Episode 12 Film 2011 with Claudia Winkleman


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Episode 12

Claudia Winkleman and Danny Leigh review films including George Clooney's latest film, The Ides of March; Justin Timberlake's sci-fi spectacular, In Time; and Anonymous.


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Hello, and welcome to Film 2011. We Hello, and welcome to Film 2011. We

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are live, and if you want to get in touch, the details are on the screen

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now. Coming up tonight: George Clooney gets all powerful and

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political in The Ides of March. Today marks the beginning of a fight

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between two sets of ideals. It doesn't matter what you thought, it

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matters what you did and what yo do. Was Shakespeare the real deal?

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was the question in Anonymous. 10,000 listen to go the ideas of one

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man. That's power, Robert. Will Shakespeare, fraud, charlatan.

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And we take your breath away as Top And we take your breath away as Top

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Gun turns 25. I feel the need, the need for speed. Ow!

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Plus Paul Greengrass talks about the Plus Paul Greengrass talks about the

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making of his film, United 93. First The Ides of March, which stars my

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future husband Ryan Gosling and is directed by George Clooney. You OK?

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We are going to be fine. It's the right thing to do and if nothing

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happens we will be doing the right thing. Is this your personal

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theory? I can shoot holes in it. There's exceptions to every rule.

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The movie takes him on a classic The movie takes him on a classic

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story, you start out in something very big and bit by bit you start to

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take things away by people who are better at it than he is and he

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becomes the master of it and gives away only his soul to win.

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That to us was exciting. Got a That to us was exciting. Got a

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couple of minutes? I can't be talking to you. You are. You are

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Is it worth doing this wrong thing, Is it worth doing this wrong thing,

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leaving the campaign while the ropes, to work for

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candidate, but if he works for that candidate then he can potentially

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get into the White House and affect policy and effect change. You are

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a sinking ship. Tell her what she wants to know and jump. Come

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our side. We can control this thing. Steve? I got to go.

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I would say the movie is not I would say the movie is not

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actually about politics. It takes place in a political world. What

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it's about is universal themes like ambition, hubris, betrayal, lust. It

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just so happens it takes place political backdrop and the stakes

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are high. If he loses, you are back at a consulting firm. The themes

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are universal. I thought I was being smooth and subtle. No, you are

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being forward. You have no idea how to tie a tie, do you? No, not a

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clue. George is one of the few actors on the planet you really

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believe could be a President of United States. You look at him and

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say there's a guy who presidential by nature. What do you

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want? Cabinet post. I said I wasn't going to make those deals.

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I love working with a director I love working with a director

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that's also an actor. They know to talk to you, how to take care of

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you and what it's like to be in your shoes so they are really sensitive

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to that. He knows exactly what he wants so you can really relax.

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not telling you what to do but he is so strong in being able to -

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you are offering him, he is saying yes, that works, lose that,

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that, and it's a letter vision he does it with such - it's a

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vision but he does it with such finesse, as you might imagine.

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LAUGHTER. You really want this story getting out? Dignity matters.

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You are off the campaign but thought it was important to "fix

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things"? Integrity matters. future depends on it. Don't do

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this! I will do or say anything if I believe in it but I have to

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believe in the cause. Danny Leigh. Claudia Winkleman. Good, I'm

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pleased we've done that. Let's roll. So this is a story about

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American politics. As a West Wing obsessive, this is always going to

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be a disappointment, before you have even bought your ticket for the

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film. However, that's probably unfair on anybody who wants to write

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a political drama. You've got to put that to one side. I really found

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this enjoyable. It's taut, which I like. Sort of springy, sort of

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tight. It's solid. The actors really good. My only gripe

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to say this early on, is that the basic premise, which is some

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politicians are naughty, or they can betray people, is no biggie, because

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I feel like I think 12 years after Primary Colours you are sort of

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going - ee - however, recommend it. What do you think?

