do 150 if that's what you need.

-Would you?

0:27:100:27:13

£150 for the three?

0:27:130:27:14

-Well, that's 50 quid each for me, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:27:140:27:17

-And they'll be seen by a lot of people.

-Brilliant!

0:27:170:27:19

Well, I cannot wait to see them in place. Thank you very, very much.

0:27:190:27:22

That is a colossal opening profit of £138.20 for the trio of pictures.

0:27:220:27:29

What a profit! I'm thrilled!

0:27:290:27:31

I found the auction really, really quite difficult,

0:27:310:27:33

but never underestimate the Magpie.

0:27:330:27:36

Back in the race!

0:27:360:27:38

Yes, with Christina striding ahead in this race for profit,

0:27:380:27:41

Mark had better not stall at the start.

0:27:410:27:44

He's brought his romantic painting to rainy North London.

0:27:440:27:48

It cost him just under £130,

0:27:480:27:50

but will private art collector Bronwen shower him with a profit?

0:27:500:27:55

It was painted, and it's signed down here, 1961.

0:27:550:27:59

It's very similar in style, actually,

0:27:590:28:01

to an artist called Jack Vettriano. Have you heard of him?

0:28:010:28:04

I actually have.

0:28:040:28:05

He painted The Singing Butler. That's his most famous painting.

0:28:050:28:09

What is also quite interesting, from a sort of provenance point of view,

0:28:090:28:13

on the back, you can see there's a label

0:28:130:28:16

from a gallery in Hove in Sussex.

0:28:160:28:19

Shall we see what it looks like up on the wall?

0:28:190:28:21

Actually, it looks quite nice there.

0:28:240:28:26

It actually looks lovely there.

0:28:260:28:27

Now you've actually seen it in the flesh, what are your feelings?

0:28:270:28:31

I do like it very much.

0:28:310:28:33

What about 290?

0:28:330:28:35

How about 240?

0:28:350:28:37

Put the kettle on.

0:28:390:28:41

I think I would be really happy...

0:28:410:28:44

-At 250?

-At 275.

0:28:460:28:48

I was going to say 250!

0:28:500:28:52

-260.

-260.

-OK, then.

-You've got it.

-OK, my lovely.

0:28:530:28:58

I'm never buying a painting again!

0:28:580:29:00

I need somewhere to lie down.

0:29:000:29:02

There's the couch.

0:29:020:29:05

Mark makes a big splash of £130.20 profit

0:29:050:29:08

from his priciest auction purchase, and he's as pleased as punch.

0:29:080:29:13

Well, I don't know about you, but I'm rather singing in the rain.

0:29:130:29:17

And the profits keep pouring in when Mark sells his Doulton pen stand

0:29:170:29:21

to auctioneer Robin in Essex.

0:29:210:29:23

I can feel your hand coming over, Robin, at 45.

0:29:230:29:27

I think we'll probably be able to do something at 45.

0:29:270:29:30

Netting himself £21.40 profit, and nudging into the lead.

0:29:300:29:35

Meanwhile, Christina has made a major decision,

0:29:370:29:40

and is heading to Combermere Abbey.

0:29:400:29:42

She's decided not to reupholster her pink armchair,

0:29:420:29:45

but hopes owner Sarah will still give her a profit

0:29:450:29:49

on the £77 purchase price.

0:29:490:29:51

-Hello, hello, hello!

-Hi, there!

-I found you!

0:29:510:29:54

I know, I'm so sorry.

0:29:540:29:56

-I was having a little play.

-That looks fab!

0:29:560:29:59

Isn't it fantastic? Yes.

0:29:590:30:00

-So, Sarah.

-Yes.

0:30:000:30:02

Forgive me, but you have the most stunning house,

0:30:020:30:05

-packed full of antiques.

-Yes.

0:30:050:30:07

You can't possibly want a chair.

0:30:070:30:08

I do.

0:30:080:30:11

-Really?

-Because I am restoring this north wing

0:30:110:30:13

and it's going to be run as a B&B,

0:30:130:30:15

and I have no furniture for that side of the house.

0:30:150:30:18

I understand, obviously, that there will be an upholstery cost to you

0:30:180:30:21

as well, which does cost quite a lot of money.

0:30:210:30:23

So I will try and be very, very nice.

0:30:230:30:26

-I'm so glad!

-In all honesty, I was hoping to get a couple of hundred quid for it.

0:30:260:30:30

A little over my budget, actually,

0:30:300:30:32

because if I've got to upholster it and the fabric,

0:30:320:30:35

then it's not going to be quite so attractive.

