2017 Live RIBA Stirling Prize


2017 Live

David Sillito presents a special live programme as the winner of one of the most prestigious awards in architecture, the RIBA Stirling Prize, is unveiled.


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Transcript


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cash officer with his own car

in a robbery gone wrong.

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Welcome to the Roundhouse in north

London, the RIBA Stirling Prize, the

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hunt for best new Britain in

Britain. Fixing mega best new

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building in Britain. We have an

attempt to give further education

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new status and can you reinvent the

British pier? That's like other

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nominees for the prize. -- let's

look at the nominees.

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Whoa, look at that!

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City of dreams!

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It's like walking to

the gates of heaven.

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It looks seriously so dope.

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It looks so cool.

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It has got lights, like,

not just regular lights.

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Purple lights.

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And it's a tremendous

fun, it's like a haven

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of quietness and freedom.

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And madness.

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It's just brilliant,

for me, it's excellent.

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Wow.

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I think what's unique about this

building is it's a strikingly

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modern building and a very

sensitive conservation environment.

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I love this building because it

reflects so many elements

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of the historic dockyard.

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It gets you in here,

and you just think, why?

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What are your thoughts

looking out on this now?

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Oh, I love it, it's

just so peaceful.

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A very brief glimpse into the six

nominated buildings before the

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announcement and the next ten

minutes or so, let's have a longer

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look at those six building. I'm

joined by Ollie Wainwright,

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architectural critic, and Emma

Froud, a community architectural

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correspondent?

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I make sure that communities are

involved in architectural projects.

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But look at the first one. Over DC,

you were involved in this from the

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beginning, Hastings Pier?

It was a

project where I worked with the

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community to look at the questions

they asked about architecture, to

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make sure they got the architect

that would work well done.

And what

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they have created is is what they

expected? It's extraordinary what

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they created.

This is architecture

that is doing what architecture is

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most to do, which is supporting

community life.

Ollie, what do you

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make of it?

My favourite is that it

has locally been nicknamed the

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Plank. But may sound a criticism but

is a massive plank, it's a flexible

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blank canvas.

Some people got

concerned they lost the end of the

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pier attraction?

Its teeming with

attractions, it has public shows,

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attractions, ourselves, it had has

been embraced by big amenity.

When I

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went out there, you feel like you

are out at the. -- out at sea. You

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really inhale the experience.

You

have the community activity in the

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middle but then a sublime experience

at the far end grip is it the future

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of Tambe Mike Woods?

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-- is it the future appears?

It is a

glimpse into the future.

You like

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this one, the Glasgow?

This is

taking something that is rarely

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celebrated in this way and giving it

civic pride in the centre of

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Glasgow. Considering its own

privately financed initiative, it

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has all the things about a city

squeeze into one building.

It has a

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sense of dignity doesn't it?

It has

a real civic presence but as a

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humility to the architecture because

they have mapped this complex brief

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of making sure every skill can be

accommodated.

You are suddenly met

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inside by 20 stewards and

stewardesses marching in uniform

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pass the test, past the dock

workers?

It's a high Street, you can

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go to the restaurant and B has on

why people are training. It's a

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miniature world.

You think, how

brilliant to be a student there.

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Completely different, come on of the

oceans, Tatham, but more modest, --

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Command of the Oceans, Tatham. More

modest but Mavi Heritage?

It's

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rambling sheds. It takes visitors on

a atmospheric journey below the

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floorboards where you discover the

Septembers therefore so many years.

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It's a difficult task because the

old building they had to respond to

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is made from this ancient ship

timbers themselves. You have to

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respond in a humble way.

A bit of

concrete looks like timber as well.

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I remember they really had to fit in

carefully into this. The same with

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the British Museum, one of the great

landmarks of London.

Yeah. But this

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building is quite magical, and it

looks better in the flesh than a

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dozen photos.

It's an iceberg of a

building, you only see the tip. The

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wooden brick outside, what do you of

those?

Not ground-breaking but

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interesting piece of cross laminated

timber, a cheaper way to build.

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Maybe it will catch on, it's a good

model.

They also have this cheeky

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relationship with the homes, in a

mixed up street.

Intentionally

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cartoonish quality, next to a

primary school, so it looks like a

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child's drawing of it how. It's a

good addition to the street.

And we

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will now, I think, move very quickly

across to Louise Minchin who is

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announcing, and Ben Derbyshire, the

president of the Royal Institute of

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British architects, the announcement

of this year's RIBA Stirling Prize.

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We've just got a couple of seconds

and you can do the honours.