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don't think you talk to the story - I've lost my train of thought

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completely. Take me. I will. George Clooney I think directs

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really, really well. Ryan Gosling is brilliant. My train of thought has

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returned. It's like a very built lovingly crafted box. I think

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the question is whether that's enough. You've got it

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with great performances. Yeah. you say. The main problem is this

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film is saying something which it thinks is revelatory, which is

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as you say the American system does strange things

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they can be corrupted. I don't know if that's enough to carry the movie.

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As a Friday night film it's fine and it is piled high with great

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performances. It's an actor's movie essentially. Yes. Clooney is a

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master really, even when he is in the shot himself. Getting out of

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shot and letting people of the character of Philip Seymour Hoffman

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do their stuff, on that scale it works perfectly. Like you I have

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reservations about the message. The cherry is Ryan Gosling and it's

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brilliantly cast. Here is the thing. When you get 20 minutes

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you are going to sort of know what's going to happen. If you are

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expecting a twist, that's not the way it works. Yes, the thing is,

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the way the film is sold as a political thriller, it's doing

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itself a disservice there because people will be expecting something

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to happen whereas if people are sitting there on the weekend

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they can pause the screen 20 in, if you took a straw poll after

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that and ask to take a wild guess about what will happen to each of

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the characters here, pretty much everyone will be spot on. I have a

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lot of respect for the job George Clooney has done here. What he has

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done is on one level he has got of the way of the actors; on

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level he is also aware that making a film about men in shirt

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talking to each other sort of visual energy and

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imagination. He does just enough. He doesn't do what Roland Emmerich,

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we will be talking about later on - he manages to make these scenes of

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men in rooms work. It's just that you keep coming round to that same

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problem which is that in will be next year, 2011 at the

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moment, talk being the 2012 elections, I don't know if what this

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film is saying is cute or enough because America has bigger

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problems actually than the fact that individual politicians have strange

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proclivities. Yes, but I would recommend it. Would you? I would

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a Friday night movie. What's interesting is that it has its

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shameless Oscar bait and it has pretensions - a cruel word - but

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pretensions to being more than that. As a Friday night movie it's fine.

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Next up is Anonymous. The film the question: was Shakespeare

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We all know Shakespeare, the most We all know Shakespeare, the most

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famous author of all time. Writer of 37 plays, and why we are here today.

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But what if I told you Shakespeare never wrote a single word?

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This film is a political thriller, This film is a political thriller,

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set on a backdrop of Elizabethan England, and it also begs the

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question whether William Shakespeare of Stratford was the author of the

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complete works of Shakespeare or whether it was Edward de Vere,

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Earl of Oxford, who I play in the film.

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All art is political otherwise it would be just decoration and artists

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have something to say otherwise they would make shoes, and you are not

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cobbler, are you? My God, the Earl of Oxford does not write plays.

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this is to be done, it must be carefully. Skillfully. It was a

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period in England where society and information was in flux. The Church

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was no longer a mouthpiece for the masses. The theatres were.

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10,000 all listening to the ideas one man. That's power. When I

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out I had been asked to audition for Shakespeare, I was excited. It

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not be performed until I tell you what you will only have a day's

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notice. That will be expensive, having everything ready and keeping

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props made cheaply. We wanted him to look like

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to look like William Shakespeare, to have the same hair and everything,

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everyone has an idea, but then to confound that by being quite

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You've had a poem published today. You've had a poem published today.

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Published, what, do you mean, like, in a book?

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I think Will told a lie and there I think Will told a lie and there

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are a lot of famous people that say the same thing and I think

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should be made aware that the man from Stratford is only one of the

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candidates. Ben, I'm an actor. Every inch of me, down to my very

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toes, I want the - crave, to act. So bloody well act like a writer. And

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for God's sake keep off the stage, will you? Writers do not have time

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to act. What appealed to me about the film, the whole subject matter,

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Shakespeare, Elizabethan will have, politics.