0:30:350:30:39

Could you come down to closer to 100?

0:30:390:30:42

I would love to,

0:30:430:30:45

-but that really doesn't leave me a huge amount of profit.

-Oh.

0:30:450:30:48

-What about...

-It's going to go in a wonderful place.

0:30:480:30:51

CHRISTINA LAUGHS

0:30:510:30:52

Oh, yes, it will go in a beautiful place.

0:30:520:30:54

Don't try that with me!

0:30:540:30:56

What about 150?

0:30:580:31:00

Yes, that's meeting in the middle.

0:31:000:31:02

-Split the difference, meet in the middle.

-That's acceptable.

-Yeah?

0:31:020:31:05

-Yeah.

-Happy with that?

-Happy with that.

0:31:050:31:07

-Brilliant. And I'm very happy.

-Shall we shake on it?

0:31:070:31:09

Yes, let's! Absolutely!

0:31:090:31:11

Christina makes £73.30 profit on the chair,

0:31:110:31:15

and washes her hands of another sale.

0:31:150:31:18

In Essex, Mark is hoping antiques dealer Kim will be impressed

0:31:180:31:22

with the footbath and sugar bowl that cost him just under £24.

0:31:220:31:25

-Now, this is a surprise to you, I know.

-It is a big surprise, Mark.

0:31:260:31:30

It's Victorian. It's got a mark on the back.

0:31:300:31:34

-It's called...

-Lotus.

0:31:340:31:35

..Lotus CM, which I think stands for Charles Meigh, M-E-I-G-H.

0:31:350:31:41

-Don't know them.

-Well, it fits.

0:31:410:31:44

Look, it is worn, let's be honest. It's got a bit of wear.

0:31:440:31:47

-It is, but it's big.

-It's big and bold.

0:31:470:31:50

And I love the colour.

0:31:500:31:51

I would use it, especially coming up to a function or a party,

0:31:510:31:55

I'd put loads of ice in it and some lovely big bottles of champagne.

0:31:550:31:59

Oh, do you know, that sounds wonderful. When am I coming round?

0:31:590:32:02

Any time you like.

0:32:020:32:04

I was hoping for somewhere in the region of sort of £40-£60,

0:32:040:32:08

but I'll throw in this absolutely charming Ming-period sugar bowl.

0:32:080:32:13

Well, this makes all the difference, doesn't it?

0:32:140:32:17

It is the icing on the cake!

0:32:170:32:19

Joking apart, it is what it is and it's OK, isn't it?

0:32:190:32:22

It's OK, but I don't think it should come into the negotiation, really.

0:32:220:32:27

Well, depending on how much you would pay,

0:32:270:32:30

-I thought I might give you it as a little freebie.

-OK.

0:32:300:32:33

-It's nice of you - a present.

-So what do you think of 40-60?

0:32:330:32:37

I don't like it at all, really.

0:32:370:32:39

Hit me with another price, Mark.

0:32:410:32:43

I'm going to be fair with you.

0:32:430:32:44

I paid about £23.50 for it in the auction.

0:32:440:32:49

So can I make a working profit on that with you, do you think?

0:32:490:32:53

Are we talking 30?

0:32:530:32:54

Well, if we must, but I was rather hoping

0:32:550:32:58

that there'd be something other than a zero after the three.

0:32:580:33:01

-31?

-35.

0:33:010:33:03

33.

0:33:030:33:05

-35.

-Oh, go on, then.

0:33:050:33:07

-Go on.

-Go on, then.

-And you get that as well.

0:33:070:33:10

-Oh, I'd forgotten this.

-You'd forgotten it.

0:33:100:33:13

I had. 35 is fine, then.

0:33:130:33:15

Do you know, there we are.

0:33:150:33:18

You see, I've put my foot in it again, haven't I?

0:33:180:33:20

Mark makes £11.40 on the pottery, which is good,

0:33:220:33:26

but then our hero really does put his foot in it.

0:33:260:33:29

The sales were going wonderfully well. In fact, swimmingly well,

0:33:300:33:34

until, of course, catastrophe struck and I broke my ankle.

0:33:340:33:38

With Mark temporarily laid up, let's take a look at the figures so far.

0:33:380:33:42

Mark Stacey has sold three items and made a profit of £163.

0:33:430:33:49

Christina Trevanion has only sold two,

0:33:490:33:51

but she's out in front in profit terms - £211.50.

