Episode 4 The Arts Show


Episode 4

Actor Adrian Dunbar talks about his life and career, plus there are profiles of the escalating e-publishing and animation industries in Northern Ireland, and music from Foy Vance.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to The Arts Show,

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covering the best of arts and culture in Northern Ireland.

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We've got a packed show for you tonight. Here's what's coming up.

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Enniskillen actor Adrian Dunbar

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talks about his long stage and screen career,

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and his role in the groundbreaking BBC drama, Nick Nickleby.

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Animation in Northern Ireland

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has surprisingly taken off as an emerging industry,

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with growing respect on the world stage.

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We investigate some of our brightest prospects.

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And singer-songwriter Foy Vance, who's about to embark on a US tour

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with phenomenally popular Ed Sheeran,

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gives The Arts Show an exclusive performance.

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But first, the printed book has been around for nearly 600 years.

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But the publishing world is getting to grips with a new way of reading

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due to the changes electronic or e-publishing

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is bringing to the industry. A staggering 1.9 million titles

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are now available to download onto your e-reader.

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And sales in the UK alone rose by 366% last year.

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Also, a growing number of these titles are self-published.

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So how does an aspiring writer break into the market?

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You upload it as a file and publish, that's it.

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If you follow the instructions, you're good to go.

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For writers, self-publishing promises you can be master of your own destiny.

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No longer at the mercy of publishers who might reject your masterpiece.

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'Well, Mr Red, White and Blue was standing there with dinner made for us and all.

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'Now we're not talking a bucket from KFC

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'or a portion of well-done scallops from Manny's chippie.

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'It was friggin' oysters. And this is him:

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' "These are an aphrodisiac, Margaret."

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'And this is me: "Your whatsit?"'

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This time last year I was sitting in this very seat

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and I just dreamed of writing a book. I started writing with this pen.

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I wrote the last half of the book with it. It's my lucky pen.

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I was just typing these on to Facebook and hitting 'Post'.

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No editing or anything.

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Just shared amongst my friends on the Friday night.

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Over the weekend they shared it with their friends,

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they shared it, they shared it,

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and by the Monday there was a thousand people on it.

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And now there's about 29,000 or something.

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I'd just heard of e-publishing,

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so I decided to put it all together on a document.

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The next day it went live. The numbers just went up and up and up.

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"He staggered towards the coop, the weight of the girl wearing him down,

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"pushing his feet deeper into the sticky ground.

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"It was quite a distance. Dre stood over the Caldwell boy for a moment.

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"He knelt rocking in the dirt, the noise of his grinding the only thing breaking the silence."

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"Oh, you can't get a publisher, so you're going to go down the e-publishing route?"

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That's what most people sort of thought, without a publisher you were absolutely nothing.

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Now authority and things sits with the writers a lot more.

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But publishers are also keeping track of what is happening online.

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It wasn't long before Lisa was approached about a print version

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of "50 Shades of Red, White and Blue".

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But why get a publisher if you're selling e-books on the Internet?

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Well, as a writer it kind of validates it for you.

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You've came on this journey, you've written a novel.

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Until you actually hold a book in your hand that you have written,

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and been published, I don't think you really believe

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that you've achieved something and done something. That's me personally.

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We bring a credibility to writers.

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And then potentially building a brand for a writer,

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that can take them to the next level. And often,

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most times, that's the publisher who helps the writer to do that.

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If you're self-publishing, being a good writer is not enough.

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You have to stand out from the crowd.

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In the last 90 days, 170,252 books have come out.

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So my little one book that came out, what, about six weeks ago,

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has disappeared beneath nearly 200,000 books.

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For Rebecca, the solution is social media.

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Well, I always go into my mail and see how many responses I'll have had to different things.

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It's really a matter of going through all the pages

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and responding to as many people as possible,

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and posting things up on as many sites as possible.