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What thought of you of our young Lord's play, William, if plays are

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indeed such a sin I pray that I will not find my salivation until very

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late in life. On the one were extremely refined people, the

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Renaissance, on the other hand were quite blood lusty and used

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anything, you know, to keep their power. The theme was: is the pen

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mightier than the sword? He is not an intellectual or worthy or sphere

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I do not remember film; it's a cracking story. This will put

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spanner in the complete works. of your plays will ever carry

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What did you think of this one? What did you think of this one?

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think the first time that you hear about Anonymous, you think: hang on,

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this is absurd. Roland Emmerich, the director of Godzilla and 2012 and

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the Day After Tomorrow is going to put away his effects and make an

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Elizabethan costume drama about the disputed authorship of Shakespeare's

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place. Maybe you think this is a lifetime's passion but no, Roland

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Emmerich didn't like Shakespeare a kid. He has admitted that in a few

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interviews and it was only as adult that he saw some adaptations,

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and I have written this down, and he said: wow, this guy can tell a

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story. Then you see the thing and it's so full of

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it's so full of melodrama and it's just flagrant nonsense. How

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could take this seriously is beyond me. It reaches a pitch of absurdity

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and ludicrousness that actually it pains me to admit it, but it becomes

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weirdly gripping. It's like gripped round the back of the neck,

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not what I'm necessarily comfortable with, but gripped,

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Claudia, I was. I totally agree with you. I haven't been to a

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pantomime but I am sure I will It reminded me of one, if you like,

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where he is going to shout: no, is behind you. The whole thing is

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absurd. If you go into this thinking you will find out the truth

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about Shakespeare you will be (a) lived and (b) disappointed. My

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father is a massive fan of Shakespeare and I imagine he

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be standing up shouting: no, people will get into trouble for this!

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However, it is a rollicking good ride, I think over 120 minutes, but

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I would say that Rhys Ifans is brilliant, Joely Richardson as well,

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wonderful her mother plays the older Queen Elizabeth. I enjoyed it. I

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think Rhys Ifans holds it together because his character make it is

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believable. Rhys Ifans' career is interesting. He is clearly very

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talented but at the same time if you look back, it's less a filmography

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and more a charge sheet read out a trial but here he gives the film

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heart. There are other great performances. Vanessa Redgrave

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fantastic. I think it's worth mentioning that someone else

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brought in to direct the stage element of the film which is

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interesting because as a director I am not sure Roland Emmerich has such

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a wonderful touch with actors so here you have a film where every

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actor is playing at a slightly different pitch. They seem to be

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acting in a in fact to other characters and

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there's a moment also where the CGI suddenly comes out and you can

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Roland Emmerich exhaling with relief: finally I can blow

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up. Would you tell people to see this film? With reservations.

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What's interesting is it has inspired this real life controversy.

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I can see why Shakespearean dons are angry because they will be spending

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the next 20 years now dealing with people who think that this is

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somehow the truth but at the same time it's Roland Emmerich. The guy

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clearly had to be restrained from recreating Elizabethan England and

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flying pterodactyls over the top of it. Anyone who is taking this as

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historical - Fact. - is sorely misguided. OK, on that topic it's

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Cinema always treated history as Cinema always treated history as

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nothing more than one enormous room and here are my top 5

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historically inaccuracies. At number 5: The Patriot. May I sit with you?

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It's a free country. Or will be. Not only does it suggest

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that slavery itself was abolished by the American war of independence, it

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also allows Heath Ledger to get married on a beach amongst

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slaves in what looks like a Caribbean utopia more suitable for

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the cover of a 1980s Sandals brochure. Will you have this

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to be your wife, to live together the covenant of marriage, will you

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love, comfort and honour her for so long as you both shall live?

