Worcester The Great Antiques Map of Britain


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Worcester

Antiques series. Tim Wonnacott pitches up at a flea market and collectors fair near Worcester, where he sees a handwritten letter from Elgar and more.


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Britain is stuffed with places famous for their antiques,

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and each object has a story to tell.

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Hello!

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'I'm Tim Wonnacott

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'and as the crowds gather for their favourite outdoor events around the country,

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'I'll be pitching up with my silver trailer...' How do you do?

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'..to meet the locals with their precious antiques and collectables.'

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I'm feeling inspired myself, thank you very much.

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SHE LAUGHS

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Their stories will reveal why the places we visit

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deserve to be on the Great Antiques Map of Britain.

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Today we're in wonderful Worcester at a flea and collectors fair.

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'Lots of eager owners

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'have come along to show us their intriguing items...'

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"All good wishes for 1928, yours, Edward Elgar."

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'..which represent this area's unique antiques heritage.'

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This is a wonderful object.

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We have here a view of Worcester Cathedral.

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'And of course,

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'they want to find out what their precious objects are worth.'

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Between £400 and £600.

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£1,000 to £2,000.

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£1,500 to 2,500.

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£15,000.

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-Now, what I've got here is an unusual trophy.

-Mm-hm.

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'And have a guess

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'how much these sporting objects could fetch at auction.'

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The name Worcester fair trips off the tongue, doesn't it?

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Must be because it's got so many everyday associations for us.

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There's the sauce of course,

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and there's the cricket

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and the porcelain, to name but three.

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Worcester became known as The Faithful City,

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because folk here supported the King during the English Civil War.

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It has a rich industrial,

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ecclesiastical and political heritage

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and as a result, it's a place that bristles

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with antiques and collectables.

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I've unhitched the old rig

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at one of the regular flea and collectors fairs

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taking place in The Three Counties Showground

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in sight of the beautiful Malvern Hills.

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God, what a spot!

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Now, we couldn't come to Worcester without seeing

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some of its highly collectable porcelain.

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Richard's brought along a ravishing piece

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which has a bit of a yarn attached to it.

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I've brought a vase that belonged to my great-uncle

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that was presented to him in 1946.

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Allegedly the vase was originally intended for Winston Churchill

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when he got the Freedom of the City of Worcester,

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but he didn't come,

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so my great-uncle had it instead.

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This is a wonderful object.

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What we have here is a view of Worcester Cathedral

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from more or less where the cricket ground is,

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and what never ceases to take my breath away

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is how the enameller,

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the person that decorated this piece

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is able to do it in colours

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which are then fired on to the porcelain

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so that they transform

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from the colour that is applied to the porcelain pre-firing

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and then the bright colours that you get back post-firing.

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And that decorator is of course Harry Davis,

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and for some people,

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Harry Davis was the supreme decorator

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at Royal Worcester of the 20th century.

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The gilding in this instance is very fine,

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as you would expect for a presentation piece

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that potentially could've gone to Winston Churchill

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and, um, must be a thrill to own such a thing, frankly.

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It is, it is, we're very lucky...

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It stays in a museum. I think it's too, it's too,

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probably too valuable to stay at home

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-and it's somewhere that people can see it and should do, I think.

-Yes.

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'So, got any thoughts about the value of this fine piece?

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'Keep mulling and I'll reveal all soon.'

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Never judge a book by its cover, I was always told.

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Well, my old mate Philip Serrell has stopped by

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to show us a Georgian antique,

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but I'd have never have had HIM down as a bookworm.

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I'm a Worcester boy, born and bred in the county.

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I think they say Worcester-born, Worcester-bred, strong arm, thick in the head, so I'm well-qualified.

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These books were the Holy Grail of local history collecting for me,

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but to find a set that's complete and that I could afford,

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it took me 20 years to get them,

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so for me, they really were the Holy Grail of books.

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-So, what are these two volumes?