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Word-of-mouth is what it's all about. And all you need

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is a few people to say, "Oh, have you seen this novel?" And that's it.

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It's away, it's a runaway success.

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In the mid-20th century, there was an earlier publishing revolution

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brought by new technology.

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Cheap paperbacks rolled off the presses

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and suddenly new experiences and new voices were making it into print.

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Is this happening again?

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I just thought, I'm going to write it as she says it. That's part of the joke.

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"Here's me", well that means, "What?" Only in Belfast!

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The way in which we read, and potentially the way we write,

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is all up for change just now.

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It's a while maybe since we've had

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a woman coming forward and writing in that kind of voice.

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So would a new voice like Lisa have been signed

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if she had just sent in a sample chapter?

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She's a great entrepreneur, Lisa.

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Whether that would have persuaded us, I'm not sure.

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But as it was, we knew she had 28,000 followers on Facebook.

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So if you ever wanted a kind of demonstration of an audience,

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that's it there for you, laid on a plate.

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Fewer books are going to be printed on paper.

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But can e-publishing alone be enough for writers?

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I think, for me, I'm going to stay with the e-book publishing.

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And my main aim would definitely be to have an e-publisher

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probably take my books, and then I would literally get time to write!

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And they could do the hard bit for me!

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This is the advance chromalin proof of the cover for Lisa's new book.

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We just wanted it to have a really fun, kind of party feel. Lots of glitz.

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I was over the moon at the people buying online, on the Kindle and everything.

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But to actually have it and to flick through it

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and to feel it, you know, it just brings it all home.

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Like, "Oh my God, look what I've done", you know.

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It definitely is a massive difference for me.

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And good luck to them.

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Now, Enniskillen's Adrian Dunbar

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is one of our best-known actors in film, television and stage.

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He's also carved out a career as a screenwriter, singer and director.

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His movie credits include 'Hear My Song', 'My Left Foot', 'The Crying Game' and 'The General'.

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While on TV he has been in popular dramas from 'A Touch of Frost' to 'Line of Duty'.

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He's known for playing tough characters, and just last week

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saw him play the villainous Uncle Ralph in 'Nick Nickleby',

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BBC Northern Ireland's modern-day adaptation of the Dickens classic.

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Nick Nickleby.

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-Here.

-There is some spell about that boy.

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What usually happens when you do Dickens is that all the comedy gets stripped out.

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-Just the cruelty is left.

-And just the cruelty's left.

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So this is both cruel and funny.

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-Good evening, Miss Nickleby.

-Still Missus, if you don't mind, Ralph. It's early days yet.

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What was very, very difficult about it was knowing where it was pitched.

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Whether we're going for the humour, whether we're going for the tragedy,

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you know, where is the balance to go from real intense drama to slapstick, you know, all in the one piece?

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Do you like playing horrible characters?

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Well, it's great fun, yeah! There's a lot of them!

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In his early 30s, Adrian co-wrote and starred in 'Hear My Song',

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playing a club impresario wooing his true love

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in this BAFTA-nominated film.

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-Nancy here?

-Yeah.

-Champagne?

-Yeah.

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Give that to her halfway through the second verse.

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When you walk out in that scene and you start to sing to Nancy,

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how much do you improvise in a role?

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'That's very interesting, that particular scene.

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'It makes you like the central character.

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'You start to like this guy despite the fact that he's kind of'

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so cheeky and abrasive and kind of obviously trying to put one over on so many people.

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So, you know, but somebody who's brave enough

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to do something like that, you kind of like, you know.

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APPLAUSE

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It was a real fabulous moment in my career,

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just to see something that you created go all the way through.

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Let's move on then to a completely different kind of film.

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We're fast-forwarding seven years as well. 1998 and 'The General'.

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Why don't you go after them instead of harassing ordinary decent criminals?

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Does that kind of swagger and strut come easily to you? Some actors just don't have it.

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No, I don't think it comes easily to you.