0:33:510:33:56

And the Magpie is hot on the trail of her next deal, too,

0:33:560:34:00

taking the gilt mirror that cost her £177

0:34:000:34:03

to the Shropshire village of Stanton upon Hine Heath.

0:34:030:34:06

I'm here to see a friend of mine, Marcus Moore,

0:34:060:34:09

who not only is an antiques dealer, but he's also a restorer.

0:34:090:34:12

Now, my mirror, unfortunately, does need quite a lot of work doing to it

0:34:120:34:16

and he's the only man that I know

0:34:160:34:17

who could potentially restore it to its former glory.

0:34:170:34:20

Let's hope he wants to buy it.

0:34:200:34:23

-Well, Marcus?

-Well, it looks very interesting.

0:34:230:34:26

Very interesting, indeed.

0:34:260:34:28

But have you got all the bits?

0:34:280:34:29

-Well, hang on a minute.

-That's the question.

0:34:290:34:32

I've got that bit.

0:34:320:34:33

-I've got that bit.

-Is that anything to do with it?

0:34:340:34:38

I've got...

0:34:380:34:39

Oh, no, look! That bit.

0:34:390:34:42

-Right.

-And that bit.

-Is that it?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:34:420:34:47

I know that you're the man to buy it

0:34:480:34:50

-because you'd do such a brilliant job of restoring it.

-Right.

0:34:500:34:53

What do you think would be a fair price, do you think, to pay for it?

0:34:530:34:57

Ordinary ones have got to be in the 80 to 120 region, haven't they?

0:34:570:35:01

But this is not an ordinary one.

0:35:010:35:02

So I'd suggest it was worth a couple of hundred pounds.

0:35:020:35:05

A couple of hundred pounds, OK.

0:35:050:35:07

That sort of figure, but, you know...

0:35:070:35:09

And even then, on top of that,

0:35:090:35:11

we're going to probably spend a couple of hundred pounds on it.

0:35:110:35:15

-Really?

-Yeah.

-OK. But, then, after that, it will be stunning.

0:35:150:35:19

It's going to be stunning.

0:35:190:35:21

Maybe 250?

0:35:210:35:23

-Yes.

-Yeah? You're a gentleman.

0:35:230:35:25

Thank you very, very much.

0:35:250:35:27

Despite the restoration required,

0:35:270:35:29

Christina still bags a £73 profit on the mirror.

0:35:290:35:32

Down in Essex, Mark is not letting something as trivial

0:35:350:35:38

as a broken ankle get in the way of his profit quest.

0:35:380:35:41

Well, as you can see, disaster struck, so I'm now being

0:35:420:35:45

pushed around by my partner Xander to get me

0:35:450:35:48

around in the wheelchair.

0:35:480:35:49

And I've come to see Jonathan,

0:35:490:35:50

who I used to work with at an auction house,

0:35:500:35:52

who loves watercolours and I think his house is covered in them,

0:35:520:35:56

so I'm hoping to get a good profit

0:35:560:35:58

out of this lovely pair of watercolours.

0:35:580:36:01

Fingers crossed, let's go and find out how we do.

0:36:010:36:05

Johnny, thank you so much for inviting us to your charming home.

0:36:050:36:07

-It's just as I pictured it - lots of watercolours.

-There are, yes, lots.

0:36:070:36:11

-Hundreds, in fact.

-Hundreds.

0:36:110:36:14

-Well, I think I've found you another two.

-Just what I need!

-I hope so.

0:36:140:36:18

-I sent you photographs.

-You did.

0:36:180:36:20

I think you're going to like them better in the flesh.

0:36:200:36:23

I love this one with the coach and horses coming round.

0:36:230:36:25

It's very nicely done.

0:36:250:36:26

It's indistinctly signed, isn't it, I don't recognise that.

0:36:260:36:29

I know that artist. You see that a lot, don't you, Signed Indistinctly?

0:36:290:36:33

Yes. Yes, he's very famous.

0:36:330:36:36

Do you think they're mid-19th century?

0:36:360:36:38

-They must be, mustn't they?

-I thought maybe 1840, maybe 1860.

0:36:380:36:42

Yes, I think 1840s.

0:36:420:36:43

A little bit of damage there, top right.

0:36:430:36:46

Oh, I didn't notice that.

0:36:460:36:48

That's just knocked it down by quite a portion.

0:36:480:36:50

There are aspects of this which are very nicely done,

0:36:500:36:54

but the back wheel looks a little bit ropey.

0:36:540:36:56

-I can see the price plummeting.

-The price has plummeted instantly.

