Episode 4 The Arts Show


Episode 4

Marie-Louise Muir celebrates the best of creativity and innovation in this special edition of The Arts Show from CultureTech, a festival of digital technology, media and music.


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Transcript


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You're very welcome to the first Arts Show of the season.

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We're in Londonderry for CultureTECH -

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a celebration of the fusion of culture, arts and technology.

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Now in its third year, the festival attracts thousands of people

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into the city for gaming, seminars and performance.

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Its aim - to celebrate where arts and technology creatively collide.

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We're here to find out what that impact is culturally.

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Coming up:

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The Royal Shakespeare Company's digital producer Sarah Ellis

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and technology entrepreneur Mary McKenna

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discuss the digitally enhanced landscape of creativity.

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£50 plus 30 minutes equals one music video, thanks to a new application.

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The prestigious competition

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which headhunts our future digital pioneers...

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There's an exclusive Arts Show performance from Little Matador.

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And that's just for starters.

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"Pleasingly literate indie stomp" -

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that's how the Guardian described the band Seven Summits.

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They are: Rory, Dominic and Joe.

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Strong riffs and even stronger songs.

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Here is Sing To Me.

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APPLAUSE Two, three, four...

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# Come

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# Sing me a song before you have to go

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# And waste away your day without me

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# Come

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# Make me want to ease a fading soul

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# Something like Oh-oh-oh

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# Something like Oh-oh-oh

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# Come

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# Come on home to me each evening

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# Home

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# These four walls we live between

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# Come, come

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# Don't forget what we are here for, no

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# No

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# Just sing to me Oh-oh-oh

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# Just sing to me Oh-oh-oh

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# I'm fading so low

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# Just sing to me Oh-oh-oh

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# Just sing to me Oh-oh-oh

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# Just sing to me Oh-oh-oh

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# Just sing to me Oh-oh-oh

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# Come

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# Sing me a song before you have to go. #

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APPLAUSE

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Seven Summits, and you can see another song from the band

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recorded exclusively for The Arts Show on our website.

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Now, "An epic festival of digital technology, media and music" -

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that's how the organisers describe CultureTECH.

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Mark Nagurski, festival director, tell me more.

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Well, that's pretty much it, it is a big, long week

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of anything from video games, to animations, to...

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Anything that has technology and creativity wrapped in it,

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we try to show it off and bring as many people to the party as we can.

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When you put two words together like culture and tech,

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it can make some people feel a little bit uneasy.

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How do the two go together?

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I think a lot of technology out there is kind of embedded in the culture.

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So, if you're watching things on television

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or playing your favourite video game,

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there is technology at the heart of it.

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Somebody's been creative using that technology,

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and that's really what we're trying to showcase.

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But at the same time there are other ends of the spectrum,

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so we also have some of the more techier tech, so to speak...

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MARIE-LOUISE LAUGHS ..and we also have a lot more of the fun things -

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film screenings, music events, great bands playing like Seven Summits.

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-That's the feel of the festival, so there's something for everybody.

-Where did the idea come from?

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To be honest with you, we've been working with lots of local companies

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who are in that digital space and they were really exciting,

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but they didn't have an event of their own,

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so we decided to create one.

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The first year was good enough that we got a second year

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and the second year was good enough that we got a third year,

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and hopefully this one will give us a fourth year.

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"Digital space" -

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-again, two words that can make people slightly uneasy.

-Yeah.

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How do you make people who work in the world of arts

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get a sense of how much they can explore the digital world safely?

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Yeah, I think...

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For me, creativity comes in lots of shapes and sizes and forms,

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and you can certainly be creative with a paintbrush or a guitar.

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The software and the technology that's out there

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is just another tool.

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It doesn't replace any of those things, but it's a tool.

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It can augment them,

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or for some people that's how they express their creativity.

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So, somebody creating a fantastic video game with the visuals

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and the music and everything that goes into that,

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for me, is just as creative

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as somebody who's painting oil on canvas.

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So for artists, I think it's about realising that creative spirit

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in other people who just happen to use a different set of tools.

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How do people get access to it?

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It's a world that people imagine has got a wealth of money in it

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and also a world in which they can make money.

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It certainly is, there's lots of people who do.

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But I think like any other discipline,

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it has both ends of the spectrum.

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There are certainly lots of things

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which take a lot of technology and a lot of investments to get into,

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but at the other end of things, most people have access to the internet

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and, you know, simple web tools or their phone can give them access

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to fantastic artistic content and also the tools to create more.

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So, it is really accessible and I think like anything else,

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as you take it more seriously, as you progress, as your skills develop,

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then naturally you move on to some of the more complicated tools.

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But for most people it can be as easy as picking up their phone.

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But also, I suppose, people of a certain age

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are maybe a bit phobic about technology,

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with the young people coming through this festival,

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it's kind of just a way of life, isn't it?

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Absolutely. I think there's a great definition of what technology is,

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and it's really things that were invented in your lifetime.

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So, if you think of some of the kids who are here today

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and they are 12 and 13 years old and they're having a fantastic time,

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they've never known a world where there wasn't the internet.

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Whereas a lot of grown-ups obviously do remember that.

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So, I think there is a transition period of course,

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but realistically people are using these technologies every day.

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You know, if you're listening to the radio or you're watching this on your TV,

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there's probably digital in there somewhere.

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So, people are getting more used to it

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and I think what we're hoping to do with events like this

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is make it even more accessible, by demystifying it a little bit,

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taking it out of the...you know, the ivory tower, so to speak,

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and bring it onto the streets so people can see it themselves.

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-Don't be scared.

-Absolutely.

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-Thank you. Mark Nagurski, thank you very much.

-No problem.

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Well, one man who wasn't scared is Diarmuid Moloney,

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the founder of Rotor, the company behind a £50 application,

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which automatically generates music videos.

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It's getting huge interest from record companies

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like Universal and Polydor

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and it got its kick-start here at a CultureTECH competition in Derry.

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# Today is the last day

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# That I'm using words... #

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# It's just a matter of time In the summertime

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# You'll be mine

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# All mine... #

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The difference between these two videos

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is that Madonna had a budget of 4.8 million.

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She could spend months making her video.

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The Rotor video is done in 30 minutes

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and it just costs 50 quid.

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What we've developed is a tool for creating music videos

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that puts music video creation in the hands of the everyday user.

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The way Rotor works is the user will simply go to our website

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and they upload the song.

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The next thing to do is to select a style for their video.

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When they select their style it will prompt them to upload

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a certain number of video clips to go with that style.

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And if they don't have their own clips,

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we have a free stock library of footage

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that they can choose from.

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All that's left to do is click go

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and Rotor will generate a music video for them.

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Now, after a period of about 30 minutes, their music video is ready.

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They click the link and they get to preview the video

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that was made for them.

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At that point they can pay for their video and download it.

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If not, they can go back and try again

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until they're happy with the results.

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I wanted to develop a tool that would create music videos

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in response to audio.

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I then entered that personal project into the CultureTECH competition

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and that gave me my first introduction

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into the world of the start-up company

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and it also gave me the possibility to win a cash prize of £10,000.