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There's a certain amount of responsibility

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to get the character right, that you hit the right pitch.

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There's a bit of fear involved. Also, a kind of brio and bravado that's kind of unfounded,

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because you know that you're connected to a criminal gang.

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But ultimately it's a collaborative thing,

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so you're looking to see what's coming off the crowd.

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You're looking to see what Seamus Deasy's doing with the camera.

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You're aware, even as you're acting, you're aware of the crew and the camera and all of that?

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Yes, you have to be aware of environment.

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I mean, environment is crucial to all these things.

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While some roles need a high degree of technical know-how,

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others require a personal response.

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In Mickybo & Me, Adrian played the father of a young boy

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in 1970s Belfast.

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The scene we're going to look at

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is where Micky meets his dead father - your part.

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You have been killed in a pub shooting,

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and it is an unbelievably tender interaction

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between a father and son.

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I have to tell him!

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Are you dead, Da?

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I am that, son.

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Every square inch of me.

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Why, Da?

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It all happened dead quick.

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Just sitting having a wee pint.

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Thinking about the world...

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Where did that incredible performance come from?

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My own father died quite young, when he was 50.

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We didn't have a very close relationship.

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So I kind of thought about...

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some of those aspects, of those lost aspects of relationships.

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It is strange, sometimes, if you just work off...

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-Yeah.

-..an understanding of something like that -

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that it will read entirely to an audience.

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I found a place

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where I felt the scene could exist

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in projecting what the future might be.

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I knew that the audience would be understanding that this child...

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was suddenly going to be unprotected in the world, if you like.

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Christina would sally forth to weddings and wakes,

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taking me by the hand with her,

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cos I was her Benji.

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Her golden boy.

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One of Adrian's most high-profile stage roles

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has been Irish playwright Brendan Behan.

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This was informed by a very different kind of personal insight.

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I threw him the whole way down the stairs...

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-Physically, you're not like him in any way, shape or form.

-No.

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But you inhabited him so powerfully.

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Did your own struggle with alcohol help you get into the mind

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of what it must have been like to be Brendan?

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I think it probably did.

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I don't consider myself an alcoholic -

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I just consider myself someone who is very lucky to stop drinking when he did.

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HE LAUGHS

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Just put it that way.

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Maybe I should take a drink of it,

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just to prove to meself that I'm no longer in its thrall.

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That I'd just as soon have a cup of coffee,

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and at the same time, you don't want to cause offence, do ya?

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And I see this... hand...

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..reaching out...

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for the brandy.

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'When I came to dealing with Brendan,'

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I had a lot of compassion and understanding

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for where he was at, I think.

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I didn't let it colour my performance to the extent

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where I was trying to get that across.

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I think I would try to show Brendan

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and his alcoholism for what it is,

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and it's not a very nice thing.

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If you can try and understand it as a disease,

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then you can have a better understanding

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of the madness and the problems he was facing.

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DS Cottan, is it all right if I call you Matthew?

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Fine by me, sir.

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In the recent Line Of Duty,

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Adrian played a cop whose job is to police the police.

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It's a role that demands the right presence on screen.

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'You have the benefit of uniform.'

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That helps, does it?

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It tends to give you a sort of moral authority, doesn't it?

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There's also a thing that goes across

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both the North of Ireland and Scotland

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that there is a kind of moral authority

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that comes with...the accent.

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HE LAUGHS

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I think, you know,

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we're big on finding the truth,

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and wanting to know what the truth is.

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And the subtlety is only really actually in

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how your eyes slowly lose their twinkle.

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Very much so. I was doing a lot

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of distracting things that you don't actually see.

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"We decided, we decided." Who decided, Matthew?

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Getting him kind of comfortable, and then just gradually

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slightly unnerving him...

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I do remember, after the scene,

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he said, "What the hell was all that about?"

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But that comes across so powerfully...

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That comes across, yeah.