Thank

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you very much. Good evening, ladies

and gentlemen. The Royal Institute

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of British architects is a global,

professional membership body. A

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charity supporting architect and

society to deliver better buildings

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and places, stronger communities and

a sustainable environment. On this

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very special occasion, we are

celebrating the winner of the most

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coveted award in architecture. A

prize that illustrates why UK

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architecture is the envy of the

world. The RIBA Stirling Prize

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showcases the remarkable skills for

tenacity and problem-solving player

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of our talented architectural

practices. It also rewards the

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patrons of great architecture.

Clients that have taken the

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initiative and sometimes a risk, to

create innovative extraordinary

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environments that delight and

inspire. The built environment plays

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a crucial role in how people

understand and value of the world

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around them. The quality of the

places in which we live, work and

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play, is a reflection of our

country's ambition and success. We

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must insist upon and nurture

exceptional design, we know that it

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is worth every penny of investment

and more. As chair of the jury, I

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congratulate every single one of

this year's finalist. Truly

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remarkable buildings designed and

built perfectly for the people that

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they serve. And here comes the

moment, I'm absolutely delighted to

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announce that the winner of the 2017

RIBA Stirling Prize for architecture

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is, and you will have to wait while

I fell it in my other pocket...

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Hastings pier.

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Congratulations. Please come and

join us on stage.

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We can keep going, we can keep

cheering, come on!

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Congratulations.

CHEERING

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I didn't peer into the future but I

did make, just in case, a couple of

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nights. First of all, because we are

on live linkup with Hastings Pier,

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hello Hastings! Yes! We've got the

Hastings Pier party going on. It was

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called Win or lose. So this is

double suite. I first of all want to

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acknowledge all the contenders in

this Stirling Prize award which is

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always hotly contested, and I think

you will agree we have seen some

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incredible quality. So fair play.

And I would like to acknowledge that

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you've all done fine buildings but

it seems that this year, what really

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captured the imagination was not

doing one. In favour of making

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space. In favour of making public

space. When you invent, you need to

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collaborate, and this project really

did define collaboration. So I have

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to acknowledge that this, and you

can see from the stage here, of the

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members who worked on the scheme,

and incredible design team PT

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projects. We had a dedicated design

team which works closely and very

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broadly with the client. You cannot

do interesting and special projects

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without a special client and I would

say Hastings Pier Charity are up

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there among the most special, even

eccentric clients you will ever

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meet. But I also want to acknowledge

the people that delivered it were

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absolutely fantastic. In the end,

the double-macro charity, formally

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trust, became the project managers

to build it using local contractors,

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and that was a really special

process. It was actually realised

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and delivered. So fair play to all

the delivery team, the contractors

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and ultimately, the agility of the

funding came from Heritage lottery

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fund for which we are also extremely

grateful. -- the majority of the

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funding. Finally, I just say thanks

to the RIBA for this amazing award,

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and I guess, it is nice to be

recognised by your peers.

Thank you

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very much.

The winner of this year's

RIBA Stirling Prize. Hastings Pier,

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an extraordinary adventure in

reinventing something that many

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people in the town had thought had

gone forever. The building, a huge,

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empty space, effectively, with a

pavilion on top. Many calling it the

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plank. As you were there from day

one with the residence, it must be

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quite a good feeling?

Yes, I have

not seen the residents sense but I'm

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so delighted, they found a good one.

They got a good architect.

Do you

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think this is a worthy winner.

I do,

it is difficult to convey the power

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through the photographs, you have to

stand on the end of this pier

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leaning PCBs, taking in the view,

feeling the expense of the sea. As

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you say, it is a public space. It is

not a photogenic or immaculate work

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of architecture in that space, it is

a basic piece of public space that

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serve its function.

Do you think

that people going on there bucket

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and spade holidays will take do this

when they do not get the end of the

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Pier amusement, the penny slots and

whatever, it is a bit of an

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adventure in architecture? Have the

architects led the public was not a

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yes, but to witness the public using

it today, Alex said he didn't do a

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building but the building in the

middle is extraordinary.

It's got a

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cluster of beach huts around, but

that is what good architecture does.

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It supports and enhances human

rights. -- human life. Every nook

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and cranny has been used.

You have

the steps going to the cafe, with

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the seating, so the public really

depends in an unexpected ways that

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they weren't imagining.

I know

there's a gathering of people on the

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pier at the moment watching the

announcement, that doesn't happen

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off with architectural awards, the

thousand people, shareholders, they

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brought pier themselves, this is

more than just the architects'

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story?

Yes. It's architecture,

architects being the facilitator for

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the desires of a community. And it's

really wonderful to see, you see the

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people, I was there at the weekend

they were running workshops, the joy

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of people running things in that

building.

The power of amenity

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ownership. Before, it has been owned

by a company in Panama, they did not

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care when it burned down, they

compulsively purchased the structure

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of the £1, give it to the charity,

then it shows the power of building

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momentum of people that live there

to make this project up.