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CultureTECH itself also exposed me to industry professionals,

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it helped me to make contacts

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and it basically kick-started the whole process.

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Winning the £10,000 at CultureTECH

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gave me the budget to bring together a team of creatives,

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to bring together a technical team

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and to start prototyping out what exactly this product was.

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It also helped me to formalise the business

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so that we could move ahead to where we are now.

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We're developing a mobile app which will allow the end user

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to create a music video in their bedroom, on the train, on the bus.

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They can do it in the coffee shop or wherever they like.

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The record labels aren't generating the revenue they used to,

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and producing music videos has become a problem for them.

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The independent artists are under increasing pressure

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to have a presence online,

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and Rotor puts music video creation into their hands,

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making it accessible and affordable to them also.

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We are going to London for three months to take on investments.

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We've had a lot of interest from the record labels,

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so we're going to be working with those guys.

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Where we go from there is we do a big launch in the States in 2015,

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at which point Rotor will be accessible worldwide.

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That's a clear indication of the benefits of technology and music.

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But what about other art forms? What impact is technology having on them?

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Sarah Ellis and Mary McKenna, welcome.

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Royal Shakespeare Company -

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even the Bard is getting in on the digital act?

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-Can it be possible?

-It's completely possible.

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The Royal Shakespeare Company

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have been innovating with Shakespeare for over 50 years,

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so it's only right that we should look at digital

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as something to connect to Shakespeare and his work,

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and what we're doing is looking at how our craft and our stage craft

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can connect with audiences and artists

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and ourselves as an organisation.

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Where's the art, though, in that?

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I think the art is Shakespeare

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and the imagination that his stories unlock.

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If we think about how theatre has developed

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over 400 years since Elizabethan times,

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we can see how technology has innovated over time.

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But it's his stories, his work that's stayed in people's imagination.

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And I think it's how we interpret them today

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which is the important thing to do

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and for us to connect with the next generation.

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It's important for us to be part of that conversation.

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So the conversation is very much skewed towards a younger generation.

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I think it's about how you take your core audiences with you

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but how you inspire the next generation,

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and we look at the past, the present and the future as a company.

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Mary, you're a technology entrepreneur.

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Should technology service the arts,

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or should it be the other way around?

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Well, I think it's technology that services the arts,

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because the arts have been here, as Sarah's said, for hundreds of years.

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Technology's new,

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technology's often used as a transformative medium,

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and, for the theatre, anyway, it helps us bring about new ways

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of engaging with existing audiences and new ones, as well.

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You've done something quite innovative

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when it comes to Shakespeare with Midsummer Night's Dream.

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That is a play that we all know, we all love, we learned at school.

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You can remember it so, so well.

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So how do you innovate digitally with something so sacred as well?

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You ask the right questions,

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and I think that what digital unlocks for culture

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is that we're now a network, and the RSC is part of that network,

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so it's about how technology extends the reach of the live experience.

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And the question within that project

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was to see how far we could extend the RSC experience.

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So we performed the play live in Stratford-upon-Avon

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but we also created an online world where people could see glimpses

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and parts of the play wherever they were.

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And it allowed us to see what the potential was

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around social media and reach

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and just bring an audience that may not come to Stratford

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but has a connection with our company.

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And the story of Midsummer Night's Dream lent itself to the internet.

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It's playful, it's fun, it's got fairies. We could...

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That's a total internet world, is it?

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I think so.

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What it was about was about being playful on the internet

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and seeing how Shakespeare could speak to a different audience

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but also have the live experience at its heart.

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So we perform that play in real-time, we perform

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the scenes of the play at the time they were performed in the play.

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So we started off Act 2, Scene 1 at two o'clock in the morning

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and we actually had a whole different experience as an audience

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witnessing that play at the time that the actors were performing it

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at the time of the play.

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And at four o'clock in the morning,

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as the line in the play responds to the dawn chorus breaking,

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birds outside started singing.

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That we can't create online yet,

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and it was the mixture between those worlds that we were excited by.

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Could local theatre companies...

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If we look at theatre - and your background was the Millennium Forum

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here in Derry - could local theatres do something as innovative as that?

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Or have they got the money to do it, as well?

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It's hard enough to get the play on the stage.

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I think it is a complex ask,

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but technology's becoming cheaper all the time,

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and with technologies like the Oculus Rift,

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where you can actually be in immersive technologies,

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but also Google Glass...

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A couple of the opera companies have kitted out their sopranos

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and their stage hands and their orchestra members

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with Google Glass, and what that allows

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is it allows the audience that's viewing the opera on the internet

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to experience it apparently with the thrill

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of a football match from the perspective of a midfielder.

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How great is that?

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Sarah, when you ring up somebody and say,

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"I'm digital producer with the RSC," it's a huge calling card,

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looking for funding, looking for skills.

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People here locally don't have that at all.

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They've probably got only about one person to man the phones

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and clean the toilets and put the thing on stage.

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What's your advice to somebody trying to be ambitious digitally?

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I think it's about connections

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and using the network that we are all part of in the culture sector.

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And being at CultureTECH from the RSC is really important,

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because I'm here to listen to ideas, I'm here to connect,

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I'm here to understand what people are up to,

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and we're interested in sharing our learning and our expertise

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but also we're also interested in

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the world and the sector that we're working in, and as a company

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we have a responsibility to be an active member in that

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and champion the theatre

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and champion the innovation around theatre.

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And our work extends in partnership across the whole of the UK.

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In cinemas worldwide, we're now live to cinema.

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And these are important stakes for us to be part of.

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But, Mary, RSC, it's a brand, it's a global brand.

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Locally, Northern Ireland, what are the skills

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that somebody would need

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to make themselves penetrate that market effectively?

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I think that we have people in our theatre

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that have world-class marketing skills

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and that they're plugged in to all of these networks.

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Everything today is far more connected.

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With technology comes an increased pressure on the artist.

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I think that applies to every walk of life in our modern world,

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not just the arts, everything.

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All businesses need to be able to market themselves better these days,

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so it affects everybody.

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Thank you so much to Mary McKenna

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and thank you so much to Sarah Ellis as well.

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Now, right outside here, slap bang in the middle of Guildhall Square,

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is a videodome full of music and graphics wizardry.

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We sent along our first-time reporter

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Eimear Coyle of the band Wonder Villains to find out more.

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I've played in some crazy places in the past few years,

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but this is a new one for me.

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That is the Dome, and to be honest,

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it looks a bit like someone's built an igloo in Guildhall Square.

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But on the inside it's a 360-degree video wall.

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When the musicians are performing,

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live visuals are being beamed onto the roof.

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Imagine stepping into a music video. This is the future.

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And this is the guy creating these images.

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-Pedro, explain what's happening here.

-Well, this is the Dome.

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It's with visuals. It has five projectors,

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and we call it Full Dome.

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And I am a VJ,

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and VJs have different ways to express their work.

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It's no more than a performance art.

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Does the music that you hear affect the visuals that you choose?

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Of course. The only reason that a VJ exists is because of the music.