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At number 4, Titanic. Famously At number 4, Titanic. Famously

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riddled with howlers, there are whole websites devoted to it but I

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particularly rememberrish the moment - cherish where Rose sighs over a

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number of paintings which didn't go down with the ship since

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they currently hang in the Modern Art. They are fascinating,

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like being inside a dream or something. There's truth but no

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logic. What's the artist's name? Something Picasso. He won't

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to a thing, he won't, trust me. At least they were cheap. At number 3,

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No, the Americans did not capture No, the Americans did not capture

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the first naval Enigma machine leading to the cracking of vital

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German codes; it was in fact our very own HMS Bulldog and not even

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the presence of the Bon Jovi is going to change that.

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Great movie though. At number 2, Where Eagles Dare and

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specifically Clint Eastwood's hair style, an anachronistic style if

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ever I saw one. This is be

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be the Secret Service in Bavaria. What were you

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about? I told him I was Himmler's brother. I can see why that would

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shake him up a little. More than a little I would think. Keep an eye on

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things, I will be back. At number 1,

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1, in the 1971 adaptation, most of mankind was to be wiped out by 1975,

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leaving behind little but the entirely humourless Charlton Heston

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which thankfully didn't happen. In 2001 a Space Odyssey they predicted

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a nonstick frying pan on the moon. Which of those

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pass? Brilliant. Thank you so much for

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your tweets. One says: every time I hear someone in a Shakespeare movie

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call him Will, I feel a tiny sick. Another one: he likes to

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fast and loose with history, the little tinker. Another one

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to Schindler's list and passive smoking which was only discovered in

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the 1970s. Up next, a young woman is murdered

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by a notorious gang member, sister wants revenge and joins

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rival girl gang to get it. .

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Just want to come up and take what's Just want to come up and take what's

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mine. I will sort it. Leave it. What are you talking about? Leave

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her alone. Stupid bitch. He is the one that killed my sister.

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to kill you. /! Come on!

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We are not getting involved. We are not getting involved.

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happened to protecting each over? We are protecting ourselves. She

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What happens? The only way you What happens? The only way you

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# Break, break your neck # # Break, break your neck #

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All right, bruv? Yes, exactly. What All right, bruv? Yes, exactly. What

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# Break, break I liked about this film is I really

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cared about the characters. There is menace in the air. There is a murder

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scene - I don't think I am giving anything away because they show a

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part of it and it happens the scene, it's really, really quite

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terrifying, really scary. There is a girl in it called Lily Loveless

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is brilliant - hello - who absolutely brilliant, and you can't

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take your eyes off her and I it's just an amazing performance

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because you are always drawn to her. I think what's wrong with it is it

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can be quite disjointed. know if you agree? It is incredibly

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disjointed, rough and would be easy to sit here and

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the boot in. Let's accentuate the positive. If you look at British

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crime movies, certainly in the post-Guy Richie era, so much of it

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doesn't exist in reality. Girl gangs, I think anyone who lives in

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London and any major city, will do exist. I spent a lot of time

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the top deck of the A7 bus so I'm often around girl gangs and at

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that's rooted in authenticity. Lily as you say is the real ace up

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sleeve of this film. That's not to disrespect any of the other cast

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members. Although not the biggest part, she is probably the best known

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person in the film and she is class act. She elevates things. I

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would almost be tempted to leave it there but in fairness we do have

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point out that the film, as I rough and ready is the least of it.

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It almost feels like it's built out of a kit of 101 other movies, and

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there's a sort of sense of kidulthood and Byker Grove. So not a

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winning combination. It's not great, there are good things about it.

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years ago saw the release of that I love. Danny, you may look

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away. As if my night weren't enough already. It may not be

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considered a classic - is - it may not be high up but it

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contains a volleyball sequence voted best scene in a film by Suck

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magazine three years in a row. What more do you want?

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It's easy to see why Top Gun struck It's easy to see why Top Gun struck

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such a chord back in the 1980s. It has everything, fast planes, big

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guns, hot guys, cool shades and tache. It's a movie about hot young

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guys flying planes. This gives me a hard on. It's vacuous, empty, loud.