-Two volumes of Nash's History Of Worcestershire,

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just here, "Nash's Worcestershire." And if I can just show you

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one of the reasons why they're rare.

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Now, there's a plan of the city of Worcester.

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And you can see Pitchcroft there, that's the racecourse now.

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And there we've got Worcester Cathedral,

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and dealers would've bought these books in times gone by,

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cut this plate out

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and sold the map and perhaps got 50 or £60 for the map.

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This book would've been written in the 1750s.

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These are views from the city, this is from Red House Hill,

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this is from the north-east,

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and you've got the Malvern Hills where we are today,

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so I think your Airstream's about there somewhere.

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TIM LAUGHS

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-Well, I love that. That just pinpoints it, doesn't it?

-Yes.

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I have sold these four prints cut out of this book for £500.

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-Have you really?

-Yeah.

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-It's a wicked thing, isn't it, when they are removed?

-It is.

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-But I've got one last one I want to show you, Tim.

-Mm-hm.

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That was my office.

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-When you started in business?

-Yes, not in 1750 though.

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-THEY LAUGH

-Yes.

-No, lovely.

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If they were to come up in your saleroom today,

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what would the local value be for two Nash's volumes like this?

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£1,000 and £2,000, perhaps £1,500 and £2,500,

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it's the condition is all,

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-and you can find many of these, but they've been cut up.

-Mmm.

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And to find two volumes that haven't been cut is just...

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good.

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CHORAL SINGING

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Rising over 200 feet in the air,

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ethereal Worcester Cathedral reaches for the sky.

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-BELLS RING

-The bells inside that tower

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are recognised as among the finest in the world

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and they're antiques.

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I'm meeting the cathedral's Ringing Master, Mark Regan.

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Now, bell-ringing,

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as an activity, is something that's happened for centuries.

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Bells have been rung in celebration, in mourning,

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to tell the news, from about the 15th or 16th centuries, we think,

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bells told the rhythm of the working day.

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In Worcester Cathedral,

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the Dean ordered for the bells to be rung for victory over the French...

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-Mmm.

-..in the Napoleonic wars,

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but one thing happened with the bells which is really special,

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in 1928.

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They were recast

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and the money was given by the clergy who lost their sons in the Great War.

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So, the history here is enormous and fantastic.

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-Do these bells ever wear out?

-No.

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The bells in the cloister were cast in the 14th, 15th century.

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Those bells are the bells that rang in the Civil War,

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they're the bells that rang in the 18th and 19th century,

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they could still be used.

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Bell ringing is maths and music and sport.

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-We have 12 bells.

-Mm-hm.

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So, when we ring, we'll go from the highest note,

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just there, it's called the treble,

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to the biggest note, the lowest, right behind you, the tenor,

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-and that weighs two and a half tonnes.

-God.

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-So, we go down the scale.

-Right.

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Then we just change the pattern of the bells.

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So, if you have three bells, one, two, three,

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you'd go two, one, three, two, three, one, three, two, one, three, one, two, that's quite simplistic.

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The more bells you have, the more changes you have.

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We learn a pattern, we don't have a score,

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and we'll stand up here for these great long pieces of ringing,

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four hours without stopping, one person per bell...

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You must all be incredibly clever. Because if you get it wrong,

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presumably you completely mess it up, do you?

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We do, which happens often, it's very noisy.

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They're also very, very difficult to ring,

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because the tower is quite slender and it moves a lot.

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-Well, we'll stand by for a performance, thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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BELLS RING

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Back at the fair, we've got a set of hand bells

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that were given to the cathedral by Pat's ancestor.

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I've brought along a set of 31 hand bells,

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which my great-great-uncle donated to the Cathedral

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and I believe are still used today, in the training of the bell ringers.

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The story is partly told by this brass plaque on top of the box.

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"These hand bells, 31 in number,

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"were presented to the Worcester Cathedral Guild Of Change Ringers

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"by Harvey Reeves."

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And if I open it up, we can see how beautifully fitted the case is.