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These are just things you kind of learn

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as you're going along.

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Interview terminated.

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You've played a lot of very big, masculine characters,

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who really dominate the screen or stage.

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How much of this comes from within you?

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I've never thought about that, to tell you the truth,

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it's just the characters I play.

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You don't bring anything of yourself? You have to surely

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bring some part of yourself?

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Oh, no...

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it's mostly myself.

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I mean, that's where you start.

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Mm.

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Then you lay character and all the rest on the top,

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but you try and use as much of your self as you can - of course you do.

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And, after nearly 40 years as an actor,

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there's a new challenge -

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directing for the theatre.

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I have a vocabulary, and I understand the process

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that actors go through,

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so I'm able to communicate with them.

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So, yes... of THAT bit of directing, I understand.

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There are other bits which I'm still learning about.

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Coming up, I've got two plays that are going to be...

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aired in Derry,

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for the UK Capital Of Culture

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next year.

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Translations is one of those amazing plays,

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and it's a huge responsibility.

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So...

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HE SIGHS

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Got to get that right - you know?! Heh!

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Animation has become something of a surprising emerging industry in Northern Ireland.

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Local designers and studios are beginning to garner respect on the world stage

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through film and TV work, and a University of Ulster graduate

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recently won a worldwide award in the genre.

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We sent reporter Sarah Brett to investigate

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some of our brightest prospects.

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Before 24-hour cartoon channels,

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there were Saturday morning marathon cartoon sessions -

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Tom & Jerry, Scooby-Doo, the Flintstones, anyone?

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These, for the most part, were animated productions,

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made by the big US studios.

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Since then, computer technology has transformed the animation industry...

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and the transition from children's entertainment

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to feature film is now complete.

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Three years ago, James Cameron's Avatar

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became the highest-grossing film of all time,

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clearing 2.8 billion at the box office.

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The appetite for animated movies is continuing to grow,

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and here, in Northern Ireland,

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creative industries are making their mark.

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'In 1988, University of Ulster design graduate Greg Maguire

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'left Northern Ireland

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'for the US, to pursue his dreams in animation.

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'Since then, he's put together a pretty impressive CV.

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'Working with Disney and George Lucas,

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'he went on to be a key player in the Oscar-winning Happy Feet,

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'and, more recently, creature director on Avatar.

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'Despite all the accolades,

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'Greg recently returned home to the university,

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'to teach and inspire a new generation of local talent.'

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I was working on Harry Potter & The Prisoner of Azkaban.

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I went, "Woah! That's Daniel Radcliffe."

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And it dawned on me, "I'm working on a Harry Potter film."

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And I thought of my friends and I thought of my family,

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and I thought of everyone back home who would saw off their right arm

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to be doing what I'm doing right now.

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Nobody really wanted to work on Avatar when it came in,

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because it was an emergency job.

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You're trying to do something someone else has taken two years over,

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and you're given a crunch time of six months to complete.

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James is a very demanding director, and he'll keep asking for more.

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He's looking at my shot...

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and his eyes got wide.

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He was like, "Wow, this is freaking AWESOME!"

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And I was like, "Yes!"

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HE LAUGHS

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"James Cameron likes my work!"

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One of my recent graduates, Gerard Dunleavy,

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was voted CGI Student, 2012, award.

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The judges were from Pixar, from DreamWorks,

0:18:320:18:34

from Double Negative, and from Animal Logic.

0:18:340:18:37

So, he won the top prize, the top award in the world.

0:18:370:18:40

You could say he's the best CGI student in the world, but I won't...

0:18:400:18:43

HE LAUGHS But I will.

0:18:430:18:45

The animation industry was not as far along as I thought it could be, or should be.

0:18:480:18:53

Erm... I was determined to change that.

0:18:530:18:57

Avatar was not made by one person in their bedroom -

0:18:570:19:00

it was made by a group of people that came together to create something bigger than themselves.