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So I tap the visuals in time with the music.

0:19:100:19:13

So if the drums go boom-boom-boom, I go boom-boom-boom.

0:19:130:19:16

And it's really fun, because I can have fun at work. It's fantastic.

0:19:160:19:19

And this dome's here as part of CultureTECH, and this just seems

0:19:190:19:23

bang on trend in that it's got art and technology mixing together.

0:19:230:19:26

This is actually like da Vinci! You know? Art and technology together.

0:19:260:19:30

-Wow.

-A couple of hundred years later, we go back to the same.

0:19:300:19:34

Collaborating alongside Pedro and United VJs

0:19:340:19:37

are some of Ireland's leading DJs,

0:19:370:19:39

including Anna and Conan, also known as Contour.

0:19:390:19:42

-Hey, guys.

-How are you?

0:19:420:19:43

Now, usually when you go and see a band,

0:19:430:19:45

it's a dark room with one spotlight on the singer.

0:19:450:19:47

This seems like the exact opposite! How are you finding it?

0:19:470:19:51

Yeah, well, we wouldn't really be the "dark room" kind of music.

0:19:510:19:54

We're crazy into the visual side of things,

0:19:540:19:56

-but we've never played anything like this.

-Yeah, it's fantastic.

0:19:560:19:59

-Are you looking forward to playing?

-Yeah, big time.

0:19:590:20:02

-This is the spot for it, isn't it?

-Yeah, it's going to be great.

0:20:020:20:05

All right, well, I think we've heard

0:20:050:20:07

enough about how it's all going to work. Let's see it in action.

0:20:070:20:09

# Curiosity

0:20:210:20:24

# Opened up into the dark

0:20:260:20:31

# Experience

0:20:310:20:32

# Lit a fire from the spark

0:20:350:20:39

# Wants to be a door

0:20:390:20:41

# Is a rolling stone

0:20:440:20:48

# Went too far

0:20:480:20:50

# Rolled downhill alone

0:20:520:20:55

# You better change your ways for good

0:20:560:20:59

# I see the figure in the black hood

0:21:010:21:03

# And he's standing over your shoulder

0:21:030:21:05

# And he knows you're getting older

0:21:050:21:08

# But you're still happy with your child's play

0:21:090:21:13

# Don't want to see you learn the hard way

0:21:130:21:16

# He's standing over your shoulder

0:21:160:21:18

# And he knows you're getting older. #

0:21:180:21:21

From hi-tech digital to analogue,

0:22:040:22:06

and an antidote to the world of smartphones and digital cameras.

0:22:060:22:11

The Starry Messenger: Seven Artist Film-Makers

0:22:110:22:13

is currently at the Void gallery here in Derry.

0:22:130:22:16

Its aim, to explore the analogue film-making process

0:22:160:22:19

and the need to protect the art form.

0:22:190:22:22

As film processing labs close, the exhibition is part of a campaign

0:22:220:22:26

by film-makers, artists and critics across the world

0:22:260:22:28

to ask for greater institutional support to safeguard the ability

0:22:280:22:32

to manufacture, shoot, process, print, make and project film.

0:22:320:22:37

So, in a digital age,

0:22:370:22:39

has film come dangerously close to being an endangered species?

0:22:390:22:44

Janine Davidson is one of the artists

0:22:440:22:45

taking part in the exhibition,

0:22:450:22:47

and Carrie Davenport - with her cameras - is a photographer.

0:22:470:22:51

Janine Davidson, can we say

0:22:510:22:53

that celluloid film-making is about to become extinct?

0:22:530:22:57

I don't think it's about to become extinct.

0:22:570:22:59

I think it's another option out there for artists and film-makers.

0:22:590:23:02

I think the inherent quality in processing the film

0:23:020:23:06

is kind of apart from digital.

0:23:060:23:08

A lot of digital camera makers are trying to replicate cameras,

0:23:080:23:11

behave in the same way as old 35mm. So it's still a viable option.

0:23:110:23:15

It's just become more expensive for processing.

0:23:150:23:17

What is happening here? What do you think?

0:23:170:23:20

I think basically everything's digital now,

0:23:200:23:23

there's no actual physical product, whereas people like that,

0:23:230:23:25

they like having something like vinyl or a bit of film or a print,

0:23:250:23:29

and I think people maybe don't tend to print digital photos out,

0:23:290:23:33

and they can be easily lost.

0:23:330:23:34

There's that kind of resurgence, people are starting to go back.

0:23:340:23:37

You see things like Instagram,

0:23:370:23:39

where people are replicating the old films and the old styles,

0:23:390:23:41

and then people like yourself are keeping it alive

0:23:410:23:44

and other people are taking it up, getting into it as something new,

0:23:440:23:47

a bit different from the digital, a bit more kind of hands-on.

0:23:470:23:51

Can you have, Janine, a digital photographer,

0:23:510:23:54

a viable digital artist working in that medium?

0:23:540:23:57

Well, I think you can work in both. I use digital cameras to do a test run

0:23:570:24:01

of what I'm going to produce on film,

0:24:010:24:03

cos you can cut out all the mistakes and have it totally finely planned.

0:24:030:24:07

But that's what you've said, cut out all the mistakes.

0:24:070:24:10

Are the mistakes not part of the joy of the artistic process?

0:24:100:24:15

Well, they are, because the piece that I have in the Void at the minute

0:24:150:24:18

was kind of a bit typically complicated in the beginning,

0:24:180:24:21

and the end result wasn't exactly what I wanted,

0:24:210:24:23

but I still think it gets across the message that I wanted to get across.

0:24:230:24:26

So it's beautiful.

0:24:260:24:28

But let's look at some of the cameras that you've brought in here.

0:24:280:24:31

They're beautiful. They're a little bit of history.

0:24:310:24:34

Some of them still work. Ones like this would still work.

0:24:340:24:37

I've used that quite recently.

0:24:370:24:39

Ones like this are more ornamental, really old ones like this.

0:24:390:24:42

My dad actually got this. It was scrap in a car boot sale.

0:24:420:24:44

It was in bits, and he rebuilt it for me.

0:24:440:24:46

And it's just nice to have that,

0:24:460:24:48

because if you don't keep these things, they'll just disappear.

0:24:480:24:51

So it's nice to have that...

0:24:510:24:53

Like, the Polaroid one, for instance,

0:24:530:24:55

loads of people still use these. The film is quite expensive.

0:24:550:24:57

There's a website called The Impossible Project

0:24:570:25:00

who started to remanufacture the film,

0:25:000:25:02

and it's great to see that come back

0:25:020:25:03

after companies like Polaroid disappeared.

0:25:030:25:05

But are they not a bit antiquated?

0:25:050:25:07

Yeah! But old things are pretty.

0:25:070:25:09

Pretty. But should they still be functional?

0:25:090:25:13

Should we not be celebrating the press-delete world?

0:25:130:25:16

Nobody seems to have redeye any more in photographs.

0:25:160:25:19

"I don't like the look of that!"

0:25:190:25:21

We can all Photoshop ourselves and we can all kind of...