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All 31 bells are complete,

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either outside on the table, or in this case.

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And of course each of these bells are specially tuned to a note,

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so that if you were a bell-ringer...

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TIM RINGS BELL

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..and in particular, obviously a hand bell-ringer,

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you could actually play a tune.

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As far as Harvey Reeves is concerned,

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it says on the plaque, "A native of this city,

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"First Editor of The Bell News,"

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and that was the bell-ringing chronicle of the time, I guess.

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Yes, it was.

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He founded the Bell News And Ringers' Record

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and it was THE magazine.

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It's difficult for us to grasp today

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just the passionate interest that there was across the country

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in bell-ringing and in particular, hand bells.

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Now, when it comes to the value of a set like this,

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it's difficult, because they don't crop up that often,

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but where we've got a named route to Worcester

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and we know where they were presented

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and by whom and at that date,

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and they're all complete,

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it's quite likely that if this set of bells were sold,

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they would bring between probably 1,500 and £2,000.

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-Very good.

-Which sort of strikes the right note, doesn't it?

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Definitely does, yes.

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This is one of Worcestershire's success stories.

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Henry Morgan first designed his iconic three-wheeled car in 1909,

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and it was an instant hit, according to archivist, Martin Webb.

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The Morgan became a huge success right from the start,

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because here was a car that people could afford to buy,

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halfway between a motorcycle and a motor car.

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Morgans were built as three wheelers because of the tax advantage.

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These were hugely popular, so demand for the car increased rapidly.

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Harry Morgan was a very clever engineer.

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He went to Swindon Railway Works to receive his apprenticeship,

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a very astute man from the point of view of not only the engineering,

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but the business side of things as well.

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Combined with success on the racetrack,

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he convinced people that the Morgan was the car to buy.

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And then of course in the 1930s,

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people wanted a four wheeler rather than a three wheeler

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and the four-wheelers that we built before the war

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were then developed throughout the '50s and '60s

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and we continue to build these traditional cars today.

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Richard is the proud owner of a contemporary Morgan.

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But what I want to look at is the camera he's restored,

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which was once owned by Henry Morgan himself.

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I'm a Morgan owner and I've been using HFS Morgan's 1928 Leica.

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Leica is very much like Morgan,

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it's a good, strong brand, it's been going a long time.

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I'm hoping that Tim can have a look at it

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and give his opinion on the camera.

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Now, Richard, we know that Henry Morgan owned this camera

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and it is a Leica 1A,

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and indeed,

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he created some of these prints you've brought along, didn't he?

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Yes, he did.

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I mean, this particular print actually is taken at Brooklands

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and you can see HFS Morgan actually holding the camera.

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-And he's the geezer in the suit.

-He's the geezer in the suit.

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TIM LAUGHS

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-But he was very proud of his race team...

-Yes.

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..which had just won at Brooklands and done very well.

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Richard, who's this an image of?

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This is Peter Morgan who is HFS Morgan's son,

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who was involved with the company after the war and eventually became chairman.

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He's in his wartime uniform and obviously home on leave.

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And do we think that his father took that image with this camera?

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Almost certainly, because it was taken from a negative

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which was found with the camera

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and which was processed last year.

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Very special.

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Ernst Leitz created the name Leica

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from partly his name, L-E-I,

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and C-A for camera

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and that's where the brand name Leica came from in 1925.

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This was the revolutionary camera that you had to own

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at that period

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and to make it in a size that was portable

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and capable of doing landscape photography,

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all of that was a revolution.

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'So, what would a collector pay

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'for this little camera with a connection like that?

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'Find out my estimate later on.'

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300 years ago, the big business in Worcester was glovemaking.

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At the turn of the 19th century,

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nearly half the glovers in England were based here,

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but it all started even earlier, according to Philippa Tinsley

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at Worcester City Art Gallery and Museum.

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We know that there were glovemakers here in Worcester

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right back into the 13th century.

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But in 1777, the first glovemaking factory was built here in Worcester.