0:19:000:19:04

That was not going to happen in Northern Ireland,

0:19:040:19:06

unless people were actually talking to each other.

0:19:060:19:08

'Greg left sunny California, taking a chance that he could make it work at home.

0:19:080:19:13

'And he's not the only one taking business risk based on drive and belief.'

0:19:130:19:17

Belfast-based based animation studio Black North

0:19:170:19:19

got off the ground in the middle of the recession,

0:19:190:19:22

trying to show that staying local can still attract international work.

0:19:220:19:26

And it's a gamble that's paid off,

0:19:260:19:28

with work on big projects like the Bruce Willis epic Looper

0:19:280:19:31

and Good Vibrations.

0:19:310:19:34

It was a really interesting time

0:19:450:19:47

to set up when we stepped out in 2009,

0:19:470:19:51

because of the financial difficulties

0:19:510:19:53

a lot of larger studios found themselves in.

0:19:530:19:55

It was an opportunity for us.

0:19:550:19:57

The other thing that happened was,

0:19:570:19:59

people were starting to stay around,

0:19:590:20:00

so, rather than leaving university and heading to London or the States,

0:20:000:20:04

they were staying and looking for opportunities here.

0:20:040:20:07

Here To Fall is an Irish Film Board-funded project.

0:20:090:20:12

We wanted to use people that were Belfast-based, primarily...

0:20:120:20:16

and employed a number of people from the University of Ulster,

0:20:160:20:18

studying an MA at the time.

0:20:180:20:21

Because it was a slightly abstract and experimental animation,

0:20:210:20:25

they had room to experiment, themselves,

0:20:250:20:27

but ultimately still had a brief and still had a project that was live.

0:20:270:20:31

Insiders say the industry is in a state of hope, rather than glory,

0:20:310:20:35

but, with continued committed funding,

0:20:350:20:37

companies HAVE been able to stay at home and compete on the international stage.

0:20:370:20:41

Dog Ears, based here, in Derry, resisted relocation offers,

0:20:410:20:45

and now they're on the verge of launching their first children's animated TV series.

0:20:450:20:50

Hello! I'm Rosie - Miss Rosie Red!

0:20:500:20:54

We're going to make the Rosie Red cartoon in Derry.

0:20:540:20:57

Scriptwriting has begun,

0:20:570:20:58

storyboarding for the cartoon has begun on the back of that,

0:20:580:21:01

and we're casting for the different voices for the animation.

0:21:010:21:04

Hello, Cooper!

0:21:040:21:05

Some of the progress we've had in the last couple of months

0:21:050:21:08

is just such vindication.

0:21:080:21:09

When there's a small team of four people,

0:21:090:21:11

and you're working really hard,

0:21:110:21:13

and people are sometimes saying,

0:21:130:21:16

"You're doing it in Derry.

0:21:160:21:17

"Do you have a chance, cos you're not in London,

0:21:170:21:20

"or one of the major centres?"

0:21:200:21:21

But we really feel like

0:21:210:21:23

our hard work is paying off. and it's exciting in that respect.

0:21:230:21:26

Dog Ears is making a TV show

0:21:260:21:28

about me...

0:21:280:21:31

all the funny things that happen to me...

0:21:310:21:33

A huge amount of work goes into making something simple.

0:21:330:21:37

I think that's true in any kind of discipline.

0:21:370:21:39

We're also in fairly advanced talks

0:21:390:21:41

with major national broadcasters, as well,

0:21:410:21:43

who've shown a fair degree of interest,

0:21:430:21:46

so we can't say any more than that at the minute,

0:21:460:21:48

but things are going extremely well in that respect.

0:21:480:21:50

We are in a three-way partnership now

0:21:530:21:55

with Penguin and Cartoon Saloon,

0:21:550:21:57

and we'll be rolling out Puffin Rock globally in TV, apps

0:21:570:22:01

and a cartoon series,

0:22:010:22:03

all being well, next year.