0:25:210:25:24

I think it's kind of you can cheat a lot more with digital,

0:25:240:25:26

you can make things easier.

0:25:260:25:27

You can edit, you can airbrush, you can fix things, you can share them,

0:25:270:25:31

and we maybe take that for granted.

0:25:310:25:32

But then, when you look back at things like this,

0:25:320:25:35

there's something a bit more, like you said, hands-on.

0:25:350:25:37

You get the wee mistakes, you get the wee errors.

0:25:370:25:40

And then also it's just something a bit different.

0:25:400:25:42

It's more about the process,

0:25:420:25:43

and it's kind of more permanent, maybe, than digital

0:25:430:25:46

because it's not just a wee file that's invisible on your computer.

0:25:460:25:49

It's also about texture, isn't it, Janine?

0:25:490:25:53

And as an artist, that's key to creating a photograph, surely.

0:25:530:25:58

I know, and the lighting as well, and the depth of field

0:25:580:26:01

is quite different to what you can achieve with digital.

0:26:010:26:05

-And have you been admiring some of these cameras here?

-I have.

0:26:050:26:07

I picked up my actual Standard 8 camera in a car boot sale as well.

0:26:070:26:12

They asked for £20 with a tripod. It worked perfectly.

0:26:120:26:15

That's what I shot the piece on in Derry.

0:26:150:26:19

So it kind of adds a little edge to it,

0:26:190:26:21

that I acquired the camera myself. I bought it personally.

0:26:210:26:23

It didn't come from a shop, it had its own inherent history.

0:26:230:26:26

It came with films with it, which I used as well,

0:26:260:26:28

so there's these layers upon layers.

0:26:280:26:30

But do you think that maybe we're creating people

0:26:300:26:33

that are technically proficient at taking a photograph,

0:26:330:26:36

whether it be my six-year-old or you,

0:26:360:26:38

but we're really not creating

0:26:380:26:40

a world for people to be photographic artists any more?

0:26:400:26:44

I think to an extent.

0:26:440:26:46

I started off all film , all slide film and then transferred to digital.

0:26:460:26:50

When I studied in university, it was all still film.

0:26:500:26:52

That was a really good way to learn, cos you learn to do it right.

0:26:520:26:55

You have 24 or 36 exposures on a roll,

0:26:550:26:57

and you couldn't afford to waste them,

0:26:570:26:59

and so therefore you put the effort in and you got it right,

0:26:590:27:01

whereas digital does maybe make you a little bit lazier,

0:27:010:27:04

cos you can take hundreds. However, on the other hand...

0:27:040:27:07

And store them in a cloud.

0:27:070:27:08

See, you've got it all there, but it's really easy to lose.

0:27:080:27:11

And I teach a bit of photography, and you do workshops as well.

0:27:110:27:15

It's easier to let people try it if it's digital,

0:27:150:27:17

because they can take it and see it instantly.

0:27:170:27:20

They don't have to wait a week for films coming back.

0:27:200:27:22

So it kind of gives people a chance

0:27:220:27:23

to then get into it and see if they want to go further.

0:27:230:27:26

-But there's no anticipation any more...

-No.

-I know!

0:27:260:27:29

..that moment of waiting to see how many of your pictures made it.

0:27:290:27:33

I know, and especially with when you're shooting moving film, as well.

0:27:330:27:36

It's a lot more expensive. But then, all the labs now are in...

0:27:360:27:39

I sent my film to London and then it went to Berlin and came back again.

0:27:390:27:43

And one couldn't be developed, and that has to go to America, so...

0:27:430:27:46

-It's having a journey.

-It is, yeah.

0:27:460:27:48

Is photography art?

0:27:480:27:51

I think so, yes. But you may be better qualified to...

0:27:510:27:54

Erm, I think so, yeah. I think anything...

0:27:540:27:57

I think it depends on the medium behind it,

0:27:570:28:00

also the person taking the photo.

0:28:000:28:02

Maybe it's less important how the picture's taken,

0:28:020:28:04

more the ideas behind it and who's taking it.

0:28:040:28:07

I think there's kind of...

0:28:070:28:08

There was always this phrase that the camera never lies,

0:28:080:28:11

but now it's digital it obviously can very easily.

0:28:110:28:14

But I think it was always a case of

0:28:140:28:15

the camera told what the person behind it wanted to anyway.

0:28:150:28:18

So it's important not to forget that you're always getting that message,

0:28:180:28:22

and I think it's maybe not the same

0:28:220:28:23

as someone spending hours and hours painting something,

0:28:230:28:26

it's just a different way of telling a story.

0:28:260:28:28

It just lies better in the digital age.

0:28:280:28:31

-God bless it!

-It lies more convincingly. It lies easier.

0:28:310:28:34

Janine Davidson and Carrie Davenport, thank you very much.

0:28:340:28:38

And The Starry Messenger is at the Void gallery.

0:28:380:28:40

Now, Northern Ireland's knowledge economy

0:28:400:28:43

is growing faster than anywhere in the UK

0:28:430:28:45

thanks to a new breed of technology entrepreneurs.

0:28:450:28:48

Friday Night Mashup is just one of the places at which they meet.

0:28:480:28:52

This month it's based at Ebrington, and we met one of its founders.

0:28:520:28:55

I'm Aaron Taylor, founder of the Friday Night Mashup,

0:28:550:28:58

Ulster CEO of GoPrezzo.

0:28:580:29:01

So, Friday Night Mashup, it's a quarterly networking event.

0:29:010:29:04

It's there to highlight

0:29:040:29:05

the brightest and the best creative industries technology entrepreneurs.

0:29:050:29:09

There are so many cool companies in Northern Ireland doing great things

0:29:090:29:12

but really suffering from a lack of exposure.

0:29:120:29:14

The key thing for us is trying to raise that level of ambition.

0:29:140:29:19

Usually companies come along, share what they do, pitch to the audience,

0:29:190:29:22

tell them the various great things that they're doing in their business.

0:29:220:29:26

We also bring along really great speakers.

0:29:260:29:28

You get inspired with the people you're listening to.

0:29:280:29:30

You get to really connect and engage with the companies that are demoing.

0:29:300:29:34

That's the whole ethos behind the Mashup.

0:29:350:29:37

It's trying to inspire that one person who comes along

0:29:370:29:40

to want to do something really great

0:29:400:29:41

and to give them the framework to do that.

0:29:410:29:43

You could look at it as a huge party

0:29:490:29:51

or you could look at it through where the value comes from.

0:29:510:29:53

We also have a lot of people looking for work.

0:29:530:29:55

There's a lot of sponsors there

0:29:550:29:57

who would be obviously pushing out what they're doing.

0:29:570:30:00

We have been lucky that a number of people who came along

0:30:000:30:03

have actually ended up getting work with sponsors

0:30:030:30:05

who have been there highlighting what they've been doing.

0:30:050:30:07

We've had numerous sponsors, we've got clients out of it,

0:30:070:30:10

we've had companies that have got investment out of it.