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Don't tease me. Incredibly This is what I call a target-rich

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environment. It matches the drug of the decade. This is a cocaine movie.

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You are the top 1% of all naval Aveiators. The elite. Best of the

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best. We will make you better. OK, we all know that it is no Citizen

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Kane but the story of iceman and colleagues has become the stuff of

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legend. I feel the need, the need for speed, it's one of my favourite

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lines, quoted all the time. I they would send me a buck every time

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the line is quoted. Jester's dead. Yehaw. I can't have the rest of my

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life without someone shouting that at me from across the airport. You

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are. You are all Top Guns. It is deftly deconstructed by Tarantino

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himself. It is a story about a struggling with his own

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homosexuality. The director is beavering away on a conversion but

0:25:090:25:14

he told us why it's still flying high after 25 years. It's a rare

0:25:140:25:19

mixture of everything: character, of action, of a very simplistic

0:25:190:25:28

but a great story. Tony Scott and famously Ridley Scott, London ad men

0:25:280:25:33

went over in the 1980s and brought this wonderfully glossy airbrushed

0:25:330:25:36

take to Hollywood. If you look commercial directors even today they

0:25:360:25:43

are all doing bad imitations of Tony Scott's look. Sunrises, saucy light,

0:25:430:25:47

motorbikes roaring through the desert. All of that is Tony

0:25:470:25:55

and he invented it with Top Gun. Real fighter pilots and

0:25:550:26:00

were used to create extraordinary sequences. But working

0:26:000:26:05

with the US Navy wasn't always easy, particularly when it came to getting

0:26:050:26:10

this crucial shot. CHEERING. Got the shot all ready to go and then they

0:26:100:26:16

turned the aircraft carrier so the light went flat and horrible,

0:26:160:26:21

and I got the admiral on the bridge and said what does it cost

0:26:210:26:25

minute to run in a particular direction, and I think in the end I

0:26:250:26:29

paid $25,000, I got them to send my chequebook up on a rope to the

0:26:290:26:35

Admiral, he then turned around and I got my shot. You! You

0:26:350:26:45
0:26:450:26:48

are still dangerous. You can be my wing man any time. Bull, you can be

0:26:480:26:54

sadly not all problems could be sadly not all problems could be

0:26:540:26:56

sadly not all problems could be solved quite so easily. They

0:26:560:26:56

solved quite so easily. They solved quite so easily. They

0:26:560:26:57

sadly not all discovered in the editing room

0:26:570:27:04

these incredibly expensive, incredibly complicated and

0:27:040:27:07

choreographed air sequences didn't actually make any sense and were not

0:27:070:27:11

communicating to the audience the drama, the nearness of the

0:27:110:27:16

the tension that they needed it to so they had to sort of start over.

0:27:160:27:21

Scott and the film's producers spent days and nights re-working the

0:27:210:27:27

aerial footage. Adding new lines of dialogue under the character's

0:27:270:27:35

masks. Watch out, there's an Mig your right, he is firing. I am hit,

0:27:350:27:42

I'm hit! There were first complaints that there wasn't

0:27:420:27:46

action on the ground, in the bedroom, so at the last minute

0:27:460:27:53

Scott pulled together a love scene. Tom was off then shooting Colour of

0:27:530:28:01

Money and we shot the elevator scene. Hair had been changed since

0:28:010:28:11
0:28:110:28:14

the first takes, hence the cap and an unlit set. The best song by

0:28:140:28:22

Berlin was also added at the minute and Top Gun was complete.