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So in the 1820s,

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we know they were making just over six million gloves

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here in Worcester every year,

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which is a total of somewhere around £30 million worth of value of business.

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Today, there is only one handmade glove company left in Worcester

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using the traditional methods.

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It's run by the indefatigable 95-year-old Les Winfield.

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Production has slowed down a bit,

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but if anyone knows what it takes

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to make a jolly good pair of gloves, it's Les.

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The trade is very skilled,

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one of the very skilled trades,

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because you've got to use your head, your hands, your feet,

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'everything about you.'

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We also still make hand-sewn gloves.

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Worcester is renowned for the picturesque setting

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of its cricket ground in the lee of the cathedral.

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And cricket has its own memorabilia,

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like the two pieces Tim would like to have valued. Great name.

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One is a piece of Royal Worcester porcelain,

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plaque painted by Harry Davies, the great artist,

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relating to one of Worcester's finest cricketers, Fred Root.

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The other is a match ball from 1899, when two Worcester cricketers,

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the Foster brothers,

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both scored 100 in each innings in the same game against Hampshire.

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Now, what I've got here is an unusual trophy.

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It's half a cricket ball and it says on it, on a silver plaque,

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-"A memento of July 27th, 28th and 29th 1899."

-Yes.

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All beautifully mounted up in silver, look,

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and on an ebonised plaque like that.

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So what is the significance of those dates, Timbo?

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Two Worcestershire batsmen, RE Foster and WL Foster,

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became the first brothers to score 100 in each

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innings in the same game. I don't think it's been done since.

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That is extraordinary, isn't it?

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-Now, the photograph in front is of Reg.

-Yes, it is.

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And apart from being entitled to this trophy for that match

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that's recorded in 1899,

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he was an incredible all-round sportsman, wasn't he, Reg?

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He was, very much so. Very gifted at football as well.

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Still the only man to captain England at football and at cricket.

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He holds the record for the highest score on Test debut

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when he went, in 1903/04, to Australia with the England MCC team

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and in the first Test at Sydney, in response to Australia's

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first innings of 285, he scored 287 on his own.

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That's amazing, isn't it?

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-That's the way to beat the Aussies.

-Phenomenal.

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-Now, moving on to the plaque.

-Yes.

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Here we scroll forward a few years, don't we?

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Because this porcelain plaque,

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made by the Royal Worcester porcelain factory,

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is beautifully decorated,

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showing the Worcester cricket club ground

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with Worcester Cathedral in the background.

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And it shows a special match in 1925.

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Tell us about that match, Tim.

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Well, the scene is actually celebrating

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the career of one of Worcester's very best bowlers.

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A fellow called Fred Root,

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who joined Worcester in the early '20s from Derbyshire.

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He was a legend in bowling because he held the attack together

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through turbulent times in the '20s and early '30s.

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In 1925, he became the first Worcester bowler to ever take

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- and still is - 200 wickets in a season,

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at just a shade over 17 runs apiece, which is phenomenal.

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His wife, Mrs Root, she had this specially commissioned

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and painted by the legendary artist

0:17:500:17:52

Harry Davies at the Royal Worcester works.

0:17:520:17:55

-And that's an image of Fred Root in the foreground.

-It is.

0:17:550:17:59

Taken, probably, in the mid-1920s but it is a superb picture of him.

0:17:590:18:03

It looks as if it's in front of the old pavilion at Worcester,

0:18:030:18:06

so it's a nice item. Beautifully signed as well.

0:18:060:18:09

Good, clear signature.

0:18:090:18:11

And a very interesting pair of objects,

0:18:110:18:13

connected directly with Worcester and this part of the world.

0:18:130:18:16

Well, I have to say, the porcelain plaque is a top quality object.

0:18:160:18:21

All these things made by the Royal Worcester porcelain

0:18:210:18:23

company are top quality

0:18:230:18:25

but when you get something decorated by Harry Davies,

0:18:250:18:28

and specifically for a commission like this,

0:18:280:18:31

showing an individual scene that will never be repeated

0:18:310:18:34

in any kind of mass production sense,

0:18:340:18:36

it becomes very, very special indeed.