0:30:100:30:12

We've had a couple of companies who have come through,

0:30:120:30:14

Chance Man for example, who won the very first pitch fest

0:30:140:30:17

at our first event, and they've raised £100,000

0:30:170:30:19

in a kick-starter campaign. Another company

0:30:190:30:22

that were kick-starter project of the month,

0:30:220:30:24

they were going through a kick-starter project at that time.

0:30:240:30:27

I think they raised over £50,000 on their kick-starter campaign,

0:30:270:30:30

which was more than what they were expecting to.

0:30:300:30:32

The big thing for us is building that collaborative network.

0:30:320:30:35

Having people there who are meeting other people doing something similar.

0:30:350:30:38

Meeting people who can help them shape something that's in their head

0:30:380:30:41

around an idea they have for a business.

0:30:410:30:43

Without having that awareness of opportunity you'll only ever

0:30:430:30:46

push to what you know. We're trying to make people believe

0:30:460:30:49

that they can do anything they want.

0:30:490:30:51

We're a small country, we only have 1.6 million people.

0:30:510:30:53

We can't afford to work in stand-alone silence,

0:30:530:30:56

we have to come together for the greater good.

0:30:560:30:58

'On a personal level, it's a way of giving back.

0:31:000:31:04

'When we started our company it was incredibly difficult to get things

0:31:040:31:07

'off the ground. What we are trying to do is fill those gaps now

0:31:070:31:11

'so that there are those networks in place.'

0:31:110:31:13

It'll make things so much easier for people coming behind us

0:31:130:31:16

and for ourselves again whenever we're trying to

0:31:160:31:18

start another company.

0:31:180:31:19

We've got pretty big plans for the mashup. We're tentatively aiming for

0:31:240:31:28

within this next couple of years is to look at putting on

0:31:280:31:30

a festival of music, technology and film in Northern Ireland.

0:31:300:31:33

So let's hope that happens!

0:31:340:31:36

Little Matador is Snow Patrol guitarist Nathan Connolly's

0:31:500:31:54

current music project. We caught up with him for a chat

0:31:540:31:57

and an exclusive Arts Show performance.

0:31:570:31:59

# I can't make sense of what you want

0:32:100:32:15

# Where do I go, where do I belong?

0:32:160:32:21

# I can't take it, I can't take it

0:32:210:32:26

# Why can't you give

0:32:310:32:33

# Why can't you give it up?

0:32:330:32:36

# I'm left dumb

0:32:360:32:39

# I'm left dumbstruck

0:32:390:32:41

# I can't take it, I can't take it

0:32:410:32:46

# I can't take it

0:32:510:32:53

# I can't take it

0:32:530:32:56

# Take my broken heart

0:32:560:32:59

# Tear it apart

0:32:590:33:02

# Gather the pieces up

0:33:020:33:03

# Steady your shaking hands

0:33:070:33:09

# Stitch yourself up

0:33:090:33:11

# So we won't come undone

0:33:120:33:14

# So we won't come undone

0:33:140:33:16

# You say the words left ringing in my ears

0:33:220:33:27

# It's on my skin

0:33:270:33:29

# You are all I want

0:33:290:33:32

# I can't let go, I can't let go

0:33:320:33:37

# Now you've given

0:33:420:33:45

# Now you've given up

0:33:450:33:47

# I'm left dumb

0:33:470:33:49

# I'm left dumbstruck

0:33:490:33:52

# I can't let go, I can't let go

0:33:520:33:56

# I can't let go, I can't let go

0:34:020:34:07

# Take my broken heart

0:34:070:34:09

# Tear it apart

0:34:100:34:12

# Gather the pieces up

0:34:120:34:14

# Steady your shaking hands

0:34:170:34:20

# Stitch yourself up

0:34:200:34:22

# So we won't come undone

0:34:220:34:25

# So it won't come undone

0:34:250:34:27

# Take my broken heart

0:34:480:34:50

# Tear it apart

0:34:500:34:52

# Gather the pieces up

0:34:520:34:54

# Steady your shaking hands

0:34:570:35:00

# Stitch yourself up

0:35:000:35:02

# So we won't come undone

0:35:020:35:05

# So we won't come undone. #

0:35:050:35:07

Little Matador are a dirty sleazy rock band

0:35:140:35:19

who are formed of five different members from five different bands,

0:35:190:35:23

some of who worked together before,

0:35:230:35:25

and we make honest...a lot of rock music,

0:35:250:35:30

and that's what we set out to do and that's what we've done.

0:35:300:35:33

We're very proud of it.

0:35:330:35:34

Being a front man, after being a guitar player on the left-hand side

0:35:340:35:40

of the stage for 20 years, yeah, it's something I never set out to do.

0:35:400:35:45

It's something that I'm really enjoying.

0:35:450:35:47

Over the last year I feel more comfortable with it.

0:35:470:35:50

It's time and certainly a different headspace

0:35:500:35:53

and I have even more respect for somebody like Gary or other front men

0:35:530:35:57

than I did before.

0:35:570:35:59

We've had a busy year playing all sorts of festivals,

0:35:590:36:02

our own shows. Great support with bands like Queens of the Stone Age,

0:36:020:36:06

Biffy Clyro just at Belsonic recently.

0:36:060:36:09

We had T in the Park, Reading and Leeds, so...

0:36:090:36:12

To be honest, we've achieved everything that we had set out to do

0:36:120:36:16

initially, the goals we wanted, which is amazing.

0:36:160:36:19

The one thing we know we want to do is make another record.

0:36:190:36:22

Whether that'll be in two years' time or sooner...

0:36:220:36:27

We're very proud of this one and we feel it's just the beginning of...

0:36:270:36:32

We still feel this band's in its infancy, so it's something

0:36:320:36:35

we'll come back to, for sure.

0:36:350:36:36

From a performer who's known commercial success to those

0:36:420:36:46

just starting out. The 48 Hour Music Bootcamp has got one goal -

0:36:460:36:50

to get from song concept to music video in just two days.

0:36:500:36:54

Is that possible? Peter Cinnamond is on the case.

0:36:540:36:58

Not all of the events at CultureTECH are taking place in and around

0:37:040:37:08

the heart of the city.

0:37:080:37:10

I've heard about a very special collaboration

0:37:100:37:13

taking place in an industrial estate right on the river's edge.

0:37:130:37:17

This is home to Smalltown America.

0:37:200:37:23

A recording studio, a record label,

0:37:230:37:25

and today they've opened their doors to a group of young musicians.

0:37:250:37:28

CultureTECH has set them the challenge of recording a song

0:37:390:37:42

and a music video and then release both all in the space of 48 hours.

0:37:420:37:48

But is it really possible to create something artists

0:37:480:37:51

spend months on crafting and do it in a mere two days?

0:37:510:37:56

Let's see.

0:37:560:37:57

The idea of an artist writing a song over three months in a studio,

0:38:020:38:06

or a couple of weeks to shoot a video, that's all gone.

0:38:060:38:08

We all know that and we all have these tools, right down to our

0:38:080:38:11

mobile phones, that allow us as creators to do all this stuff

0:38:110:38:15

really quickly. What we wanted to do, with Bootcamp, was to show

0:38:150:38:20

the accessibility of all these different parts of music creation

0:38:200:38:24

and how quickly it can be done without any sense of

0:38:240:38:27

artistic compromise on behalf of the artist.