0:28:220:28:32
0:28:320:28:34

Right now, the sequel is being worked on. I ask only one thing for

0:28:340:28:40

that, that they somehow bring back Anthony Edwards from the dead, him

0:28:400:28:46

and his magnificent tache. Now, if you will excuse me, I feel the need,

0:28:470:28:56
0:28:570:28:58

the need for speed. God damn it, son after bitch! Yeeha! I love Chris

0:28:580:29:03

Hewitt. We've had so many tweets. Does it really upset you? It does

0:29:030:29:11

rather. You have a far away your eye. I apologise. Has been

0:29:110:29:18

sent in: I will never watch it. I'm 42. The other one: I grew to love

0:29:180:29:23

it. Worked in cinema when first released, it played for 26 weeks.

0:29:230:29:27

Not a lot else going on in Portsmouth. That's unfair, I love

0:29:270:29:31

Portsmouth, but that's a long time to sit in the cinema watching that

0:29:310:29:36

film. Next the story of a Mexican girl who dreams of becoming

0:29:360:29:41

queen but is forced into a life of drug running after she become as

0:29:410:29:48

eyewitness to a terrible crime. . Judge.

0:29:480:29:58
0:29:580:29:58

Apology for the loss of subtitles for 60 seconds

0:29:580:30:59

. GUNFIRE . Judicious.

0:30:590:31:03

I think technically, as a piece of I think technically, as a piece of

0:31:030:31:09

capital F Film, it's face-slappingly good, breathtaking. It's all about

0:31:090:31:13

camerawork and that's extraordinary here. What I do need to say to

0:31:130:31:17

people, particularly having seen that clip and they may be slightly

0:31:170:31:22

misled, although it's a bullet-strewn story, this isn't City

0:31:220:31:27

of God. It's something much arm's length and more distinctive

0:31:270:31:30

because of that. You are following the camera into strange

0:31:300:31:35

and unlikely places. There's a virtuoso gun battle that we saw in

0:31:350:31:41

that clip. You are following it all from ground level so it's

0:31:410:31:47

disorientating. City of God was a fantastic movie, but it was

0:31:470:31:51

Scorsese's Brazil. I love that this never seems like an audition for

0:31:520:31:55

Hollywood, it is made completely on its own account. I know, I thought

0:31:550:31:58

it was brilliant as well, and I keep on expecting her to be saved, just

0:31:580:32:03

because you mentioned Hollywood. are just thinking: please, can it go

0:32:030:32:07

differently? It's incredibly tense because everything you think is

0:32:070:32:10

going to happen you have to wait for so it's almost worse - you will know

0:32:100:32:14

hopefully when you go and see it, but you are just waiting for the

0:32:140:32:19

horror and of course it comes. is brilliant, this girl in it. She

0:32:190:32:23

is fantastic because it's such unusual character. You are not

0:32:230:32:28

dealing with a plucky underdog she is also not a villainous and her

0:32:280:32:31

character is in shock for most of the film. She has to play that.

0:32:310:32:35

doesn't have a big back story, a big emotional set piece, and yet all the

0:32:350:32:39

same it's a fantastic performance. What's your film of the week?

0:32:390:32:44

Miss Barlow in fact. And The Ides of March. Neither of us

0:32:440:32:52

have said Anonymous which is a heartbreaker. You can log onto our

0:32:520:33:00

website to find details. Next, director's cut and this week

0:33:000:33:07

we hear about the filming of 93.

0:33:070:33:10

Not that long after 9/11, I started Not that long after 9/11, I started

0:33:100:33:14

thinking about how I could make film that would explore it.

0:33:140:33:20

United 93 Cleveland, verify your United 93 Cleveland, verify your

0:33:200:33:23

altitude. Tom, I'm getting no response out of an United 93.

0:33:230:33:28

response at all. I remember absolutely drawn to United 93. And

0:33:280:33:35

the struggle on the plane. So it was a question of situating that

0:33:350:33:41

struggle in its correct context, which was all these systems. The

0:33:410:33:48

thin tissue of rationality by which we live our lives and how easy it is

0:33:480:33:53

to tear it, and what happens when we do and how swiftly the systems

0:33:530:34:00

All the people were all air traffic All the people were all air traffic

0:34:000:34:01

controllers who had been there on controllers who had been there on

0:34:010:34:03

All the people the day. We had brought over to play

0:34:030:34:08

that part. The idea was that you would sort of have a few actors in

0:34:080:34:12

amongst professionals, and, if you get that balance right and

0:34:120:34:17

are very, very lucky, the sort of actors stop acting and the

0:34:170:34:25

non-actors start acting and you get this beautiful sense of reality.