0:18:360:18:39

I've spotted there's a fine hairline crack running through it.

0:18:390:18:43

'So how will that hairline crack affect the plaque's value?

0:18:430:18:47

'These pieces surely put Worcester on the Great Antiques Map.

0:18:470:18:50

'But what are they worth? I'll let you know later!'

0:18:500:18:52

Lovely day here.

0:18:560:18:58

People milling around, browsing and snapping up treasures.

0:18:580:19:01

Meanwhile, we have two antique sporting guns

0:19:010:19:04

made in Worcester in the mid-19th century and owned by Vaughan.

0:19:040:19:08

I've brought along two guns made in the Victorian period

0:19:100:19:13

by John Perrins & Son, the great master gunmaker of Worcester.

0:19:130:19:18

Now, Vaughan, if I grab this one, correct me if I'm wrong

0:19:180:19:22

but this is a percussion cap

0:19:220:19:25

-muzzle-loading sporting gun.

-Right.

0:19:250:19:28

And we know it's a percussion cap because if I slightly cock it,

0:19:280:19:31

there's a nipple inside and you would have clad that

0:19:310:19:35

in an explosive device, which would be a cap.

0:19:350:19:38

And in this instance the cap,

0:19:380:19:41

because it's so beautifully made, is concealed within the butt, there.

0:19:410:19:46

So you take a cap out from there, you'd prime it, effectively,

0:19:460:19:51

with that cap.

0:19:510:19:53

Having previously, as a muzzle-loader,

0:19:530:19:56

-loaded your black powder, got your wadding in.

-Right.

0:19:560:19:58

What I love about this one is we've got these great engravings

0:19:580:20:02

here where it says Perrins & Sons.

0:20:020:20:05

You can see the hound putting up a pheasant

0:20:050:20:08

all engraved into the metal, which is really rather special.

0:20:080:20:11

-It is. It's been well done.

-It's a lovely thing.

0:20:110:20:14

Next door to that we've got the next development, so to speak.

0:20:140:20:18

-Haven't we?

-Absolutely.

-With a gun that looks remarkably similar.

0:20:180:20:21

It's got hammers like the muzzle-loader,

0:20:210:20:25

except that we've got an underlever opening device here,

0:20:250:20:28

which reveals the revolution of the cartridge,

0:20:280:20:32

which is that fellow.

0:20:320:20:34

Load that with your powder and shot, insert it into the piece

0:20:340:20:38

and those pins standing up proud are effectively the igniters.

0:20:380:20:44

And when you fire it, the hammer comes forward, hits the pin

0:20:440:20:49

-and the pin ignites the cartridge and boom, boom.

-Absolutely right.

0:20:490:20:53

They're very, very handsome pieces.

0:20:530:20:55

Now, Vaughan, when it comes to values, I've taken a bit of advice.

0:20:550:20:58

And the pinfire would be likely, at auction,

0:20:580:21:01

-to bring between £600 and £900.

-OK. OK.

0:21:010:21:05

But the surprise to me in my investigations

0:21:050:21:08

is that the muzzle-loader could be worth as much as £1,500 to £2,000.

0:21:080:21:14

Right. OK. That's very interesting.

0:21:140:21:16

The composer Edward Elgar

0:21:270:21:29

was born in a village just outside Worcester in 1857.

0:21:290:21:33

His music is synonymous with all things English

0:21:330:21:36

and his legacy has spread wide.

0:21:360:21:39

I've heard about a local private collection of mechanical

0:21:390:21:42

musical boxes, where I can hear a bit of Elgar

0:21:420:21:45

in a way I've never heard it before!

0:21:450:21:48

The collection includes pianolas, euphonia and automata dating back

0:21:480:21:53

to the origins of mechanical music in the 19th century.