0:38:270:38:31

The session has been opened up to local music lovers

0:38:310:38:33

and is a unique insight into the complete production process.

0:38:330:38:37

# Take your body... #

0:38:370:38:41

There's a definite inspirational thing that we want,

0:38:410:38:43

as well as a kind of pure...we want to scale our local industry up.

0:38:430:38:46

# Take your body home. #

0:38:460:38:53

Is that strange recording a song with an audience around you?

0:38:550:38:58

Yes, strange enough doing it in such a small space of time

0:38:580:39:02

with someone who I've never met before.

0:39:020:39:05

'To have the added dimension of making the process public

0:39:050:39:09

'makes it ever more intriguing.'

0:39:090:39:13

You guys are making this a very unique experience.

0:39:130:39:16

Now that the recording of the song has been laid down,

0:39:170:39:20

it's time to rush across the woods where we're going to

0:39:200:39:22

shoot the video.

0:39:220:39:23

This is what CultureTECH is all about, showing people new skills

0:39:300:39:34

with technology and what they can really do with it.

0:39:340:39:38

I feel, under the time pressures, we've coped very well.

0:39:380:39:41

It's enforced collaboration in a short space of time.

0:39:410:39:45

So there's been back and forth very rapidly with ideas,

0:39:450:39:48

throwing ideas out, keeping ideas, and it's forced us to be

0:39:480:39:52

very creative.

0:39:520:39:53

'So, that's a wrap here on the music video.

0:39:590:40:02

'It has been a jam-packed day full of stuff going on.'

0:40:020:40:06

To see the full video, make sure to head over to the website.

0:40:060:40:09

But for now, here's a sneak peek.

0:40:090:40:11

# This is the water running for you

0:40:140:40:21

# Take your body or your blood

0:40:210:40:28

# This is the water running for you

0:40:280:40:34

# Take your body

0:40:360:40:40

# Take your body

0:40:400:40:42

# As my eyes began to close

0:40:420:40:46

# All the water lines arose

0:40:460:40:50

# The love I know no more than floats upon a wave... #

0:40:500:40:56

And you can see the rest of the music video

0:40:580:41:00

at bbc.co.uk/artsshow. Now CultureTECH is all about

0:41:000:41:05

predicting the future of the creative industries.

0:41:050:41:07

The Honeycomb Creative Buzz Award is a prestigious competition

0:41:070:41:10

seeking out the top 20 digital creators of tomorrow.

0:41:100:41:14

These bright young things are in town, getting intensive mentoring

0:41:140:41:17

and networking experience, all hoping to win

0:41:170:41:20

an all-expenses paid trip to CultureTECH Brooklyn.

0:41:200:41:23

Honeycomb, the overall project, is

0:41:320:41:34

for the creative industries, and that covers a range

0:41:340:41:37

of creative industries.

0:41:370:41:39

The Buzz Award we decided to set up because we have absolutely

0:41:390:41:43

fantastic potential with young people, tremendous skills,

0:41:430:41:48

really innovative work.

0:41:480:41:49

What we wanted to do was to give them some kind of opportunity

0:41:500:41:54

for the best graduates from this year.

0:41:540:41:57

We had a lot of applications. The 20 winners actually come from

0:41:570:42:01

all sorts of different courses.

0:42:010:42:03

Creative work emerges from all sorts of graduate programmes.

0:42:040:42:09

We're trying to give these young people some skills

0:42:110:42:16

to really promote themselves.

0:42:160:42:18

It's designed around an elevator pitch, which is that

0:42:200:42:23

you have three minutes to sell your story.

0:42:230:42:26

What is illumine? It's an interactive

0:42:260:42:29

audio visual installation based on the four seasons.

0:42:290:42:31

Depending on how close or far away you are to that sensor,

0:42:310:42:34

you can have live rain or very little rain drizzle.

0:42:340:42:38

Thank you very much, and I'd really appreciate any questions.

0:42:380:42:41

We designed the Bootcamp to try to give these young people

0:42:410:42:45

the skills to really sell themselves and make more people in the industry

0:42:450:42:51

and in the regions aware of the great talent that we have here.

0:42:510:42:55

I entered a short animation that I had done called

0:42:580:43:00

Ennui, The Imp Of Boredom.

0:43:000:43:03

A small devil-type creature that was responsible

0:43:030:43:06

for why you were bored.

0:43:060:43:08

I heard about Honeycomb through my university

0:43:130:43:16

during our final year show.

0:43:160:43:18

There was a whole lot of flyers and information about it passed out.

0:43:180:43:21

One of my tutors came in, slammed the flyer down in front of me

0:43:210:43:24

and went, "You need to enter that."

0:43:240:43:27

I think it would be a good place to network. There'll be a whole lot

0:43:270:43:29

of people there doing similar stuff, professionals,

0:43:290:43:32

industry-standard people, you'll be able to get your work looked at.

0:43:320:43:35

I think ultimately I should be able to get a job out of it.

0:43:350:43:38

I heard about Honeycomb through my university lecturers,

0:43:410:43:46

who wanted me to enter the competition with my vest.

0:43:460:43:50

The vest is built with 18 sensors that interact with the game.

0:43:500:43:56

The players being shot, the person wearing the vest

0:43:570:44:01

feels the vibration.

0:44:010:44:04

-Where are you being shot at?

-Just here on the left-hand side.

0:44:040:44:08

The purpose of it was to make it more immersive, engage the user,

0:44:080:44:11

make it more fun to play.

0:44:110:44:14

There's more opportunities than I thought there was.

0:44:180:44:20

I figured I would just go back to doing what I was doing beforehand

0:44:200:44:23

and getting paid very little for it, but I know now that there's

0:44:230:44:26

grants and funds and organisations

0:44:260:44:29

and people who want to get the work out there,

0:44:290:44:31

especially in Northern Ireland.

0:44:310:44:33

There is a lot more coming out of here than there has been

0:44:330:44:35

the last couple of years, and it's doing incredibly well.

0:44:350:44:38

A lot of money, a lot of talent, a lot of production.

0:44:380:44:40

I didn't realise how important networking was until I came here

0:44:400:44:45

and talked to my peers and the experienced people.

0:44:450:44:48

It's opened my eyes to...

0:44:480:44:52

the stuff that you can learn from other people.

0:44:520:44:54

It's amazing.

0:44:540:44:56

Artistic expression and artistic projects perhaps push us

0:45:000:45:04

to make us think about things in slightly different ways.

0:45:040:45:08

We're a very creative culture.

0:45:080:45:11

I think that there's commitment from the various funding and

0:45:110:45:15

stakeholders such as Northern Ireland Screen to bring

0:45:150:45:18

the industry here and I think if we can connect up our pool of talent

0:45:180:45:23

with all of those people who want to produce in Northern Ireland

0:45:230:45:27

then we have a great future.

0:45:270:45:29

Well, unfortunately for John and Dominic it wasn't to be their night.