0:34:250:34:28

Ben, New York centre called, they were tracking the primary target and

0:34:280:34:33

they've lost it. Where? Somewhere over the city. Over the city?

0:34:330:34:37

down over the city? All in touch with the Metro tower,

0:34:380:34:45

if they have a visual. Jesus! my - And there was this incredible

0:34:450:34:48

emotional electricity on the you could see it in other moments. I

0:34:480:34:51

remember, there's a shot in that film, one of my

0:34:510:34:57

the film actually, where you are inside that military command centre.

0:34:570:35:03

Did you see that, sir? One of the Did you see that, sir? One of the

0:35:030:35:06

planes has gone off course and they are trying to work out what's

0:35:060:35:16

on. Jesus Christ. And the second plane, I think, has just hit

0:35:160:35:24

tower. And you see this woman and one of the officers is pushing the

0:35:240:35:29

room for information and you can see on her face shock and emotion. What

0:35:290:35:36

have you got, Shona? Passengers said they have another hijacked aircraft,

0:35:360:35:42

United 175. And that's not acting. You know, she had re-lived events

0:35:420:35:47

that she had gone through. What is happening?

0:35:470:35:50

h happen. We are going back to the airport, everything is going to

0:35:500:35:54

fine. The rule that I set was that we weren't going to shoot

0:35:540:35:58

from outside the aeroplane. In other words, we weren't going to use it as

0:35:580:36:03

a set with floating walls, which you could have done. We could have cut

0:36:030:36:06

the thing on half. They are on the ground, outside the cockpit. They

0:36:060:36:14

are on the floor. I wanted the situation that we were on the plane

0:36:140:36:18

and as constricted. She saw two bodies in front of the

0:36:180:36:24

the floor. You know, the way Barry Ackroyd and Clements shot it, they

0:36:240:36:27

were inhabiting this world so they were responding to events

0:36:270:36:37
0:36:370:36:38

were occurring, and it gave it that heightened sense of reality.

0:36:380:36:41

I think that scene that begins with I think that scene that begins with

0:36:410:36:51
0:36:510:36:51

the counterattack, if you like, from the passengers - go, go, go! Then

0:36:510:36:55

it always felt to me, watching that, that there was something of what was

0:36:550:37:04

going on in our world. That was the post-9/11 world. You know. A

0:37:040:37:13

desperate sort of struggle for the control of modernity, you know.

0:37:130:37:16

So fascinating, that's my film of So fascinating, that's my film of

0:37:160:37:21

the week. Mine too. Just stay in, get that. You can see more on the

0:37:210:37:25

Film 2011 website and over following weeks you will he we will have more

0:37:250:37:30

directors including Mike Leigh and Stephen Frears. Next week we will be

0:37:300:37:37

reviewing Straw Dogs and back to our regular Wednesday night spot.

0:37:370:37:42

Playing us out tonight a clip from In Time starring Justin Timberlake

0:37:420:37:46

in cinemas from 1st you very much for watching.

0:37:460:37:56
0:37:560:38:04

MUSIC. You are going to kill us. MUSIC. You are going to kill us.

0:38:040:38:14
0:38:140:38:18

MUSIC. You are going to kill us. What are you doing? Do you even know

0:38:180:38:19

What are you doing? Do you even know What are you doing? Do you even know

0:38:190:38:23

In this episode, Claudia and Danny review George Clooney's latest film, The Ides Of March; Justin Timberlake's sci-fi spectacular, In Time; and Anonymous, the film that asks 'Was Shakespeare a fraud?'.