0:36:560:37:01

I was hoping to get a rather modest sum for them

0:37:010:37:04

of between 100 and 150 for the pair.

0:37:040:37:06

-That's not going to happen, is it?

-Good Lord!

0:37:060:37:10

-Well...

-Now you've seen them, you must be honest, Johnny.

0:37:100:37:14

-Oh, no, they're charming.

-Why don't we start at, say, 90?

0:37:140:37:17

You can start where you like.

0:37:170:37:19

But, you know what they say,

0:37:190:37:21

it's not where you start, it's where you finish.

0:37:210:37:24

-Right, so I think probably £30 each.

-£60?

-Yes.

-Oh, Johnny!

0:37:240:37:29

What's your very, very best price?

0:37:290:37:32

I should think 65, at an absolute push.

0:37:320:37:34

I've always said about you, Johnny, there's a heart of gold

0:37:340:37:38

lying somewhere in the deep interior of your anatomy.

0:37:380:37:42

-Are you happy at 65?

-I'm happy at 65.

-Let's do 65.

-65.

0:37:420:37:45

-Thanks very much indeed.

-Splendid.

0:37:450:37:47

Mark paints himself a profit of £41.40 for the watercolours.

0:37:470:37:51

And, as he wheels off in search of more profit,

0:37:510:37:54

Christina gets the ball back in her court

0:37:540:37:57

as she sells her garnet brooch to Shrewsbury-based jeweller Nigel.

0:37:570:38:02

-£80 it is.

-£80.

0:38:020:38:04

I'm a happy girl.

0:38:040:38:06

Earning a glittering profit of £42.24.

0:38:060:38:09

With just one item left to sell,

0:38:090:38:11

Christina hotfoots it north to Northwick in Cheshire.

0:38:110:38:15

And she has a date at the Davenport Tearooms

0:38:150:38:18

that she definitely doesn't want to be late for.

0:38:180:38:21

I thought of you because I love this tearoom and the wonderful

0:38:210:38:24

-Alice In Wonderland theme that you've got going on.

-Thank you.

0:38:240:38:27

Tell me, why did you choose that theme?

0:38:270:38:30

Well, Cheshire is the birthplace of Lewis Carroll.

0:38:300:38:32

It's only two and a half miles, so it says it all.

0:38:320:38:35

-It seems perfect.

-Absolutely.

-Very, very appropriate.

0:38:350:38:38

-What about your murals? Who did those?

-I did those.

-Did you?

-Yes.

0:38:380:38:41

Well done, you. Gosh, you're very talented.

0:38:410:38:44

And I see they're taking tea,

0:38:440:38:45

which brings me to my tea service. It's a Davenport tea service.

0:38:450:38:49

-Oh, we like Davenport.

-And you're a Davenport!

0:38:490:38:51

You are Belinda Davenport. I mean, it's amazing.

0:38:510:38:54

-So, are you related to the Davenport family as in the china?

-No.

0:38:540:38:59

Right, but you like it because of your name.

0:38:590:39:01

Well, we like it because all of the Davenport ones

0:39:010:39:05

tend to do really good quality stuff, anyway.

0:39:050:39:09

Now, they used that mark between 1870 and 1886,

0:39:090:39:12

so it's a good Victorian piece.

0:39:120:39:14

And I love the fact that obviously it's got this wonderful

0:39:140:39:17

pink and gilt decoration. Do you like it?

0:39:170:39:20

-I do like it.

-Do you?

-It's very, very pretty.

-Do you love it?

0:39:200:39:23

I love it, actually, yeah.

0:39:230:39:24

Got to be worth a couple of hundred pounds, hasn't it?

0:39:240:39:27

What do you think?

0:39:270:39:29

-150, then.

-It's a deal.

0:39:290:39:31

I'm very happy that it's going to a Davenport.

0:39:310:39:34

Christina falls down the hole

0:39:340:39:36

and emerges with £102.80 profit for the tea set and she's all done.

0:39:360:39:41

Back in Essex, Mark is down to his final sale.

0:39:420:39:46

It's the miniature chair that cost him just over £35 at auction,

0:39:460:39:50

and he's brought it to show collector Michael.

0:39:500:39:53

Well, I know you're an expert in collectables,

0:39:530:39:56

-but you like miniature furniture.

-I do.

0:39:560:39:59

-Victorian, I think?

-It is.

0:39:590:40:00

But underneath, I'm afraid, it's had a bit of an amateur repair.