0:45:380:45:42

It was the night,

0:45:420:45:44

though, for a young music production graduate.

0:45:440:45:47

In terms of our winner, it was a difficult decision

0:45:470:45:51

but a unanimous decision, nonetheless.

0:45:510:45:53

And our winner today is Aishling Grufferty.

0:45:530:45:57

APPLAUSE

0:45:570:45:59

Honeycomb has definitely kick-started

0:45:590:46:01

my own business for me, 100%.

0:46:010:46:03

It's let me in the door

0:46:040:46:08

edgeways to maybe investors

0:46:080:46:10

or people of the industry that have years' experience above me

0:46:100:46:14

that I could learn so much more about them and it's

0:46:140:46:16

definitely given me that edge above

0:46:160:46:19

everyone else that's starting.

0:46:190:46:22

So, I'm so grateful for it!

0:46:220:46:24

I've won and I'm going to New York, where I've never been.

0:46:240:46:28

So, it's going to be a complete eye-opener.

0:46:280:46:31

Exciting times ahead, anyway!

0:46:310:46:33

Well, it's obvious to see from the buzz around CultureTECH

0:46:340:46:37

that the links between the creative arts

0:46:370:46:39

and technology are growing steadily but how do we build on that creative

0:46:390:46:43

confidence and take the next step to have our voices heard globally?

0:46:430:46:47

With me is Tim Brundle from the University of Ulster,

0:46:470:46:49

Christine James who is from Blick Studios over in Ebrington

0:46:490:46:53

and Jon Vanhala who is a musician,

0:46:530:46:56

music executive and start-up investor.

0:46:560:46:59

"Knowledge economy" has been used throughout this programme,

0:46:590:47:02

what is it?

0:47:020:47:03

Well, "knowledge economy"

0:47:030:47:05

is a phrase that's been used for many decades

0:47:050:47:08

and it was really to give a distinction between those people

0:47:080:47:11

who had access to information,

0:47:110:47:13

erm, against those who had access to means of production.

0:47:130:47:17

Where does creativity operate within that then?

0:47:170:47:20

Well, I'm not sure that "knowledge economy"

0:47:200:47:22

is a terribly helpful phrase.

0:47:220:47:24

I mean, we have the creative economy now being used, which is

0:47:240:47:28

to distinguish those people that are

0:47:280:47:30

using their creativity to create value.

0:47:300:47:32

Now, in one way that's a good thing

0:47:320:47:35

because it shows that we do all have access to information -

0:47:350:47:39

it's what we do with it that makes things really exciting.

0:47:390:47:42

CultureTECH is about those people who have taken their creativity and their

0:47:420:47:46

talent and applied it to technologies that they've found on the web,

0:47:460:47:51

to information, to things found out on the street and done beautiful

0:47:510:47:56

and interesting things with it.

0:47:560:47:58

Christine, is that what's happening over in Ebrington,

0:47:580:48:00

in Blick Studios, in these creative clusters, are they called?

0:48:000:48:04

Yeah, well, that's the plan anyway.

0:48:040:48:06

It would be a creative hub with shared work space

0:48:060:48:08

and facilities for creative businesses, from all different...

0:48:080:48:11

from illustrators, fashion, film, music, media.

0:48:110:48:14

That's the idea, is they all come together,

0:48:140:48:15

cluster and share ideas and inspiration

0:48:150:48:17

and help each other to grow their businesses.

0:48:170:48:20

-So, nobody has their hand around their homework?

-Exactly that.

0:48:200:48:23

And talking to each other.

0:48:230:48:24

That's the beauty of people coming from slightly different

0:48:240:48:27

industries, we find, because they're much more open to sharing ideas

0:48:270:48:30

and collaborating and working together.

0:48:300:48:32

And give us an update as well, as a side issue, to Ebrington,

0:48:320:48:36

to those buildings, 1881,

0:48:360:48:38

Turner was there last year.

0:48:380:48:41

So, is it still being retained as an art gallery?

0:48:410:48:43

Yeah, well, the decision for that was made before we were appointed as

0:48:430:48:46

operator but the plan certainly is to retain some of the gallery

0:48:460:48:49

space, the bottom two spaces as dedicated gallery space.

0:48:490:48:53

Hopefully that will be an opportunity that will be appreciated

0:48:530:48:56

by the local community and somebody will step forward and take that up.

0:48:560:48:59

We can hear music, Jon, as we're in here at the moment -

0:48:590:49:03

it kind of feels a natural fit.

0:49:030:49:06

Is technology and music...can it be applied as effectively to

0:49:060:49:10

other disciplines in the arts?

0:49:100:49:13

Absolutely, I mean technology

0:49:130:49:15

is a wonderful toolset enabling

0:49:150:49:18

toolset for all forms of creativity.

0:49:180:49:21

And I think that's the draw of CultureTECH

0:49:210:49:23

and it's the draw of this notion of the creative economy period

0:49:230:49:28

and while music has been a language even before we learn to speak,

0:49:280:49:34

it's by no means limited to music at all.

0:49:340:49:37

There's creativity in coders,

0:49:380:49:40

there's creativity in all forms of business, different nouns

0:49:400:49:43

and verbs but the way toolset through digital

0:49:430:49:48

and tech have just enabled access for all forms of creators.

0:49:480:49:52

Have you met anybody interesting...?

0:49:520:49:54

Many people and that's really why I came over

0:49:540:49:57

here from New York City to meet very smart,

0:49:570:50:00

cool people like the panel up here and others that drew me over.

0:50:000:50:05

It's a wonderful experience and it's

0:50:050:50:06

a perfect blend of culture, arts, tech.

0:50:060:50:10

It's sort of a sweet spot that I'm drawn to, personal passion point.

0:50:100:50:13

A sweet spot, Tim, I like the sound of that.

0:50:130:50:17

Yeah, and that's what this is.

0:50:170:50:19

There are stimuli right throughout

0:50:190:50:22

this week that range from music, from

0:50:220:50:26

film, from people using very, very interesting ways of producing things.

0:50:260:50:31

And it's the dialogue that continues throughout the day that makes

0:50:310:50:36

all of this so very, very interesting.

0:50:360:50:38

And it's why from the very first year CultureTECH was established,

0:50:380:50:42

we have had people from all around the world here being

0:50:420:50:45

part of that dialogue.

0:50:450:50:47

How does Northern Ireland fare outside of a wonderful

0:50:470:50:49

week of a festival?

0:50:490:50:51

I mean, everybody's pretty much-loved up

0:50:510:50:53

but they have to go back.

0:50:530:50:54

Yeah, and I think people are pretty loved up throughout the year as well

0:50:540:50:58

and the data would support that.

0:50:580:51:00

Creative industries are fast growing,

0:51:000:51:03

particularly within Northern Ireland,

0:51:030:51:05

we're seeing this massive growth in the creative economy that is

0:51:050:51:09

being fuelled by the universities,

0:51:090:51:12

it's being fuelled by the contact that people have with each other

0:51:120:51:15

at events like this and the accessibility of technology platforms

0:51:150:51:20

that enable people to make films and make music in short periods

0:51:200:51:25

and be able to broadcast that all around the world.