0:21:530:21:56

John Phillips is my guide.

0:21:560:21:58

This particular piano is more than just a pianola.

0:21:580:22:02

It's what they call a reproducing piano.

0:22:020:22:04

It actually reproduces the touch, on every note,

0:22:040:22:07

that the original pianist played.

0:22:070:22:09

And in this case, it's Elgar's Land of Hope and Glory,

0:22:090:22:12

played and arranged by Max Darewski.

0:22:120:22:15

It's all driven by a vacuum.

0:22:150:22:18

The vacuum drives the motor, the motor turns the spool

0:22:180:22:22

and the holes in the paper are read by the tracker bar

0:22:220:22:26

and there's binary coding on the end that actually tells it what

0:22:260:22:30

weight to play each note. And off it goes.

0:22:300:22:33

MUSIC: Land of Hope and Glory by Elgar

0:22:330:22:37

-Makes you proud to be British.

-British.

0:22:410:22:45

It certainly is a very stirring piece of music.

0:22:550:22:58

-HE CLAPS

-Isn't that absolutely marvellous?

0:23:000:23:04

Now I've heard it all. Well, not quite.

0:23:040:23:06

John himself has restored

0:23:060:23:08

this exquisite little mechanical music box.

0:23:080:23:11

Let me play it for you.

0:23:110:23:13

CHIRPING

0:23:130:23:16

To my mind, it's the mechanics that have gone into it

0:23:160:23:18

that make them so worth collecting today.

0:23:180:23:21

See, even the head moves quite separately.

0:23:210:23:24

The wings, the tail, the beak and the head all move.

0:23:240:23:28

And to have the clockwork movement that's capable of making that bird

0:23:280:23:31

make all those gestures is extraordinary.

0:23:310:23:34

-And then we have the music at the same time.

-That's right.

0:23:340:23:36

I wonder what Elgar would have made of this little warbler.

0:23:360:23:40

Back at the collectors fair,

0:23:400:23:42

Cora has brought along her piece of Elgar memorabilia for a valuation.

0:23:420:23:46

I first became interested in Elgar because I found

0:23:460:23:49

he was engaged to a woman in 1883 and she appears on my family tree.

0:23:490:23:54

Ah!

0:23:540:23:55

Is there a connection between that family connection and this postcard?

0:23:550:24:00

It is said, in this lady's family, that in 1887,

0:24:000:24:04

Elgar asked her father for her hand in marriage

0:24:040:24:09

and her father immediately said no because Edward Elgar

0:24:090:24:14

was a Roman Catholic and he was an Anglican priest.

0:24:140:24:17

Edward Elgar had no money and he wasn't a gentleman.

0:24:170:24:21

-HE LAUGHS

-So, on three counts,

0:24:210:24:23

-Elgar was not eligible to marry the vicar's daughter.

-That's right.

0:24:230:24:28

Well, if we look at the postcard itself, it's fascinating

0:24:280:24:33

cos the script on it says, in Elgar's hand,

0:24:330:24:37

"Many thanks.

0:24:370:24:39

"It seems strange that I should be living here for a little time.

0:24:390:24:44

"All good wishes for 1928. Yours, Edward Elgar."

0:24:440:24:49

And it's addressed to her in her married name,

0:24:490:24:53

which is Mrs Jenner at The Cottage, Abbots Morton, Worcester.

0:24:530:24:58

So, despite their potential romance falling abroad,

0:24:580:25:04

they were linked professionally, weren't they?

0:25:040:25:07

Yes. She was a soprano and she sang in local concerts

0:25:070:25:13

and he accompanied her on the piano on several occasions.

0:25:130:25:17

And I see from the postmark that it's sent on the 4th January 1928.

0:25:170:25:24

So, this is his new year message to his former potential fiancee.

0:25:240:25:29

-That's right.

-Now, how did it come into your possession?

0:25:290:25:32

I give lectures on Elgar and, last year,

0:25:320:25:35

I was giving a lecture and before I'd even started,

0:25:350:25:38

a lady came up to me with this and said, "Would you like it?"