0:22:030:22:05

You've had offers to leave but you haven't left.

0:22:060:22:09

Why have you stayed in Derry?

0:22:090:22:10

We're really keen about growing local talent,

0:22:100:22:13

about fostering things that are happening here.

0:22:130:22:15

And in collaboration with, be it a cartoonist in Kilkenny

0:22:150:22:19

or studios further a-field...

0:22:190:22:21

but very much based here.

0:22:210:22:24

That's the point.

0:22:240:22:26

Now, with his tips on what's not to miss

0:22:260:22:29

in the music world over the next few weeks,

0:22:290:22:31

here's Ralph McLean.

0:22:310:22:33

Thanks, Marie-Louise.

0:22:330:22:34

We'll start with the first appearance on these shores

0:22:340:22:36

of a true cult legend.

0:22:360:22:38

Anyone who's seen the multi-award-winning documentary Searching For Sugarman

0:22:380:22:41

will know what an amazing talent Sixto Rodriguez is.

0:22:410:22:44

It's a mad story, as well.

0:22:440:22:45

Donovan-flavoured Detroit singer-songwriter releases

0:22:450:22:48

a couple of phenomenal albums in the early '70s,

0:22:480:22:50

and then just disappears off the face of the Earth.

0:22:500:22:53

Down the decades, his reputation has grown and grown,

0:22:530:22:55

and now he's back sounding as wise and wonderful as ever.

0:22:550:22:58

Rodriguez plays the Empire Music Hall on the 28th of this month.

0:22:580:23:01

Support comes from local hero David Holmes.

0:23:010:23:03

Trust me, this is one gig you will not want to miss.

0:23:030:23:06

Current flavour of the month, folk-rock trio The Staves,

0:23:060:23:09

will be playing the Limelight in Belfast on Saturday night,

0:23:090:23:12

When they come through town next time, it'll be in a considerably bigger venue,

0:23:120:23:16

as they're really on the up at the minute.

0:23:160:23:18

So it's the perfect time to see them.

0:23:180:23:19

For my money, The Undertones are the greatest singles band in Irish rock history.

0:23:190:23:24

Think Teenage Kicks, Here Comes The Summer, Jimmy Jimmy -

0:23:240:23:26

the examples of pure pop perfection

0:23:260:23:28

just keep on coming.

0:23:280:23:30

Paul McLoone may have replaced Feargal Sharkey as the lead singer,

0:23:300:23:33

and the old hair may be getting a bit thinner on top for some of them,

0:23:330:23:36

but they're still an electrifying live prospect.

0:23:360:23:38

Where better to see them than in a home-town gig?

0:23:380:23:40

The play the Nerve Centre in their native Derry/Londonderry

0:23:400:23:43

tomorrow night.

0:23:430:23:44

Peter Wilson, AKA Duke Special,

0:23:440:23:46

has been a stalwart of the live local music scene for years now.

0:23:460:23:49

The dreadlocked Duke will be out on the road again in December.

0:23:490:23:52

He plays An Creagan Centre in Omagh on the ninth,

0:23:520:23:55

the Atlantic Lounge in Portrush on the 14th,

0:23:550:23:57

and the Arts Centre in Newry on the 15th of December.

0:23:570:24:01

Irish duo The Lost Brothers have been described as a kind of cosmic Everly Brothers,

0:24:010:24:05

and that makes sense because their harmonies are beautiful,

0:24:050:24:08

but, most importantly, they write great songs.

0:24:080:24:10

I've seen them a lot and I can tell you they're brilliant live, as well,

0:24:100:24:13

and they play the Errigle in Belfast on the fifth of December,

0:24:130:24:16

then go up to Sandino's Bar in Derry on the sixth.