0:51:250:51:28

Christine, though, it has to be much more than a networking

0:51:280:51:32

exercise, as well, or does it?

0:51:320:51:34

Is it important that you do meet the likes of Jon,

0:51:340:51:37

you do have those chats over a coffee or whatever

0:51:370:51:41

and then you're able to continue the conversation the next day by e-mail?

0:51:410:51:45

Absolutely, erm, I think

0:51:450:51:47

especially that's one of the really interesting things,

0:51:470:51:50

wonderful things about starting a business in Northern Ireland

0:51:500:51:53

is that you can essentially be a big fish in a small pond.

0:51:530:51:56

It's so easy to make those few key connections that can really

0:51:560:51:59

push your business forward and can connect you to other people

0:51:590:52:02

and can make it a bit easier to get noticed.

0:52:020:52:04

So, who's in Blick Studios then?

0:52:040:52:06

Who's in that creative cluster at the moment?

0:52:060:52:08

-In Ebrington?

-Yeah.

-It's not open yet.

0:52:080:52:10

Right, OK, so when are you hoping to open it?

0:52:100:52:13

Fingers crossed, January.

0:52:130:52:16

OK, and how many are going to be in there?

0:52:160:52:18

Space for 50 individuals,

0:52:180:52:20

so that will be split up into...there'll be

0:52:200:52:22

an incubation programme which will select eight of the most

0:52:220:52:25

creative and innovative businesses, hopefully, in Derry-Londonderry.

0:52:250:52:28

Find people who are interested

0:52:280:52:30

and then there'll be co-working space for a further 16

0:52:300:52:32

and beyond that there'll be some private, dedicated office space.

0:52:320:52:36

Like, who? Who would you ideally like to see there?

0:52:360:52:39

I mean, are we talking animators, are we talking musicians?

0:52:390:52:41

There's going to be a gallery space there,

0:52:410:52:44

so there's going to be visual arts side too...writers, who's in there?

0:52:440:52:47

Well, we're basing it on our model in Belfast -

0:52:470:52:50

we have two creative hubs in Belfast

0:52:500:52:52

and we have a really broad range of creative business space there.

0:52:520:52:55

From freelancers, to small businesses, to tech start-ups.

0:52:550:52:59

So, we have fashion stylists, illustrators, sculptors,

0:52:590:53:04

gaming companies, software companies, design, media,

0:53:040:53:08

film, TV - it's really that mix of different

0:53:080:53:10

creative businesses that appeals to me.

0:53:100:53:13

So, anybody listening now, watching now,

0:53:130:53:15

they could...they still have a chance to get in in January?

0:53:150:53:18

Absolutely, yeah.

0:53:180:53:19

OK, Jon, what is a start-up investor fellow,

0:53:190:53:22

how does it work?

0:53:220:53:23

I'm with a company that I helped co-found called Thesis Ventures,

0:53:230:53:26

we're a company builder.

0:53:260:53:28

We invest our network, our connections,

0:53:280:53:31

our intellectual capital and we invest cash.

0:53:310:53:34

It's a fancy way of saying we put money

0:53:340:53:38

and sweat into early-stage start-ups.

0:53:380:53:40

Anybody here that you've seen over your few days?

0:53:400:53:43

There's a couple of very interesting entrepreneurs that have a very smart

0:53:430:53:47

approach that I'm going to continue to correspond with, for certain.

0:53:470:53:50

What have you liked?

0:53:500:53:52

Obviously you can't give away their identity

0:53:520:53:54

but what have you liked about them?

0:53:540:53:56

Have they shamelessly pitched themselves at you or has it

0:53:560:53:59

just been an incredible idea?

0:53:590:54:02

Shameless pitchsters.

0:54:020:54:04

You know, I respect anyone that hustles...I do.

0:54:040:54:08

-Hustling's good!

-I truly do!

0:54:080:54:11

But actually, that's not what gets you to the endgame.

0:54:110:54:13

I have respect for anyone trying,

0:54:130:54:16

I really do, but the ones that really make it that I'll be

0:54:160:54:20

maintaining connection with,

0:54:200:54:23

is they've really thought through their milestones

0:54:230:54:25

and they have a thoughtful plan, a core product,

0:54:250:54:28

they've thought about their brand and they've thought about what

0:54:280:54:31

they're doing over the next 12 months.

0:54:310:54:33

Maybe first and foremost,

0:54:330:54:34

they really understand who their audience is and how they're

0:54:340:54:37

solving a problem for demand and thinking through a need state.

0:54:370:54:43

And developing solutions to solve a problem for an audience.

0:54:430:54:47

Tim, I mean, that's incredible there and it's incredible and it's real!

0:54:470:54:51

Erm, how though can we really, truly go global?

0:54:510:54:54

Yeah, I mean, I think back to events like this, back to events like

0:54:550:55:00

CultureTECH, CultureTECH brings the density of people together

0:55:000:55:04

and brings that density of ideas together.

0:55:040:55:07

In the same way that Christine

0:55:070:55:08

and Blick Studios are helping with that clustering effect,

0:55:080:55:12

for people who are learning from each other, this is very much

0:55:120:55:16

a collaborative activity.

0:55:160:55:18

Back in CultureTECH this week we have...

0:55:180:55:21

..we have these great stimuli across

0:55:240:55:28

different sectors, we have great people learning from each other.

0:55:280:55:31

But unless we had that density,

0:55:310:55:33

people all here at the same time, we're not going

0:55:330:55:36

to get people like Jon who will have a reach

0:55:360:55:39

beyond these islands.

0:55:390:55:42

He will have a reach into America and all around the world and

0:55:420:55:45

so we need to be able to brigade our talents and capability

0:55:450:55:50

and creativity together and we need to learn from each other

0:55:500:55:53

and work together.

0:55:530:55:55

We need to help provide that shop window for the world's

0:55:550:55:58

investors and for the world's talents.

0:55:580:56:01

What I need to do now is let you guys sit together

0:56:010:56:04

and continue that dialogue but for the moment, Tim, Christine

0:56:040:56:08

and Jon, thank you very much, and we look forward to hearing who those

0:56:080:56:11

guys are that you are going to give your hard-earned cash to, thank you.

0:56:110:56:14

That's it from The Arts Show at CultureTECH.

0:56:140:56:17

You can join me live on Twitter straight after this show

0:56:170:56:20

and you can keep up to date with all arts

0:56:200:56:22

and culture on BBC Radio Ulster, Monday to Thursday, Arts Extra

0:56:220:56:25

and Pure Culture on a Friday, also at half past six.

0:56:250:56:29

You can also go online now to our website for behind the scenes

0:56:290:56:33

and extra content.

0:56:330:56:35

But for the moment, we leave you with the sights

0:56:350:56:37

and sounds of CultureTECH,

0:56:370:56:39

good night.

0:56:390:56:41

Marie-Louise Muir celebrates the best of creativity and innovation in this special edition of The Arts Show from CultureTech, a festival of digital technology, media and music taking place in Derry/Londonderry.


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