It did seem

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like this first.

I think now is a

good moment for us to actually have

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a look, killing

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-- look at Hastings Pier and the

story of how we got here after that

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terrible fire in 2010.

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It gets you in here.

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You just think, why?

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You were here when it broke down?

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You were here when it burned down?

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I was.

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People that I've never spoken

to before were stopping me to

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talk about the pier

and everyone was devastated.

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It was really quite upsetting.

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The fact there had been a massive

fire and it felt like

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actually, how is it going

to come back from that?

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Did you think it was all over then?

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I did and I know a lot

of people did, and it was

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actually the opposite.

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So, seven years after that

fire, Hastings Pier

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has been reborn.

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Jill, Dot and Gillian are

shareholders, the local community

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now owns the pier.

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And it's been rebuilt.

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This curtain of glass,

finally give the people of

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Hastings a panoramic

view out to the sea.

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The woodwork here is the original

timber from the pier.

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There are still some

of the scorch marks

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from the fire of 2010.

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But the most important

innovation is this.

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Nothing.

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What they chose not to build.

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The empty space.

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There is no end of the pier.

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And there's a good reason

for all this space.

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The history of Britain's piers

is a story of recurring disaster,

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flimsy wooden attractions that

have a habit of

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going bankrupt and burning down.

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So much to listen to,

say much to see.

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And everything must be

the finest in the world.

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Even the potato peeler.

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The old seaside

attractions have gone.

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In their place, open space that can

be used for a variety of

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moneymaking enterprises.

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The Victorians had

this great concept of

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walking over the sea, promenading.

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And thanks to them, we've got this

madness in our society called piers.

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Madness?

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Absolutely bonkers.

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Madness?

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Peter Weaver is a piers engineer,

3000 tonnes of new steel

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have been added to try to keep

the elements at bay.

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It's a triumph of hope

over reality isn't it?

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Yes and that's

the biggest challenge.

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How does the pier fund

its own maintenance?

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That's where piers have a problem.

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So, 145 days after it was first

opened, Hastings Pier is reborn and

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is now Britain's best

new building of 2017.

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What are your thoughts

looking out on this now?

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Oh,

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I love it.

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It's so peaceful.

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I'm joined now by the winner of this

year's RIBA Stirling Prize, Alistair

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of DRM N architects. It must be a

good feeling?

It's a fantastic

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feeling. Not only have we laboured

on behalf of the people that worked

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on this project.

It's not the normal

product at all?

It was initiative by

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a local community group who

kick-started an effort to save a

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derelict pier that then caught fire

and had to be rethought. It was a

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long process, seven years of

thinking and drawing and composing,

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to now come here and be recognised

as not just a immunity room project,

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but an exemplar of design, it's

fantastic.

A lot of people, when

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they saw the plans, thought, "Hang

on a second, I can see a pier but

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not anything else, you've forgotten

to build the buildings."

The joke

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was that it was the plank.

Conceptually, it was a hard one at

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first, but the thought was, it had

to be so many different things for

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the many people, you have do make

things that enable lots of different

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things, and to build one so-called

iconic building at the end of it

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would not serve all the people who

are not using about that time.

It

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has also provided the town and

visitors with a proper view. You can

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sit out, 365 days a year, you don't

get that then every other

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double-macro?

Absolutely,s Eyebrows,

Her Domestic British Ideal.

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-- Peers Are A British Ideal. It's a

space where you can be part of the

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weather. Sometimes in the year, you

will be on your own, sometimes there

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will be packed thousands of people

there because there are also a band

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or a circus. It is about creating

possibilities.

Do you have a

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question for him?

At a brave move to

have left it open and not do the

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obvious thing and placing the iconic

building at the end, were you

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worried it might end up being barren

and an empty space for the year? Was

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that concern in the back of your

mind?

We were never worried it be

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barren. Partly because the local

people are genuinely eccentric and

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fun and they love life, they love

dressing up, they will always have

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events and that was never a risk.

The idea of making a big public

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space was so beguiling because we

don't have that much in the UK. We

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don't have open public space that

isn't full of stuff. And here we

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have the opportunity to demonstrate

people's imagination and the way in

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which they can colonise and use the

space is very important. Children

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are always good at that.

Congratulations, the winner of this

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year's Tom,

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RIBA Stirling Prize. This is what it

was all about. Hastings Pier,

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described in the 1870s as peerless,

a masterpiece of Victorian

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engineering, it's gone through fire,

storm neglect, changing fashion.

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What we've seen today is an attempt

to reinvent the British pier for the

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future. The winner of this year's

RIBA Stirling Prize, Hastings Pier.

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