0:24:160:24:19

Sheffield crooner Richard Hawley will be promoting his Mercury-nominated album,

0:24:190:24:23

the defiantly psychedelic and, let's be honest, fairly noisy album,

0:24:230:24:26

Standing At The Sky's Edge,

0:24:260:24:27

with a couple of gigs in Northern Ireland.

0:24:270:24:29

He plays the Nerve Centre in Derry on the first,

0:24:290:24:32

and then plays the Mandela Hall in Belfast on the second.

0:24:320:24:34

Finally, a big shout out to one of my favourite singer-songwriters,

0:24:340:24:37

the phenomenally-talented Gareth Dunlop.

0:24:370:24:40

He'll be playing tunes from his brand-new EP

0:24:400:24:41

in the Empire Music Hall on the fifth of December.

0:24:410:24:44

Get your tickets, and I'll see you there.

0:24:440:24:46

Thank you, Ralph.

0:24:460:24:47

That's almost it for tonight. The Arts Show will be back

0:24:470:24:50

on the 13th of December with actor James Nesbitt

0:24:500:24:53

talking about his latest role in the Christmas blockbuster The Hobbit.

0:24:530:24:56

You can keep up to date with what's happening every weeknight

0:24:560:24:59

at half-past six on BBC Radio Ulster's Arts Extra.

0:24:590:25:03

You can also join our guest Tweeter-In-Residence,

0:25:030:25:05

critic Hugh Odling-Smee,

0:25:050:25:07

who'll be curating our Twitter account tomorrow.

0:25:070:25:09

We leave you with some music.

0:25:090:25:11

Local singer-songwriter Foy Vance has a growing international reputation.

0:25:110:25:15

His songs have featured in hit US TV series Grey's Anatomy,

0:25:150:25:19

and he begins a US Tour with Ed Sheeran in January.

0:25:190:25:22

Foy's recent EP, Melrose, produced by David Holmes,

0:25:220:25:25

formed the soundtrack to the Oscar-winning short film The Shore.

0:25:250:25:29

Taken from it, this is Be The Song.

0:25:290:25:32

GUITAR PICKING

0:25:320:25:34

# When nightmares come

0:26:090:26:13

# Keep you awake

0:26:130:26:17

# Baby, close your eyes

0:26:170:26:21

# I'll take the weight

0:26:220:26:25

# But I won't speak

0:26:270:26:31

# I will refrain

0:26:310:26:35

# And be the song

0:26:350:26:38

# Just be the song

0:26:400:26:45

# When inner scars

0:26:450:26:49

# Show on your face

0:26:490:26:53

# And darkness hides

0:26:530:26:58

# Your sense of place

0:26:580:27:01

# Well, I won't speak

0:27:030:27:06

# I will refrain

0:27:070:27:11

# And be the song

0:27:110:27:16

# Just be the song

0:27:160:27:18

# Flow down all my mountains

0:27:220:27:26

# Darling, fill my valleys

0:27:270:27:31

# Flow down all my mountains

0:27:310:27:36

# Darling, fill my valleys

0:27:360:27:40

# Flow down all my mountains

0:27:400:27:45

# Darling, fill my valleys

0:27:450:27:49

# And when you run

0:27:560:28:00

# Far from my eyes

0:28:000:28:04

# Then I will come

0:28:050:28:09

# In dead of night

0:28:090:28:13

# But I won't speak

0:28:140:28:18

# Till morning light

0:28:180:28:21

# I'll be the song

0:28:230:28:27

# Just be the song

0:28:270:28:32

# Flow down all my mountains

0:28:340:28:38

# Darling

0:28:380:28:41

# Flow down all my mountains

0:28:420:28:47

# Darling. #

0:28:470:28:49

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:29:060:29:09

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:29:180:29:21

Enniskillen actor Adrian Dunbar talks about his life, career and latest role in Nick Nickleby, a modern-day adaptation of the Dickens novel. Plus there are profiles of the escalating e-publishing and animation industries in Northern Ireland, and music from singer/songwriter Foy Vance.


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