0:25:380:25:42

And I looked at the signature and I nearly died.

0:25:420:25:44

I couldn't say thank you quite soon enough.

0:25:440:25:47

-You bit her hand off and snatched it from her...

-I did really.

0:25:470:25:51

..and said thank you very much.

0:25:510:25:53

I must have seemed so ungracious but I really...I was just bowled over.

0:25:530:25:57

Well, with your special interest and this very generous gift

0:25:570:26:00

all coming together, how marvellous is that?

0:26:000:26:02

Well, ordinarily, if you were an autograph hunter,

0:26:020:26:07

if you were a person who collected famous people's

0:26:070:26:10

bits of correspondence, I would think this postcard,

0:26:100:26:14

in its innocent state might be worth, I don't know, £200 or £300.

0:26:140:26:19

But because of what you've told us

0:26:190:26:21

and what we now know about the tapestry

0:26:210:26:23

that has been woven into this simple note and the potential

0:26:230:26:26

significance of the hidden message that might be within it...

0:26:260:26:30

'Hold on! Have a think, quick. What's it worth?'

0:26:300:26:33

We've seen some very distinctive objects today,

0:26:350:26:38

appealing to particular collectors.

0:26:380:26:41

Cora's Elgar-signed postcard would appeal to autograph collectors

0:26:410:26:45

and Elgar fans.

0:26:450:26:47

In my mind, if you were to sell it, you would be more likely to get

0:26:470:26:50

-between £400 and £600 for this simple postcard.

-For a postcard!

0:26:500:26:56

I just hope the lady that gave it to you last year

0:26:560:26:58

isn't watching this show!

0:26:580:27:01

'The Leica camera is a classic.'

0:27:020:27:04

There is a sort of standard price for a Leica of this nature.

0:27:040:27:08

Maybe £400-£600.

0:27:080:27:11

But I think the Morgan connection with this camera would

0:27:110:27:14

transport it to the £1,000-£2,000 price range.

0:27:140:27:17

A thrill for us to see here in Worcester.

0:27:170:27:19

Now, that special cricket ball trophy.

0:27:190:27:22

On a good day that is worth between £1,000-£1,500.

0:27:220:27:26

But Tim's Royal Worcester plate has a hairline crack,

0:27:270:27:30

so how does that affect its value?

0:27:300:27:33

I fancy, because the sportsmen will still love it,

0:27:330:27:36

whether it's got a hairline crack or not, on a good day,

0:27:360:27:38

£3,000 or £4,000 in your back pocket.

0:27:380:27:41

-Has that bowled you out or not?

-It has slightly, yes.

0:27:410:27:44

So, knowing that, what do you think Richard's equally unique

0:27:440:27:47

but pristine piece is worth?

0:27:470:27:49

If I was put in a spot and said,

0:27:500:27:52

"How much should I insure this pot and cover for?"

0:27:520:27:56

I would have thought in the order of £15,000.

0:27:560:28:00

I think we'll wrap it up very,

0:28:000:28:02

-very carefully in that suitcase you brought it in.

-Yes, we will!

0:28:020:28:06

Having seen all these marvellous objects, there's no doubt Worcester

0:28:100:28:15

certainly deserves its place on our Great Antiques Map of Britain.

0:28:150:28:20

In fact, with all this eclecticism, it's been a thrill to investigate.

0:28:200:28:27

Cheerio!

0:28:270:28:29

Worcester proves to have an intriguing past and plenty of interesting antiques when Tim Wonnacott pitches up at a flea market and collectors fair. Local resident and antiques expert Philip Serrell drops in to show Tim some rare books about Worcester, while other locals bring such fascinating objects including a handwritten letter from Elgar and a Royal Worcester piece made especially for Winston Churchill. Tim views a collection of mechanical music machines that have never been filmed before and finds out about the antique bells that ring in Worcester Cathedral.