0:40:000:40:04

I think somebody has just decided, because it was loose,

0:40:040:40:06

they've put those awful brackets in. Fortunately, they're underneath.

0:40:060:40:10

It really needs to be stripped and glued again, Mark, and put together.

0:40:100:40:14

-I don't want to be unkind because you're a good friend.

-Thank you.

0:40:140:40:18

-£50.

-Oh, Michael!

0:40:180:40:21

Can't we get closer to 80?

0:40:210:40:23

I'll go to 60, but no more.

0:40:230:40:25

-Oh, Michael!

-60 is enough.

0:40:250:40:27

Well, the chair is a miniature and my profit is a miniature,

0:40:270:40:30

-but I'm happy with it. Michael, thanks so much.

-A good deal.

0:40:300:40:33

Mark makes £24.60 on the chair.

0:40:330:40:36

It's a small profit, but a profit is a profit and I've found the perfect

0:40:360:40:40

home for that miniature chair, don't you agree?

0:40:400:40:43

And what's best of all is I've sold up.

0:40:430:40:46

It was a tough auction, but I've made profits on everything.

0:40:460:40:49

And so, with both our experts all sold up,

0:40:490:40:51

it's nearly time to discover who is today's winner.

0:40:510:40:54

Will Mark's maverick mentality

0:40:540:40:56

come out on top against Christina's sensational selling skills?

0:40:560:41:01

All will soon be revealed.

0:41:010:41:03

Our two towering experts set off on the saga

0:41:040:41:07

with £1,000 of their own money.

0:41:070:41:10

Mark "The Maverick" Stacey bought six items and spent £236.

0:41:100:41:14

Christina Trevanion picked up five lots at a total cost of £350.46.

0:41:150:41:22

But who made the most profit?

0:41:220:41:25

All the money our experts have made in their challenge will go to their chosen charities,

0:41:250:41:29

so let's find out who is our Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is champion.

0:41:290:41:34

That auction...

0:41:340:41:37

Don't let me relive it! It was bad enough the first time!

0:41:370:41:39

Oh, it was frightening, wasn't it?

0:41:390:41:41

But you did get some nice things in the end, didn't you?

0:41:410:41:44

I loved my tea service, very pretty, very pinky, beautiful tea service.

0:41:440:41:47

-Very girlie, that.

-Very girlie. Did you like it?

0:41:470:41:50

Not particularly, no.

0:41:500:41:52

-It's not my cup of tea.

-Ah-ha!

0:41:520:41:55

I did like the painting I bought.

0:41:550:41:57

-Oh, that was fantastic!

-Yeah, I'm so glad I bought that,

0:41:570:41:59

because I found a nice lady in London who loved it.

0:41:590:42:02

-It was just so romantic.

-It WAS so romantic. Just like us, really.

0:42:020:42:06

-Shall we find out?

-Yes, let's do it. Are we ready?

0:42:060:42:09

Are you ready? One, two, three...

0:42:090:42:12

-Oh!

-Oh, my goodness!

0:42:140:42:15

Gosh, you did very well. How did you do that, Christina?

0:42:150:42:19

In all honesty, I have absolutely no idea!

0:42:190:42:22

-Well done, you.

-Thank you, and well done, you, darling.

0:42:220:42:25

I think you've done very well, especially under these circumstances, Hopalong.

0:42:250:42:28

I'll have to start researching again. I clearly know nothing.

0:42:280:42:32

Actually, I knew that at the beginning!

0:42:320:42:34

And so, Christina is the winner,

0:42:350:42:38

thanks mostly to her profits on the tea set and the trio of prints.

0:42:380:42:42

Sevenoaks was a buying location

0:42:420:42:43

where I didn't think that I would triumph. It was the auction.

0:42:430:42:46

I found it incredibly difficult, but, lo and behold,

0:42:460:42:49

it was that pink tea service that Mark was incredibly rude about

0:42:490:42:52

that helped win the day.

0:42:520:42:53

The auction was tough for both of us.

0:42:530:42:55

I thought I did rather well with the paintings

0:42:550:42:57

and some of the other things. Christina really struggled,

0:42:570:43:01

but she still won. How did that happen?

0:43:010:43:03

Well, Mark will have another shot at the crown tomorrow

0:43:030:43:06

when our duo go head-to-head at an antiques fair in Lincolnshire.

0:43:060:43:10

Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey face off at an auction house in Sevenoaks. Christina doesn't heed her own advice and plays a risky game of catch-up when things don't go her way, while Mark falls in love with a romantic painting - but will it be worth the heartache?